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NASA's next-generation asteroid impact monitoring system goes online
To date, nearly 28,000 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) have been found by survey telescopes that continually scan the night sky, adding new discoveries at a rate of about 3,000 per year. But as larger and more advanced survey telescopes turbocharge the search over the next few years, a rapid uptick in discoveries is expected. In anticipation of this increase, NASA astronomers have developed a next-gen
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Unveiling charge dynamics of visible light absorbing oxysulfide for efficient overall water splitting
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27199-3 Deciphering charge dynamics is imperative to realize efficient oxysulfide photocatalysts. Herein, with experiments and modelling, the authors report the dominant mechanisms behind decay, estimate material parameters, and formulate design principles.
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LATEST

Assisted-Suicide Chamber Approved by Authorities in Switzerland
Switzerland is one of a handful of countries that supports physician-assisted suicide. However, one company wants to take the doctors out of the process and allow patients to kill themselves at the push of a button. Exit International, a nonprofit dedicated to assisted suicide advocacy, has developed a 3D-printed suicide chamber dubbed Sarco, according the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation (SBC) . T
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Scientists Say They Caught China Successfully Changing the Weather
China has succeeded in literally changing the weather, a new study claims. As the South China Morning Post reports , researchers say that during the Chinese Communist Party's centennial celebration over the summer, weather authorities successfully modified the weather above Beijing to clear the sky and reduce pollution for the tens of thousands gathered for a commemorative ceremony in Tiananmen S
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Scientists find 'stealth' version of Omicron that may be harder to track
Variant lacks feature that allows probable cases to be distinguished among positive PCR tests Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists say they have identified a "stealth" version of Omicron which cannot be distinguished from other variants using the PCR tests that public health officials deploy to gain a quick picture of its spread around the world. The stealth va
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Iron integral to the development of life on Earth and the possibility of life on other planets
Iron is an essential nutrient that almost all life requires to grow and thrive. Iron's importance goes all the way back to the formation of the planet Earth, where the amount of iron in the Earth's rocky mantle was 'set' by the conditions under which the planet formed and went on to have major ramifications for how life developed. Now, scientists at the University of Oxford have uncovered the like
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How SpaceX's massive Starship rocket might unlock the solar system—and beyond
If all goes to plan, next month SpaceX will launch the largest rocket in human history. Towering nearly 400 feet tall, the rocket – Starship – is designed to take NASA astronauts to the moon. And SpaceX's CEO, Elon Musk, has bigger ambitions: he wants to use it to settle humans on Mars . Much has already been made of Starship's human spaceflight capabilities. But the rocket could also revolutioni
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Cataract surgery linked with lessened dementia risk
Based on the longitudinal data of over 3,000 study participants, researchers found that subjects who underwent cataract surgery had nearly 30% lower risk of developing dementia from any cause compared with those who did not. This lowered risk persisted for at least a decade after surgery. Cataract surgery was also associated with lower risk of Alzheimer disease dementia specifically.
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Michele Brown was vaccinated – but had a suppressed immune system. Would better health advice have saved her?
The mother-of-two carefully shielded until the government said it was safe to see friends and family. She had no idea how her existing conditions could affect her The feeling of relief was immense as 58-year-old Michele Brown returned home from the vaccine centre. Her husband, Terry, 61, had taken time off from his job as a supervisor at a heavy machinery factory to drive her to her second Covid-
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Viagra could be used to treat Alzheimer's disease, study finds
US scientists say users of sildenafil – the generic name for Viagra – are 69% less likely to develop the form of dementia than non-users Viagra could be a useful treatment against Alzheimer's disease, according to a US study. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of age-related dementia, affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Despite mounting numbers of cases, however, there is cur
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Moderna or Novavax after AstraZeneca jab confers high Covid immunity, study finds
Finding is good news for lower-income countries that have not yet completed their primary vaccination campaigns Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Combining a first dose of the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine with a second dose of either the Moderna or the Novavax jabs results in far higher levels of neutralising antibodies and T-cells compared with two doses of the AstraZ
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How to Socialize Safely in the Booster Era
This past spring, if someone told you that they were fully vaccinated, you knew precisely what they meant: At least two weeks before, they'd received two doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, two doses of Pfizer, or one dose of Johnson & Johnson. Now what it means to be vaccinated encompasses much more variety. Some people who have gotten their initial doses haven't gotten a booster dose , and s
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The Mighty James Webb Space Telescope Is All Fueled Up for Launch
Ready to Launch The James Webb Space Telescope is all fueled up and ready to go. NASA announced on Monday that the controversial spacecraft has been loaded with a propellant it'll use for its thrusters to move around while in orbit, according to a blog post from the agency . These thrusters will be crucial as the craft makes precise course corrections shortly after launch. "The loading of propell
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Elon Musk Says He Wants to Put Brain Chips in Humans Next Year
Neuralink cofounder Elon Musk says that the neurotechnology company plans to put brain chips in humans as soon as next year. Musk announced the timeline during an interview at The Wall Street Journal CEO Council Summit on Monday — in remarks spotted by Insider — where he was asked about Neuralink's goals for 2022. The billionaire referenced the company's success in implanting neurochips in monkey
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Professor Says Hydrogen Cars Are an Amazingly Bad Idea
Educated Opinion A key climate researcher published an op-ed late last month declaring that hydrogen-powered cars are a bad idea — and a terrible way to solve the climate crisis. Anthony Patt is a professor in Zurich, Switzerland in the department of environmental systems science at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). Writing for the institute's website, he opined that fossil
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Whistleblower: Tesla Didn't Tell Buyers Its Solar Panels Might Catch Fire
Solar Fire We might finally have an answer as to why Elon Musk's Tesla started selling stainless steel " Cyberwhistles " last week. "Blow the whistle on Tesla!" Musk tweeted at the time. Now, Reuters is reporting that the Securities and Exchange Commission has opened an investigation into the electric carmaker after a whistleblower filed a complaint about Tesla failing to notify shareholders that
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From South Africa to freezing Birmingham. Welcome to my £2,285 quarantine world | Carla Stout
I'm stuck in a hotel for 10 days, under a system that is disorganised and shockingly expensive I am writing this on day zero, having arrived at my government-designated quarantine hotel after 24 hours of travel. I need to isolate in my room for 10 days and 11 nights. It is, to put it mildly, a bit of a dump: a tired, chipped Formica table, sagging curtains, freezing cold. For this, I paid £2,285.
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Tesla Engineers Say Elon Musk Misled the Public About Autopilot's Safety
Blow the Whistle Nineteen Tesla engineers went public earlier today about their concerns over the safety of Tesla's Autopilot features, saying that CEO Elon Musk hasn't been upfront about the risks to drivers and the public. The automaker promised to the herald in the future of driving through Autopilot, a system of features designed to steer, brake and accelerate the electric vehicles without hu
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Woman Says Hackers Searched Her Phone for Nudes After Sending to Google for Repair
Repair Nightmare Game designer and author Jane McGonigal says someone hacked into her Google Pixel 5a after she sent it off to Google for a repair. McGonigal tweeted about the disaster on Saturday, advising consumers not to send their phones to the company. "Last night someone used it to log into my gmail, Drive, photos backup email account, dropbox, and I can see from activity logs they opened a
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New Brain Maps Can Predict Behaviors
Last summer a group of Harvard University neuroscientists and Google engineers released the first wiring diagram of a piece of the human brain. The tissue, about the size of a pinhead, had been preserved, stained with heavy metals, cut into 5,000 slices and imaged under an electron microscope. This cubic millimeter of tissue accounts for only one-millionth of the entire human brain. Source
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Someone Strapped Three Jet Engines to a Tesla and, Uh, Wow
Jetsla Motors It's been over two years since Tesla CEO Elon Musk promised — or maybe joked? — that the upcoming and long-awaited Roadster will be available with a futuristic add-on: a " SpaceX package " that would allow the next-generation hypercar to accelerate using rocket power developed in-house by SpaceX or even "hover ." We haven't heard many updates on that ambition from Musk lately, but Y
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Northern lights photographer of the year – in pictures
The travel photography blog Capture the Atlas has published its annual northern lights photographer of the year collection with stunning images from 25 photographers. Coinciding with the northern lights season at the end of the year, it aims to share the beauty of this natural phenomenon Continue reading…
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The Republican Congresswoman Taking on Lauren Boebert
In a world where elected Republicans were not terrified of the most extreme elements of their base, the response to Representative Lauren Boebert's open Islamophobia would have been swift public condemnation. We do not live in that world. Kevin McCarthy, the leader of the House Republicans, has not denounced Boebert's comments comparing Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota to a suicide bomber.
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He Voted to Impeach. Can He Survive in the GOP?
Late at night on the second Tuesday of January, Peter Meijer, a 33-year-old freshman congressman from West Michigan, paced the half-unpacked rooms of his new rental apartment in Washington, D.C., dreading the decision he would soon have to make. Six days earlier, Meijer had pulled a smoke hood over his face and fled the U.S. House of Representatives as insurgents broke into the lower chamber. The
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Top 25 News Photos of 2021
As we approach the end of the year, here is a look back at some of the major news events and moments of 2021. The breach of the U.S. Capitol on January 6 set the stage for a contentious year in the United States, and COVID-19 variants and regional surges slowed worldwide efforts to return to pre-pandemic life. The delayed 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics were finally held, even though stadium
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Elon Musk Admits That He's Not Sure Starship Will Even Work
Whoopsie Daisy SpaceX CEO Elon Musk seems to have admitted that he's not positive his company's forthcoming Starship is going to work — just a week after leaked emails revealed that the company is, in Musk's own analysis, facing bankruptcy . Musk's comments came during a wide-ranging panel talk given at the Wall Street Journal 's CEO Summit. As CNBC space reporter Michael Sheetz noted , Musk emph
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Justice Kavanaugh's Empty Democratic Promise
"The Constitution is neither pro-choice nor pro-life." So said Justice Brett Kavanaugh, not once, not twice, but three times during last week's oral argument in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization . It's the judicial equivalent of a poll-tested line, an attempt to message the overturning of Roe v. Wade as fundamentally pro-democratic, something for voters to decide. A woman's right to en
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'Disastrous' plastic use in farming threatens food safety – UN
Food and Agriculture Organization says most plastics are burned, buried or lost after use The "disastrous" way in which plastic is used in farming across the world is threatening food safety and potentially human health, according to a report from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization. It says soils contain more microplastic pollution than the oceans and that there is "irrefutable" evidence
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Antiquities for auction could be illicitly sourced, archaeologist claims
Etruscan bronze attachments in Sotheby's sale and and Bonhams' Sardinian lamp said to match items in convicted dealers' archives The auction houses Sotheby's and Bonhams are facing a call to withdraw two antiquities from sale in London today from an archaeologist who raised "serious suspicions" that the items came from illicit excavations. Lot 68 in the Sotheby's sale is a pair of decorative Etru
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Artist Promises to Sell One of Her Eggs to Whoever Buys Her NFT
Egg Head Non-fungible tokens meet artificial insemination — in a piece of art that's for sale at the renowned Art Basel art fair this week. Artist Narine Arakelian, as Page Six reports , is including a contract promising one of her eggs to whoever buys her NFT, entitled "Live," at the Miami art exposition. The digitized piece of art comes from a physical "Live, Laugh, Love" triptych, The Daily Be
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Examining the neurotoxin from a black widow
Phobias are often irrational by nature—especially in the case of spiders, as these creatures are usually more afraid of humans than vice-versa. But: some species are a force to be reckoned with—for example, the Latrodectus spider, more commonly known as the Black Widow. It catches its prey by using venom—to be precise, latrotoxins (LaTXs), a subclass of neurotoxins, or nerve poisons. A bite from a
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Evolution of intelligent data pipelines
The potential of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) seems almost unbounded in its ability to derive and drive new sources of customer, product, service, operational, environmental, and societal value. If your organization is to compete in the economy of the future, then AI must be at the core of your business operations. A study by Kearney titled " The Impact of Analytics in 2
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Community investment is the missing piece of climate action | Dawn Lippert
There's been explosive investment in new technologies aimed at decarbonizing the planet. But climate investor Dawn Lippert says something key is missing from this strategy: investment in the local people these solutions would most affect. She shares how she's bridging the gap between investment in new tech and local communities — by getting closer to the places where these ideas are being put int
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Story of Stonehenge to be told in major British Museum exhibition
Curator puts monument in context of era, with loaned objects including 3,600-year-old Nebra sky disc A bronze disc inlaid with gold symbols and two gold cone-shaped hats decorated with solar motifs are among objects from the Stonehenge era that will go on show for the first time in the UK at a landmark exhibition at the British Museum. The objects are among more than 250 being loaned to the natio
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The Political Obituary of Aung San Suu Kyi
A s Aung San Suu Kyi climbed the steps of the gargantuan parliamentary building into her first session as an elected lawmaker, I watched along with my colleagues in the offices of The Myanmar Times , where we crowded around and turned our heads upward to the boxy televisions that hung precariously above the newsroom. This was July 2012. Suu Kyi's arrival had been delayed by a whirlwind 17-day lap
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The 10 Best Films of 2021
At the end of last year , I pondered whether the pandemic was irrevocably changing cinema or merely interrupting it; whether the medium would soon return to being a public, collective experience or overwhelmingly remain an at-home event. With another year gone, I still don't know for sure. In 2021, we've seen the resumption of blockbusters showing at multiplexes, but as with so many aspects of li
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Ugh, Men! Study Finds That Dudes Spread Way More COVID
Scientists have accidentally discovered that men spread COVID-19 more than women and children. The Colorado-based study, CBS News reported , was intended to look into COVID transmission at performing arts events. But when measuring the number of aerosols emitted by its 75 participants, researchers found something surprising: the adult male subjects spewed way more particles than adult women or ch
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Military Satellite Launch Delayed After Fuel Leak
United Launch Alliance "scrubbed" and delayed a military rocket launch that was scheduled to lift off Sunday — after a leak was found in the fuel ground storage system. The launch provider initially said on Twitter that the Atlas 5 rocket launch would be rescheduled for Monday, but then tweeted that employees needed more time to evaluate the fuel issue. The new launch date is Tuesday, Dec 7. "Dur
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Visualising cell structures in three dimensions in mere minutes
Viral pathogens like the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus change the interior structure of the cells they infect. These changes occur at the level of individual cell components—the organelles—and can provide information on how viral diseases develop. Extremely powerful imaging techniques are needed to visualize them, but such methods are very data- and time-intensive. A German-American research team under t
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Robots Evolve Bodies and Brains Like Animals in MIT's New AI Training Simulator
In their efforts to create smart robots, AI researchers have understandably tended to focus on the brains. But a group from MIT say AI can help us design better bodies for them too, and we should be doing both in parallel. For a robot to solve a task, its brain and its body have to sync up perfectly to get the job done. That means that an effective AI controller that's good at piloting one kind o
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Poorer nations are being denied vaccines, and Britain must take much of the blame | Lara Spirit
Omicron's emergence is no surprise, as richer countries' broken promises lead to low vaccination rates – and virus mutation The world is hostage to what's been called " a cycle of panic and neglect ". The Omicron variant, while we wait for clarification on its many unknowns, has sparked the latest bout of that panic. But it is a panic born directly of selfish insularity: as wealthy nations have a
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Why Are We Still Isolating Vaccinated People for 10 Days?
For most fully vaccinated people, a breakthrough coronavirus infection will not ruin their health . It will, however, assuming that they follow all the relevant guidelines, ruin at least a week of their life. That very frustrating week began for Joe Russell on November 11, the day he found out he'd tested positive for the virus, just one month after getting a Pfizer booster, and about five or six
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The Atlantic Daily: January 6 Was Practice
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Former President Donald Trump's antidemocratic campaign to overturn the 2020 election failed. Next time—and there will be a next time—American democracy might not be so lucky, our staff writer Bar
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Paper on sexual orientation and neuropsychiatric disorders earns an expression of concern
An Elsevier journal has issued an expression of concern for a paper it published earlier this year by a Dutch researcher who studies the neurobiology of sexuality. The article,"Sexual orientation, neuropsychiatric disorders and the neurotransmitters involved," was written by a group led by Dick Swaab, of the Department of Neuropsychiatric Disorders at the Netherlands Institute … Continue reading
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The tipping point for legislative polarization
A predictive model of a polarized group, similar to the current U.S. Senate, demonstrates that when an outside threat—like war or a pandemic—fails to unite the group, the divide may be irreversible through democratic means. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences as part of a Dynamics of Political Polarization Special Feature, the model identifies such atypical behavior am
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AI Researchers Fight Noise by Turning to Biology
Artificial intelligence sees things we don't — often to its detriment. While machines have gotten incredibly good at recognizing images, it's still easy to fool them. Simply add a tiny amount of noise to the input images, undetectable to the human eye, and the AI suddenly classifies school buses, dogs or buildings as completely different objects, like ostriches. In a paper posted online in June..
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The sunshine vitamin that 'D'elivers on cardio health
Free from the sun, vitamin D delivers a natural source for one of the hormones essential to our bodies, especially the bones. But when you're down on this essential nutrient, it's not only your bones that could suffer, but also your cardio health, according to new research.
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Minimal effort required: A ten-minute run can boost brain processing
Researchers found that as little as ten minutes of moderate-intensity running could benefit mental health. In study participants, both mood and cognitive functions improved, and the activation of bilateral prefrontal subregions associated with cognitive function and mood also increased. These results demonstrate the potential advantages of exercise prescriptions for various conditions including me
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Southern Cross star is 14.5 times heavier than sun, scientists say
Using astroseismology, researchers have calculated that the bright blue giant Beta Crucis is 11m years old One of the more striking constellations of the southern hemisphere's sky, the Southern Cross, can claim a new accolade – its bright blue giant Beta Crucis star has been revealed as a heavy-weight champion. An international team of scientists have discovered that Beta Crucis, also known as Mi
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Astronomers find final missing piece of galaxy cluster collision puzzle
Astronomers have a model of how galaxy cluster collisions go through different stages, taking on various shapes. A blunt body shape turns into a sharp cone, which turns into a tongue-like shape. The first and last have been observed many times, but the sharp cone was always missing, until now. A publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics is forthcoming.
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Japanese fashion tycoon to blast off for ISS as Russia revives space tourism
Yusaku Maezawa to become first space tourist sent to space station by Russia in more than a decade The Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa has said he can barely contain his excitement on the eve of blasting off to the International Space Station in a prelude to a more ambitious trip around the moon with Elon Musk's SpaceX planned in 2023. The 46-year-old fashion magnate and art collector has bee
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Sir Martin Wood obituary
Engineer and entrepreneur who founded Oxford Instruments and made the UK's first MRI body scanner In 1959 Martin Wood asked his boss at the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, if he could to start a company making specialist magnets for research. At that time the concept of a spinout was unheard of in that university, but the easy-going Hungarian physicist Nicholas Kurti offered every support
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'It's Giving': A Gift to Language
Sign up for Caleb's newsletter here. The first time I heard the phrase It's giving , I admit that I was mystified. A friend showed me a pre–Met Gala Instagram post by the pop star Camila Cabello: a picture of her face with small circles of makeup next to her eyes, each a different reddish shade, to which she had given the caption, "It's giving … dots." I had so many questions, mainly: What does i
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The Loss I Didn't Have Words For
When you have a miscarriage, one thing that gets drilled into you fast is that miscarriage is common. According to the American Pregnancy Association, 10 to 25 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage. Those are just the ones we know about; many others happen too early to ever be detected. And the risk gets higher as you get older. Your friends, if you tell them about your miscarriage, will conf
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Researchers sound alarm on 'predatory' rankings
Hey, researchers and universities, want to be included in a new ranking scheme? No problem, just pony up some cash. Tanvir Ahmed, a postdoc at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, says this year has seen a rise in news stories— for example from Bangladesh, Kashmir, and Nigeria — reporting so-called predatory rankings. These come … Continue reading
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Empathy-based counterspeech can reduce racist hate speech in a social media field experiment [Social Sciences]
Despite heightened awareness of the detrimental impact of hate speech on social media platforms on affected communities and public discourse, there is little consensus on approaches to mitigate it. While content moderation—either by governments or social media companies—can curb online hostility, such policies may suppress valuable as well as illicit…
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Researchers develop a world-first antibody-drug delivery system
It sounds like the stuff of science fiction: a man-made crystal that can be attached to antibodies and then supercharge them with potent drugs or imaging agents that can seek out diseased cells with the highest precision, resulting in fewer adverse effects for the patient.
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The Impossible Politics of Johnny Cash
Johnny Cash in 1994 (Andy Earl / Camera Press / Redux) Johnny Cash , so the standard line goes, was a man of many parts. "There was no one single Cash," the scholar Leigh H. Edwards has argued. "He was always multiple, changing, inconsistent." He was both "Saturday night and Sunday morning" is how the rock journalist Anthony DeCurtis put it; he was a "walkin' contradiction," Kris Kristofferson, C
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New tools to unearth rare metals
A new understanding of how volcanic processes form deposits of rare earth metals, vital to everyday modern technology, is revealed in a new study from the University of St Andrews.
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VLA reveals double-helix structure in massive galaxy's jet
Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have shown that a jet of material propelled from the core of a giant galaxy is channeled by a corkscrew-shaped magnetic field out to nearly 3,300 light-years from the galaxy's central supermassive black hole. That is much farther than such a magnetic field previously had been detected in a galactic jet.
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Ryan Martin Races for $40,000! | Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings #StreetOutlawsNoPrepKings #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on
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Urbanization improves out-group trust
It's a trope that's played out in many forms: an innocent villager goes to the big city, and their naivety in the ways of the world is immediately rewarded with someone taking advantage of their trust.
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Development of a transparent and flexible ultra-thin memory device
A two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial-based flexible memory device is a critical element in the next-generation wearable market because it plays a crucial role in data storage, processing, and communication. An ultra-thin memory device materialized with a 2D nanomaterial of several nanometers (nm) can significantly increase the memory density, leading to the development of a flexible resistance-vari
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Så kan fritids bli meningsfullt och utvecklande
Hur kan fritidslärare skapa goda förutsättningar för elevernas lärande och utveckling på fritids? Det undersöks i en forskningsöversikt från Skolforskningsinstitutet. Översikten, som fått namnet "Meningsfull fritid, utveckling och lärande i fritidshem", baserar sig på 37 studier och forskningsresultaten presenteras under tre teman: Inta ett medvetet förhållningssätt Skapa kreativa miljöer Organis
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Cancer, hopp och att våga leva
Att vara hoppfull, att ta hjälp av varandra och att låta livet vara föränderligt. Det är aktiva handlingar som kan hjälpa människor att finna trygghet vid svår sjukdom som cancer. Det menar Ulrika Sandén som nyligen disputerat med en avhandling om att leva med cancer. Människor som anar att något är fel, med symtom som ännu inte förklarats, befinner sig ofta i en sorts väntrum. Väntan kan pågå lä
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Link between long-term exposure to air pollution and fatty liver disease shown
Metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) is a growing global health challenge and poses a substantial economic burden. A large-scale epidemiologic study has identified links between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and MAFLD. These links are exacerbated by unhealthy lifestyles and the presence of central obesity, report scientists.
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Stress makes life's clock tick faster: Chilling out slows it down
Scientists in recent years have developed ways to measure biological age by tracking chemical changes in DNA that occur naturally as people age but occur at different times in different people. These so-called 'epigenetic clocks' have proved to be better predictors of lifespan and health than chronological age. In a new study, Yale researchers used one such clock, appropriately named "GrimAge," to
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Terrain, weather can predict wild pig movements
Managing the United States' growing wild pig population has become a significant challenge over the past few decades, but new research may help landowners and government agencies fine-tune their strategies for limiting crop and property damage caused by the animals.
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Oops! You did it again; new test predicts if impulsivity is pathological
If you can't stop saying or doing things that you later regret, here's a diagnostic test for you: Researchers have pioneered a way to better determine when acting on one's worst impulses verges on pathological. Turns out, acting more recklessly when your emotions run high can be correlated with how fast you react to stimulating visuals, especially disturbing ones.
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CRISPRing the microbiome is just around the corner
CRISPR is widely used to target specific cell types, but only one at a time. Researchers have now developed methods to edit genes in multiple organisms within a diverse community of microbes simultaneously, a first step toward editing microbiomes such as those in the gut or on plants. One method assesses which microbes are editable; a second adds genes with a barcode that allows scientists to inse
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Storing information in DNA: Improving DNA storage with nanoscale electrode wells
Geneticists can store data in synthetic DNA as a medium for long-term storage due to its density, ease of copy, longevity and sustainability. Research in the field had recently advanced with new encoding algorithms, automation, preservation and sequencing. Nevertheless, the most challenging hurdle in DNA storage deployment remains the write throughput, which can limit the data storage capacity. In
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Glacier retreat creating new Pacific salmon habitat in western North America
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26897-2 Potential gains in future salmon habitat associated with glacier loss have yet to be quantified. This study projects future gains in Pacific salmon freshwater habitat within western North America by linking a model of glacier mass change for 315 glaciers, forced by five different Global Climate Models, with
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Iron integral to the development of life on Earth – and the possibility of life on other planets
Iron is an essential nutrient that almost all life requires to grow and thrive. Iron's importance goes all the way back to the formation of the planet Earth, where the amount of iron in the Earth's rocky mantle was 'set' by the conditions under which the planet formed and went on to have major ramifications for how life developed. Now, scientists have uncovered the likely mechanisms by which iron
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Scientists find first in human evidence of how memories form
In a discovery that could one day benefit people suffering from traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia, researchers have identified the characteristics of more than 100 memory-sensitive neurons that play a central role in how memories are recalled in the brain.
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As melting increases, killer whales hang out longer in Arctic Ocean
Underwater microphones placed off the western and northern coasts of Alaska show that killer whales have spent more time than previously recorded in the Arctic, following the decrease in summer sea ice. Killer whales are intelligent, adaptive predators, often teaming up to take down larger whales as prey. Continuous reduction in sea ice in the Arctic Ocean is opening areas to increased killer wha
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The Best Rechargeable Batteries of 2022 for Long-Lasting Power
Single-use, throw-away batteries might initially seem like the budget option, but they can go flat surprisingly quickly. That's not good for your pocket, and even if you drop them off for recycling, it's not great for the environment. Scientists are discovering alternative options for recharging batteries , but in the meantime, the best rechargeable batteries are the answer. That said, many recha
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A light in the dark tissue: Switchable proteins for biomedical imaging
Dr. Andre C. Stiel leads the group for Cell Engineering at the Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging at Helmholtz Munich. He contributed to the paper "Genetically encoded photo-switchable molecular sensors for optoacoustic and super-resolution imaging" published in Nature Biotechnology, and explained its relevency in a recent interview:
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Developing an unprecedented 3D X-ray microscope methodology to image plants at cellular resolution
Measuring plant phenotypes, a term used to describe the observable characteristics of an organism, is a critical aspect of studying and improving economically important crops. Phenotypes central to the breeding process include traits like kernel number in corn, seed size in wheat, or fruit color in grape. These features are visible to the naked human eye but are in fact driven by microscopic molec
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New study shows plants struggle to keep pace with climate change in human-dominated landscapes
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz are contributing new insights into the challenges plants face in adapting to climate change. Prior research has long anticipated that plants might be able to respond to increasing temperatures by changing their phenology—or the timing of seasonal life processes—at a rate that matches the rate of climate change. But a new global-scale analysis, published in the journal
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United Nations sea treaty should help protect penguins, researchers say
Penguins may not require passports to travel, but they do need protection, according to an international research team who analyzed 131 scientific papers on penguin movement at sea. The work comes as the United Nations continues to negotiate a treaty regarding the sustainable use of areas beyond national jurisdiction, the high seas over which no coastal state can claim ownership.
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Burrowing critters increase risk of levee failure
When burrowing animals dig into earthen levees to make their homes, they can weaken the infrastructure to the point of collapse and localized flooding — but most flood risk models don't take that into account. Researchers have developed a new method to estimate the risk of levee failure and flooding from burrowing animals like badgers and porcupines.
2h
Factors that prevent mangroves from spreading in South America
Due to their pronounced carbon storage capacity, mangroves are an important player in climate change. But they sometimes just don't extend beyond certain latitudes, even when the sites seem suitable. Researchers have now cracked this question for the eastern coast of South America. They could show that seasonal atmospheric and oceanographic factors determine mangrove expansion and this independent
2h
Most dog breeds are highly inbred
The majority of canine breeds are highly inbred, contributing to an increase in disease and health care costs throughout their lifespan, according to a new study. Dogs are often recognized for distinctive traits—the short legs of a dachshund, the wrinkled face of a pug, the spotted coat of a Dalmatian. Unfortunately, the genetics that give various breeds their particular attributes are often the
2h
What's behind the illegal 'tiger bone glue' trade?
New research is among the first to interview the buyers of pressure-cooked tiger bones, known as "tiger bone glue," which, in parts of Asia, is perceived as a remedy for a variety of ailments. Thousands of tigers, bred on farms like pigs and raised in basements, end up in high-pressure cookers, where their bones are dissolved and transformed into traditional medicine. More tigers now live in ille
2h
How to end the pandemic — and prepare for the next | Maria Van Kerkhove
We will get out of this pandemic, says Maria Van Kerkhove, the COVID-19 Technical Lead of the World Health Organization (WHO). The question is how fast — and if we'll take what we've learned from the past two years and apply it to the next emerging pathogen. In conversation with TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, Van Kerkhove provides insights on the Omicron variant, details
2h
These COVID masks are best for understanding the wearer
To assess how different styles of face masks affected speech intelligibility in normal hearing listeners, researchers put some of the most popular mask designs to the test. The researchers found that cotton masks with filter inserts and masks with a transparent plastic panel were associated with the worst performance when it came to understanding what the wearer was saying. While they were surpri
2h
MSI Shows Off the Most Insane Z690 Motherboard We've Ever Seen
(Image: MSI) MSI has begun teasing a motherboard — the latest in their "Godlike" series, the MEG Z690 Godlike, intended to power systems based on Intel's Alder Lake. Like the Z590 Godlike that came before it, this is a balls-to-the-wall motherboard with not only every bell and whistle you can think of, it's adding a few that we never thought we'd ever see on a motherboard, all for a price that is
2h
Observation of the ponderomotive effect in non-valence bound states of polyatomic molecular anions
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27468-1 The ponderomotive effect experienced by electrons in a molecule under a transient electric field impacts the reactivity, but has been difficult to detect. The authors observe a ponderomotive force on the excess quasi-free electron in the non-valence bound state of three molecular anions, by measuring the pho
3h
Visualizing nanometric structures with sub-millimeter waves
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27264-x The authors demonstrate a far-field approach for height profile measurements with sub-millimetre waves. By evaluating Fabry-Pérot oscillations within surface-structured samples, combined with a Hilbert-transform approach, they visualize structures with a height of 49 nm, with 31 nm precision.
3h
Dynamic restructuring of supported metal nanoparticles and its implications for structure insensitive catalysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27474-3 Structure insensitivity in catalysis has been empirically observed, but no satisfactory theoretical explanation could be given. By studying different nanoparticle sizes under dynamic catalytic conditions reaction-dependent particle size dependent restructuring was linked to the aforementioned.
3h
Vortex clustering, polarisation and circulation intermittency in classical and quantum turbulence
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27382-6 Turbulent flows may be regarded as an intricate collection of mutually-interacting vortices. Here, authors investigate the statistics of velocity circulation in quantum and classical turbulence and propose a connection between intermittency on both cases.
3h
Biological heterogeneity in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension identified through unsupervised transcriptomic profiling of whole blood
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27326-0 Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and fatal disease with a heterogeneous treatment response. Here the authors show that unsupervised machine learning of whole blood transcriptomes from 359 patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension identifies 3 subgroups (endophenotypes) that
3h
Boosting quantum yields in two-dimensional semiconductors via proximal metal plates
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27418-x The short exciton lifetime and strong exciton-exciton interaction in transition metal dichalcogenides limit the efficiency of exciton emission. Here, the authors show that exciton-exciton interaction in monolayer WS2 can be screened using proximal metal plates, leading to an improved quantum yield.
3h
Viral evasion of the integrated stress response through antagonism of eIF2-P binding to eIF2B
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26164-4 Viral infection triggers the integrated stress response (ISR) by phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2 which becomes an inhibitor of eIF2B. Here the authors show that the NSs protein of Sandfly Fever Sicilian virus allows evasion of the ISR by blocking eIF2-P binding to eIF2B.
3h
DeepMind's AI Helped Crack Two Mathematical Puzzles That Stumped Humans for Decades
With his telescope, Galileo gathered a vast trove of observations on celestial objects. With his mind, he found patterns in that universe of data, creating theories on motion and mechanics that paved the way for modern science. Using AI, DeepMind just gave mathematicians a new telescope. Working with two teams of mathematicians, DeepMind engineered an algorithm that can look across different math
3h
Important role of prokaryotic viruses in sewage treatment uncovered
Prokaryotic viruses (phages) existing in activated sludge (AS), a biological treatment process widely used in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), act to regulate the composition of microbial community in the activated sludge. Phages are major bacterial predators, through virus-host interactions with key bacterial populations in AS systems, they can influence the removal efficiency of pollutants.
3h
A little twist adds magnetic complexity
Researchers report engineering magnetic complexity into atomically thin magnets. Because most computers use magnets to store information, finding ever thinner magnets is key to faster, lighter electronics. While graphene , a material that is one atom thick, is not magnetic itself, its discovery triggered the interest of searching for atomically thin magnets. In 2017, scientists found an ultrathin
3h
Beyond Omicron: what's next for COVID's viral evolution
Nature, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03619-8 The rapid spread of new variants offers clues to how SARS-CoV-2 is adapting and how the pandemic will play out over the next several months.
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Daily briefing: Francis Collins reflects on science and the NIH
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03657-2 What the leader of the world's biggest public funder of biomedical research thinks about the future of science. Plus, meet a stunningly spiky new dinosaur and go deep into the science and engineering of the James Webb Space Telescope.
3h
Democracy as a Complex Adaptive System
What do economics, biological evolution, and democracy have in common? They are all complex adaptive systems. This realization reflects one of the core strengths of a diverse intellectual background – there are meaningful commonalities underlying different systems and areas of knowledge. In fact, science and academia themselves are complex adaptive systems that benefit from diversity of knowledge
3h
Hackers Just Stole Nearly $200 Million from a Crypto Exchange, in the Second Heist in Two Weeks
Over the weekend, hackers stole almost $200 million from the BitMart cryptocurrency exchange — the latest in a seemingly endless string of heists, headaches, and heartbreak for those who invest and trade in crypto. CNBC reported that although BitMart has admitted to $150 million in losses due to a "security breach," the blockchain security and analytics firm PeckShield — which was first to notice
3h
Protein structural dynamics underlie their evolution and adaptability over the centuries
"How does nature utilize the common repertoire of folds in proteins to differentiate their specificity, and ultimately their function?" This long-standing and fundamental question was addressed in a study conducted at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of the Foundation for Research & Technology-Hellas (FORTH-IMBB). The results of this work were recently published in the Proceedi
3h
'Unfreezing' molecular proteins to discover their functions in action
A team of researchers from Weill Cornell Medical School's Department of Physiology and Biophysics has developed a new computational technique to conduct molecular dynamics simulations of proteins at the specific concentration of hydrogen ions (pH) at which they function. Called the Equilibrium Constant pH (ECpH) method, it presents a significant advance in the ability of computational simulations
3h
Researchers call for standards for biological imaging
Stained molecules in the cell nucleus, the inner life of a synaptic cleft, or the surface of a floral leaf: Modern microscopes enable researchers to examine processes that are otherwise invisible and located in tiniest structures of organisms. However, the wide variety of available instruments and image editing techniques confront scientists with a challenge: Experiments from different laboratorie
3h
Collecting and mapping carbon benefits of wind power, silviculture and peatlands
While renewable energy is needed, wind turbines cannot, for example, be built too close to residential areas due to noise and landscape factors. Then again, erecting turbines in uninhabited areas makes nature more fragmented and affects animals. The use of forests and peatlands has an impact on carbon sinks. The LandUseZero project, coordinated by the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), ai
3h
Violent crime is rising. What can cities do?
In 2019, following a years-long decline, crime rates were flat or at all-time lows nationwide. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit, and a very different pattern emerged. Though major crimes dropped overall, violent crime surged. Across the U.S., rates of gun violence rose by 30 percent. Nearly 5,000 additional homicides occurred in 2020 compared to 2019—the biggest year-to-year jump in murders since 19
3h
Dismantling anti-Black racism in our schools: Accountability measures are key
Education is built on the belief that people can be more. In the words of the 20th-century American sociologist and writer W.E.B. DuBois, an important anti-racist leader and figure in the development of African American education, "what people are depends on the way they have been educated, the way … their possibilities have been developed and drawn out." Du Bois's speeches and writings on the edu
3h
Novel numerical model simulates folding in Earth's crust throughout the earthquake cycle
Earth's crust is constantly in motion. As tectonic plates that make up the lithosphere shift, pulling apart and crashing into each other, the crust fractures and folds in response. Both faulting and folding play out at fault-bend folds, which are created by ramp-décollement systems, but the dynamics and timing of folding in relation to earthquake cycles are not well understood.
3h
Eye To Eye With the Tiger | Project CAT
Follow a wildlife photographer's journey through India to go eye to eye with the tiger. Zoom in with the Galaxy S21 Ultra 5G. Filmed #withGalaxy #TigerTuesday #ProjectCAT Join the Project CAT fight at https://projectcat.discovery.com/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery
6h
Hur kan konkurrenter samarbeta för hållbarhet?
I en värld där allt högre krav ställs på hållbarhet tvingas konkurrerande företag att samarbeta för att nå upp till målen. Hur ser denna samverkan ut och vilka resultat uppnår man? Siarhei Manzhynski, doktorand vid Handelshögskolan, Umeå universitet har studerat, så kallad "coopetition för hållbarhet". Coopetition är ett sammanslaget ord från engelskans collaboration = samarbete och competition =
7h
Victoria Dyring: Vi föds på nytt hela tiden
Vetenskapens värld fyller 50 år och det firar redaktionen genom att titta tillbaka på vad vi har sänt det här halvseklet. Det är mycket arkeologi, rymd och så klart Lennart Nilssons filmer om livet. Spela videon och se godbitar från programmet genom tiderna.
7h
Arleen Salles on the value of neuroethics and philosophical reflection in the Human Brain Project
The Human Brain Project is addressing ethical and societal considerations at different levels. We work across the project engaging different stakeholders. In the last phase of the project, we are working to further integrate ethical and societal considerations throughout the project. This is expressed through "embedded" neuroethics and philosophy tasks in the different scientific work packages. F
7h
Arleen Salles on embedding ethical reflection in Human Brain Project research
The Human Brain Project is committed to implementing responsibility in research and innovation practices. Implementing responsibility means more than setting standards or enforcing compliance. It also means changing mindsets and promoting an ethical culture, where ethical culture means that scientific excellence includes ethical excellence. We are integrating neuroethics and philosophy as key com
7h
Sämre kondition hos unga med mycket skärmtid
Hur mycket rör sig 13-14-åringar? Forskning från GIH visar att var tredje har 60 minuters pulshöjande aktivitet dagligen. Och att varannan unge tillbringar mer än fem timmar framför skärmen under helgen. Forskare vid Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan har undersökt samband mellan kondition och fysisk aktivitet, skärmtid och organiserad idrott. Syftet var att undersöka samband mellan kondition och sk
8h
Kombination av biomarkörer visar vem som har nytta av klassiskt diabetesläkemedel
Metformin beskrivs ofta som en trotjänare för behandling av typ 2-diabetes, men alla blir inte hjälpta av läkemedlet. Forskare vid Lunds universitet har upptäckt en kombination av biomarkörer som kan förutsäga vilka personer som får nytta av behandlingen. Nu fortsätter arbetet med att bekräfta resultaten i en större patientgrupp, med målet att utveckla ett test som kan användas av sjukvården.
9h
Covid-19: How fast is the Omicron variant spreading? podcast
Over 40 countries have now confirmed the presence of Omicron. And, in the UK, scientists have been increasingly expressing their concern about the new variant. Some have speculated there could be more than 1,000 cases here already, and that it could become the dominant variant within weeks. To get an update on what we know about the Omicron variant, and how quickly it might be spreading, Madeleine
12h
Is adherence to a dominance hierarchy evident in the biology?
Title really much says it all. Many psychology academic material I've seen mention dominance hierarchy. I'm curious if this is somehow tied to the biology. This came to mind during a thought experiment I had regarding the workplace. If we're all talented and do our jobs, is management necessary? If management is unnecessary, does that break the biological adherence to the dominance hierarchy? So
17h
Hög vilopuls riskfaktor för demens
Hög vilopuls kan vara en oberoende riskfaktor för demens, visar en studie från Karolinska institutet. Vilopuls är enkelt att mäta, och går att sänka med hjälp av motion eller medicin. Därför tror forskarna på nya möjligheter med att mäta vilopuls hos äldre. Att mäta vilopuls hos äldre kan bli ett sätt att upptäcka personer med högre risk för demens – och göra det möjligt att förebygga sjukdomen i
19h
Study reveals how bacterial pathogen adapts to nutritional stress
In order to cause disease, the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus must adapt to the changing host environment. Many of these adaptations are mediated through two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) that coordinate gene expression in response to environmental stimuli. In a new study reported in the Journal of Bacteriology, researchers at Illinois provide insight into the signal transduct
19h
A polygenic score for educational attainment partially predicts voter turnout [Social Sciences]
Twin and adoption studies have shown that individual differences in political participation can be explained, in part, by genetic variation. However, these research designs cannot identify which genes are related to voting or the pathways through which they exert influence, and their conclusions rely on possibly restrictive assumptions. In this…
19h
Parallel genomic responses to historical climate change and high elevation in East Asian songbirds [Evolution]
Parallel evolution can be expected among closely related taxa exposed to similar selective pressures. However, parallelism is typically stronger at the phenotypic level, while genetic solutions to achieve these phenotypic similarities may differ. For polygenic traits, the availability of standing genetic variation (i.e., heterozygosity) may influence such genetic nonparallelism. Here,…
19h
Evaluation of borinic acids as new, fast hydrogen peroxide-responsive triggers [Chemistry]
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is responsible for numerous damages when overproduced, and its detection is crucial for a better understanding of H2O2-mediated signaling in physiological and pathological processes. For this purpose, various "off–on" small fluorescent probes relying on a boronate trigger have been prepared, and this design has also been involved…
19h
Pedestrian dynamics at the running of the bulls evidence an inaccessible region in the fundamental diagram [Applied Physical Sciences]
We characterize the dynamics of runners in the famous "Running of the Bulls" Festival by computing the individual and global velocities and densities, as well as the crowd pressure. In contrast with all previously studied pedestrian systems, we unveil a unique regime in which speed increases with density that can…
19h
Distinct roles of hnRNPH1 low-complexity domains in splicing and transcription [Biochemistry]
Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) represent a large family of RNA-binding proteins that control key events in RNA biogenesis under both normal and diseased cellular conditions. The low-complexity (LC) domain of hnRNPs can become liquid-like droplets or reversible amyloid-like polymers by phase separation. Yet, whether phase separation of the LC domains…
19h
ATP disrupts lipid-binding equilibrium to drive retrograde transport critical for bacterial outer membrane asymmetry [Biochemistry]
The hallmark of the gram-negative bacterial envelope is the presence of the outer membrane (OM). The OM is asymmetric, comprising lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer leaflet and phospholipids (PLs) in the inner leaflet; this critical feature confers permeability barrier function against external insults, including antibiotics. To maintain OM lipid asymmetry,…
19h
Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA facilitates SARS-CoV-2 infection in human pulmonary cells [Microbiology]
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), binds to host receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) through its spike (S) glycoprotein, which mediates membrane fusion and viral entry. However, the expression of ACE2 is extremely low in a variety of human tissues, especially…
19h
Mutations in artificial self-replicating tiles: A step toward Darwinian evolution [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Artificial self-replication and exponential growth holds the promise of gaining a better understanding of fundamental processes in nature but also of evolving new materials and devices with useful properties. A system of DNA origami dimers has been shown to exhibit exponential growth and selection. Here we introduce mutation and growth…
19h
Mechanistic and structural diversity between cytochrome bd isoforms of Escherichia coli [Microbiology]
The treatment of infectious diseases caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens is a major clinical challenge of the 21st century. The membrane-embedded respiratory cytochrome bd-type oxygen reductase is a critical survival factor utilized by pathogenic bacteria during infection, proliferation and the transition from acute to chronic states. Escherichia coli encodes for two…
19h
Selective packaging of HIV-1 RNA genome is guided by the stability of 5' untranslated region polyA stem [Microbiology]
To generate infectious virus, HIV-1 must package two copies of its full-length RNA into particles. HIV-1 transcription initiates from multiple, neighboring sites, generating RNA species that only differ by a few nucleotides at the 5′ end, including those with one (1G) or three (3G) 5′ guanosines. Strikingly, 1G RNA is…
19h
The role of HIRA-dependent H3.3 deposition and its modifications in the somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin variable regions [Immunology and Inflammation]
The H3.3 histone variant and its chaperone HIRA are involved in active transcription, but their detailed roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin variable regions in human B cells are not yet fully understood. In this study, we show that the knockout (KO) of HIRA significantly decreased SHM and…
19h
Sleep promotes the formation of dendritic filopodia and spines near learning-inactive existing spines [Neuroscience]
Changes in synaptic connections are believed to underlie long-term memory storage. Previous studies have suggested that sleep is important for synapse formation after learning, but how sleep is involved in the process of synapse formation remains unclear. To address this question, we used transcranial two-photon microscopy to investigate the effect…
19h
Single-molecule sequencing reveals a large population of long cell-free DNA molecules in maternal plasma [Medical Sciences]
In the field of circulating cell-free DNA, most of the studies have focused on short DNA molecules (e.g., <500 bp). The existence of long cell-free DNA molecules has been poorly explored. In this study, we demonstrated that single-molecule real-time sequencing allowed us to detect and analyze a substantial proportion of…
19h
Integrative geochronology calibrates the Middle and Late Stone Ages of Ethiopia's Afar Rift [Anthropology]
The Halibee member of the Upper Dawaitoli Formation of Ethiopia's Middle Awash study area features a wealth of Middle and Later Stone Age (MSA and LSA) paleoanthropological resources in a succession of Pleistocene sediments. We introduce these artifacts and fossils, and determine their chronostratigraphic placement via a combination of established…
19h
Correction for Schuster et al., Metabolism drives demography in an experimental field test [Ecology]
ECOLOGY Correction for "Metabolism drives demography in an experimental field test," by Lukas Schuster, Hayley Cameron, Craig R. White, and Dustin J. Marshall, which published August 20, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2104942118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118, e2104942118). The authors note that on page 1, right column, first paragraph, lines 18–19, the…
19h
How two scientists are balancing the planet's natural carbon budget
A pair of researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently published the results of a study that is the first to take a process-based modeling approach to understand how much CO2 rivers and streams contribute to the atmosphere. The team focused on the East River watershed in Colorado's Rocky Mountains, and found that their new approach is far more accurate than traditional approache
19h
Temporal variation of planetary iron as a driver of evolution [Evolution]
Iron is an irreplaceable component of proteins and enzyme systems required for life. This need for iron is a well-characterized evolutionary mechanism for genetic selection. However, there is limited consideration of how iron bioavailability, initially determined by planetary accretion but fluctuating considerably at global scale over geological time frames, has…
21h
Discovering new drugs, inspired by Darwinian theory
The body must constantly defend itself against bacteria and viruses. It generates millions of different antibodies, which are selected to recognize the enemy and trigger the best possible immune response. Scientists use these antibodies for therapeutic purposes to target proteins and disrupt their harmful effects. However, identifying small molecules that will form the basis of drugs is a long and
21h
Best Digital Cameras to Capture the Best of 2022
The digital camera on your phone might be impressive, but if you're ready to move beyond what it can offer, you've come to the right place. The best digital cameras let you capture the world with crystal clarity, and there's a wide variety and price range to choose from. From rugged outdoor models to those that let you walk the bridge into pro territory, you've got some decisions to make. The opt
21h
Persistent gender bias found in scientific research and related course materials: A long-term linguistic analysis
Two companion research articles published in the current issue of Language point to persistent gender bias in both peer-reviewed journal articles and course materials used in the field of linguistics. The first study examined undergraduate textbooks commonly used for linguistics courses taught in English. The second study examined over 1,000 research articles published in top linguistics journals
22h
New type of earthquake discovered
A research team has documented a new type of earthquake in an injection environment in British Columbia, Canada. The seismic events are slower than conventional earthquakes. Their existence supports a scientific theory that until now had not been sufficiently substantiated by measurements.
22h
Too dry, too hot, or too wet: Increasing weather persistence in European summer
Global warming makes long lasting weather situations in the Northern hemisphere's summer months more likely — which in turn leads to more extreme weather events, a novel analysis of atmospheric images and data finds. These events include heatwaves, droughts, intense rainy periods. Especially in Europe, but also in Russia, persistent weather patterns have increased in number and intensity over the
22h
Can pandemic worry hamper your cognitive abilities?
The pandemic may have impaired people's cognitive abilities and altered risk perception at a time when making the right health choices is critically important. The COVID-19 pandemic has tested our psychological limits. The stress of potential illness and the confusion of constantly changing health information and new restrictions has affected some people more than others. Researchers surveyed mor
22h
Fiber lasers poised to advance lab's development of practical laser-plasma accelerators
The next phase in the development of laser-plasma particle accelerators (LPAs)—potentially game-changing tools for research and practical applications—is underway at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). A new approach to high-power lasers—combining the pulses from many fast-acting but lower-energy optical fiber lasers—will energize these super-compact ac
22h
Liquid crystals for fast switching devices
An international team has investigated a newly synthesized liquid-crystalline material that promises applications in optoelectronics. Simple rod-shaped molecules with a single center of chirality self-assemble into helical structures at room temperature. Using soft X-ray resonant scattering at BESSY II, the scientists have now been able to determine the pitch of the helical structure with high pre
23h
Political party fights may be good for public investment
Are political parties getting in the way of our well-being? On the contrary, a historical state-level analysis links party competition to increased public investment and greater social well-being. Today, the two major political parties are often blamed for a plethora of problems in American governance. But for most of the last century and a half, political party competition has had positive effec
23h
Do You Have Any Idea What This Means? Oh My God…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200330181658.htm https://www.webmd.com/balance/features/is-the-nocebo-effect-hurting-your-health I will let you puzzle it through. Do the math for me. What does this mean? submitted by /u/Angelo_Maligno [link] [comments]
23h
Male spiders are attracted by a female like planets orbiting a star
The tiny male golden orb-weaving spider faces a considerable challenge when searching for a mate. He is a fraction of the size of the massive female, but must carefully enter her web and approach her without being noticed, because the cannibalistic female will kill and eat him if he makes one wrong move on her web. Add to this gamble the competition he faces from other males also on the delicate a
23h
Gas bubbles in rock pores were a nursery for life on early Earth
Where and how did life begin on Early Earth more than 3.5 billion years ago from non-living chemicals? A key necessity for the first cells on Earth is the ability to make compartments and evolve to facilitate the first chemical reactions. Membraneless coacervate microdroplets are excellent candidates to describe protocells, with the ability to partition, concentrate molecules and support biochemic
23h

 

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