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Allegra Stratton resigns after No 10 Christmas party video
Boris Johnson 'sorry to lose' spokesperson for climate summit who was seen in footage joking about party during lockdown Pressure on Johnson over No 10 Christmas party – politics live Allegra Stratton has stepped down as the government's spokesperson for the Cop26 climate summit after footage emerged of her joking about a party at Downing Street during the peak of lockdown rules in December last
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The inner lives of cats: what our feline friends really think about hugs, happiness and humans
They do what they want, all the time – and can teach us a lot about how to live in the present, be content and learn from our experience I wanted to know the exact amount of time I spend ruminating on the inner lives of my cats, so I did what most people do in times of doubt, and consulted Google. According to my search history, in the two years since I became a cat owner I have Googled variation
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Scientists: Stealing the Blood of the Young May Make You More Youthful
A team of researchers — who definitely aren't vampires — have discovered new evidence that the blood of the young could be the secret to actually staying young. In a new study published in the prestigious journal Nature Aging , the team found that particles in mouse blood called extracellular vesicles (EV) send instructions for a longevity protein called "Klotho" to muscle cells, according to a p
2h
What Happened to American Conservatism?
I fell in love with conservatism in my 20s. As a politics and crime reporter in Chicago, I often found myself around public-housing projects like Cabrini-Green and the Robert Taylor Homes, which had been built with the best of intentions but had become nightmares. The urban planners who designed those projects thought they could improve lives by replacing ramshackle old neighborhoods with a serie
10h
Best physical evidence of Roman crucifixion found in Cambridgeshire
Near 1,900-year-old skeleton discovered with nail through heel bone during excavation in Fenstanton Found at the site of a future housing development in Cambridgeshire, the near 1,900-year-old skeleton at first did not seem particularly remarkable. Aged 25 to 35 at the time of death, the man had been buried with his arms across his chest in a grave with a wooden structure, possibly a bier, at one
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UK Covid live: Met police will not investigate No 10 Christmas party allegations
Latest updates: Scotland Yard cites 'absence of evidence', as PM triggers plan B Covid restrictions Full story: PM triggers plan B Covid measures in England Allegra Stratton resigns after No 10 Christmas party video Johnson 'apologises unreservedly' over Christmas party video Three Pfizer jabs likely to protect against Omicron, tests suggest Downing Street sources are saying this morning that "no
5h
Denisovans or Homo sapiens: Who were the first to settle permanently on the Tibetan Plateau?
The Tibetan Plateau has long been considered one of the last places to be populated by people in their migration around the globe. A new paper by archeologists at the University of California, Davis, highlights that our extinct cousins, the Denisovans, reached the "roof of the world" about 160,000 years ago—120,000 years earlier than previous estimates for our species—and even contributed to our a
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Physicists discover special transverse sound wave
Can you imagine sound traveling in the same way as light does? A research team at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has discovered a new type of sound wave: The airborne sound wave vibrates transversely and carries both spin and orbital angular momentum like light does. The findings shattered scientists' previous beliefs about the sound wave, opening an avenue to the development of novel applic
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Very Large Telescope images planet around most massive star pair to date
The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) has captured an image of a planet orbiting b Centauri, a two-star system that can be seen with the naked eye. This is the hottest and most massive planet-hosting star system found to date, and the planet was spotted orbiting it at 100 times the distance Jupiter orbits the Sun. Some astronomers believed planets could not exist aro
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Pfizer's vaccine takes a "very large" hit from omicron—but boosters help
A double dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech covid-19 vaccine can't stop the omicron virus, according to labs tests done in in South Africa and Germany, and either a booster or a new vaccine will be needed. The omicron variant was detected in South Africa last month, and because it contains a large number of genetic changes, scientists predicted it might "escape" protection offered by current vaccines, w
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Physical features boost the efficiency of quantum simulations
Recent theoretical breakthroughs have settled two long-standing questions about the viability of simulating quantum systems on future quantum computers, overcoming challenges from complexity analyses to enable more advanced algorithms. Featured in two publications, the work by a quantum team at Los Alamos National Laboratory shows that physical properties of quantum systems allow for faster simula
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Finally Some Good News: Hubble Space Telescope Back at Full Health
Back in Action Good news! NASA's legendary Hubble Space Telescope is back to full science operations, according to a new update . All four of its scientific instruments are live again after a software glitch forced the telescope into safe mode early last month — a testament to weeks of hard work to ensuring the continued existence of one of the most important space observatories in history. The t
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Anti-Vax Group Creates "Unvaxxed Sperm" Crypto Because God Is Dead and We Have Killed Him
Do the Sperm Because we live in a nightmare of our own making, a group of ardent morons have created a new cryptocurrency based on the idea that vaccines lower your sperm count. The cryptocurrency, dubbed "Unvaxxed Sperm," launched earlier this month, Vice reports . Its developers wrongly claim that most people don't need the COVID vaccine, and are fierce advocates of quack treatments such as ive
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Elon Musk Says "Civilization Is Going to Crumble" Unless People Have More Children
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is no stranger to ringing the alarm bells. When he's not warning of an imminent nuclear Armageddon , the eccentric billionaire has often brought up another one of his favorite talking points: declining birthrates. "I think one of the biggest risks to civilization is the low birthrate and the rapidly declining birthrate," he said at The Wall Street Journa l's CEO Council Monda
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Elon Musk Says That Immortality Tech Would Be Very Dangerous
SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk has some strong feelings when it comes to our fate as a civilization. During an interview at The Wall Street Journal 's CEO Council Summit on Monday, Musk warned that letting people live longer — or, presumably, forever — through new technologies may actually be a really bad idea. "It is important for us to die because most of the time people don't change their mind
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Three Pfizer jabs likely to protect against Omicron infection, tests suggest
Initial findings indicate stark reduction in protection against new variant from two vaccine doses Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Three doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine are likely to protect against infection with the Omicron variant but two doses may not, according to laboratory data that will increase pressure to speed up booster programmes. Tests using antibo
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No 10 faces Tory and public backlash over Christmas party video
Sajid Javid pulls out of interviews amid anger over footage of aides joking about party during lockdown Pressure on Johnson over No 10 Christmas party – politics live The health secretary, Sajid Javid, pulled out of Wednesday morning's broadcast interviews after a video emerged showing No 10 aides laughing about a Christmas party during Covid restrictions. The government was facing a furious Tory
12h
Elon Musk Just Sold His Final Home to Live in a Small Prefab Box
No Homes Tesla CEO Elon Musk has officially sold off his last remaining home, for a cool $30 million. That means his only official abode is a small, $50,000 prefab he's renting at his space company's headquarters near Boca Chica, Texas. Back in June, Musk tweeted that he'd "decided to sell my last remaining house. Just needs to go to a large family who will live there." "It's a special place," he
2h
Scientists Invent New Mask That Glows When Exposed to Coronavirus
Researchers in Japan have developed a face mask that glows under UV light when exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19 — so it just might be the hot new accessory at next year's big EDM festival. The team at Kyoto Prefectural University created the mask to give wearers a quick and easy way to see if they contracted the virus, according to Japanese news agency Kyodo News . They hope to eventuall
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MIT Scientist Says We're on the Brink of a Mass Extinction Event
Inching Toward Extinction There's no question things are a bit dire right now when it comes to climate change — but there is some good news: a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) scientist says we're on the brink of mass extinction. Wait, no. That's horrible news. Daniel Rothman, a professor of geophysics at MIT, has spoken about his predictions of a new mass extinction event in the past.
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A booster may help protect you from Omicron – but it won't end the pandemic | Charlotte Summers
It's important to know how boosters work, but they must not impede the push towards worldwide vaccination First there was Alpha, then Beta, Gamma and Delta. Now, thanks to the tremendous efforts of scientists in sub-Saharan Africa, the world is getting to grips with the Omicron variant . This new variant of Covid-19 has a number of mutations that distinguish it from previous ones, raising concern
11h
Falsifying Russia's History Is a Step Toward More Violence
One night in October, a group of masked men burst into the Moscow offices of Memorial, the celebrated Russian historical society and civil-rights organization, and disrupted a screening of Mr. Jones , a film about the Ukrainian famine of 1932–33. They shouted, gesticulated, and chanted "fascists" and "foreign agents" at the audience. Police were called, but they allowed the masked men to escape.
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Omicron Covid cases 'doubling every two to three days' in UK, says scientist
Prof Neil Ferguson says coronavirus variant likely to be dominant strain in the UK before Christmas Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The spread of the Omicron variant of coronavirus appears to be doubling every two to three days, Prof Neil Ferguson has said, adding that it could be necessary to impose new lockdowns as a result. Ferguson, a member of the UK government'
13h
Tesla Is Now Letting Drivers Play Video Games While the Car Is Moving
Gaming While Driving Tesla is allowing drivers — yes, the person behind the wheel who is ideally preoccupied with tasks such as "steering" — to play video games on its vehicles' massive console touchscreens while driving. "I only did it for like five seconds and then turned it off," Tesla owner Vince Patton told The New York Times . "I'm astonished. To me, it just seems inherently dangerous." The
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Space Force Installs Huge Radar System to Track Tiny Objects in Orbit
Seek and Destroy The US Space Force installed a high tech new radar system this week that it says will be able to detect objects the size of baseballs in orbit. The massive monitoring system, dubbed the Long Range Discrimination Radar (LRDR), is located at the Clear Space Force Base near Fairbanks, Alaska, according to The Anchorage Daily News . The radar is slated to support the US missile defen
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People Have Some Wild Theories About the Cube China Found on the Moon
Mystery House China spotted what it's calling a " mystery house " on the surface of the Moon — what appears, in a grainy photo taken by the country's Yutu-2 rover, to be a cube-shaped object on the horizon. While scientists mostly agree that it's probably just the remnants of a meteor impact — the rover's surroundings are practically covered in impact sites — that hasn't stopped galaxy-brained ne
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Microplastics cause damage to human cells, study shows
Harm included cell death and occurred at levels of plastic eaten by people via their food Microplastics cause damage to human cells in the laboratory at the levels known to be eaten by people via their food, a study has found. The harm included cell death and allergic reactions and the research is the first to show this happens at levels relevant to human exposure. However, the health impact to t
8h
The Kleptocrats Next Door
Illustration by Javier Jaén I n 2010, things started going wrong at the steel plant in Warren, Ohio, a Rust Belt town that went on to cast its votes twice for Donald Trump. A cooling panel started leaking, and the furnace operator didn't see the leak in time; the water hit molten steel, leading to an explosion that sent workers to the hospital with burns and severe injuries. A year later, another
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Three Myths of the Great Resignation
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . The "Great Resignation" remains one of the buzziest economic stories of 2021. But the more people talk about it, the more I wonder whether most people know what they're talking about. As so often happens with other nifty phrases and neologisms, use of the term and abuse of the term are in equal proportion. Let's start with what's true. More Americans left the
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Elon Musk Hates Drugs Now, Apparently
Elon Musk apparently doesn't think drugs are cool anymore. In his, uh, wide-ranging appearance at the Wall Street Journal 's very cool-sounding CEO Summit, the SpaceX founder said, among other things, that "drugs probably make you age more." "I don't think dropping acid makes you age less," Musk said in reply to an apparently off-handed question on psychedelics and aging. Back in reality, of cour
23h
Can an Athlete's Blood Enhance Brainpower?
Scientists who injected idle mice with blood from athletic mice found improvements in learning and memory. The findings could have implications for Alzheimer's research and beyond.
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Amazon Outage Shuts Down IoT Vacuums, Doorbells, Fridges, Even Home Locks
Vaunted megacorporation Amazon suffered an outage this week that left tons of customers with "smart homes" in the lurch. As Bloomberg reported , the Amazon Web Service (AWS) outage disrupted a wide variety of the company's Internet of Things products, including its Alexa voice assistant and Ring smart doorbell — and those products' users were royally pissed when they couldn't turn on their automa
1h
Russia Mocked SpaceX. Now It's Reserved a Seat for a Cosmonaut
After years of snide remarks, mockery , and even thinly-veiled threats , Russia is ready to make peace with SpaceX. In fact, Dmitry Rogozin, the bumbling head of the country's space agency Roscosmos, announced on Twitter today that Russia will send cosmonaut Anna Kikina to the International Space Station late next year on board a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule — rather than one of the country's own S
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Billionaire Playboy Boards International Space Station
Space Cowboys Japanese Billionaire Yusaku Maezawa is now, officially, a bonafide astronaut. As International Space Station watchers on Twitter have noted, the e-commerce magnate has successfully boarded the International Space Station after taking off from our pale blue dot in a Russian Soyuz rocket early this morning. Yusaku Maezawa enters the ISS. pic.twitter.com/AdfgCDwi7q — Jeff Foust (@jeff_
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The West's Nuclear Mistake
Updated at 10:43 a.m. ET on December 8, 2021. In Germany and here in the United States, politicians who want to be seen as environmentalists are increasing greenhouse-gas emissions by forcing the premature closing of serviceable nuclear-power plants. You might think of Germany as a global environmental leader. But if you look at actual practices, you'll see a different story. Germany burns a lot
12h
Gravitational Waves Should Permanently Distort Space-Time
The first detection of gravitational waves in 2016 provided decisive confirmation of Einstein's general theory of relativity. But another astounding prediction remains unconfirmed: According to general relativity, every gravitational wave should leave an indelible imprint on the structure of space-time. It should permanently strain space, displacing the mirrors of a gravitational wave detector…
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The Wizard Sails Right Up to the Ice Pack | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #TheWizard Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://
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Jen Psaki's Rapid-Testing Gaffe Is Not as Simple as It Seems
At a White House press briefing yesterday, NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson asked Press Secretary Jen Psaki a question that's been on many people's minds: "There are still a lot of countries, like Germany and the U.K. and South Korea, that basically have massive testing, free of charge or for a nominal fee," she said. "Why can't that be done in the United States?" Psaki gave a
22h
Researchers solve mystery of 'structure-insensitive' catalytic reactions
An international team of researchers has solved one of the fundamental mysteries in catalysis: The paradox of structure insensitivity. To make better catalysts, researchers have long been studying the optimal shape and size of these nanoparticles, as this should have an influence on how well they perform in chemical reactions. Mysteriously, for some catalysts, the shape and size of the nanoparticl
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Omicron Has Created a Whole New Booster Logic
The day before I got my COVID booster shot, news of the variant we're now calling Omicron erupted around the world. Mere hours earlier, I'd been on the fence about boosting, as I had been for months. I'm relatively young and healthy; I'd had two doses of Pfizer in the spring. And although a boost would probably benefit me, I didn't feel like I necessarily needed it now —a stance that, comfortingl
4h
The employee-driven future
The global pandemic accelerated the trend toward a work-from-anywhere, distributed workforce. As we approach a post-pandemic world, companies—and employees—expect this trend to become the norm. While IT departments are rapidly configuring and deploying devices, infrastructure, and software to support the shift in a secure and productive way, employees are likewise having to reset priorities and l
6h
Ammonites were jet set of the Mesozoic era, say scientists
Shelled creatures roamed oceans millions of years ago by jet propulsion, suggests innovative 3D imaging Analysis of an extraordinary fossil discovered in a Gloucestershire gravel pit has given fresh insight into how an ancient sea creature swam through oceans and defended itself from predators millions of years ago. Innovative imaging techniques have allowed scientists to build up a 3D picture of
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What it will take to unleash the potential of geothermal power
There's enough heat flowing from inside the earth to meet total global energy demand twice over. But harnessing it requires drilling deep underground and transforming that heat into a usable form of energy. That's difficult and expensive, which is why geothermal power—sometimes called the forgotten renewable—makes up only about 0.3% of electricity generation worldwide. Now, though, it's getting a
11h
A new NASA telescope is going to look at our galaxy's most energetic objects
NASA plans to launch a new x-ray telescope this week to help answer questions like what's inside a black hole and how bright pulsars can get. On Thursday, December 9, the agency will launch the Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer, known as IXPE, on a Falcon 9 rocket from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It will be the first x-ray telescope capable of measuring polarization, a property of li
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'Dream come true': Japanese billionaire blasts off for ISS
Yusaku Maezawa fulfils childhood ambition with 12-day trip to International Space Station A Japanese billionaire has fulfilled his childhood dream of travelling to space, as one of two passengers onboard a Russian rocket that blasted off towards the International Space Station. Yusaku Maezawa, the founder of Zozo, a successful online fashion business, and his production assistant, Yozo Hirano, on
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South Korea hospitals under intense pressure amid record 7,175 Covid cases in a day
Rise in infections attributed to young people who have yet to be fully vaccinated and older citizens who have not received boosters Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage South Korea has reported a record daily total of 7,175 new Covid cases as officials urged people to complete their vaccinations. The prime minister, Kim Boo-kyum, warned that hospitals were coming under in
20h
Covid live news: South Korea surge sparks hospital alarm; 'stealth' Omicron variant found
South Korea daily cases top 7,000 for first time; 'stealth' version of Omicron 'cannot be detected by routine tests'; Boris Johnson staff filmed joking about No 10 party WHO Europe: jab young children to cut Covid risk at Christmas Moderna or Novavax after AstraZeneca jab confers high immunity: study Up to 6m eligible Britons may not have had a jab. Who are they? Podcast: How fast is the Omicron
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Don't Look Up review – slapstick apocalypse according to DiCaprio and Lawrence
Adam McKay's laboured satire challenges political indifference to looming comet catastrophe but misses out on the comedy Having long complained that movies aren't engaging with the most vital issue of our time – the climate crisis – it's perhaps churlish of me not to be glad when one comes along that does exactly that. But Adam McKay 's laboured, self-conscious and unrelaxed satire Don't Look Up
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Gemini South telescope catches a one-winged butterfly
This breathtaking visible-light image, taken with the Gemini South telescope, looks as though it is ready to flutter off the screen. This apparently wispy object is an outflow of gas known as the Chamaeleon Infrared Nebula—so named because it is bright at some infrared wavelengths of light, although it can also be seen in visible light, as in this view. Hidden at the core of this reflection nebula
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Check Out How Stoked This Billionaire Is to Leave Our Dying Planet
A Japanese billionaire is becoming the first space tourist to go to the International Space Station in more than 10 years, and boy does his excitement show. "I'm excited. I feel like an elementary school student about to go on [an] outing," Yusaku Maezawa told reporters at a pre-launch news conference. "I didn't think I would be able to go to space. I used to like the starry sky and heavenly bodi
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Anger as Jair Bolsonaro to allow unvaccinated visitors into Brazil
There are fears the decision will reverse the gains made by a successful vaccination campaign Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Brazilian government has been accused of seeking to turn the South American country into a haven for unvaccinated tourists after it shunned calls – including from its own health regulator – to demand proof of vaccination from visitors. The
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How Australian police will use DNA sequencing to predict what suspects look like
Technology a 'gamechanger' for forensic science but raises privacy and racial profiling issues Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Australian federal police have announced they are using next-generation DNA sequencing technology to predict the physical appearance of potential suspects. Based on DNA left at a crime scene, the technology – also known as massively parallel sequenc
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Woman Gives Birth in Tesla While Stuck in NYC Traffic Hell
Move over, "The Day After Tomorrow" — New Yorkers now have a new worst nightmare. As The New York Post reported , a woman was forced to give birth inside a luxury Tesla that was stuck in standstill traffic, as her husband tried to drive her to the hospital for the delivery. This wasn't any old traffic, either: they were on 5th Avenue in Manhattan's Midtown neighborhood, home to the uberbusy Times
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New technique reveals the age of massive Southern Cross star
An international team of astronomers from Australia, the United States and Europe has for the first-time unlocked the interior structure of Beta Crucis—a bright blue giant star that features on the flags of Australia, Brazil, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Samoa.
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The Head of the CIA Says It's Been Doing Mysterious Cryptocurrency Work
The feds are looking intro cryptocurrencies, and apparently have been since the Trump administration. This revelation came during the Wall Street Journal 's uberhyped CEO Summit on Monday, where as Vice reported , CIA Director William Burns admitted that his agency has "a number of different projects focused on cryptocurrency." He went on to say that he "inherited" the agency's crypto maneuvers f
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Is Trouble Ahead for South Africa's Private Rhino Breeders?
A new proposal in South Africa would phase out intensive and captive rhino breeding in the country. Private rhino owners — including John Hume, who has about 13 percent of the world's white rhinos — aren't pleased. But as wild populations decline, concerns about possible domestication of captive rhinos mount.
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The end of Roe v. Wade — and what comes next | Kathryn Kolbert
Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision protecting people's right to have an abortion in the United States, will be overturned within a year, says reproductive rights attorney Kathryn Kolbert. In this electrifying call to action, she breaks down the systematic attack against reproductive freedom in the US and envisions what a post-Roe world could look like. "First, we've got to build
7h
Omicron cases could exceed 1 million by month-end – Sajid Javid
UK health security agency estimates number of infections to be 20 times higher than confirmed cases Omicron cases could exceed 1 million by the end of this month on the current trajectory, Sajid Javid has told MPs, describing the new variant as "an even more formidable foe". In a statement delivered to the House of Commons, the health secretary said that there were 568 confirmed cases of the Omic
2h
A Legendary VC Has a Plan for Solving Climate Change
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . It's not perfect, but sometimes I think about the computer and internet revolution as an analogy for the energy transition. Each shift required electrify
11h
DeepMind says its new language model can beat others 25 times its size
In the two years since OpenAI released its language model GPT-3 , most big-name AI labs have developed language mimics of their own. Google , Facebook , and Microsoft—as well as a handful of Chinese firms—have all built AIs that can generate convincing text, chat with humans, answer questions, and more. Known as large language models because of the massive size of the neural networks underpinning
4h
10 Books Texas Doesn't Want You to Read
Choosing what to read is both a small decision and one of utmost importance. For students, that choice is crucial in getting kids to read at all. Some books feel like magic, world-making and unforgettable. Some feel dangerous, upsetting. Many inspire both feelings, especially in young people. Reading is meant to be challenging, and literature should serve as a way to explore ideas that feel unthi
2h
Why Mitch McConnell Caved Again
F or the second time this fall, the Senate's proud king of obstruction is caving to the Democrats. Two months ago today, Mitch McConnell sent President Joe Biden a letter containing a warning so important that he repeated it three times in five paragraphs. The Senate Republican leader vowed that he would "not be a party to any future effort" to help Democrats lift the debt ceiling—a necessary ste
5h
Plants buy us time to slow climate change—but not enough to stop it
Because plants take up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and convert it into food, forests and other similar ecosystems are considered to be some of the planet's most important carbon sinks. In fact, the United States and many other countries that participated in last month's UN Climate Change Conference have made nature-based solutions a critical feature of their carbon dioxide mitigation framew
7h
Devising new meat alternatives with 3D printing—and cocoa butter
No longer just a dream of vegetarians and vegans, fake meat is becoming more widely available in grocery stores and restaurants. And more options are almost certainly on the way. In a study reported in ACS Food Science & Technology, one team has developed a new combination of plant-based ingredients tailored for 3D printing meat alternatives. Their most successful recipes required an odd-sounding
9h
Queensland declares 'world first' Omicron Covid genetic variation but experts say it is not a new variant
Sub-lineage described as Omicron 'like' was identified in an overseas arrival to the state from South Africa Download the free Guardian app ; get our morning email briefing Queensland has declared a "world-first" sub-lineage of Omicron but experts say it's not a new variant or a new strain and more information is needed. The new Omicron Covid sub-lineage, known as Omicron "like", was identified i
17h
UKHSA considers legal action against privately run Immensa lab
Watchdog refuses FoI request from Good Law Project to give details of audit Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A government health watchdog is considering legal action against a private health company whose laboratory gave at least 43,000 people potentially false negative Covid-19 test results. The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), the successor body to Public Health E
17h
2021 in Photos: How the First Months Unfolded
As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look at some of the most memorable events and images of 2021. Events covered in this essay (the first of a three-part photo summary of the year) include the January 6 breach of the U.S. Capitol by Trump supporters, the inauguration of President Joe Biden, the ongoing effects of the coronavirus pandemic worldwide, tensions on the border between Ukr
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Twitter reveals dynamics of stories surrounding Trump's presidency
A computational analysis of billions of phrases found in tweets has uncovered new insights into the timelines of the many major stories that surrounded Donald Trump, former President of the United States, from 2016 to 2021. Peter Dodds of the University of Vermont, Burlington, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 8, 2021.
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The history of Covid vaccine development
A year has passed since the UK became the first western country to license a vaccine against Covid Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage It has been a year since the UK became the first western country to license a vaccine against Covid and since then the world has embarked on a battle against the virus. Here is a history of the vaccination development Continue reading…
17h
Research reveals how plasma swirling around black holes can produce heat and light
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have uncovered a process in the swirling masses of plasma surrounding black holes and neutron stars that can cause previously unexplained emissions of light and heat. The process, known as magnetic reconnection, also jettisons huge plumes of plasma billions of miles in length. These findings can increas
1h
Podcast: How AI is giving a woman back her voice
Voice technology is one of the biggest trends in the healthcare space. We look at how it might help care providers and patients, from a woman who is losing her speech, to documenting healthcare records for doctors. But how do you teach AI to learn to communicate more like a human, and will it lead to more efficient machines? We meet: Kenneth Harper, VP & GM, Healthcare Virtual Assistants and Ambi
16h
Study finds future snowmelt could have costly consequences on infrastructure
Climate change and warmer conditions have altered snow-driven extremes and previous studies predict less and slower snowmelt in the northern United States and Canada. However, mixed-phase precipitation—shifting between snow and rain—is increasing, especially in higher elevations, making it more challenging to predict future snowmelt, a dominant driver of severe flooding. Researchers at the Univers
13h
A song of ice and cloud: Marine aerosols from Southern Ocean help summer ice cloud growth
Climate models are digital simulations of the Earth's climate system. These models calculate the interactions of various drivers of climate, such as land, sea, atmosphere, and humidity among others and forecast the future climate of the world. Yet, simulating clouds, a key factor of the Earth's climate system, has always been challenging. Their complex behavior makes it easy for climate modelers t
6h
Self-administered cognition test predicts early signs of dementia sooner
Many people experience forgetfulness as they age, but it's often difficult to tell if these memory issues are a normal part of aging or a sign of something more serious. A new study finds that a simple, self-administered test can identify the early, subtle signs of dementia sooner than the most commonly used office-based standard cognitive test.
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4 steps to hiring fairly — and supporting criminal justice reform | Nyra Jordan
Many companies have made strides when it comes to prioritizing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), but one group remains largely left out: people who have been involved in the criminal justice system. Social impact investor Nyra Jordan introduces us to "fair chance hiring" — the practice of hiring people with criminal justice records — and shares four steps companies can take to make sure ev
7h
Mysterious metal depositions were 'the most ordinary thing in the world'
In Bronze Age Europe, many bronze objects such as axes, swords and jewels were deliberately left at specific spots in the landscape. Ph.D. research by Leiden archaeologist Marieke Visser shows that these practices were expressions of people's relationship with the world around them. "It was a completely normal practice, which we shouldn't label as irrational."
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The Simple Math That Makes Omicron So Alarming
A lot is still unknown around Omicron, but a worrying trend has become clear: This variant sure is spreading fast. In South Africa , the U.K. , and Denmark —countries with the best variant surveillance and high immunity against COVID—Omicron cases are growing exponentially. The variant has outcompeted the already highly transmissible Delta in South Africa and may soon do the same elsewhere. Accor
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Scientists Discover Gigantic New World that Defies Previous Planetary Understanding
Rejoice! Scientists have discovered a new planet — and it's really honkin' big ! The new exoplanet, named "b Centauri b" for its location orbiting the b Centauri binary star system, is located a cool 325 light years from Earth in the neighboring Centaurus constellation. First photographed by the aptly-named Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory — confusingly located in Chile —
19min
Study outlines ways to help children learn forgiveness
A recent study suggests that teaching children to understand other people's perspectives could make it easier for them to learn how to forgive other people. The study also found that teaching children to make sincere apologies can help them receive forgiveness from others.
23min
Our First Preview of How Vaccines Will Fare Against Omicron
And there it is, the first trickle of data to confirm it. In the eyes of vaccinated immune systems, Omicron looks like a big old weirdo—but also, a kind of familiar one. That's the verdict served up by several preliminary studies and press releases out this week, describing how well antibodies, isolated from the blood of vaccinated people, recognize and sequester the new variant in a lab. The new
37min
The impact of drugs on gut microbes is greater than we thought
We are one of the most medicated generations of humans to live on our planet. Cardiometabolic diseases like type 2 diabetes, obesity, and coronary artery disease continue to increase in prevalence and together constitute the highest cause of mortality worldwide. Affected people often have to take multiple daily medications for months or even years. Researchers from the Bork group at EMBL Heidelber
58min
Ocean tides are gatekeepers of groundwater discharge to Hawai'i coastal zone
Submarine groundwater discharge is a process by which water exits coastal aquifers and enters the ocean. This can be terrestrial freshwater or salty seawater that intruded into the porous aquifer at the ocean's edge. A new study, published in Scientific Reports by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers, showed that while precipitation and sea level drive coastal groundwater levels, it is sea l
1h
A Tragic Conflict of Competing Goods
Sign up for Conor's newsletter here. Conversations of Note Abortion has been discussed intensely this past week due to oral arguments in a Supreme Court case that could significantly alter the constitutional right to the procedure in the United States. At issue is a Mississippi law that bans abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, contra current precedent. If upheld, the law will likely inspire ne
1h
The Atlantic Daily: Americans Are Reimagining Work
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Getty; Adam Maida / The Atlantic This holiday party season will not be a normal one. But if it were, employees would have plenty to gossip about. Although most Americans are working in the office
1h
New research says baboon breakups are mutual
Just like humans, groups of baboons sometimes break off relations. Scientists have studied the dynamics of such breakups and say baboons tend to split up in a cooperative, egalitarian way.
1h
Study shows how waste can be converted into materials for advanced industries
Between 118 and 138 million tons of organic waste are generated annually worldwide, with waste from the food production and distribution chain accounting for 100 million tons of the total. Only about 25% of all this biowaste is collected and recycled. The other 75% is simply thrown away, representing a huge loss of potential resources and major damage to the environment.
1h
ESO telescope images planet around most massive star pair to date
The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) has captured an image of a planet orbiting b Centauri, a two-star system that can be seen with the naked eye. This is the hottest and most massive planet-hosting star system found to date, and the planet was spotted orbiting it at 100 times the distance Jupiter orbits the Sun. Some astronomers believed planets could not exist aro
2h
Ubisoft Will Add NFTs to Games Starting with Ghost Recon Breakpoint
Ubisoft is among the game publishers that invested early in microtransactions, which many would argue have made gaming worse. Well, get ready for microtransactions on steroids. There won't be anything "micro" about the NFTs Ubisoft plans to add to Ghost Recon Breakpoint . These unique in-game items will give your characters a little more gravitas, and you will be able to buy and sell NFTs with th
2h
Why 'democracy by deterrence' might be weakening in the United States
American democracy is in crisis—a majority of scholars and the public agree. Allegations of unfair voting practices, such as voter suppression and gerrymandering, abuses of executive power, and mounting concerns about the legitimacy of elections have become regular occurrence in the United States, rather than isolated events.
2h
Biodiversity collections enable foundational and data skills
The task of training an effective cadre of biodiversity scientists has grown more challenging in recent years, as foundational skills and knowledge in organismal biology have increasingly required complementary data skills and knowledge. Writing in BioScience, Dr. Anna K. Monfils, of Central Michigan University, and colleagues identify one way to address this training conundrum: biodiversity colle
2h
Study tests multiple indicators of wastewater contamination to shellfish farms
Human wastewater poses a global threat to seafood safety and the financial stability of the aquaculture industry. A recent study by researchers at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the University of South Alabama, in collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, tested multiple indicators of wastewater contamination to identify potential sources of contamination to local shellfish farms a
2h
Streamline Your Workout With the Best Fitness Trackers of 2022
Gone are the days when you had to guess at health metrics like your exercise intensity or your stress level—now the best fitness trackers can do it for you . In fact, fitness trackers can help provide health data, metrics, a pretty clear snapshot of your activity levels and, probably most satisfying of all, how that's changed since you started tracking. And the best part is that fitness trackers
2h
Print books beat tablets when reading to toddlers
When it comes to reading to young children, huddling together over a good old-fashioned book is still better than story time on a tablet, new research suggests. Researchers examined interactions between 72 parents and their toddlers ages 24-36 months and compared interactions while reading tablet apps versus traditional children's books. Parents talked more to their children—with children in turn
3h
2021 in Photos: A Look at the Middle Months
As the year comes to a close, it's time to revisit some of the most memorable events and images of 2021. Events covered in this essay (the second of a three-part photo summary of the year) include the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, vaccination drives worldwide, flooding in Western Europe, periodical cicadas in the United States, a "sea snot" outbreak in Turkey, wildfires in Greece, and much more. Check bac
3h
The geometry of decision-making in individuals and collectives [Ecology]
Choosing among spatially distributed options is a central challenge for animals, from deciding among alternative potential food sources or refuges to choosing with whom to associate. Using an integrated theoretical and experimental approach (employing immersive virtual reality), we consider the interplay between movement and vectorial integration during decision-making regarding two,…
3h
Unraveling the genotype by environment interaction in a thermosensitive fish with a polygenic sex determination system [Developmental Biology]
In most animals, sex determination occurs at conception, when sex chromosomes are segregated following Mendelian laws. However, in multiple reptiles and fishes, this genetic sex can be overridden by external factors after fertilization or birth. In some species, the genetic sex may also be governed by multiple genes, further limiting…
3h
Perception of structurally distinct effectors by the integrated WRKY domain of a plant immune receptor [Plant Biology]
Plants use intracellular nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR)–containing immune receptors (NLRs) to detect pathogen-derived effector proteins. The Arabidopsis NLR pair RRS1-R/RPS4 confers disease resistance to different bacterial pathogens by perceiving the structurally distinct effectors AvrRps4 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi and PopP2 from Ralstonia solanacearum via
3h
The hippocampus as the switchboard between perception and memory [Neuroscience]
Adaptive memory recall requires a rapid and flexible switch from external perceptual reminders to internal mnemonic representations. However, owing to the limited temporal or spatial resolution of brain imaging modalities used in isolation, the hippocampal–cortical dynamics supporting this process remain unknown. We thus employed an object-scene cued recall paradigm across…
3h
Targeted polyelectrolyte complex micelles treat vascular complications in vivo [Medical Sciences]
Vascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and globally. Pathological vascular remodeling, such as atherosclerosis and stenosis, largely develop at arterial sites of curvature, branching, and bifurcation, where disturbed blood flow activates vascular endothelium. Current pharmacological treatments of vascular complications principally target systemic…
3h
Evolution of variable lymphocyte receptor B antibody loci in jawless vertebrates [Immunology and Inflammation]
Three types of variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) genes, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC, encode antigen recognition receptors in the extant jawless vertebrates, lampreys and hagfish. The somatically diversified repertoires of these VLRs are generated by serial stepwise copying of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) sequences into an incomplete germline VLR gene. Lymphocytes that…
3h
Hobit confers tissue-dependent programs to type 1 innate lymphoid cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Identification of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s) has been problematic. The transcription factor Hobit encoded by Zfp683 has been proposed as a major driver of ILC1 programs. Using Zfp683 reporter mice, we showed that correlation of Hobit expression with ILC1s is tissue- and context-dependent. In liver and intestinal mucosa,…
3h
Mobile phone apps make it almost impossible to get lost these days. And that isn't good for us | Adrian Chiles
In an era of mobile phones, we rarely lose our way – which means we miss out on the joy and relief of finding it again A travel company called Black Tomato, in return for a significant sum of money, will drop you in the middle of you know not where, and leave you there. The product is called Get Lost and is surely more evidence that we've, well, lost our way. Which isn't to say that it's a daft i
3h
Fusion Experiment Reaches Vital Power Generation Milestone
The world struggles to produce enough power as it is, but there's a real possibility we will have to phase out fossil fuels in the coming decades. And what's left then? Wind? Solar? We might be able to skip the middleman and make our own solar energy via fusion, but the technology to make that a reality is still evolving. However, researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
4h
Nvidia's Refreshed RTX 2060 12GB Already Impossible to Find
(Image: Zotac) A few days ago we wrote about the impending launch of Nvidia's upgraded RTX 2060 GPU, which has double the memory from the previous card. The card is being billed as a solution to the current GPU supply crisis. Built with last-gen tech and featuring a low hash rate, it was hoped that miners would simply ignore the rejuvenated GPU. You won't believe what happened next. The card sile
4h
The right e-cigarette nicotine delivery can help smokers quit
Electronic cigarettes with cigarette-like nicotine delivery may help some people stop smoking cigarettes, according to a new study. By switching to e-cigarettes, the researchers say tobacco users may reduce their exposure to certain carcinogens, or cancer causing substances. For six months, the research team followed 520 smokers looking to reduce their cigarette consumption by at least 50% but ha
4h
Early warning signals could help monitor disease outbreaks
New research suggests early warning signals (EWSs) could help in the monitoring of disease outbreaks, such as COVID-19. The study found warnings could be detected weeks earlier than any rapid increase in cases. The findings could help governments and policy makers improve the accuracy of their decisions and allow timely interventions if needed.
4h
Opinion: We should ban all new oil and gas fields
As a professor of geophysics, I have spent 36 years training young geologists destined to work in the fossil fuel industry how to look for oil and gas. But now I believe it's time to stop fossil-fuel exploration and halt the development of all new oil and gas fields. We cannot safely set fire to all the fuel we've already found, so why look for more?
4h
Important role of prokaryotic viruses in sewage treatment
Prokaryotic viruses (phages) existing in activated sludge (AS), a biological treatment process widely used in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), act to regulate the composition of microbial community in the activated sludge. Phages are major bacterial predators, through virus-host interactions with key bacterial populations in AS systems, they can influence the removal efficiency of pollutants.
4h
The GovLab publishes report examining public opinion on government reform
Today The Governance Lab at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering released an interactive report entitled "What Americans Want from Reform." The report by Paul C. Light, Paulette Goddard Professor at the NYU Wagner School of Public Service and Senior Fellow at the GovLab, analyzes six key indicators about American attitudes toward government.
5h
Why it's time to make ecocide a crime, for the sake of its victims
In November, the world's first global citizens' assembly—made up of 100 people chosen by lottery from around the world—declared its recommended responses to the climate crisis at the UN climate conference COP26. Among these recommendations was that causing severe environmental destruction, or "ecocide," should become a crime.
5h
Mammaroll med overklighetskänsla efter livmodertransplantation
Att bli mamma efter en livmodertransplantation ger en overklighetskänsla utöver det vanliga. Detta parallellt med den vardag som snabbt infinner sig. – Att bli mamma efter livmodertransplantation verkar psykologiskt vara en blandning av att känna sig som vem som helst och samtidigt brottas med en känsla av overklighet, konstaterar Stina Järvholm, docent i psykologi och en av forskarna bakom en st
5h
Stem-cell breakthrough could preserve diverse livestock breeds
When Vimal Selvaraj's uncle first imported Holstein semen to start his dairy farm in India in the early 1990s, he was hailed as a revolutionary on the cutting edge of agriculture. His first generation of cattle crosses between Holsteins and Sahiwals, a native Indian breed, seemed to carry the best traits of both: the Holsteins' high milk production, and the Sahiwals' disease resistance and extreme
5h
Omicron likely to weaken COVID vaccine protection
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03672-3 Early lab results suggest existing vaccines could be less effective against the fast-spreading coronavirus variant, but boosters should improve immunity.
5h
Sustainable Christmas trees: an ecologist's buying guide
If you celebrate Christmas, chances are you are planning to decorate a tree (or have already). But how do you make an informed and environment-friendly choice? Environmental impact is a complex question for any product, and as a tree ecologist I know that Christmas trees are no exception.
5h
How Hydra animals regenerate their own heads
A new paper in Genome Biology and Evolution maps out for the first time how Hydra, which are a group of small aquatic animals, can regenerate their own heads by changing the way that their genes are regulated, known as epigenetics.
5h
What China's plans to decarbonize its economy mean for Canada's energy exports
One of the surprises to come out of COP26 was the U.S.-China joint declaration on enhancing climate action through the 2020s. Although the declaration lacked details, it offers a positive sign of progress toward curbing global greenhouse gas emissions, in part because China and the United States are the world's two largest emitters of greenhouse gases.
5h
Rocket Lab shows off its new reusable neutron rocket, due for launch in 2024
On December 2, 2021, the commercial space company Rocket Lab unveiled the detailed architecture of their Neutron rocket for the first time. In a live-streamed event, the company showcased all the new elements that will make this "megaconstellation" launcher a serious contender in the coming years. These include updated details about the rocket's design, materials, propulsion, and reusability archi
5h
Star's self-destruction is shown in 3D, revealing new details
A 1,000-year-old supernova has been captured in 3D images that reveal yet unseen details of the elements that are ejected when a star explodes. Analysis of data from the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) and X-shooter at the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT), offers new insights into how stars self-destruct.
5h
Wine: New and old vs emerging and established
For decades, the primary division in the world of wine was between the "Old World" of European wines and the "New World" of North America, Australia ND New Zealand, South Africa, and elsewhere. There is a need to update this for the modern age where emerging nations are creating products to compete in the global market with the old vanguard.
5h
Teacher support for 'zero tolerance' rules tied to lower feelings of safety
Despite widespread criticism from education authorities, nearly three-fourths of surveyed teachers support the use of "zero tolerance" as an effective discipline practice, according to a new study. Contrary to the goals of zero tolerance policies, teacher support was linked to higher rates of out-of-school suspensions as well as lower feelings of safety at school among both students and teachers,
5h
Deep-learning model speeds extreme weather predictions
Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity today. To help address this, researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), Caltech, and NVIDIA trained the Fourier Neural Operator (FNO) deep learning model—which learns complex physical systems accurately and efficiently—to emulate atmospheric dynamics and provide high-fidelity extreme weather predictions ac
6h
Modeling emissions pathways for India's climate amid COVID-19 recovery
As the global economic recovery from COVID-19 continues, decisions regarding emissions strategies can have important implications on regional climate change. A new paper in Environmental Research Letters explores the impact of such decisions in India, modeling the effects of COVID-19 emissions recovery pathways on India's summertime climate.
6h
Digitizing the Natural History Museum London's entire collection could contribute over £2 billion to the global economy
The societal benefits of digitizing natural history collections extends to global advancements in food security, biodiversity conservation, medicine discovery, minerals exploration, and beyond. Brand new, rigorous economic report predicts investing in digitizing natural history museum collections could also result in a tenfold return. The Natural History Museum, London, has so far made over 4.9 mi
6h
Singapore's first 3D-printed artefact to be launched to the moon
The Moon Gallery Foundation is developing an art gallery to be sent to the Moon, contributing to the establishment of the first lunar outpost and permanent museum on Earth's only natural satellite. The international initiative will see one hundred artworks from artists around the world integrated into a 10 cm x 10 cm x 1 cm grid tray, which will fly to the Moon by 2025. The Moon Gallery aims to ex
6h
Baleens read like a whale's history book
By chemically analyzing sequential samples from the baleen of dead whales, it is possible to read not only the history of the diet, but also the migration route of the animals. In the latest issue of the journal Royal Society Open Science, NIOZ researcher Philip Riekenberg and colleagues from Utrecht University and Wageningen Marine Research present their results of a novel way of analyzing nitrog
6h
Bird singing contests: A clash of culture and conservation
For thousands of years, people have been keeping wild birds. It is often a deeply ingrained part of the culture. One of the more recent trends to emerge from this practice is the singing contest which pits male birds against each other to impress human judges with their songs, plumage, and movement. A Cornell Lab of Ornithology examination of the scientific literature on this topic finds that bird
6h
Novel computer simulation method can accelerate COVID-19 drug discovery
A study by researchers affiliated with institutions in Brazil, Germany and Finland proposes a new standard for computer simulation that promises to accelerate the search for novel bioactive compounds against the virus that causes COVID-19. The researchers used the procedure to analyze a key protein in the reproductive cycle of SARS-CoV-2, which has been a major focus of attention for scientists an
6h
Inventory of the world belowground: Using DNA to study fungal communities
Fungi tend to be absent in conversations regarding climate change, deforestation, and environmental pollution, overlooked in favor of large and conspicuous plants. But plants don't exist in isolation. Beneath the ground, specialized fungi called mycorrhizae form an intricate web in and around roots that is vital to forest health and long-term carbon storage.
6h
Nature or nurture: How does an animal get its microbiome?
We know that sharks are voracious eaters, but what do we know about the source of its microbiome? To date, not much. But a recent study from the University of Chicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) fills a gap in understanding the microbiome associated with a close relative in the Chondrichthyes, a class of fish that includes sharks, rays and skates.
6h
Meet the new climate refugee in town: Coyotes
Amid the sylvan tranquility of the Berkeley hills neighborhood, an image of a snarling predator, fangs bared, stares down at passers-by from atop a pole planted in the yard of a sprawling Tudor-style home. "Danger! "Coyotes!" the homemade placard warns.
6h
Guidelines may promote over-diagnosis of cow's milk allergy in infants, study finds
International guidelines developed to help doctors diagnose cow's milk allergy may lead to over-diagnosis, according to new research. The study found that three-quarters of infants have two or more symptoms at some point in the first year of life which guidelines say may be caused by cow's milk allergy, yet the condition only affects one in 100.
6h
SKB:s VD: "Vi tror på ett positivt beslut"
– Det kommer alltid att finnas kritiska parter. Men jag känner mig trygg i att vi kommer att få ett positivt besked, säger Johan Dasht, VD vid SKB. Tidsplanen för besked om slutförvar som presenterades av klimat- och miljöministern Annika Strandhäll idag välkomnas av företaget.
6h
Blame the supply chain for lack of Christmas trees
Persistent global supply chain issues seem to be causing problems for consumers trying to get a Christmas tree. Consumers visiting local tree farms in search of the perfect fir may get a shock at the limited choices. While environmental factors and lack of tree planting are playing a significant role in the shortage of real trees, supply chain issues are affecting the availability of both real an
6h
Megastudies improve the impact of applied behavioural science
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04128-4 A massive field study whereby many different treatments are tested synchronously in one large sample using a common objectively measured outcome, termed a megastudy, was performed to examine the ability of interventions to increase gym attendance by American adults.
6h
Structure of pathological TDP-43 filaments from ALS with FTLD
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04199-3 Cryo-electron microscopy of aggregated TDP-43 from postmortem brain tissue of individuals who had ALS with FTLD reveals a filament structure with distinct features to other neuropathological protein filaments, such as those of tau and α-synuclein.
6h
High-frequency and intrinsically stretchable polymer diodes
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04053-6 A stretchable anode, cathode, semiconductor and current collector have been developed to create stretchable diodes that can operate at megahertz frequencies for use in wirelessly operated, skin-like wearable electronics.
6h
Structure and mechanism of the SGLT family of glucose transporters
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04211-w Cryo-electron microscopy structures of the sodium–glucose cotransporter SGLT1 and a related transporter SMCT1 define the architecture of this protein family and provide insights into substrate binding and transport function.
6h
The emergence, genomic diversity and global spread of SARS-CoV-2
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04188-6 The potential origins and global spread of SARS-CoV-2, the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern and the importance of genomic surveillance for the control of the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed.
6h
A wide-orbit giant planet in the high-mass b Centauri binary system
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04124-8 A direct imaging study demonstrates the existence of a giant planet in a wide orbit around the high-mass b Centauri binary system, and uses measurements of the orbital properties to discuss its formation mechanism.
6h
A heritable, non-genetic road to cancer evolution
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03606-z Treatment for leukaemia can fail for reasons that are not fully clear. Tracking the progress of individual cellular lineages for this type of cancer offers a way to investigate this phenomenon.
6h
Major cholesterol study reveals benefits of examining diverse populations
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02998-2 Researchers performed the largest genetic study of cholesterol levels so far by combining data from 201 studies in 35 countries involving 1.65 million people. Diversifying research participants improved the ability to identify genes controlling cholesterol levels and to predict levels across all ancestries.
6h
What surveys really say
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03604-1 Increasing the sample size of a survey is often thought to increase the accuracy of the results. However, an analysis of big surveys on the uptake of COVID-19 vaccines shows that larger sample sizes do not protect against bias.
6h
Gut clues to weight gain after quitting smoking
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03548-6 Research has uncovered factors that underlie the weight gain associated with cessation of smoking. Here, scientists consider the implications of this finding from the perspectives of gut biology and of smoking.
6h
Giant planet imaged orbiting two massive stars
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03607-y Direct imaging has revealed the existence of a large planet orbiting a binary system that contains the most massive planet-hosting stars detected so far. The discovery challenges existing models for how planets and stars form.
6h
Aggregates of TDP-43 protein spiral into view
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03605-0 In some neurodegenerative diseases, a protein called TDP-43 forms aggregates in the brain, resulting in neuronal cell death. The structure of these aggregates and their properties have been unveiled.
6h
Constraints on estimating the CO2 fertilization effect emerge
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03560-w Plants offset a large fraction of Earth's carbon dioxide emissions, but estimating the size of this carbon sink relies on differing terrestrial-biosphere models. Combining multiple models with data has now reduced the uncertainty.
6h
Poopy hippo pools become their 'meta-gut'
The pools where hippos hang out—and poop a lot—are extensions of their guts, report researchers. Hippopotamuses can eat nearly 100 pounds of food daily—and, as a result, they fill the pools where they spend much of their lives with huge amounts of waste. Bacteria and other microbes expelled into the water survive and are shared among the congregating animals. This "meta-gut," as the researchers c
7h
Phone data link gratitude and lower blood pressure
People in a recent study who were more grateful had lower blood pressure and heart rate, as well as greater feelings of appreciation toward others. The study, published in the journal Emotion , finds that optimism was also linked to health and mental benefits, such as better sleep quality and more positive expectations and reflections. Researchers examined these traits through a cell phone app ca
7h
Report: Plastic pollution is also pervasive in our agricultural soils
The scourge of unsightly images of plastic refuse littering our beaches and oceans always receives much attention. But a new report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) suggests that the land we use to grow our food is contaminated with far larger quantities of plastic pollution, posing an even greater threat to food security, people's health, and the environment.
7h
Predictive Policing Software Shown to Entrench Bias, not Address It
(Photo: Scott Rodgerson/Unsplash) Automation can be the key to unlocking efficiency—but what happens when the algorithms at the core of an automated process perpetuate racial and economic biases? A new analysis of popular predictive policing software by Gizmodo has concluded that such software disproportionately targets poor communities and communities of color. Gizmodo's analysis is the first in
8h
Making lasers more efficient, versatile and compact
Their inner workings reside in the realm of physics, but lasers make everyday life possible. Talking on a cell phone or googling COVID stats while your apples and oranges are scanned at the checkout counter—lasers at every step.
8h
These Maps Reveal the Profound Progress and Peril of Modern Civilization
Today's mega-threats are systemic and interconnected. The growing demand for energy and meat helps explain the steady rise in carbon and methane emissions. Coal-belching factories and burning forests are in turn speeding up global warming, increasing the frequency of storms, deepening food insecurity, and imperiling flood-prone cities. The interdependent nature of our biggest challenges and most
8h
Fleshing out the bones of Quetzalcoatlus, Earth's largest flier ever
Though discovered more than 45 years ago, fossils of Earth's largest flying animal, Quetzalcoatlus, were never thoroughly analyzed. Now, a scientific team provides the most complete picture yet of this dinosaur relative, its environment and behavior. The pterosaur, with a 40-foot wingspan, walked with a unique gait, but otherwise filled a niche much like herons today. The researchers dispel ideas
8h
Mercury exposure in tidal marshes affecting breeding success of two sparrow species
Mercury exposure is related to a 10 percent decrease in nest survival in two tidal marsh songbird species surveyed in four states, from Maine to New Jersey, according to a new University of Maine-led study. These species have been experiencing sharp declines in this region due to sea level rise-related habitat loss and, therefore, mercury may exacerbate known climate change-driven population decli
8h
Prioritising protection for threatened carbon-storing landscapes
As efforts accelerate to mitigate the threat of runaway climate change through nature-based approaches like large-scale reforestation, a new study led by scientists from the Nature Conservancy provides a timely reminder not to overlook the benefits of improving landscape protection and management in favor of other Natural Climate Solutions (NCS).
8h
Zebra finches alter song to eggs during hot periods to repress heat production in embryo cells
A team of researchers from Deakin University in Australia and Clemson University in the U.S. has found that female finches change the song they sing to their eggs when temperatures rise. This results in hatchling mitochondria producing more ATP and less heat. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with captive zebra finches.
8h
Coaxing jellyfish, flies and mice to regenerate body parts
Caltech researchers have discovered certain conditions that enable different laboratory animals to regenerate amputated appendages. Upon consuming a diet high in sugar and an essential amino acid, three different species—the moon jellyfish Aurelia coerulea, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and common laboratory mice—all demonstrated some ability to regenerate appendages after amputation.
8h
To counter hate speech, push for empathy?
It's possible to curb online hate speech by inducing empathy for those affected, research on "counterspeech" finds. In contrast, the use of humor or warnings of possible consequences have little effect, say the researchers. To moderate hateful comments, many social media platforms have developed sophisticated filters. However, these alone are not sufficient to fix the problem. For example, Facebo
8h
Industry demand drives innovation
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03634-9 Less-established universities form strong business links to learn what the market needs.
8h
Universities under 50 carve their niche
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03635-8 In bioimaging, high-energy physics, geoscience and chemistry, these young universities are making their mark.
8h
Customized recruitment attracts top talent
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03633-w Young universities need to identify their unique attributes and communicate their value to ambitious researchers.
8h
Young universities forge new paths to success
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03631-y The brightest young universities are deliberate in developing a strong sense of their purpose, and leave researchers to chart an independent course.
8h
A guide to the Nature Index
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03636-7 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality that is available free online at natureindex.com.
8h
Devising new meat alternatives with 3D printing — and cocoa butter
No longer just a dream of vegetarians and vegans, fake meat is becoming more widely available in grocery stores and restaurants. And more options are almost certainly on the way. One team has now developed a new combination of plant-based ingredients tailored for 3D printing meat alternatives. Their most successful recipes required an odd-sounding addition: cocoa butter, derived from cocoa beans o
8h
Impaired-driver sensor could pave the way for safer vehicles
The bipartisan infrastructure bill recently signed into law by President Joe Biden includes a requirement for automakers to install driver monitoring systems that detect intoxicated or impaired drivers. Current systems rely on cameras, which have limitations. Now, researchers have made heat-resistant, pressure-detecting sensors that, when attached to seats, can tell whether a driver is drowsy or h
8h
Wearable sensor measures airborne nicotine exposure from e-cigarettes
Some studies have shown that nicotine, an addictive substance in electronic cigarettes, increases the risk of cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. But to get a full understanding of its potential health effects, a real-time nicotine monitoring device is needed. Such a device could also help vapers — as well as non-vapers who encounter second-hand smoke — measure their exposure. Now, researc
8h
CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing boosts effectiveness of ultrasound cancer therapy
Sonodynamic therapy uses ultrasound in combination with drugs to release harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the site of a tumor. However, the treatment isn't very effective because cancer cells can activate antioxidant defense systems to counteract it. Now, researchers have breached these defenses with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, allowing sonodynamic therapy to effectively shrink tumors in a m
8h
Wastewater helps decipher the popularity of new synthetic drugs
Over the years, hundreds of new synthetic drugs that mimic the effects of illegal and legal substances have emerged. The underground nature of each drug's development and distribution makes its international popularity hard to track. Now, using wastewater from the days near the 2021 New Year holiday, researchers report an increased international usage of some synthetic drugs, including eutylone an
8h
När får vi ett tillgängligt samhälle för alla?
Det finns ett glapp mellan politiska ambitioner om tillgänglighet och hur verkligheten faktiskt ser ut. Trots lagstiftning och löften så kvarstår många hinder och många känner sig utestängda. En grupp samhällsvetenskapliga forskare ville ta reda på varför det är så och har tillsammans undersökt vad de kallar tillgänglighetens tröghet. – Många medborgare känner sig åsidosatta och utestängda. Det f
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Our emotions and identity can affect how we use grammar
Language and social identity have been making headlines recently. Last month, Air Canada's CEO Michael Rousseau faced scrutiny over not knowing French—his language deficit is helping support Bill 96 in Québec (which seeks to change the Canadian Constitution to affirm Québec as a nation and French its official language). Meanwhile Indian chain store Fabindia had to change advertisements for its fes
9h
Giant stars and the ultimate fate of the sun
Astronomers have a new tool to help them understand giant stars. It's a detailed study of the precise temperatures and sizes of 191 giant stars. The authors of the work say that it'll serve as a standard reference on giant stars for years to come.
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How to maintain gender equality through the sex chromosomes
Asymmetric sex chromosomes were independently shaped during evolution in many species, and different strategies evolved alongside to overcome the resulting imbalance in genetic information. Molecular biologist Marie-Line Faucillion has studied this in her dissertation, defended at Umeå University, Sweden. Her findings can be useful to better understand how sex chromosomes are regulated, but also t
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'Supportive voices' get picked for teams at work
Communicating in "supportive voice" at work may make your colleagues want you on their team, research finds. "What we say within a group, the ideas we suggest, and the way we support others, signals something about who we are to our coworkers. It can attract people to us or repel them," says Melissa Chamberlin, assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship at Iowa State University, and c
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Brazil is in water crisis — it needs a drought plan
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03625-w To avoid crop failures and soaring power costs, Brazil needs to diversify sources, monitor soil moisture, model local hydroclimate dynamics and treat water as a national security priority.
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How to drive energy efficiency in low-income countries
Credit market failures could slow energy efficiency adoption in low-income countries, according to a new research paper titled "Credit, Attention, and Externalities in the Adoption of Energy Efficient Technologies by Low-Income Households."
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»Først og fremmest vil jeg bare gerne arbejde som læge«
23,1 mio. kr. på finansloven har skabt fornyet håb for 1.284 udenlandske læger, som aktuelt ønsker at arbejde i Danmark, men er sandet til i dansk bureaukrati. En af dem er 44-årige Maryann Katherine Overland fra USA, der landede i Danmark i juli med sin familie og et stærkt CV i bagagen, men fik besked på at tage plads i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerheds venteværelse i 31 måneder.
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California's water supplies are in trouble as climate change worsens natural dry spells, especially in the Sierra Nevada
California is preparing for a third straight year of drought, and officials are tightening limits on water use to levels never seen so early in the water year. Most of the state's water reservoirs are well below average, with several at less than a third of their capacity. The outlook for rain and snow this winter, when most of the state's yearly precipitation arrives, isn't promising.
11h
Student of yoga tourism won't get PhD as he earns five retractions
For Pramod Sharma, the study of yoga tourism has proven to be a downward-facing dog. Last year, the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Roorkee blocked Sharma – who posed as a legit yoga researcher but in reality stole other people's work – from receiving his PhD after determining that his thesis was "plagiarized and … Continue reading
12h
Will future microbots be task-specific customized machines or multi-purpose "all in one" vehicles?
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26675-0 While existing microbots display effective propulsion, their functionalities decrease dramatically upon decreasing the robot size. Accordingly, it is desired to customize microscale robots for their specific mission and body location. Selecting the microbot constituents with task-specific tailored functional
12h
Ir-catalyzed enantioselective B−H alkenylation for asymmetric synthesis of chiral-at-cage o‑carboranes
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27441-y Chiral-at-cage o-carboranes are clusters of carbon and boron atoms that, when functionalized, can lower the symmetry of the cluster. Here the authors present a method to alkenylate B–H bonds on ocarboranes enantioselectively via iridium catalysis.
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Engineering Bacillus subtilis for the formation of a durable living biocomposite material
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27467-2 Despite the advances in engineered living materials (ELMs), the diversity of ELMs especially those that are capable of autonomous self-fabrication and regeneration, is low. Here, the authors engineer a resilient ELM biocomposite using Bacillus subtilis and secreted EutM proteins as selfassembling scaffold bu
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Design of a methotrexate-controlled chemical dimerization system and its use in bio-electronic devices
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27184-w Efforts to engineer artificial allosteric systems are ongoing. Here the authors analyse factors influencing development of artificial small molecule:protein complexes that act as chemically induced dimerization (CID) systems; they use one of the CIDs to construct an electrochemical biosensor of methotrexate.
12h
Probing ion channel functional architecture and domain recombination compatibility by massively parallel domain insertion profiling
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27342-0 Here, the authors perform a large-scale, high-throughput biochemical assay to determine the compatibility of over 300,000 domain recombination variants of the inward rectifier K+ channel Kir2.1. They derive rules for designing domain insertion variants that fold and traffic to the cell surface and conclude t
12h
Leveraging machine learning to rapidly discover novel beneficial microbes
When you think about agriculture, what comes to mind? Tractors? Fields of corn? Big red barns? Often we don't think of computers. But computers and technology are playing a huge role in making our food system more sustainable and reliable. In the past few decades, high-tech machinery and robotics have changed the agroindustry. High-tech farming is making our crops more resilient against pathogens,
14h
Researchers say it's time to clean up the US Clean Water Act
While the Clean Water Act successfully regulated many obvious causes of pollution, such as the dumping of wastewater, it's done less to limit more diffuse types of pollution, such as 'nonpoint source pollution' that includes agricultural runoff from fields and urban stormwater from buildings, paved surfaces and yards — says a new study.
22h
Future snowmelt could have costly consequences on infrastructure
Researchers took a closer look at previous studies with snowmelt predictions, and because geographical areas respond differently to climate change, they found future snowmelt incidences could vary greatly by the late 21st century. Snowmelt could decrease over the continental U.S. and southern Canada but increase in Alaska and northern Canada resulting in larger flooding vulnerabilities and possibl
23h
Avoiding blackouts with clean, renewable energy
Study analyzes grid stability under a scenario in which wind, water and solar energy sources plus storage power 100% of U.S. energy needs for all purposes. It finds that blackouts can be avoided with short-duration batteries while lowering energy costs, creating jobs, improving people's health, and reducing land requirements.
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The human and economic impacts of COVID-19
Throughout its unsteady course, the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the behavior of businesses and households. Those behavioral changes, intensified by government actions like mandatory closures, have had a reverberating impact on the U.S. economy.
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Unprecedented three-dimensional X-ray microscope methodology to image plants at cellular resolution
Measuring plant phenotypes, a term used to describe the observable characteristics of an organism, is a critical aspect of studying and improving economically important crops. Phenotypes central to the breeding process include traits like kernel number in corn, seed size in wheat, or fruit color in grape. These features are visible to the naked human eye but are in fact driven by microscopic molec
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Researchers identify sildenafil as candidate drug for Alzheimer's disease
A new study has identified sildenafil — an FDA-approved therapy for erectile dysfunction (Viagra) and pulmonary hypertension (Ravatio) — as a promising drug candidate to help prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease. Researchers determined that sildenafil is associated with 69% reduced incidence of Alzheimer's.
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Common Arctic finches are all the same species
New research could ruffle some feathers in the birding world. It finds that Redpolls, a bird found in the Arctic that will sometimes come to the Southern latitudes during the winter and can be hard to differentiate, aren't actually multiple species, genetically speaking. Instead, the three recognized species are all just one with a 'supergene' that controls differences in plumage color and morphol
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New succulent species of Euphorbia discovered in Kenya
During a field investigation in open deciduous woodlands covered by lava outcrops in Makueni County, southern Kenya, in September 2018, a shrubby Euphorbia with densely stellate hairs on the abaxial leaf surface attracted the attention of a research team. Soon afterward, the researchers revisited the area, performed more careful observations on its morphological characters, and collected enough sp
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Researchers find surprising benefit to the immune system following infection
The human body's immune system weakens over time, making older adults more susceptible to infections and leaving scientists with the puzzling dilemma of how to maintain health across the lifespan. A recent study into how infection affects the immune system resulted in a surprising outcome that could lead to new immunotherapies to prevent disease and novel ways to strengthen the aging immune system
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Local dendritic balance enables learning of efficient representations in networks of spiking neurons [Neuroscience]
How can neural networks learn to efficiently represent complex and high-dimensional inputs via local plasticity mechanisms? Classical models of representation learning assume that feedforward weights are learned via pairwise Hebbian-like plasticity. Here, we show that pairwise Hebbian-like plasticity works only under unrealistic requirements on neural dynamics and input statistics. To…
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Preventing extreme polarization of political attitudes [Political Sciences]
Extreme polarization can undermine democracy by making compromise impossible and transforming politics into a zero-sum game. "Ideological polarization"—the extent to which political views are widely dispersed—is already strong among elites, but less so among the general public [N. McCarty, Polarization: What Everyone Needs to Know, 2019, pp. 50–68]. Strong mutual…
1d
Inequality, identity, and partisanship: How redistribution can stem the tide of mass polarization [Evolution]
The form of political polarization where citizens develop strongly negative attitudes toward out-party members and policies has become increasingly prominent across many democracies. Economic hardship and social inequality, as well as intergroup and racial conflict, have been identified as important contributing factors to this phenomenon known as "affective polarization." Research…
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Link recommendation algorithms and dynamics of polarization in online social networks [Computer Sciences]
The level of antagonism between political groups has risen in the past years. Supporters of a given party increasingly dislike members of the opposing group and avoid intergroup interactions, leading to homophilic social networks. While new connections offline are driven largely by human decisions, new connections on online social platforms…
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Polarized information ecosystems can reorganize social networks via information cascades [Social Sciences]
The precise mechanisms by which the information ecosystem polarizes society remain elusive. Focusing on political sorting in networks, we develop a computational model that examines how social network structure changes when individuals participate in information cascades, evaluate their behavior, and potentially rewire their connections to others as a result. Individuals…
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Interindividual cooperation mediated by partisanship complicates Madison's cure for "mischiefs of faction" [Evolution]
Political theorists have long argued that enlarging the political sphere to include a greater diversity of interests would cure the ills of factions in a pluralistic society. While the scope of politics has expanded dramatically over the past 75 y, polarization is markedly worse. Motivated by this paradox, we take…
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The nonlinear feedback dynamics of asymmetric political polarization [Political Sciences]
Using a general model of opinion dynamics, we conduct a systematic investigation of key mechanisms driving elite polarization in the United States. We demonstrate that the self-reinforcing nature of elite-level processes can explain this polarization, with voter preferences accounting for its asymmetric nature. Our analysis suggests that subtle differences in…
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Segregation and clustering of preferences erode socially beneficial coordination [Political Sciences]
Polarization on various issues has increased in many Western democracies over the last decades, leading to divergent beliefs, preferences, and behaviors within societies. We develop a model to investigate the effects of polarization on the likelihood that a society will coordinate on a welfare-improving action in a context in which…
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The microdynamics of spatial polarization: A model and an application to survey data from Ukraine [Political Sciences]
Although spatial polarization of attitudes is extremely common around the world, we understand little about the mechanisms through which polarization on divisive issues rises and falls over time. We develop a theory that explains how political shocks can have different effects in different regions of a country depending upon local…
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Computing the daily reproduction number of COVID-19 by inverting the renewal equation using a variational technique [Applied Mathematics]
The COVID-19 pandemic has undergone frequent and rapid changes in its local and global infection rates, driven by governmental measures or the emergence of new viral variants. The reproduction number Rt indicates the average number of cases generated by an infected person at time t and is a key indicator…
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Entropy-regularized deconvolution of cellular cryotransmission electron tomograms [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) allows for the high-resolution visualization of biological macromolecules. However, the technique is limited by a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and variance in contrast at different frequencies, as well as reduced Z resolution. Here, we applied entropy-regularized deconvolution (ER-DC) to cryo-ET data generated from transmission electron microscopy (TEM)…
1d
Microscopic origin of the effect of substrate metallicity on interfacial free energies [Chemistry]
We investigate the effect of the metallic character of solid substrates on solid–liquid interfacial thermodynamics using molecular simulations. Building on the recent development of a semiclassical Thomas–Fermi model to tune the metallicity in classical molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce a thermodynamic integration framework to compute the evolution of the interfacial…
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A single intranasal dose of a live-attenuated parainfluenza virus-vectored SARS-CoV-2 vaccine is protective in hamsters [Microbiology]
Single-dose vaccines with the ability to restrict SARS-CoV-2 replication in the respiratory tract are needed for all age groups, aiding efforts toward control of COVID-19. We developed a live intranasal vector vaccine for infants and children against COVID-19 based on replication-competent chimeric bovine/human parainfluenza virus type 3 (B/HPIV3) that express…
1d
Microtopographical guidance of macropinocytic signaling patches [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
In fast-moving cells such as amoeba and immune cells, dendritic actin filaments are spatiotemporally regulated to shape large-scale plasma membrane protrusions. Despite their importance in migration, as well as in particle and liquid ingestion, how their dynamics are affected by micrometer-scale features of the contact surface is still poorly understood….
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Intersection of regulatory pathways controlling hemostasis and hemochorial placentation [Developmental Biology]
Hemochorial placentation is characterized by the development of trophoblast cells specialized to interact with the uterine vascular bed. We utilized trophoblast stem (TS) cell and mutant rat models to investigate regulatory mechanisms controlling trophoblast cell development. TS cell differentiation was characterized by acquisition of transcript signatures indicative of an endothelial…
1d
Complex pathways and memory in compressed corrugated sheets [Applied Physical Sciences]
The nonlinear response of driven complex materials—disordered magnets, amorphous media, and crumpled sheets—features intricate transition pathways where the system repeatedly hops between metastable states. Such pathways encode memory effects and may allow information processing, yet tools are lacking to experimentally observe and control these pathways, and their full breadth has…
1d
A serum-stable RNA aptamer specific for SARS-CoV-2 neutralizes viral entry [Biochemistry]
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has created an urgent need for new technologies to treat COVID-19. Here we report a 2′-fluoro protected RNA aptamer that binds with high affinity to the receptor binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, thereby preventing its interaction with the host…
1d
An endoplasmic reticulum-localized cytochrome b5 regulates high-affinity K+ transport in response to salt stress in rice [Plant Biology]
Potassium (K+) is an essential element for growth and development in both animals and plants, while high levels of environmental sodium (Na+) represent a threat to most plants. The uptake of K+ from high-saline environments is an essential mechanism to maintain intracellular K+/Na+ homeostasis, which can help reduce toxicity caused…
1d
Homogeneous antibody and CAR-T cells with improved effector functions targeting SSEA-4 glycan on pancreatic cancer [Biochemistry]
Pancreatic cancer is usually asymptomatic in the early stages; the 5-y survival rate is around 9%; and there is a lack of effective treatment. Here we show that SSEA-4 is more expressed in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined but not detectable in normal pancreatic cells; and high expression of…
1d
The emergence and perils of polarization [Social Sciences]
We provide commentaries on the papers included in the Dynamics of Political Polarization Special Feature. Baldassarri reads the contribution of the papers in light of the theoretical distinction between ideological partisanship, which is generally rooted in sociodemographic and political cleavages, and affective partisanship, which is, instead, mostly fueled by emotional…
1d
Neurotoxin from a black widow spider examined
Although many people lose their nerve and panic when they see a spider, only very few of the creatures are actually dangerous. The black widow, however, is a force to be reckoned with: it catches its prey by means of nerve poison — to be precise, latrotoxins (LaTXs). Researchers have now investigated the substance — also with a view to medical applications.
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College-in-prison program found to reduce recidivism significantly
A new study sought to determine the effects of a college-in-prison program, the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI). The study found a large and significant reduction in recidivism rates across racial groups among those who participated in the program. It also found that participants with higher levels of participation had even lower rates of recidivism. In light of their findings, the authors offer seve
1d
Researchers say it's time to clean up the Clean Water Act
In 1969, the Cuyahoga River near Cleveland was so polluted that it caught fire, helping to launch the modern environmental movement and prompting Congress to pass the Clean Water Act three years later. It was one of the first laws to safeguard waterways and set national water quality standards.
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COVID vax protection may be 'shakier' against Omicron mutations
Researchers have compiled a list of mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein that may make the Omicron variant more resistant to neutralizing antibodies, including those from vaccinations. That could increase the risk of breakthrough cases of COVID-19. "Since the SARS-CoV-2 virus will not stop mutating, our goal is to provide a community resource to rapidly identify, aggregate, and share high-qu
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Cataract surgery linked to lower dementia risk
Results from a recent study associate cataract surgery with 30% lower risk of dementia in an aging population. The Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study is a long-standing, Seattle-based observational study at Kaiser Permanente Washington of more than 5,000 participants older than 65. Based on the longitudinal data of over 3,000 ACT study participants, researchers have now found that subjects who
1d
How to teach climate science
The big glitch in California's new science education standards, which focus heavily on climate change, is that few schoolteachers have the background to conduct lessons on the subject, says Kelley Le, director of the UCI Science Project.
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Webcast: how to plan your career
Nature, Published online: 07 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03663-4 Start early, use mentors, map your networks. Experts share their career development tips.
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New website evaluates the effectiveness of science communication activities
Scientists regularly appear in the media. They participate in science cafés, write a popular-science book or visit school classes. In that way, they want to convey their knowledge and enthusiasm to society. But do they succeed? To answer that question, a new website is launched, with a toolbox full of instruments to evaluate the effect of science communication activities.
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