Search Posts

Nyheder2021december09

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at udpege vigtigste nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP CHOOSE THE MOST IMPORTANT SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Toward achieving megatesla magnetic fields in the laboratory
Recently, a research team at Osaka University has successfully demonstrated the generation of megatesla (MT)-order magnetic fields via three-dimensional particle simulations on laser-matter interaction. The strength of MT magnetic fields is 1–10 billion times stronger than geomagnetism (0.3–0.5 G), and these fields are expected to be observed only in the close vicinity of celestial bodies such as
8h
Massive image-based single-cell profiling reveals high levels of circulating platelet aggregates in patients with COVID-19
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27378-2 The authors report the landscape of circulating platelet aggregates in COVID-19 obtained by massive single-cell image-based profiling and temporal monitoring to elucidate the underlying process of COVID-19-assocaited microvascular thrombosis.
10h

LATEST

Why I Became an American
When I first arrived in the United States, I had to adjust to a new language, new norms, and new traditions. But I was perhaps most stunned by a simple comment a teammate made. He criticized President Barack Obama, which I feared could have landed him in prison. He smiled and said: "This isn't Turkey, brother. You have the freedom to say whatever you want." Americans might find the thought absurd
10h
New goniopholidid species from the Upper Jurassic likely had a palatal valve in its throat
A team of researchers from Hokkaido University and the Gunma Museum of Natural History, both in Japan and Carleton University in Canada, has found evidence of anatomical parts in an ancient relative of the crocodile that allowed it to continue breathing as prey held in its mouth drowned. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of the anat
6h
Mode changing phenomenon detected in the millisecond pulsar J1909−3744
Using the MeerKAT telescope, astronomers have conducted radio observations of a millisecond pulsar known as J1909−3744. The study found that J1909−3744 experiences the so-called mode changing, which makes it only the third known millisecond pulsar that exhibits such behavior. The finding was detailed in a paper published December 2 on the arXiv pre-print server.
6h
Towards quantum states of sound
Researchers make key steps towards generating quantum states of sound inside a microscopic device using laser light and single-photon measurements.
6h
A new understanding of mental illness
The causes of psychiatric disorders are poorly understood. Now there is evidence that a wide range of early onset psychiatric problems (from depression, anxiety and addictions to dyslexia, bulimia, and ADHD) may be largely due to the combination of just three factors. The first is biological –i n the form of individual variability in the brain's dopamine reward pathway. The second is social — an
18h
New Zealand to Completely Ban Tobacco for Anyone Born After 2008
Smoke 'em if you got 'em, Kiwis — because New Zealand will soon be permanently banning tobacco sales for anyone born after 2008. The country's government announced plans to ban young people from ever being able to purchase tobacco products on Thursday, New Zealand news site Stuff reports . Under the new law, anyone born before 2008 will still be allowed to purchase tobacco if they can prove their
4h
The inner lives of dogs: what our canine friends really think about love, lust and laughter
They make brilliant companions, but do dogs really feel empathy for humans – and what is going through their minds when they play, panic or attack? Read more: the inner lives of cats : what our feline friends really think It is humanity's great frustration, to gaze into the eyes of a dog, feel so very close to the creature, and yet have no clue what it's thinking. It's like the first question you
15h
New Law Would Fund Reverse Engineering of UFO Tech
UFO IT Congress is set to pass a new defense bill introduced on Tuesday that would allow funding to reverse engineer UFO technology. That's right. Just like in the " Independence Day " movies. The bill would form a rapid response force that would conduct field investigations and analyze data from any sightings of unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP), the US government's preferred term for UFOs, re
3h
This Photo of the Sun Is so Absurdly Detailed That It Looks like a Living Organism
Black Hole Sun Famed astrophotographer Andrew McCarthy has truly outdone himself with his latest picture of the Sun. McCarthy, who calls himself "just a normal guy with a telescope" on his Instagram account , stitched a whopping 150,000 images of the Sun together to form a massive 300 megapixel image he titled "Fire and Fusion." The result is a glorious swirling mess of hot gases that almost appe
4h
Debacle over No 10 Christmas party 'threatens efforts to control pandemic'
Scientists say rule-breaking 'could damage public compliance behaviours when they are more important than ever' The debacle over the No 10 Christmas party threatens to undermine efforts to control the Covid pandemic at a time when the Omicron variant is fuelling fears of an imminent and major wave of disease, say scientists. A so-called Cummings effect last year led to "negative and lasting conse
15h
Elon Musk Now Feuding with *Checks Notes* Pete Buttigieg
Elon vs World Jeff Bezos can breathe easy. His cyberbully Elon Musk has refocused his ire on another familiar target: the US government . In a wide ranging interview at The Wall Street Journal's CEO Council Summit on Monday, the Tesla CEO blasted the White House's Build Back Better Act . His criticisms likely stem from the bill's provision that would give a tax credit of as much as $12,500 to Ame
5h
Mathematicians Transcend Geometric Theory of Motion
In a nearly 400-page paper posted in March, the mathematicians Mohammed Abouzaid and Andrew Blumberg of Columbia University have constructed a major extension of one of the biggest advances in geometry in recent decades. The work they built on relates to a well-known conjecture from the 1960s made by Vladimir Arnold. Arnold was studying classical mechanics and wanted to know when the orbits of…
6h
What a National Guard Commander Saw on January 6
Nearly a year after Donald Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, Americans have a much better picture of how the attack transpired. Less clear is why measures to secure the building, and the hundreds of lawmakers inside, failed. The patchwork response is even more confounding when compared with how law-enforcement agencies and the National Guard were used during protests against police bruta
7h
What a Gun Is For
As families around the country prepare to send out Christmas cards with letters and photos commemorating the year gone by, many elected officials do the same. Representative Thomas Massie of Kentucky tweeted one such family picture on Saturday, featuring himself and his clan armed to the teeth on a leather love seat, a merry tree glittering in the backdrop. Massie's photo drew some ire . Not to b
22h
Scientists Built a Robot With Jetpacks and a Creepy, Doll-Like Face
Robo Harpy A team of researchers from the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) have created a jetpack-wearing humanoid robot — and it has a creepy, doll-like face for some reason. In other words, it's the last kind of creature we'd want to encounter during the singularity. The nightmarish monstrosity, called iRonCub (iCub Equipped with Jet Engines), as detailed in a paper recently accepted for p
2h
China Wants to Rule the World by Controlling the Rules
T o truly understand the contours of the growing competition between the United States and China, look beyond the corridors of power in Washington and Beijing, past the tensions in the waters and skies around Taiwan, away from the bellicose rhetoric at international forums, and even off the tennis court, the new front opened by the trauma of Peng Shuai . Instead, look to the courtroom. In the U.S
9h
How will humanity endure the climate crisis? I asked an acclaimed sci-fi writer | Daniel Aldana Cohen
In Kim Stanley Robinson's novel The Ministry for the Future, climate disasters kill tens of millions of people – and that's a scenario he portrays as relatively optimistic To really grasp the present, we need to imagine the future – then look back from it to better see the now. The angry climate kids do this naturally. The rest of us need to read good science fiction. A great place to start is Ki
10h
Democrats Are Losing the Culture Wars
M aybe Bill Clinton got a few things right after all. For years, Democrats have rarely cited Clinton and the centrist New Democrat movement he led through the '90s except to renounce his "third way" approach to welfare, crime, and other issues as a violation of the party's principles. Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden, and even Bill Clinton himself have distanced themselves from key components of his re
11h
Researchers Say Newly-Discovered Particle Could Help Create "Exercise in a Pill"
Lazy people, rejoice! Scientists might soon be able to create a pill that replicates the effects of exercise… without the actual exercise . A team of researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) say they've identified a molecular signal that is sent to our brains and eyes immediately after exercise, according to a press release from the school . More specifically, the signals travel vi
38min
The Feds Are Investigating Tesla for Allowing Drivers to Game While Driving
Distracted Driving Tesla owners were shocked to find that they were able to play elaborate video games while driving their vehicles, a surprisingly egregious interface decision that could lead to distracted driving on public roadways. "I was just dumbfounded that, yes, sure enough, this sophisticated video game came up," retired broadcast journalist Vince Patton told the Associated Press . Now, t
1h
The Pandemic of the Vaccinated Is Here
Even before the arrival of Omicron, the winter months were going to be tough for parts of the United States. While COVID transmission rates in the South caught fire over the summer, the Northeast and Great Plains states were largely spared thanks to cyclical factors and high vaccination rates. But weather and the patterns of human life were bound to shift the disease burden northward for the holi
3h
The World's Largest Democracy Is Failing
When Joe Biden convened his virtual Summit for Democracy today, Narendra Modi was among the attendees. The Indian prime minister is the steward of the world's largest democracy. Any conversation about global democratic decline, and what can be done to reverse it, would be incomplete without his participation. Modi's involvement in the summit nevertheless looks odd—even awkward—considering the rol
7h
The Great (Fake) Child-Sex-Trafficking Epidemic
Illustrations by Vanessa Saba A poster in the window of Cahoots Corner Cafe—great potatoes, good coffee—advertised a family event at the Oakdale, California, rodeo grounds. There would be food trucks, carnival games, live music, a raffle, and the opportunity to support the cause of "freeing child sex slaves." The event, called the Festival of Hope, was a fundraiser for the anti-child-sex-traffick
10h
Kickstarter Creators Furious Over Company's Move to Blockchain
The OG crowdfunding platform is moving to the blockchain, and its users are legitimately furious about it. First reported by Bloomberg , news of Kickstarter's decision to go crypto comes as the company tries to regain legitimacy as project and product crowdfunding, both of which it ushered in, have faded from prominence. The company is reportedly building a currently-unnamed blockchain-based plat
38min
How going to Mars improves life on Earth | Eric Hinterman
Memory foam, air purifiers, scratch-resistant lenses: these are just a few of the everyday items originally developed for space missions. Aerospace engineer Eric Hinterman invites us to dream big and imagine what technological advancements could come next, explaining why establishing a human presence on Mars is a big step for life on Earth — and a giant leap toward becoming a space-faring species
5h
Vegan Has to Eat Lizard Meat | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid About Naked and Afraid: What happens when you put two complete strangers – sans clothes – in some of the most extreme environments on Earth? Each male-female duo is left with no food, no water, no clothes, and only one survival item. #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
6h
What You're Really Worried About When You're Worried About Money
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his new podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . M oney is one of the things Americans worry about most in the world. Even in 2018, when the economy was expanding, a survey by the life-insurance company Northwestern Mutual found that more tha
10h
Omicron could be spreading faster in England than in South Africa, Sage adviser says
John Edmunds says variant is 'very severe setback' to controlling Covid pandemic and that plan B 'absolutely not an overreaction' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Cases of the Omicron variant could be spreading even faster in England than in South Africa, according to a senior scientific adviser, who warned that the variant was a "very severe setback" to hopes of brin
2h
Nanotechnology for genome editing in multiple muscles simultaneously
Many intractable diseases are the result of a genetic mutation. Genome editing technology promises to correct the mutation and thus new treatments for patients. However, getting the technology to the cells that need the correction remains a major challenge. A new study led by CiRA Junior Associate Professor Akitsu Hotta and in collaboration with Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited as part of the
9h
Simulated Webb images of quasar and galaxy surrounding quasar
Very distant, active supermassive black holes are the brightest beacons in the universe. Known as quasars, these behemoths are surrounded by equally distant galaxies. In recent decades, researchers have gone on a cosmic treasure hunt and identified the three most distant quasars known over the last three years—each more than 13 billion light-years from Earth. Astronomers theorize that it can take
9h
Fire hastens permafrost collapse in Arctic Alaska, study finds
While climate change is the primary driver of permafrost degradation in Arctic Alaska, a new analysis of 70 years of data reveals that tundra fires are accelerating that decline, contributing disproportionately to a phenomenon known as "thermokarst," the abrupt collapse of ice-rich permafrost as a result of thawing.
5h
Study: Climate-only models likely underestimate species extinction
Ecologists estimate that 15 to 37 percent of plant and animal species will go extinct as a direct result of the rapidly changing climate. But new University of Arizona-led research published in the journal Ecology Letters shows that current models don't account for the complexities of ecosystems as they are impacted by climate change. As a result, these extinction rates are likely underestimated.
9h
Nasa's new space telescope and its search for extraterrestrial life | podcast
On 22 December, if all goes to plan , the £7.5bn James Webb space telescope (JWST) will be blasted into space on top of a giant European Ariane 5 rocket. As it travels to its final destination – a point about a million miles away – it will begin to unfold its gold, honeycombed mirror ; a vast light-catching bucket that could give us a view of the universe deeper and more sensitive than we've ever
16h
Weaker ocean cir­cu­la­tion led to more car­bon stor­age in the deep sea
The movement of water masses in the ocean, its circulation, is an essential component of the global climate system. In a study recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), researchers were able to show that circulation in the deep ocean was significantly slowed down during the last glacial period. Analyses of sediment samples show that the decomposition
9h
New state of matter: Crystalline and flowing at the same time
Through their research efforts, the team was able to finally disprove an intuitive assumption that in order for two particles of matter to merge and form larger units (i.e. aggregates or clusters), they must be attracted to each other. As early as the turn of the century, a team of soft matter physicists headed by Christos Likos of the University of Vienna predicted on the basis of theoretical con
6h
Studying the power of megastudies by testing the idea on just one subject: How to get people to exercise more
A large team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions across the U.S. has tested the idea of conducting megastudies to better under social issues or problems. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes conducting a megastudy to learn more about how to get people to continue working out at a gym. Heather Royer, with the University of California, Santa Barbara h
7h
A beetle chemical defense gland offers clues about how complex organs evolve
Rove beetles are among the chemists of the insect world, concocting noxious compounds within their bodies that are weaponized to ward off predators, enabling the beetles to survive in leaf litter and soil in ecosystems across the planet. On December 9 in the journal Cell, investigators studying a species of rove beetle report how two distinct cell types have come together to form a specialized gla
5h
Earth Will Soon Have a Black Box to Chronicle Humanity's Downfall
If the world as we know it comes to an end (maybe even starting with an earthquake, birds and snakes and airplanes ), future generations will have access to a vault containing duplicates of seed samples from the world's crop collections, a frozen Noah's Ark of animal DNA to bring species back from extinction, and if a new initiative pans out as intended, a black box to record how it all went down
6h
NAD Therapy
NAD therapy is touted as a cure-all for addiction and several chronic diseases. Evidence supporting these claims is lacking. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
7h
Researchers unmask the environmental impacts of COVID-19
A new study has found face mask litter increased by 9,000% from March to October 2020. It shows a direct link between national legislation and the occurrence of discarded waste that included face masks and other COVID-19 related personal protective equipment.
5h
Talk therapy by US psychiatrists declined by half since 1990s
Researchers analyzing 21 years of data found that the percentage of psychiatrist visits involving psychotherapy has declined by half — dropping to only 21.6 % of patient visits. Over half of U.S. psychiatrists no longer practice any psychotherapy at all. The study found that for rural, Black, Hispanic, and Medicaid patients psychiatrists' provision of psychotherapy was exceedingly rare.
7h
Simulating matter on the nanoscale with AI
In a paper published today in the scientific journal Science, DeepMind demonstrates how neural networks can be used to describe electron interactions in chemical systems more accurately than existing methods.
2h
Here Is Everything I Think I Know About Omicron
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . The flood of Omicron news can be overwhelming. The endless data, anecdotes, and studies are hard enough to synthesize. But what makes the information even harder to parse is that so much evidence (i.e., what people are seeing ) is intertwined with opinion (i.e., what people are hoping and fearing ). To round up the week's Omicron news, I wanted to write somet
2h
Does air pollution reduce the benefits of physical activity on the brain?
A new study shows that people who do vigorous physical activities, like jogging or playing competitive sports, in areas with higher air pollution may show less benefit from that exercise when it comes to certain markers of brain disease. The markers examined in the study included white matter hyperintensities, which indicate injury to the brain's white matter, and gray matter volume. Larger gray m
19h
Prescribing the abortion pill without restrictions is safe and effective, study finds
Abortion remains safe after Canada removed restrictions on the medical abortion pill mifepristone in November 2017, according to a new study. The study used comprehensive government health data to examine 315,000 abortions in Ontario between 2012 and 2020. An analysis showed no increase in abortion-related health complications following the removal of restrictions on mifepristone.
21h
NASA Goddard helps ensure asteroid deflector hits target, predicts and will observe impact results
Although the chance of an asteroid impacting Earth is small, even a relatively small asteroid of about 500 feet (about 150 meters) across carries enough energy to cause widespread damage around the impact site. NASA leads efforts in the U.S. and worldwide both to detect and track potentially hazardous asteroids and to study technologies to mitigate or avoid impacts on Earth. If an asteroid were di
3min
Canon Develops New Sensor That Takes Color Photos in Almost Total Darkness
(Image: Canon) Canon has announced the creation of a new imaging sensor that is is able to take high-resolution, color photographs even in almost total darkness. Though you might think this will be a boon to astrophotographers, the technology will actually be aimed at more commercial fields before it arrives in a future version of the EOS Ra, if that ever happens. Its "night vision" capabilities
3min
Immune dysregulation in SHARPIN-deficient mice is dependent on CYLD-mediated cell death [Immunology and Inflammation]
SHARPIN, together with RNF31/HOIP and RBCK1/HOIL1, form the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) E3 ligase that catalyzes M1-linked polyubiquitination. Mutations in RNF31/HOIP and RBCK/HOIL1 in humans and Sharpin in mice lead to autoinflammation and immunodeficiency, but the mechanism underlying the immune dysregulation remains unclear. We now show that the…
13min
Economic evaluation of disease elimination: An extension to the net-benefit framework and application to human African trypanosomiasis [Economic Sciences]
The global health community has earmarked a number of diseases for elimination or eradication, and these goals have often been praised on the premise of long-run cost savings. However, decision makers must contend with a multitude of demands on health budgets in the short or medium term, and costs per…
13min
Endocytic proteins with prion-like domains form viscoelastic condensates that enable membrane remodeling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Membrane invagination and vesicle formation are key steps in endocytosis and cellular trafficking. Here, we show that endocytic coat proteins with prion-like domains (PLDs) form hemispherical puncta in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These puncta have the hallmarks of biomolecular condensates and organize proteins at the membrane for actin-dependent endocytosis….
13min
LinearTurboFold: Linear-time global prediction of conserved structures for RNA homologs with applications to SARS-CoV-2 [Computer Sciences]
The constant emergence of COVID-19 variants reduces the effectiveness of existing vaccines and test kits. Therefore, it is critical to identify conserved structures in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genomes as potential targets for variant-proof diagnostics and therapeutics. However, the algorithms to predict these conserved structures, which simultaneously…
13min
Catch me if you can: How mRNA therapeutics are delivered into cells
In recent years, ribonucleic acid (RNA) has emerged as a powerful tool for the development of novel therapies. RNA is used to copy genetic information contained in our hereditary material, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and then serves as a template for building proteins, the building blocks of life. Delivery of RNA into cells remains a major challenge for the development of novel therapies acro
30min
DNA transcription speeds, a function of collective modes driven by DNA supercoiling
A team of physicists working at the intersection of theory and experiment are shedding new light on the 'teamwork' of molecular motors — called RNA polymerases (RNAPs) — that mediate DNA transcription. The researchers' work revealed for the first time two essential elements in modeling transcription under torsion: first, transcription factors that are well known to affect the rate at which RNAP
30min
The 16 Best TV Shows of 2021
Last year, TV became essential . When the stages we used to go to—concert halls, movie theaters, sports arenas—closed amid the pandemic, the small screen became the only outlet for safe viewing entertainment. Things have begun to change this year: Artists are announcing tours, people have trickled back into cinemas, and even the Summer Olympics happened. ( Sort of .) But TV, thankfully, hasn't st
45min
3 ways to lower the barriers to higher education | Adrian K. Haugabrook
Less than seven percent of people worldwide have a bachelor's degree — and for many, this is simply because the cost of university is too high, says higher education executive Adrian K. Haugabrook. In this barrier-breaking talk, he introduces an innovative approach to expanding access to higher education by driving down costs and rethinking three key things: time, place and how we learn.
48min
America is more liberal than 50 years ago, but politics mask the shift
Americans' attitudes and behaviors have become more liberal overall in the past 50 years and have taken a decidedly liberal tilt since the 1990s, shows a new analysis of public opinion data. Americans are substantially more liberal on matters of gender, sexuality, race, and personal liberty than they were in the 1970s. However, this trend may be masked by static views on a few hot-button issues—w
1h
Fine-tuning motivation in the brain
Neuroscientists have discovered a set of brain cells that influence the motivation of mice to perform tasks for rewards. Increasing the cells' activity makes a mouse work harder or more vigorously. The neurons come with a feature that prevents the mouse from overdoing it and becoming addicted to the reward. The findings reveal new possible therapeutic strategies for treating mental illnesses like
1h
Measuring cancer cell state can reveal drug susceptibility
Pancreatic cancer cells can exist in, and transition between, three different cell states, according to new research. These states respond differently to a variety of cancer drugs, and altering the tumor microenvironment can drive tumor cells from one state to another, potentially offering a way to make them more susceptible to a particular drug.
1h
Fire hastens permafrost collapse in Arctic Alaska
While climate change is the primary driver of permafrost degradation in Arctic Alaska, a new analysis of 70 years of data reveals that tundra fires are accelerating that decline, contributing disproportionately to a phenomenon known as 'thermokarst,' the abrupt collapse of ice-rich permafrost as a result of thawing.
1h
Better deep brain stimulation therapy for OCD
Researchers captured more than 1,000 hours of brain recordings from patients with OCD in the clinic and at home. These data are a key first step towards designing improved deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders.
1h
Atomic structure of antifungal drug confirms unusual mechanism, opens door to less-toxic derivatives
Advanced molecular imaging technology has now mapped the structure of a drug widely used to treat fungal infections but whose workings have mystified researchers and physicians for nearly 70 years. Researchers now described in atomistic detail the structure of the drug amphotericin B, a powerful but toxic antifungal agent. Seeing the structure provides illumination in the researchers' quest to for
1h
The power of genetic diversity in genome-wide association studies of lipids
Nature, Published online: 09 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04064-3 A genome-wide association meta-analysis study of blood lipid levels in roughly 1.6 million individuals demonstrates the gain of power attained when diverse ancestries are included to improve fine-mapping and polygenic score generation, with gains in locus discovery related to sample size.
1h
In the digital era, you are not alone
Solitude, or being alone, has traditionally been considered a matter of being physically separated from other people. As the world becomes increasingly mediated, we have to rethink what it is to be alone and reconceptualize it as "noncommunication," according to a University of Michigan researcher.
1h
Study find veterans make great entrepreneurs, especially in collaborative environments
It should be no surprise that many military veterans—trained to be highly disciplined, organized, team-oriented, strategy-minded, and goal oriented—aim for entrepreneurship after having served. But a new study, commissioned by the Veterans Future Lab (VFL) at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, and Barclays, the founding supporter of the VFL since its launch in 2017, offers a revealing perspecti
1h
Talk between immune cells could lead to new cancer vaccine
In the past decade, immunotherapy has helped save the lives of many cancer patients, many with lung cancer, who might have otherwise faced almost certain death sentences. However, only about 20% of patients who received immune therapies — designed to enhance or override natural limitations on immune system response — saw sustained benefits from treatment. Now Yale scientists have helped identify
1h
Early developmental gene can cause deadly aneurysms
Mutations of a gene that regulates formation of blood vessels in the brain of vertebrates can lead to potentially deadly aneurysms in adults. Saccular brain aneurysms affect nearly 3% of the human population. If they rupture, it can cause subarachnoid hemorrhage, the deadliest type of intracranial hemorrhage. Approximately 500,000 hemorrhagic strokes are reported annually worldwide; nearly one in
1h
2,700-year-old armor shows tech moved across the ancient world
New research investigates a unique leather scale armor found in the tomb of a horse rider in Northwest China. Design and construction details of the armor indicate that it originated in the Neo-Assyrian Empire between the 6th and 8th century BCE before being brought to China. In 2013, a nearly complete leather scale armor was found in the tomb of an approximately 30-year-old male near the modern-
1h
Tropical forests regrow surprisingly fast
Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate through deforestation. A new study, published in Science, shows that regrowing tropical forests recover surprisingly fast on abandoned land.
1h
Mini-jet found near Milky Way's supermassive black hole
Our Milky Way's central black hole has a leak. This supermassive black hole looks like it still has the vestiges of a blowtorch-like jet dating back several thousand years. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope hasn't photographed the phantom jet but has helped find circumstantial evidence that it is still pushing feebly into a huge hydrogen cloud and then splattering, like the narrow stream from a hose a
1h
A young, sun-like star may hold warnings for life on Earth
Last year, scientists looked on as a star called EK Draconis ejected a massive burst of energy and charged particles many times more powerful than anything recorded on Earth's sun. Such explosive events may have been common in the early years of our solar system, the researchers say.
2h
How bone-bordering cells may help shape a skull
In a study of mice, scientists showed how the activity of one gene, turned on in a newly discovered group of bone-bordering cells, may play an important role in shaping the skull. The skulls of mice that were missing the gene were misshapen and were depleted of the cells in a manner that is reminiscent of craniosynostosis, a developmental disorder that affects about one out every 2,500 babies born
2h
2021 in Photos: Wrapping Up the Year
As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look at some of the most memorable events and images of 2021. Events covered in this essay (the last of a three-part photo summary of the year) include the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, COVID-19 vaccinations for children, an ongoing volcanic eruption on the Canary Islands, record flooding in the Pacific Northwest, a total eclipse seen in Antarc
3h
Previously unrecorded Chilean tsunami identified
A large earthquake off the coast of south-central Chile in 1737 may have caused a substantial tsunami that was absent from historical records. Historical records are used to predict how often tsunamis are likely to occur in a region in the future. Until now, it was previously believed that tsunami-causing earthquakes had occurred in this area of Chile three times since the 1570s, including after t
3h
Experimental mRNA HIV vaccine safe, shows promise in animals
An experimental HIV vaccine based on mRNA — the same platform technology used in two highly effective COVID-19 vaccines — shows promise in mice and non-human primates, according to scientists. Their results show that the novel vaccine was safe and prompted desired antibody and cellular immune responses against an HIV-like virus.
3h
White evangelicals are super resistant to pro-vaccine messages
Unvaccinated white evangelicals appear immune to pro-vaccine messaging, according to a new study. White evangelical Christians have resisted getting vaccinated against COVID-19 at higher rates than other religious groups in the United States. The new study provides evidence that persuading these vaccine holdouts to get their shots has only gotten more difficult. The study in Proceedings of the Na
3h
Rising seas swamp Black, Spanish and Indigenous history in Northeast Florida
By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central), Brendan Rivers (ADAPT), and Danielle Uliano (WJXT) The Lincolnville Museum and Cultural Center recently raised its air conditioning units 18 inches to protect them from floods. Like many in the historically Black Lincolnville neighborhood in St. Augustine, the museum is coping with more frequent and intense flooding as seas rise and hotter temperatures d
3h
Warning signs of sight loss could be identified before vision deteriorates
A new study has shown that the signs of age related macular degeneration can set in earlier than previously thought — even before patients begin to lose their sight. The findings open the door for research into earlier treatment that could help slow down the onset of the condition the most common cause of sight loss in the western world.
3h
UK professions supporting 'laundering of money & reputations' of post-Soviet elite
Despite much rhetoric and progress on paper, the UK remains a safe haven for dirty money, a great deal of which comes from Russia and Eurasia. Failure to tackle this thriving billion-dollar industry is "materially and reputationally damaging for the UK's rule of law and to the UK's professed role as an opponent of international corruption," the report says and it calls for a new anti-kleptocracy s
3h
Citizen scientists find young-Jupiter-like object missed by previous exoplanet searches
Citizen scientists have discovered a new object orbiting a Sun-like star that had been missed by previous searches. The object is very distant from its host star—more than 1,600 times farther than the Earth is from the Sun—and is thought to be a large planet or a small brown dwarf, a type of object that is not massive enough to burn hydrogen like true stars. Details about the new world are publish
3h
Scientists show how bone-bordering cells may help shape a skull
A skull is not one single bone but rather a collection of bone plates joined together early in development. In a study of mice, scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai showed how the activity of one gene, turned on in a newly discovered group of bone-bordering cells, may play an important role in shaping the skull. The skulls of mice that were missing the gene were misshapen and
3h
Pepparkakan går tillbaka till framtiden
Den 9 december firas pepparkakans dag. Även om den inte slagit igenom lika starkt som kanelbullens dag, är december tveklöst pepparkakans månad för svenska folket. Läs måltidsforskaren Richard Tellströms betraktelse över pepparkakan genom tiderna. Julen är spannmålsårets särskilda fest. Den är också de hembakta brödens och kakornas tid. Under några få veckor lägger svenskarna ned mycket tid på at
3h
The Atlantic Daily: The Biggest Reason to Worry About Omicron
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Like it or not, the Omicron variant is already here , and it's spreading fast. Just how bad will this get? Omicron's explosive growth is a warning sign. We're not back to where we were in early 20
4h
Crucial leap in error mitigation for quantum computers
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Quantum Testbed (AQT) demonstrated that an experimental method known as randomized compiling (RC) can dramatically reduce error rates in quantum algorithms and lead to more accurate and stable quantum computations. No longer just a theoretical concept for quantum computing, the multidisciplinary team's breakthrough experimental result
4h
Retention is a major factor in racial disparities in academia
Large segments of society are under-represented in science and engineering within academia at every level, but particularly among tenured professors. Moreover, the groups that are most under-represented are the fastest growing in the U.S. population. This is often attributed to challenges in recruiting graduate students and faculty from these groups. A new study published in PLoS One points to ano
4h
Human skin lipids found to repel bed bugs
University of Kentucky entomology researchers have found that skin triglycerides, or lipids, keep bed bugs from staying very long on human hosts. Their finding could lead to new management strategies for this important human pest.
4h
China's crops at risk: Climate change boosts spread of crop pests and diseases
Based on a unique, previously unpublished data set ranging from 1970 to 2016, an international team including the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) compared long-term statistical records about pest and disease occurrence in China with potential climatic driving factors—such as temperature, precipitation, humidity—as well as factors from farming practices, including for instance f
4h
Our Favorite Cancer Stories of 2021
This year revealed just how much scientists have learned about the disease, from how animals become naturally cancer-resistant to how tumor cells harness extracellular DNA to develop rapid drug resistance.
4h
The Best Inkjet Printers of 2022
While 3D printers may garner more attention, reliable inkjet printers keep getting better and better. The best inkjet printers today print photos that will make creatives 'ooh' and 'ah,' and can keep up with laser printers in speed and quality when it comes to text. They've also become steadily more efficient and economical, puttin g pressure on their laser printing cousins to compete. These prin
4h
Plastic is even worse for the environment than we thought
Researchers have revealed that the impact of plastics on climate and health is bigger than originally thought due to the increased use of coal for process heat, electricity, and as a raw material in production. Plastics are useful, cheap, and extremely popular. Global demand for them has quadrupled in the last forty years and is expected to continue to rise, with negative consequences for the env
5h
America more liberal than 50 years ago—but change not reflected in its politics
Americans' attitudes and behaviors have become more liberal overall in the past 50 years and have taken a decidedly liberal tilt since the 1990s, shows a new analysis of public opinion data. Americans are substantially more liberal on matters of gender, sexuality, race, and personal liberty than they were in the 1970s. However, this trend may be masked by static views on a few hot-button issues—wh
5h
How hairdryers and balloons inspired next-level force measurements
Millions of people have kept a balloon aloft with a hairdryer or a ball floating with a hot-air cannon. But what if you were to shrink that down? Could scientists still hold something tiny from a distance with a highly sensitive force? A research team at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) has recently found that they can hold microscopic objects by manipulati
5h
How well are alternative protein sources received by the end consumer?
Despite shifts towards vegan and vegetarian diets in Western cultures, demand for animal protein persists. Alternative protein sources are required to nourish the growing world population without compromising on sustainability. Researchers at the University of Göttingen and the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, investigated consumer preferences of alternative protein sources. Specifically,
6h
New study explores projected changes in climate and ecosystem variability
There is growing public awareness that climate change will impact society not only through changes in mean temperatures and precipitation over the 21st century, but also in the occurrence of more pronounced extreme events, and more generally in natural variability in the Earth system. Such changes could also have large impacts on vulnerable ecosystems in both terrestrial and marine habitats. A sci
6h
Engineers develop the first anti-COVID-19 stainless steel
The team led by Professor Mingxin HUANG at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with Professor Leo Lit Man POON's research team at the Centre for Immunity and Infection of the LKS Faculty of Medicine of HKU, has made significant breakthroughs in producing the first anti-COVID-19 stainless steel that kills the
6h
Study offers framework for including racism's health effects in pharmacy curricula
Racism has been declared a national public health crisis by the American Public Health Association. With the minority population in the U.S. being the fastest-growing demographic, experts say, it's essential that healthcare professionals recognize the social determinants of health among racial and ethnic minorities. Education and training, they say, should begin in school so that graduates are pre
6h
Circular economy: Researchers show how synthetic rubber raw material can be degraded
Enzymes are capable of degrading synthetic polyisoprene. The specific conditions for that have now been created and exploited by researchers at Martin Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB). Polyisoprene is the principal component of natural rubber and of many types of rubber also used in car tires, for example. Up until now, it has only been
6h
Wildfire dataset could help firefighters save lives and property
A team at UC Riverside led by computer science assistant professor Ahmed Eldawy is collaborating with researchers at Stanford University and Vanderbilt University to develop a dataset that uses data science to study the spread of wildfires. The dataset can be used to simulate the spread of wildfires to help firefighters plan emergency response and conduct evacuation. It can also help simulate how
6h
Rapid rise of decarbonization potentials of rooftop PV plus EVs in residential houses
Cities are responsible for 60-70% of energy-related CO2 emissions. As the world is increasingly urbanized, it is crucial to identify cost-effective pathways to decarbonize. Here, we propose a 'SolarEV City' concept, in which integrated systems of cities' roof-top PVs with EVs as batteries can supply affordable and dispatchable CO2-free electricity for citie's dwellers, which can reduce CO2 emissio
6h
Exposure to toxic metals may increase risk of clogged arteries
Toxic metals in the environment may increase the risk of atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque in the arteries that can prevent blood and oxygen from reaching major organs. Arsenic and cadmium, metals that can be found in food, water and tobacco, plus titanium, which can come from dental and orthopedic implants, cosmetics or auto manufacturing, were associated with a higher likelihood of having clo
6h
Drug made from pig intestine helps escape the 'trap' of clot-causing immune response
Two complementary studies show that defibrotide can successfully suppress the formation and progression of neutrophil extracellular traps, or NETs, which are web-like networks of toxic proteins that play a role in forming blood clots and promoting inflammation in several disease, including COVID-19. Researchers say findings may set the stage for defibrotide clinical trials in potentially several d
6h
Kritisk läsning inte bara källkritik
Ofta när elever i svenskämnet blir ombedda att göra en kritiskt granskning av en text pekar de på om källan är pålitlig eller ej. Textens innehåll lämnas däremot i många fall utanför granskningen. Tidsbrist, mätbarhet och brist på förankring i det egna ämnet gör att gymnasieelever riskerar att inte bli bra kritiska läsare. Det visar en avhandling om svenskämnet och de dokument som styr undervisni
6h
In the experience economy, systems of experience take center stage
In a now-famous 1998 article in the Harvard Business Review , B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore introduced the business world to the concept of the experience economy. The theory went something like this: businesses had moved through various economic stages—agrarian, industrial, and service—in which the nature of what was sold continued to evolve. For example, the agrarian economy focused on
6h
Protect or retreat: Rising seas threaten Canada's Atlantic and Pacific coasts
As witnessed in recent weeks, rising seas, swollen atmospheric rivers and post-tropical storms are a threat to community infrastructure, housing and the safety of those living along Canada's east and west coasts. In response, new guidance from the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, University of Waterloo, presents practical solutions to limit the financial and social costs of these evolving risk
6h
Looking at role of prosecutors, politics in mass incarceration
District attorneys pursue crimes and longer sentences at higher rates in election years, according to a new working paper that looks at whether politics affect the behavior of prosecutors and hints at how changing cultural attitudes about crime may influence incarceration rates.
6h
Kids can sniff out an insincere apology
Teaching children to understand others' perspectives could make it easier for them to learn how to forgive other people, according to a new study. The findings also show that teaching children to make sincere apologies can help them receive forgiveness from others. "Forgiveness is important in children and adults for restoring relationships and limiting future conflicts," says lead author Kelly L
6h
How does society impact the benefits and challenges of technology?
Technology is a big part of life in India. For example, street vendors and rickshawallahs use cellphones, the internet and Aadhar cards—12-digit identification numbers given to every citizen based on their biometric and demographic data. However, charismatic gurus and superstition still thrive in India. In the new book "Reluctant Technophiles: India's Complicated Relationship with Technology," Uni
6h
Orangutan mothers help offspring to learn
When it comes to motherhood, orangutans are animals of distinction. An orangutan mother will stay in close contact with her baby for up to nine years–longer than almost all mammals other than humans. Much like humans, orangutans rely on their mothers to learn life skills — such as what to eat and where to find it — before they finally reach independence almost a decade after birth. But unlike
7h
I remember how to control my body, therefore, I am
Researchers have demonstrated that when bodily self-consciousness was distorted in virtual reality, the recovery of a sense of body ownership could be predicted by different kinds of memories. This indicates that the bodily self is represented by multiple types of motor memory with unique characteristics.
7h
Bacterial imbalance linked to risk of emergency c-section
New research correlates the degree of vaginal bacterial imbalance in pregnancy with whether babies are born by vaginal delivery or by emergency cesarean section. Bacterial vaginosis is an imbalance in women's vaginal bacteria caused by too few lactic- acid producing Lactobacillus bacteria. Symptoms include increased vaginal discharge and a bad odor. Bacterial vaginosis is linked to a number of pr
7h
How the body uses fat to fight infection
New research reveals how our immune cells use the body's fat stores to fight infection. The research could help develop new approaches to treating people with bacterial infections. And the team say their work could one day help treat infections in vulnerable and older people.
7h
Why cannabis reeks of skunk
Nature, Published online: 09 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03650-9 Scientists discover sulfurous compounds that help to give pot a rank odour, holding out the promise of fragrance-free bud.
7h
Sjukdomsmarkör skyddar ofta mot sjukdomen
Flera olika proteiner i vårt blod som tidigare kopplats till olika inflammatoriska sjukdomar kan skydda friska individer från att utveckla sjukdom. Inflammatoriska processer spelar en viktig roll i uppkomsten av många sjukdomar, till exempel reumatism, artros, astma, allergi och inflammatoriska tarmsjukdomar. Proteinbiomarkörer är mätbara molekyler som kan användas för att diagnostisera en sjukdo
8h
Report highlights urgent need to end bottom trawling
The recent explosion of public interest in marine fisheries—driven in large part by the controversial success of Seaspiracy—has put the fishing industry firmly in the global spotlight, but has also highlighted how complex and easily misunderstood this sector is.
8h
Predicting Solar Cell Efficiency
Solar cell or photovoltaic technology is now a critically important technology for our civilization. Solar power is now among the most cost-effective power sources we have, and the greenest in terms of carbon efficiency. It can also have a very small footprint depending on where we deploy it. Rooftop solar, for example, essentially has zero footprint in terms of land use. According to one calcula
8h
Daily briefing: Omicron might weaken vaccine protection
Nature, Published online: 08 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03689-8 Early data hint that two shots of a COVID-19 vaccine might offer less protection against Omicron than against other variants. Plus, why the most water-rich country in the world is facing drought and how to tell a compelling story in scientific presentations.
8h
The loneliness of the CEOs hired from outside
A third of the new CEOs are hired outside the company despite the fact that on average their performance is lower than those who reach the top by internal promotion. A study shows that the reasons are to be found in the misalignment between the backgrounds and organizational characteristics of the company.
9h
How TIMED flies: NASA mission celebrates 20th anniversary
Launched in 2001, NASA's TIMED mission has now spent 20 years surveying the complicated dynamics of Earth's upper atmosphere. Short for Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics, TIMED observes the chemistry and dynamics where Earth's atmosphere meets space. On its 20th anniversary, the scientific community is reflecting on what they've learned from TIMED's two decades of operat
9h
Så smittar corona i inomhusluften
Människor infekterade med corona släpper ut massor av pyttesmå virusladdade partiklar bara genom att andas. De kallas aerosoler och kan hålla sig svävande i luften längre. Jakob Löndahl och Sara Thuresson, forskare vid Aerosollaboratoriet vid Lunds universitet studerar de aerosoler som kan bära på smitta, till exempel vätskedroppar från den luft vi andas ut, eller som sprids när vi hostar eller n
9h
Laminitis insights show promise for the future of treatment
Horse owners usually dread hearing the diagnosis of laminitis. The disease plagues horses of many backgrounds, ages, and disciplines. Now, using genetics, scientists from Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine and the University of Florida (UF) have made new insights in the disease. Their findings appear in the journal Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology.
9h
Orchid reintroduction is helpful to long-term species protection
Orchids are a charismatic group of plant species that currently face a considerable number of threats to their long-term survival. Orchids produce thousands of dust-like seeds that may be easily dispersed by wind. However, due to their tiny size, seeds lack an endosperm and have become highly dependent on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and further development into a seedling.
9h
Just How Frightening Is France's New Right?
In October, Éric Zemmour, the best-selling French author and media personality who has won a devoted following by applying a throwback intellectual sheen to a familiar populist xenophobia, overtook France's far-right standard-bearer, Marine Le Pen, in the polls for this April's presidential election. He officially declared his candidacy at the end of November and held his first campaign rally in
10h
RNF219 attenuates global mRNA decay through inhibition of CCR4-NOT complex-mediated deadenylation
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27471-6 The CCR4-NOT complex is a key regulator of eukaryotic mRNA deadenylation. Here the authors identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF219 as an acetylation-regulated cofactor of the complex, which inhibits mRNA decay through a direct interaction with NOT9.
10h
NuMA regulates mitotic spindle assembly, structural dynamics and function via phase separation
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27528-6 Mitotic spindle assembly is required for proper cell division, but many underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, the authors show that NuMa undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation, condensing on spindle poles during mitotic entry and enriching critical components to promote spindle assembly.
10h
How to build a ribosome from RNA fragments in Chlamydomonas mitochondria
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27200-z Mitoribosomes are remarkably diverse in their structures and compositions. Here the authors combine biochemistry, genetics, single particle cryo-electron microscopy and in situ cryo-electron tomography to reveal the mitochondrial ribosome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an extreme example of evolution and sp
10h
The concerted change in the distribution of cell cycle phases and zone composition in germinal centers is regulated by IL-21
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27477-0 How IL-21 functions during development of high affinity antibody in germinal centres (GC) is not fully known. Here using a cell cycle reporter mouse, the authors show that IL-21 promotes cell cycle progression within the GC light zone and enables release from the G1 cell cycle stage.
10h
The Experiment Podcast: Protecting the Capitol One Year After January 6
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts On January 6, 2021, William J. Walker was head of the D.C. National Guard. He had buses full of guardsmen in riot gear ready to deploy in case Donald Trump's "Stop the Steal" rally turned dangerous. But when rioters violently stormed the Capitol building, the Guard was nowhere to be found. Walker says he was forced to wai
12h
Restriktioner kommer rullende: Her er hvad vi ved om Omikron
PLUS. I den kommende uge regner forskere med at svare på to af de tre vigtigste spørgsmål om Omikron: Hvor smitsom er den? Og er vi stadig beskyttet af vacciner og tidligere smitte? Der er længere ventetid på at finde ud af, om Omikron giver et mildere sygdomsforløb.
12h
Skeptical Science New Research for Week #49, 2021
112 articles in 110 journals by 676 contributing authors Physical science of climate change, effects On the importance of sea surface temperature for aerosol-induced brightening of marine clouds and implications for cloud feedback in a future warmer climate Zhou et al. Geophysical Research Letters 10.1029/2021gl095896 Role of the Bay of Bengal warming in the Indian summer monsoon rainfall trend G
16h
Top-10 weirdest things about the bonkers 2021 Atlantic hurricane season
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Jeff Masters Satellite images of the 21 Atlantic named storms of 2021, near the time of peak intensity. The 2021 Atlantic hurricane season draws to an official close on November 30, after generating an extraordinary 21 named storms (third highest on record), seven hurricanes, four major hurricanes, and an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) of 145.
16h
Scientists examine energetic oceans, eddies, and kinetic energy
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Kristen Pope Ocean eddies have an important role in moving and mixing the ocean's waters, including things like nutrients, carbon, salt, and heat, and therefore an important role on climate change. By moving heat within ocean waters – including transporting heat between different areas and vertically within the ocean – eddies, often referred to a
16h
Solar and crop production research shows 'multi-solving' climate benefits
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by by Martín Bonzi and Sarah Spengeman Stabilizing the climate demands a rapid transition to 100 percent carbon-free power, which will require large increases in solar power generation. In the U.S., the Biden administration has outlined a plan to power 40 percent of the U.S. power grid with solar energy by 2035. Compared with agriculture and ranchin
16h
Nasa's new space telescope and its search for extraterrestrial life
On 22 December, if all goes to plan, the £7.5bn James Webb space telescope (JWST) will be blasted into space on top of a giant European Ariane 5 rocket. As it travels to its final destination – a point about a million miles away – it will begin to unfold its gold, honeycombed mirror; a vast light-catching bucket that could give us a view of the universe deeper and more sensitive than we've ever ha
16h
Sunshine may shield children, young adults from MS
Living in sunny locations and spending time outdoors may raise the risk for skin cancer, but a new study shows that in children and young adults, sun exposure may protect against multiple sclerosis. The study follows previous work by other researchers that has demonstrated an association between increased ultraviolet exposure in childhood and lower odds of adult MS.
18h
Torn Muscle? Hold the Drugs or Surgery—Massage May Be the Best Medicine – Facts So Romantic
Massage therapy could treat a wide range of ailments, from peripheral artery disease to inflammatory myopathy. Image by Bartek Zyczynski / Shutterstock If you're an athlete—even a very occasional one—odds are you've dealt with a muscle injury at some point. After all, muscle injuries account for 10 to 55 percent of sports traumas. Often they're just a nuisance—say, a minor strain that takes you a
19h
Why AI Needs a Genome – Issue 108: Change
It's Monday morning of some week in 2050 and you're shuffling into your kitchen, drawn by the smell of fresh coffee C-3PO has brewed while he unloaded the dishwasher. "Here you go, Han Solo, I used the new flavor you bought yesterday," C-3PO tells you as he hands you the cup. You chuckle. C-3PO arrived barely a month ago and already has developed a wonderful sense of humor and even some snark. He
19h
All the Biomass on Earth – Issue 108: Change
All the Biomass of Earth, in One Graphic Our planet supports approximately 8.7 million species, of which over a quarter live in water. But humans can have a hard time comprehending numbers this big, so it can be difficult to really appreciate the breadth of this incredible diversity of life on Earth. To fully grasp this scale, we draw from research from " The biomass distribution on Earth ," by Y
19h
NASA Is on the Cusp of a New Era – Issue 108: Change
Jennifer Heldmann laughed when I pointed out that she used the word "unprecedented" five times in a recent paper. "I should have checked that," she said. But who could blame her? The NASA planetary scientist was describing a dream come true: The ability for humans to travel to the moon and Mars frequently—and not have to worry about packing lightly! That's because of a new vehicle the rocket comp
19h
Research reveals how aging cells can be an underlying cause of kidney damage
A study in mice has found that stress and tissue damage initiated by angiotensin II, a molecule that is known to increase blood pressure and stiffening in the linings of blood vessels, leads to cellular senescence, a process by which a cell ages and permanently stops dividing but does not die. Importantly, when the researchers eliminated senescent cells from the mice, tissues returned to a normal
19h
Reduced ocean circulation during the ice age caused anoxic conditions and increased carbon storage in the deep sea
The movement of water masses in the ocean, its circulation, is an essential component of the global climate system. Researchers have now been able to show that circulation in the deep ocean was significantly slowed down during the last glacial period. Analyses of sediment samples show that the decomposition of organic carbon in the water masses of the deep sea consumed the oxygen available there.
19h
International study supports dupilumab for treatment of moderate-to-severe asthma in children
In a late-stage clinical trial, the biologic agent dupilumab reduced the rate of severe asthma attacks and improved lung function and asthma control for children ages 6 to 11. The findings of the international multicenter Liberty Asthma VOYAGE trial supported approval of dupilumab for the treatment of moderate-to-severe asthma in this age group by the Food and Drug Administration in October.
20h
Breast cancer classified into 12 unique biological groups
Researchers have demonstrated a major step forward in melding two key methods for studying breast cancer: one by genetic analysis and the second by looking at the architecture of cells, or their pathology. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas Breast Cancer Data set, they developed classification method that divides breast cancers into 12 distinct biological groups. This could aid future research efforts
20h
Tau and PQBP1: Protein interaction induces inflammation in the brain
Researchers have clarified the relationship between the intracellular receptor PQBP1 and the structural protein Tau, which is dysregulated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Tau was found to interact with PQBP1 in immune cells of the brain, which led to activation of the inflammatory cGAS-STING pathway. PQBP1 may represent a potential target for the development of therapeut
20h
Baleens read like a whale's history book
Chemically analyzing sequential samples from the baleen of dead whales makes it possible to read not only the history of the diet, but also the migration route of the animals. In a new study, researchers present their results of a novel way of analyzing nitrogen isotopes in animal tissue.
20h
Career options
I have a PhD in cognitive psychology and am currently working as a data scientist in Pharma. It's not quite the right fit, and I'm looking to learn about what other (non-ds jobs) people with similar degrees have gone on to do! Tia 🧠 submitted by /u/esacchi [link] [comments]
21h
Soft tissue destruction and lower back pain
Back pain affects many people at some point in their lives, and a common cause is damage to the squishy discs or flexible, rubbery tissues of the spine. However, observing this damage at an early stage is difficult with current imaging methods. Now, researchers report they can see microscopic soft tissue destruction in animal spines by targeting denatured collagen with fluorescent molecules.
21h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Leave a Reply