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Nyheder2021december10

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Planetary scientist suggests loss of water to space on Mars may be tied to lower atmospheric factors
Planetary scientist Erdal Yiğit, with George Mason University, has published a Perspective piece in the journal Science suggesting that upper atmospheric interactions with solar wind cannot fully explain the loss of surface water on Mars. In his paper, he suggests three other major factors need to be taken into consideration as well: gravity waves, convection and dust storms.
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[Repost] [Academic] Looking for research subjects for a study on emotional responses to sound! Volunteer at UNLV (Anyone 18+)
Do certain sounds really bother you? Do you experience ASMR? Do you experience musical chills? If so, we want to study you! The UNLV Music Lab (Principal Investigator: Erin Hannon) is conducting a new study about misophonia, ASMR, musicality and emotional responses to meaningful sounds. We are currently recruiting for a research study in which we will ask you questions about which sounds you like
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LATEST

A quantum approach to a singularity problem
One of the major issues in general relativity that separates it from other descriptions of the universe, like quantum physics, is the existence of singularities . Singularities are points that when mathematically described give an infinite value and suggest areas of the universe where the laws of physics would cease to exist — i.e. points at the beginning of the universe and at the center of black
10h
New prime editing system inserts entire genes in human cells
Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have developed a new version of prime editing that can install or swap out gene-sized DNA sequences. First developed in 2019, prime editing is a precise method of making a wide diversity of gene edits in human cells, including small substitutions, insertions, and deletions.
8h
Kamala Harris Is Actually Right About the Bluetooth Headphones, You Nitwits
Bluetooth-Phobic VP In a classic instance of news-that-shouldn't-be-news news , Vice President Kamala Harris came under fire this week for the outrageous decision to not use Bluetooth headphones. It all began when Politico published a hard-hitting story on Monday about the VP's aversion to the technology, citing numerous examples in which Harris could be seen with wired headphones. The article we
6h
Startup Says It Can Dig Tunnels Really Fast by Melting Through Rock
Melting Rock Instead of crushing through rock with a massive grinder, a startup called Petra is hoping to dig tunnels using superheated gas, Wired reports . In 2018, according to the magazine, the company tested the technology in an industrial park in California, heating up the stone to above 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Since then, Petra settled on a slightly different method, blasting sheets of r
4h
FDA Approves Eye Drops That Replace Reading Glasses
Eye drops that could potentially replace reading glasses for millions of people were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in October, and hit the market this week. The drops, called pilocarpine and marketed as Vuity by pharma outfit Allergan, could come to the aid of some 128 million Americans who are nearsighted. According to the company, one drop in each eye can sharpen closeup vision f
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Elon Musk Says He's Thinking of Quitting SpaceX and Tesla to Become an "Influencer"
Closing Time Well, it's finally happened: Elon Musk is quitting the companies he's helped build to become a full-time influencer. Or at least that's what he claimed in a likely-facetious-but-maybe-also-slightly-self-aware tweet that had more than a few people wondering if he was being serious. "Thinking of quitting my jobs and becoming an influencer full-time [what do you think]," the world's wea
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NASA Scientists Are Gonna Bawl Their Eyes When the Tiny Mars Chopper Dies
NASA's Mars itty bitty scouting helicopter has outlived its life expectancy seven times over — and when it does finally cross the cosmic rainbow bridge, things are probably gonna get emotional. This heartwrenching insider scoop comes from Christopher Hamilton, an associate professor of planetary sciences at the University of Arizona who's witnessed other tearjerker endings at NASA's Jet Propulsio
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And Just Like That Is a Far Cry From Sex and the City
Early in the coronavirus pandemic last year, I couldn't help but wonder (sorry) how the characters of Sex and the City might be faring in quarantine. And because those characters were never really human beings so much as personality archetypes entertainingly bundled into couture and thrust into chaotic situations, the imaginary story lines wrote themselves. Carrie, obviously, was calling Miranda
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Scientists use ostrich cells to make glowing Covid detection masks
Japanese researchers use bird antibodies to detect virus under ultraviolet light Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Japanese researchers have developed masks that use ostrich antibodies to detect Covid-19 by glowing under ultraviolet light. The discovery, by Yasuhiro Tsukamoto and his team at Kyoto Prefectural University in western Japan, could provide for low-cost test
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Mouse bite may have infected Taiwan lab worker with Covid
Employee at high-security facility tests positive in island's first local infection in weeks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Health officials in Taiwan are investigating whether a mouse bite may have been responsible for a laboratory worker testing positive for Covid, the island's first local infection in weeks. The authorities are scrambling to work out how the empl
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Scientists Call for Making Pluto a Planet Again
Pluto may be reinstated to its position as a planet — and other celestial bodies may join it. A new study from the Florida Space Institute at the University of Central Florida surveyed centuries of planet literature and found that the decision that led to Pluto's demotion stemmed from extremely old-school ideas that mixed astronomy with astrology — and even folklore — and as such, the decision sh
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Steven Spielberg's West Side Story Is an Undeniable Triumph
Steven Spielberg has been making films that feel like musicals for his entire career. No, the fearsome shark of Jaws and dinosaurs of Jurassic Park didn't belt out a tune, and heroes like Indiana Jones and Tintin weren't dancing through their set pieces, but they might as well have been. Spielberg is an expert at the careful choreography of camera blocking; his gift for legibly communicating comp
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The life-changing power of assistive technologies | Jane Velkovski
"This chair is my legs — this chair is my life," says accessibility champion Jane Velkovski, who uses a wheelchair after being diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). With clarity and poise, he shares how his first motorized wheelchair empowered him with independence and ability — and why assistive technology should be available to anyone who needs it. "Freedom of movement, no matter on le
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Why Is NASA Sending Its New Telescope a Million Miles Away?
Our solar system is brimming with stunning phenomena: the stormy atmosphere of Jupiter, its clouds coiling like cream poured into hot coffee. The delicate rings of Saturn, the countless pieces of ice and rock arrayed like grooves on vinyl. The aurora borealis on Earth, the collision of solar particles and atmospheric molecules painting the night sky with a ghostly green. But some of the most mesm
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The Power of Trump's Magnetism in One Photo
Photograph by Peter van Agtmael A t a Donald Trump rally in Wildwood, New Jersey, on January 28, 2020, supporters turned to watch the president approach the podium. "I think it's more interesting to look at the movement he created than at the man himself," the photographer Peter van Agtmael says. He chose to capture the moment before the president's entrance, as members of the audience held their
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The Court Invites an Era of Constitutional Chaos
After weeks of waiting, the Supreme Court this morning finally allowed abortion providers' challenge against Texas's functional ban on abortion, S.B. 8 , to go forward . But the win for abortion providers is not the sweeping victory that seemed likely when the Court heard oral argument on S.B. 8 in November —and even if legal abortions resume in Texas, any reprieve probably won't last for long, b
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Scientists Invent Tube That Sucks on Astronauts Like Giant Popsicles
Vacuum Pants A team of scientists have created a tube-like sleeping bag that sucks on lower bodies of astronauts like human-sized popsicles — with the goal of keeping their eyes healthy. The odd contraption is designed to counter one of the most serious medical problems astronauts face when they spend prolonged periods in microgravity: a build up of fluid in the head that can exert pressure on th
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Google Refuses to Pull Website Responsible for Scores of Suicides
You can click here for a list of resources from the Suicide Prevention Resource Center. There exists in the internet ether an extremely disturbing site where users goad each other to take their own lives — and according to Google, there's nothing it can do to remove the site from its search results. A stomach-turning deep dive in The New York Times explores the site, which we won't be naming here
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Amazon Rainforest on the Verge of Becoming a Dry Savannah, Scientists Say
Total Collapse A group of scientists say that the Amazon Rainforest is on the brink of collapse — and could transform into a dry savannah in just five years. Luciana Gatti, a senior climate change researcher at the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research, is one of the many echoing this dire prediction. Speaking to New Scientist , she asserts that the Amazon could be just five years away
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Putin Is Taking a Huge Gamble
I n 2002, at the height of the unipolar moment, as the United States prepared to invade Iraq, some of the country's most prominent international-relations professors tried to solve a puzzle: Why were other major powers in the world that opposed U.S. foreign policy not doing anything about the invasion? Russia, China, France, and Germany made their views known at the United Nations, but they would
11h
COVID Has Broken the Economy
Since March 2020, the state of the economy has been tied inexorably to the state of the pandemic. And although many people in this country are leading their lives without regard to case numbers, that absolutely remains the reality. Specifically, the pandemic is contributing to the rising inflation rates that are causing the Biden administration such heartache. The consumer price index rose 6.2 pe
12h
Underground "Zombie Fires" Continue to Burn Even at 74 Degrees Below Zero
Zombie Fires Even when temperatures drop to 75 degrees Celsius below zero — that's a startling -103 Fahrenheit, some of the frostiest temperatures on Earth — massive "zombie fires" continue to burn below parts of Siberia, United Press International reports . The area contains some of the coldest permanently inhabited places on the planet, like Oimaykon, a rural jurisdiction populated by only arou
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DeepMind Says Its New AI Has Almost the Reading Comprehension of a High Schooler
Alphabet's AI research company DeepMind has released the next generation of its language model, and it says that it has close to the reading comprehension of a high schooler — a startling claim. It says the language model, called Gopher, was able to significantly improve its reading comprehension by ingesting massive repositories of texts online. DeepMind boasts that its algorithm, an "ultra-larg
3h
Testing a Wooden Barrel Still?? | Moonshiners
Stream Moonshiners on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/moonshiners #Moonshiners #Moonshine #DiscoveryChannel Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Fro
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Book Review: The Past, Present, and Future of Poop
In "The Other Dark Matter," science journalist Lina Zeldovich explores the history and science of human sewage. Inspired by memories of watching her grandfather turn septic waste into garden compost in Russia, Zeldovich surveys how sanitation can be harnessed for energy, fertilizer, and medical use.
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What Is the Point of Boris Johnson?
B y April 1968, Charles de Gaulle was bored. "None of this amuses me anymore," the French president told his aide-de-camp, Admiral François Flohic. "There is no longer anything difficult or heroic to do." Over the previous decade, de Gaulle had returned from political exile to save the country from military insurrection, killed off the Fourth Republic, created the Fifth, ended the creeping civil
17h
Removing a Hyphen Won't Stop Anti-Semitism
If you've read enough about anti-Jewish bigotry, you've probably noticed that no one can agree how to spell it: Is it anti-Semitism or antisemitism ? Regular readers of The Atlantic know that this publication uses the hyphenated version. But before I came here, I wrote for a Jewish outlet that removed the hyphen. And just this past week, The New York Times acknowledged that it had quietly revised
12h
Lessons From Succession for Non-billionaire Families
In Succession , HBO's dark comedy about the heirs to a family media empire, characters exchange artisanal insults and wear bespoke suits like armor. The ultra-wealthy Roys are constantly at war with their corporate competitors, and with one another. They squabble over money, clout, and who gets to inherit leadership of the conglomerate Waystar Royco from the patriarch, Logan Roy (played by Brian
12h
Diplomacy Alone Can't Save Democracy
As Joe Biden convened his virtual Summit for Democracy this week, he warned that democratic erosion represents " the defining challenge of our time ." He isn't wrong. Democracy is under siege , and this year has been marked by contested elections , coups , and autocratic brazenness . This was the fifth consecutive year in which the number of countries moving in the direction of authoritarianism o
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James Webb space telescope fuelled for launch
Largest space telescope ever is due to lift off from Europe's spaceport in French Guiana on 22 December Following a small hiccup i n launch preparation a few weeks ago, the James Webb space telescope is again making progress. Now scheduled to lift off from Europe's spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, on 22 December, technicians there have finished fuelling the telescope. Continue reading…
17h
A step toward "living biotherapeutics"
The human gut is home to thousands of species of bacteria, and some of those bacteria have the potential to treat a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. Some species may help to combat colon cancer, while others could help treat or prevent infections such as C. difficile.
16h
The destructive impact of hydropower plants on jaguars and tiger habitats
A pair of researchers at Southern University of Science and Technology, in China has found that when hydroelectric power plants are built, tiger and jaguar habitats are lost, putting the cats at risk. In their paper published in the journal Communications Biology, Ana Filipa Palmeirim and Luke Gibson describe assessing the amount of habitat lost to hydropower and the impact it has on local wildcat
8h
Hopeful Images From 2021
This has been another difficult year, and moments of joy could be hard to find. Efforts to reopen festivals, businesses, and borders came haltingly during the ongoing pandemic, with some success and some disappointment. Yet there were still moments of happiness, fun, and love. I have made it an annual tradition, after rounding up the often painful "news photos of the year," to compose an essay of
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The Common Good Needed Someone to Protect It
The loudest, most prominent voices in public life are not always the most influential. Some of the people who leave the most profound impact—the ones who actually shape the thinking of a generation—do so quietly. Fred Hiatt, who died earlier this week, was one of those people. Hiatt was not exactly silent. You may have read his columns in The Washington Post or, before that, his reporting. But he
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Ridley Scott Still Makes Movies for Adults. Thank Goodness.
In recent weeks, two new Ridley Scott films have arrived in theaters. At first glance, House of Gucci and The Last Duel are very different movies: one a true-crime drama about a glamorous family, the other a Rashomon -style retelling of an assault in medieval France. But, fundamentally, both of Scott's new films are about the corruptions of wealth—and the lengths men will go to defend their own p
9h
Controlled indoor cultivation without daylight comes of age
Interest in vertical farming is growing worldwide. This method of cultivation offers great advantages: local, fresh production that is possible at any location in a very sustainable way. On the negative side are the high electricity consumption and investment costs. Scientists from Wageningen University & Research, together with international colleagues, provide a balanced view of the current situ
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New phenomenon: Forest mammals eavesdrop on messy monkeys
Eavesdropping doesn't just belong in the playbooks of police officers and spies. It is also a phenomenon that plays out among animals. Previous studies have shown that certain species, especially birds, listen to each other for warnings of nearby predators. But a new study from the University of Copenhagen reveals that a variety of mammals eavesdrop on one another when it comes to finding food.
7h
Characterizing a crystal structure of a californium metallocene
A team of researchers working at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico has successfully characterized a crystal structure of a californium metallocene. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their carefully orchestrated process and the characteristics of the crystal structure they created. Julie Niklas and Henry La Pierre with the Georgia Institute of Technology
9h
Is Europe entering a golden age of astronomy?
Groundbreaking discoveries about gravitational waves, black holes, cosmic rays, neutrinos and other areas of cutting-edge astronomy may soon become more frequent due to the convergence of two major communities of astronomers in a fresh project.
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The Atlantic Daily: Watch Four of the Year's Best Movies at Home
Our culture writer David Sims has dropped his picks for the 10 best movies of 2021 . You may not recognize all of the titles, some of which have yet to be widely released. But four are ready now for your at-home viewing pleasure. Read these excerpts from his list, or his original reviews, linked below. The Power of the Dog "Jane Campion's first film in 12 years, available to stream on Netflix, is
1h
How the Toothpaste Got its Stripes
Physics amalate Fri, 12/10/2021 – 16:32 Image Media credits Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Media rights Copyright American Institute of Physics A mystery that captivated the internet has a simple answer. At least, that's what Colgate says. Friday, December 10, 2021 Haley Weiss, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/how-toothpaste-got-its-stripes
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AI models microprocessor performance in real-time
Computer engineers have developed a new AI method for accurately predicting the power consumption of any type of computer processor more than a trillion times per second while barely using any computational power itself. Dubbed APOLLO, the technique has been validated on real-world, high-performance microprocessors and could help improve the efficiency and inform the development of new microproces
2h
Finding the recipe for a larger, greener global rice bowl
A global assessment assessed rice yields and efficiency in 32 rice cropping systems. The study concluded that there is still substantial room to increase rice production while reducing the negative environmental impacts. A leading agronomist describes the study as 'the most comprehensive global evaluation of production systems for a major staple crop, (one that) will set the standard for future gl
2h
Asthma may reduce risk of brain tumors — but how?
Asthma has been associated with a lowered risk of brain tumors, and researchers now think they know why: Immune cells activated under conditions of asthma are less able to promote the growth of brain tumors. The findings could lead to new therapeutic approaches.
2h
There Are More Than Two Sides to the Abortion Debate
Sign up for Conor's newsletter here. Earlier this week I curated some nuanced commentary on abortion and solicited your thoughts on the same subject. What follows includes perspectives from several different sides of the debate. I hope each one informs your thinking, even if only about how some other people think. We begin with a personal reflection. Cheryl was 16 when New York State passed a sta
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'Human-like' brain helps robot out of a maze
A maze is a popular device among psychologists to assess the learning capacity of mice or rats. But how about robots? Can they learn to successfully navigate the twists and turns of a labyrinth? Now, researchers have demonstrated they can. Their robot bases its decisions on the very system humans use to think and act: the brain. The study paves the way to exciting new applications of neuromorphic
4h
Pop-out search instigates beta-gated feature selectivity enhancement across V4 layers [Neuroscience]
Visual search is a workhorse for investigating how attention interacts with processing of sensory information. Attentional selection has been linked to altered cortical sensory responses and feature preferences (i.e., tuning). However, attentional modulation of feature selectivity during search is largely unexplored. Here we map the spatiotemporal profile of feature selectivity…
4h
Biased M1 muscarinic receptor mutant mice show accelerated progression of prion neurodegenerative disease [Pharmacology]
There are currently no treatments that can slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is, however, a growing body of evidence that activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1-receptor) can not only restore memory loss in AD patients but in preclinical animal models can…
4h
The N-terminal cysteine is a dual sensor of oxygen and oxidative stress [Cell Biology]
Cellular homeostasis requires the sensing of and adaptation to intracellular oxygen (O2) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The Arg/N-degron pathway targets proteins that bear destabilizing N-terminal residues for degradation by the proteasome or via autophagy. Under normoxic conditions, the N-terminal Cys (Nt-Cys) residues of specific substrates can be oxidized by…
4h
Pathological {alpha}-syn aggregation is mediated by glycosphingolipid chain length and the physiological state of {alpha}-syn in vivo [Neuroscience]
GBA1 mutations that encode lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) cause the lysosomal storage disorder Gaucher disease (GD) and are strong risk factors for synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia. Only a subset of subjects with GBA1 mutations exhibit neurodegeneration, and the factors that influence neurological phenotypes are unknown. We find…
4h
Molecular mechanism of glycolytic flux control intrinsic to human phosphoglycerate kinase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Glycolysis plays a fundamental role in energy production and metabolic homeostasis. The intracellular [adenosine triphosphate]/[adenosine diphosphate] ([ATP]/[ADP]) ratio controls glycolytic flux; however, the regulatory mechanism underlying reactions catalyzed by individual glycolytic enzymes enabling flux adaptation remains incompletely understood. Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) catalyzes the rev
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Probing allosteric interactions in homo-oligomeric molecular machines using solution NMR spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Developments in solution NMR spectroscopy have significantly impacted the biological questions that can now be addressed by this methodology. By means of illustration, we present here a perspective focusing on studies of a number of molecular machines that are critical for cellular homeostasis. The role of NMR in elucidating the…
4h
Heatwaves afflict even the far north's icy seas
Nature, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03676-z Arctic waters have notched a growing number of extreme events called marine heatwaves, raising fears for the region's more heat-sensitive sea creatures.
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Please list things we will be unable or forbidden to do within one generation (50 years)
My list: Use of Unsustainable, slow growing trees, Trees, like hickory, oak or cherry, for things as trivial as furniture or cabinets. The idea that ordinary human beings will be allowed to drive a 3,000 lb vehicle at speeds in excess of 20 mph The idea that other than the wealthy people will be able to live in rural areas unless employed in agriculture. The carbon footprint of individual existen
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Climate-driven disease compromises seagrass health
In an oceanic omen for climate change's intensifying effects, Cornell-led research shows that seagrass—through large swaths of intertidal meadows in the Pacific Northwest—suffers from a lesion-filled wasting disease. The grasses' once-vibrant plant root systems are deteriorating, too.
6h
Microplastics Found to Cause Damage to Human Cells
(Photo: Sonia Sanmartin/Unsplash) Microplastics have been known for a while to end up in the human body by way of accidental ingestion, but now scientists have confirmed they cause damage to human cells. UK researchers Evangelos Danopoulos, Maureen Twiddy, Robert West, and Jeanette M. Rotchell conducted an analysis of 17 previous studies on the toxicological impacts of microplastics on human cell
6h
Seasonal temperature impacts patient lab results
Ambient temperature influences the results of some of the most used laboratory tests, and these distortions likely affect medical decision making, such as whether to prescribe medications, researchers report. The authors say that laboratories could statistically adjust for ambient temperature on test days when reporting lab results to account for day-to-day variability.
7h
Så markerar makthavare sin status i digitala möten
Hur gjorde Donald Trump för att visa upp USA:s militära muskler under ett digitalt möte med övriga G20-länder förra året? Det har forskaren Elsa Hedling visat i en studie av hur makthavare demonstrerar sin status i digitala möten. När världens ledare träffas finns i vanliga fall ett strängt protokoll, ett slags diplomatiskt regelverk, där nationella attribut helst ska undvikas. Men när pandemin b
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A bonding experience: Study reveals potential new family of compounds
On the Periodic Table of Elements, there are elements that most people remember from school—oxygen, hydrogen, gold and silver. But there are also the ones that you might not immediately recognize, such as berkelium and einsteinium. These exotic elements are typically only used in specialized laboratories to understand how chemistry and physics change at the extremes of the table.
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Resolving the puzzles of graphene superconductivity
Since superconductivity in three-layered graphene was discovered in September, the physics community has been left puzzled. Now, three months later, physicists can successfully explain the results by drawing from a theory of unconventional superconductivity.
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Astronomers Discover Enormous Exoplanet Where it Shouldn't Exist
This artist's impression shows a close up of the planet b Centauri b, which orbits a binary system with mass at least six times that of the Sun. This is the most massive and hottest planet-hosting star system found to date. The planet is ten times as massive as Jupiter and orbits the two-star system at 100 times the distance Jupiter orbits the Sun. Our sun is pretty unremarkable as far as stars g
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Orangutan mothers help offspring to learn
When it comes to motherhood, orangutans are animals of distinction. An orangutan mother will stay in close contact with her baby for up to nine years—longer than almost all mammals other than humans. Much like humans, orangutans rely on their mothers to learn life skills—such as what to eat and where to find it—before they finally reach independence almost a decade after birth. But unlike humans,
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The benefits of savanna fire management in Africa
Many savanna-dependent species in Africa, including large herbivores and apex predators, are at increasing risk of extinction. Estimated costs of achieving effective management of protected areas in Africa where lions live could reach $2 billion (USD) annually. Researchers have now explored the potential for fire management-based carbon-financing programs to fill this funding gap and benefit degra
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Storytelling is a secret weapon for increasing service sales and overcoming employee resistance to change
With the increasing digitalization in manufacturing industries, companies start to integrate big data analytics into business processes and sell smart services. However, people tend to resist change, remain skeptical about unknown products and technologies and avoid new ways of doing work. According to Valeria Boldosova's doctoral dissertation at the University of Vaasa, Finland, using deliberate
7h
How to protect your mental well-being online — from a Gen-Zer | Peachy Liv
Whether you have one follower or a million, we've all witnessed nastiness and hate speech on social media. YouTube content creator and mental well-being motivator Peachy Liv advocates for a kinder, more respectful digital world — and urges us all to reflect before we share our thoughts online. Hear her tips for dealing with cyberbullying and personal insights on how we can all make the internet a
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The Best Gaming Laptops for Digital Firepower in 2022
Gaming laptops exist at the juncture of power and portability, packing all of the components it takes to run modern games into sleek, mobile packages. Usually designed with cooling in mind, they feature smartly engineered combinations of fans and cooling vents, housing premium grade components in a package that delivers the heights of power output with the design that keeps it running. These devi
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Development of a high-energy-resolution, lanthanum hexaboride nanowire-based field emission gun
The National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and JEOL, Ltd. have developed a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) nanowire-based field emission gun that is installable on an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope (TEM). This combined unit is able to perform atomic resolution observation at an energy resolution of 0.2 eV—the highest resolution ever recorded for non-monochromatic electr
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Widespread plants displace rarer species across habitats
It is currently estimated that, worldwide, two out of five plant species are threatened with extinction. Whilst this trend is clearly identifiable at the global scale, there is debate as to whether species richness declines locally. The processes driving this phenomenon—the "biodiversity conservation paradox" as researchers call it, has remained largely unresolved until now. An international team
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The need for family reunification — to make families whole again | Elizabeth Zion
"I want all families to be made whole, to be reunified, to be together — as is our right," says writer, poet and student Elizabeth Zion. In this profoundly moving talk, Zion shares the impacts of family separation, including her personal struggles with homelessness and poverty — and points a way toward moral and just policies that recognize the human rights of migrant families.
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Can diamonds originate methane?
Turning one of the world's finest gems—diamonds—into one of the worst greenhouse gasses—methane—does not seem a great idea. Yet this happened through the work of a group of researchers from the Universities of Bologna and Edimburgh (UK), the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France) and HPSTAR (China). This outcome published in Nature Communications was not a clumsy lab mistake. In fac
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To fight climate change, listen to young people | Nkosilathi Nyathi
The climate crisis has been largely caused by irresponsible adults in developed countries, but it's the children of developing nations — like Zimbabwean environmental activist Nkosilathi Nyathi — that suffer from the most disastrous consequences. In a world where climate catastrophe feels almost unstoppable, we must involve everyone in finding solutions — especially young people, who have the m
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Study pinpoints timing of Chicxulub asteroid impact
A groundbreaking study led by researchers at Florida Atlantic University and an international team of scientists conclusively confirms the time year of the catastrophic Chicxulub asteroid, responsible for the extinction of dinosaurs and 75 percent of life on Earth 66 million years ago. Springtime, the season of new beginnings, ended the 165-million-year reign of dinosaurs and changed the course of
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A new mechanism for generation of vesicles that transport molecules and vaccine nanoparticles into living cells
Canadian and American researchers have discovered a new mechanism by which membrane vesicles are made. These self-contained nanoparticles trap proteins, RNA and other molecules from inside or outside of living cells as nutrients or regulate the numbers of cell surface hormone receptors, such as those for insulin, to control the sensitivity of cells to hormones. They also deliver protein hormones t
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Experiment finds evidence for a long-sought particle comprising four neutrons
While all atomic nuclei except hydrogen are composed of protons and neutrons, physicists have been searching for a particle consisting of two, three or four neutrons for over half a century. Experiments by a team of physicists of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) at the accelerator laboratory on the Garching research campus now indicate that a particle comprising four bound neutrons may wel
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Dinosaurs and amber: A new window to the Cretaceous world from 110 million years ago
New findings of amber in the site of Ariño in Teruel (Spain) have enabled the reconstruction of a swampy paleoenvironment with a rich coastal resin forest from 110 million years ago, from the era of dinosaurs. This place featured conifers and understories of gymnosperms and ferns, and flower plants, where insects, turtles, crocodiles, mammals and dinosaurs such as the species Proa valdearinnoensis
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An easy relationship between a beetle and its yeast symbiont
Japanese lizard beetle larvae feed on yeast injected from their mothers' abdomens into the bamboo stems they are growing in. Now, scientists at Nagoya University have made a surprising discovery: the yeast can digest some complex sugars in the bamboo woody tissue, but it doesn't. Instead, it consumes much simpler and more available sugar sources.
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Development of a versatile, accurate AI prediction technique even with a small number of experiments
NIMS, Asahi Kasei, Mitsubishi Chemical, Mitsui Chemicals and Sumitomo Chemical have used the chemical materials open platform framework to develop an AI technique capable of increasing the accuracy of machine learning-based predictions of material properties (e.g., strength, brittleness) through efficient use of material structural data obtained from only a small number of experiments. This techni
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A Scientific Framework for Consciousness
So, I've been doing a lot of thinking lately about the mind, its contents, and how to give it a more rigorous framework. Not sure where to post this information, but I figured this would be a good spot. I welcome any and all feedback! Let's see what we have: (a) An idea space consists of thoughts, emotions, sensations, and perceptions. Then, consciousness is the light one shines onto an idea spac
8h
Researchers find the best way for bacteria to navigate maze-like environments
When bacteria spread through soil, tissues and other environments crammed with obstacles, keeping on the straight and narrow path leads to dead ends. Instead, bacteria move through open spaces until they get trapped, then reorient to hop through an opening to the next hole. A new model developed by Princeton researchers explains why this hop-and- trap strategy works for bacteria and how it could b
8h
Infant stars identified at the center of our galaxy
What was previously identified as a gas and dust cloud at the center of our galaxy actually consists of three very young stars. That is the result of a new study led by scientists from the University of Cologne's Institute of Astrophysics. The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT)—a telescope with mirror diameters of 8.20 meters on the summit of Cerro Paranal in Chile—provided
8h
Seeing deeper with atmospheric muons: From archaeology to geology
Muon imaging, or "muography," may be a niche field, but with uses in probing both man-made and natural structures, its appeal is expanding rapidly. A new open-access review published in Reviews in Physics by Lorenzo Bonechi and Raffaello D'Alessandro from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, and Andrea Giammanco, Université Catholique de Louvain Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics,
8h
Leptoquarks and the physics beyond the Standard Model
The hunt is on for leptoquarks, particles beyond the limits of the standard model of particle physics —the best description we have so far of the physics that governs the forces of the Universe and its particles. These hypothetical particles could prove useful in explaining experimental and theoretical anomalies observed at particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and could he
8h
Deep-sea mining may wipe out species we have only just discovered
Deep sea hydrothermal vents harbor some of the most extraordinary species on our planet. Lying at two to three kilometers below the surface, these extreme, insular ecosystems are powered, not by the sunlight-driven photosynthesis that we're used to, but by energy from superheated mineral-rich seawater jetting from cracks in the seafloor. This supports thriving and unique animal communities with a
8h
It's time to move conversation beyond abortion
Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, which is considered by many to be the most significant battle over abortion rights in decades. If the court upholds the Mississippi law or overturns Roe v. Wade altogether, as the justices appeared poised to do, 21 states likely will ban or curtail access to abortions in short order.
8h
MicroRNAs: Biological indicators of the physiological status of animals
Known to be fine regulators of gene expression, microRNAs are small molecules that remain particularly stable in biofluids—blood, urine, etc. In humans, these molecules have revealed great potential as prognostic or diagnostic tools for many diseases such as various cancers, strokes, and, particularly, heart attacks. However, few studies have been carried out on their potential as non-invasive bio
8h
Will Self-Replicating Xenobots Cure Diseases, Yield New Bioweapons, or Simply Turn the World Into Grey Goo?
In 2020, scientists made global headlines by creating " xenobots "—tiny " programmable " living things made of several thousand frog stem cells. These pioneer xenobots could move around in fluids, and scientists claimed they could be useful for monitoring radioactivity, pollutants, drugs, or diseases. Early xenobots survived for up to ten days. A second wave of xenobots , created in early 2021, s
8h
Determining the lipid content of organic waste in anaerobic digestion
One of the important factors that need to be taken into account for anaerobic digestion is the lipid content of the organic waste. Indeed, a large quantity of lipids enables more gas to be produced: this is known as the methane potential, however too large a quantity can also inhibit the process. Organic waste is often very heterogeneous and of different origins (e.g., agriculture, food industry a
8h
With climate change, avalanches are migrating upslope
We now know that the effects of climate change are particularly strong in mountain areas. The substantial impacts on the cryosphere (snow, ice and permafrost) have been well described where changes in glaciers and snow cover are concerned, but our knowledge of how avalanche activity responds to rising temperatures is still incomplete. This is partly because we lack sufficiently long snow-avalanche
8h
Truth Is Stranger Than Autofiction
Claire Vaye Watkins, the conspicuously named protagonist of Claire Vaye Watkins's latest novel, I Love You but I've Chosen Darkness , knows that her vagina has teeth. Claire mirrors the author in many ways beyond their shared name: They're both writers navigating new motherhood and mourning a father who died when they were young. But those strange teeth—which Claire grows lovingly, in secret—are
8h
Development of a high-energy-resolution, LaB6 nanowire-based field emission gun
Engineers have developed a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) nanowire-based field emission gun that is installable on an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope (TEM). This combined unit is able to perform atomic resolution observation at an energy resolution of 0.2 eV — the highest resolution ever recorded for non-monochromatic electron guns — with a high current stability of 0.4%.
8h
Atom laser creates reflective patterns similar to light
Cooled to almost absolute zero, atoms not only move in waves like light but also can be focused into shapes called caustics, similar to the reflecting or refracting patterns light makes on the bottom of a swimming pool or through a curved wine glass. In experiments, scientists have developed a technique to see these matter wave caustics by placing attractive or repulsive obstacles in the path of a
8h
Artificial intelligence that can discover hidden physical laws in various data
Researchers have successfully developed artificial intelligence technology that can extract hidden equations of motion from regular observational data and create a model that is faithful to the laws of physics. This technology could enable us to discover the hidden equations of motion behind phenomena for which the laws were considered unexplainable. For example, it may be possible to use physics-
8h
'New normal' nudged people online
The national and local lockdowns put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic forced many people to re-evaluate the way they lived and worked. Research published in the International Journal of Web Based Communities looks at how different activities were relocated to the virtual world during lockdown and how this affected people's wellbeing and their social interactions.
8h
Innovative housing can help tackle loneliness says new research
People involved in community-led housing (CLH) are significantly less likely to feel lonely than people living in more conventional homes and neighborhoods, according to a new report by researchers from the universities of Bristol, Lancaster, Northumbria and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), released today (Tuesday 30 November).
9h
Mobbing mindre med moraliskt ansvarsfulla klasskamrater
Mobbning är inte lika vanligt i klasser där elever tror att deras klasskamrater utan undantag tycker att mobbning är fel, att den som utsätts far illa och att de som mobbar inte kan skylla ifrån sig. Det visar en studie från Linköpings universitet som undersökt hur stor tendens skolklasser har att frikoppla sig från moraliskt ansvar, genom ett så kallat moraliskt disengagemang. Mobbning är inte e
9h
A needle in a haystack: Weeding out dead catalyst
Catalysts are important additives that are used to increase the material and energy efficiency of chemical reactions and processes. Although catalysts operate in cycles that should restore their initial activity over and over again, they do deactivate over time. Researchers from Utrecht University and University of Twente have now developed a powerful analytical tool that marks dead catalyst parti
10h
Changing old polymers for use in new applications
The use of plastics on a daily basis is inherent to modern life. The most produced and utilized family of plastics are polyolefins, which are used in packaging materials, toys, lawn chairs, and extremely strong fibers and ropes. During his Ph.D. research, Simon Houben investigated how the properties of polyolefins can be changed for use in new applications such as water purification, separation of
10h
Throwing down the scientific gauntlet to assess methods for anomalous diffusion
Almost 80 years after Scottish botanist Robert Brown described the continuous random motion of microscopic particles in a fluid, Albert Einstein provided a theoretical foundation for this observation. Since then, scientists have discovered systems that deviate substantially from the laws of Brownian motion. Such deviations are referred to as anomalous diffusion and occur in a wide range of systems
10h
Is 'democracy by deterrence' eroding in the US?
Researchers have introduced the idea of "democracy by deterrence" and show how it might be weakening in the United States. American democracy is in crisis —a majority of scholars and the public agree. Allegations of unfair voting practices, such as voter suppression and gerrymandering, abuses of executive power, and mounting concerns about the legitimacy of elections have become a regular occurre
10h
New saber-toothed creature turns up in museum
A new kind of new saber-toothed predator was hiding in plain sight. The fossil specimen, unearthed in Wyoming, was on display for decades at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. When it went off-exhibit in 2017 during a museum renovation, University of Oregon graduate student Paul Barrett finally got a closer look. The animal had long, sharp, saber-shaped teeth, b
10h
For LGBT+ migrants, dating apps are about much more than sex
When you think of migration, you probably won't immediately think of dating apps. Yet such apps are important to many migrants, such as those who identify as lesbian, gay, bi, trans, queer or questioning (LGBT+). Researcher Andrew DJ Shield studied the role that dating apps play in the migration process, and discovered that these online cultures provide more than just a space to flirt. Migrants mi
11h
Hubble is fully operational once again
In the history of space exploration, a handful of missions have set new records for ruggedness and longevity. On Mars, the undisputed champion is the Opportunity rover, which was slated to run for 90 days but remained in operation for 15 years instead. In orbit around Mars, the honor goes to the 2001 Mars Odyssey, which is still operational 20 years after it arrived around the Red Planet.
11h
Social entrepreneurs in a pandemic
Research in Bangladesh reported in the International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation suggests that social entrepreneurship increased there during the COVID-19 pandemic. Areas that benefited from this activity were primarily in food, healthcare, employment, and education, the team writes. They suggest that managers should focus on these four sectors when we are faced with the next
11h
Bringing back the stars
Nature, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03727-5 A little bit of movie magic.
12h
Tilbud til dobbeltdiagnoser gør langsomt en forskel
Sengeafsnit til patienter med samtidig psykiatrisk lidelse og misbrug, der åbnede for godt et år siden, gør en forskel for patienterne, oplever afsnitsledelsen. Der er stadig hyppige genindlæggelser, men flere patienter henvender sig selv og har fundet tillid til afsnittet, hvor de møder samme personale indlæggelse efter indlæggelse.
12h
Daily briefing: Megastudy finds what will get us to go to the gym
Nature, Published online: 09 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03724-8 Teams of scientists tested 53 ways to induce people to keep returning to the gym and found that money talks. Plus, why we can't wait for the James Webb Space Telescope and replication chaos in cancer biology.
12h
Enantioselective access to tricyclic tetrahydropyran derivatives by a remote hydrogen bonding mediated intramolecular IEDHDA reaction
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27521-z Although the hetero-Diels–Alder reaction is a staple of organic chemistry, catalytic asymmetric versions of the inverse-electron demand variant often require specially engineered substrates for the reaction to work. Here the authors cyclize non-activated alkenes with α,β-unsaturated ketones or aldehydes to f
13h
Stable isotopes in global lakes integrate catchment and climatic controls on evaporation
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27569-x An isotope synthesis of 1257 global lakes revealed on average 20% of inflow is lost to evaporation, but 10% of Earth's lakes show extreme evaporative losses. Stable water isotope monitoring is an effective way to detect comparative climatic and catchment-scale impacts on lake water-balance budgets.
13h
Electroresistance in multipolar antiferroelectric Cu2Se semiconductor
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27531-x The reaction of a conductive ferroelectric matter to external electric field remains largely unknown. Here, the authors reveal the relationship between the electrically-driven crystalline domain transition along the multiple-polar directions and the resistance change.
13h
Divergent functionalization of aldehydes photocatalyzed by neutral eosin Y with sulfone reagents
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27550-8 Acyl radicals represent a reactive species that allow for aldehyde subunits to be nucleophilic instead of their typical electrophilic behavior; however, these species are difficult to access in mild conditions. Here the authors show a method to generate acyl radicals using only an organic photocatalyst and l
13h
Molecular basis of enzymatic nitrogen-nitrogen formation by a family of zinc-binding cupin enzymes
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27523-x Enzymes involved in the synthesis of nitrogen-nitrogen bond containing molecules have been identified but the processes remain largely unknown. Here, the authors use biochemical characterisation and computer modelling to study the molecular basis of hydrazine bond formation by a family of di-domain enzymes.
13h
KDM6B promotes activation of the oncogenic CDK4/6-pRB-E2F pathway by maintaining enhancer activity in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27502-2 The histone demethylase KDM6B is reported to be essential for neuroblastoma cell survival. Here the authors show that KDM6B regulates CDK4/6-pRB-E2F pathway through H3K27me3-dependent enhancer-promoter interactions in neuroblastoma.
13h
Serological responses and vaccine effectiveness for extended COVID-19 vaccine schedules in England
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27410-5 The UK extended the interval until the second COVID-19 vaccine dose up to 12 weeks. Here, the authors show in a cohort of 750 participants aged 50–89 years that the extended schedule results in higher antibody titers and estimate a higher vaccine effectiveness for the extended schedule.
13h
En fortælling fra forskningens frontlinje
Efter i årevis at have drevet journalistisk rovdrift på bl.a. sundhedsforskningen vendte jeg for nylig trafikken om for 'at give tilbage', som man siger, og deltog i et lægemiddelforsøg. Det var en ganske særlig oplevelse.
13h
Steno-center i Grønland favner bredt
Det grønlandske Steno Diabetes Center skal være løftestang for behandlingen af patienter med diabetes, men også generelt styrke behandlingen af patienter med andre kroniske sygdomme som KOL og hypertension.
15h
Lungeteam cykler ud til svært syge patienter
REPORTAGE Lungemedicinsk Afdeling på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital har succes med at tilbyde patienter med ­terminal KOL og lungesygdom et besøg i eget hjem. Vi fulgte overlæge Nassim Bazeghi Roberts og syge­plejerske Lene Nissen, da de cyklede ud til besøg hos 72-årige Jess Harbo, der er terminal KOL-patient.
15h
Podd: Vår personlighet och distansarbetet
Personlighet och familjesituation avgör hur vi mår och presterar på hemmakontoret. I den omvälvande början av pandemin gick extroverta personer på högvarv – men nu samvetsgrannhet seglat upp som en minst lika viktig drivkraft i distansarbetet.
16h
Schneider Shorts 10.12.2021 – Sex, Drugs and Quackery
Schneider Shorts 10 December 2021 – the incredible clinical partners of Cassava Sciences, Duke University expands quack operations, bullies bulling bullies at Max Planck Society, French COVID-19 suppository cancelled but we can target telomeres instead, plus there's always oleandrin, Nature has a new joke journal, Norilsk, the most polluted place on Earth, and finally: why you must never refuse se
17h
COVID-patienter presser kirurgisk afdeling længere væk fra kerneopgaven
Tredje bølge med COVID-19 har ramt Kirurgisk Afdeling på Sjællands Universitetshospital, Køge, hårdt. Det normale afsnit til planlagt kirurgi huser nu udelukkende COVID-19-patienter. Selvom afdelingen kan trække på tidligere erfaringer, så presser tredje bølge fagligheden, mens ventelisterne stiger, og patienter med udskudte operationer bliver dårligere.
18h
Trods tredje bølge sover Lars Østergaard godt om natten
Der er en helt anden ro over forberedelserne til den anden COVID-19-vinter i Danmark på Afdeling for ­Infektionssygdomme på Aarhus Universitetshospital. Hvis blot coronavirus opfører sig nogenlunde som i de første bølger, har ledende overlæge Lars Østergaard nemlig erfaringen at trække på, når det kommer til ­planlægning, behandling og arbejdsmiljø.
18h
Kronikerne må ikke drukne i næste coronabølge
Der er stadig mange ubekendte for lungemedicinerne, der ikke kun skal have deres øje på COVID-19, men også på kronikere, der bliver mere syge i et åbent samfund, og på influenza. Ulla Møller Weinreich, forsknings­ansvarlig overlæge på Lungemedicinsk Afdeling på ­Aalborg Universitetshospital, er alligevel tryg, fordi hun ved, at organisationen kan omstille sig lynhurtigt.
18h
Lægeformand om finanslov: Det lange lys forblev slukket
Sundhedsvæsenet har brug for permanente, ikke midlertidige løsninger som den coronavinterpakke, Folketinget netop har vedtaget som en del af næste års finanslov. Skuffende er det også, at der ikke er afsat penge til psykiatrien. Til gengæld er aftalen godt nyt for de omkring 1.300 udenlandske læger, der ønsker at arbejde i Danmark.
18h
Does anyone else think the Metaverse isn't questioned enough?
Ever since the day I heard about Facebook's new 'Metaverse', I've been so skeptical and against the fact that someday, humans will be fully immersed in a virtual world with almost little to no social interaction at all in the real world. This is even more concerning coming from the ideology of a man who seems to have no sense of empathy or actual interest in the well being of those using his prod
19h
Family dynamics can motivate and prevent talking about health
New research explores how family dynamics factor into whether 18- to 25-year-olds share private health information and involve their parents when making medical decisions. Having open and respectful conversations and reciprocal information sharing early on could help improve an emerging adult's overall health.
20h
[Academic] Participants aged between 50-65 years needed for a short language-related experiment that is currently running online (Right-handed, native English speakers, 50-65)
Hi, I am currently conducting an experiment to examine language processing in adults aged between 50-65 years. It is quite simple and takes approx. 10-15 minutes to complete on a laptop or PC only. Participants must also be right-handed and speak English as a first language. The experiment has received ethical approval from Maynooth University`s Research Ethics Subcommittee (SRESC-2021-2450172).
21h
Mini-jet found near Milky Way's supermassive black hole
Our Milky Way's central black hole has a leak. This supermassive black hole looks like it still has the vestiges of a blowtorch-like jet dating back several thousand years. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope hasn't photographed the phantom jet but has helped find circumstantial evidence that it is still pushing feebly into a huge hydrogen cloud and then splattering, like the narrow stream from a hose a
21h
A beetle chemical defense gland offers clues about how complex organs evolve
Rove beetles are among the chemists of the insect world, concocting noxious compounds within their bodies that are weaponized to ward off predators, enabling the beetles to survive in leaf litter and soil in ecosystems across the planet. Investigators studying a species of rove beetle report how two distinct cell types have come together to form a specialized gland for making and secreting these d
21h
Machine learning decodes tremors of the universe
Researchers train a neural network to estimate — in just a few seconds — the precise characteristics of merging black holes based on their gravitational-wave emissions. The network determines the masses and spins of the black holes, where in the sky, at what angle, and how far away from Earth the merger took place.
21h
A new super-cooled microwave source boosts the scale-up of quantum computers
Researchers have developed a circuit that produces the high-quality microwave signals required to control quantum computers while operating at temperatures near absolute zero. This is a key step towards moving the control system closer to the quantum processor, which may make it possible to greatly increase the number of qubits in the processor.
22h
Mal de Débarquement: The Science of Land Sickness
Recently I was lucky to spend seven days on a catamaran out at sea with a small group of (COVID-vaccinated) friends. We traveled around the Gulf of California, witnessing truly amazing sights like manta rays jumping out of the water, sea birds diving into the water, and turtles floating along in the swell. This was […]
23h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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