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Scientist Who Trained Rats to Play "Doom II" Says He May Start Twitch Channel
Last year, former Feinstein Institutes neuroengineer Viktor Tóth set a simple goal: he wanted to teach rats to play the classic 1994 video game "Doom II." No, it wasn't just a strange hobby. No, he wasn't trying to start a Twitch channel. The Hungarian software engineer and neuroscientist wanted to learn more about brain computer interfaces, while showcasing the potential insights researchers cou
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Where I Live, No One Cares About COVID
In November, my wife asked me whether I had seen an article with the remarkable headline "Is It Safe to Go to Thanksgiving Dinner?" "Is that from last year?" I asked. "No, it's a few days old," she said, her voice sinking to a growling murmur. "These people ." I am old enough to remember the good old days when holiday-advice pieces were all variations on "How to Talk to Your Tea Party Uncle About
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Brain surgeons and rocket scientists no brighter than the rest of us, study finds
Data from 329 aerospace engineers and 72 neurosurgeons suggests they are not necessarily cleverer than general population It may not be rocket science, but researchers have found aerospace engineers and brain surgeons are not necessarily brighter than the general population. Researchers examined data from an international cohort of 329 aerospace engineers and 72 neurosurgeons who completed 12 tas
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Can you trust a negative lateral flow Covid test?
Analysis: with cold symptoms, it is better to wait for a PCR result rather than risk spreading the virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage You wake up with a pounding head, sore throat and runny nose: you reach for one of those lateral flow tests (LFT) you've got stashed away, just to check it is not Covid. If it returns a single red line (negative), then most people w
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Discovery of 'split' photon provides a new way to see light
Nearly a century after Italian physicist Ettore Majorana laid the groundwork for the discovery that electrons could be divided into halves, researchers predict that split photons may also exist, according to a study from Dartmouth and SUNY Polytechnic Institute researchers.
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The best science images of 2021
Nature, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03521-3 A helicopter on Mars, human–monkey embryos, volcanic ash and more.
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Can oil and water mix?
Common experience tells us that oil and water do not mix. Yet, it turns out that they can mix when oil is dispersed as small droplets in water. This strange behavior has long vexed scientists because there is no explanation for it. A team of EPFL and ICTP scientists have studied this question using novel optical technology and discovered the mechanism by which these two neutral and immiscible comp
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Team develops the world's first optical oscilloscope
A team from UCF has developed the world's first optical oscilloscope, an instrument that is able to measure the electric field of light. The device converts light oscillations into electrical signals, much like hospital monitors convert a patient's heartbeat into electrical oscillation.
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Invasive snake in Gran Canaria has killed off most native reptiles on the island
A pair of researchers with Island Ecology and Evolution Research Group, Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiología, has found that an invasive species of snake has killed off nearly all of the reptiles native to Gran Canaria. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Julien Piquet and Marta López-Darias describe their comparison of habitats impacted by the importation of
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Isotope analyses unlock Iron Age secrets
Elemental and lead isotope analyses of ancient copper ingots are unlocking secrets of Early Iron Age trade routes and how indigenous Mediterranean communities functioned from about 2,600 years ago.
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Mysterious STEVE light emissions emanate from Earth's magnetosphere
For years, amateur aurora watchers from Canada have noticed mysterious streaks of pale purple and green light that seemed to dance across the nighttime sky. But it wasn't until 2016 that they shared their colorful images with scientists, who soon identified the lightshow as a new type of upper-atmosphere phenomenon that was jokingly named STEVE. Additional contributions from citizen scientists are
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Fremtidens elforsyning: Hvor lange nedbrud kan vi tåle?
PLUS. Vi kan ikke både øge elforbruget og lukke kraftværker uden at det går ud over forsyningssikkerheden, siger Dansk Energi. Men Energinet, der står bag beregningerne holder fast i, at problemet skal løses med et tættere samarbejde med vores naboer
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Human Brains Can Solve Hard Problems Moments Before Falling Asleep, Study Finds
Have you ever had a great idea right before you fell asleep — only to forget it the next morning when you wake up? A new study says there's a reason for that. Researchers have discovered that humans experience a "creative sweet spot" in the moments right before we fall asleep, according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances. More specifically, it occurs during a sleep phase cal
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Amazon Under Fire for Workplace Cell Phone Ban After Deadly Warehouse Collapse
An Amazon warehouse collapsed in Edwardsville, Illinois on Friday night, killing six people during a series of deadly tornadoes. Now, as recovery efforts are still underway, the tech giant is under fire for its controversial workplace cell phone ban — devices which many rely on to keep updated during emergencies, Bloomberg reports . The policy, which Amazon has had in place for years, restricted
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MIT Professor Warns That Cartels Could Use "Slaughterbots" to Evade Justice
Cheap, lightweight killer robots are just around the corner — and major military powers, including the US, are doing very little to stop them. In an interview with TheNextWeb , MIT artificial intelligence and weapons researcher Max Tegmark warned that the kind of "slaughterbots" that militaries are already working hard on may soon be in the hands of civilians as well. "They'll be small, cheap and
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Harvard Warns That Chinese Tech Is Rapidly Overtaking American Capabilities
The Great Rivalry The race for tech dominance between China and the US is heating up — but it's starting to look like Beijing is taking the lead. A new report, spotted by The South China Morning Post and published last week by the Harvard Kennedy School, found that China is rapidly gaining steam in the realms of artificial intelligence, quantum computing, 5G, semiconductors, biotechnology, and gr
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Elon Musk Says That Politically, He's a "Utopian Anarchist"
Tesla CEO Elon Musk isn't one to follow rules, particularly when he thinks they're bogus. The billionaire likes to envision a world, or perhaps a much smaller society on Mars, in which everybody can do as they please without a greater hierarchy of power. "If there's a utopia where people have access to any goods or services that they want, there's plenty for everyone," Musk told Time magazine aft
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Elon Musk Is Time Magazine's Person of the Year 2021
And The Winner Is… It's official: Elon Musk is Time Magazine's Person of the Year. The Tesla CEO received the illustrious designation on Monday. This year, he also joined the likes of Simone Biles, who was named athlete of the year, and vaccine scientists, who were named heroes of the year, in the magazine's annual issue that profiles people, groups, and ideas that have " had the most influence o
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Gen Z Is Done With the Pandemic
Taylor Robertson wasn't expecting his freshman year of college to end at home. The 21-year-old William & Mary junior spent most of 2020 away from his campus after classes went remote in March, and like so many other students, found that the virtual format didn't work for him. An already-difficult academic year was even more straining because he struggled to retain information from Zoom classes. W
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Guy Accidentally Sells $300,000 "Bored Ape" NFT for 1% of Its Value
One "fat finger"-ed NFT enthusiast made a typo that ended up costing him hundreds of thousands of dollars. As CNET reports , a "Bored Ape Yacht Club" fan named maxnaut (real name Max) meant to sell his ennui primate NFT for 75 ether — the Ethereum equivalent of about $300,000 — but accidentally listed it for 0.75 ether instead. Before he could correct the "fat finger error," as maxnaut put it to
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Billionaire Launches Startup to Reprogram Human Gene Expression
Billionaire Coinbase founder Brian Armstrong has launched a new "epigenetic reprogramming" company, called NewLimit, with the goal of greatly extending the human lifespan. Armstrong is collaborating with Blake Byers, a Silicon Valley entrepreneur with a Stanford PhD in bioengineering, to stop aging in its tracks. "NewLimit will start by deeply interrogating epigenetic drivers of aging and develop
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Amazon Workers Say Company Failed to Warn Them of Deadly Tornado
Deadly Practices As more tragic details emerge from the deadly Amazon warehouse collapse, some employees are claiming that the company has refused to give workers time off during severe weather — and even that it failed to warn them as the weekend's tornado approached. A new report from The Intercept found that warehouse managers at the company refused to grant time off to workers so they could s
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In 500 years' time, which current scientific theories will be as discredited as flat Earth theory?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts Five hundred years or so ago a significant number of people thought the world was flat. In 500 years' time, which current scientific theories will be relegated to the same level as the flat Earth theory is now? Richard Cutsfor
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Your niece is suddenly vegan! How to survive the 12 disasters of Christmas
One guest is an antivaxxer, another is allergic to your cats, the turkey is still raw and your best friends are splitting up in the sitting room. Here is how to face down festive fiascos It's that time of year when you wake up sweating and can't figure out why. Did you accidentally wear your thermals in bed? Do you have tuberculosis? No, dummy, it's just that it's almost Christmas, it's your turn
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Covid passports could increase vaccine uptake, study suggests
Certification encouraged vaccination in countries with low coverage, especially among young people Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus passports could lead to increased uptake of vaccines, especially among young people, a study suggests. Research by the University of Oxford found Covid-19 certification led to increased jab uptake 20 days before and 40 days af
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Scientists Sucessfully Bioprint World's Largest Lab-Grown Steak
Lab Grown Steak Israeli lab-grown meat company MeaTech 3D says it has successfully bioprinted a 3.67 ounce steak that's composed out of layers of lab-grown fat and muscle cells — making it the world's largest lab-grown steak. The company claims it's the "largest cultured steak produced to date," meaning it would serve as an "important milestone toward the goal of scaled production of cultivated b
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Billionaire Playboy Shares Video of Himself Frolicking in Outer Space
Playing Around Billionaire Yusaku Maezawa is having a blast on board the International Space Station. The wealthy Japanese space tourist recently launched into orbit on a Soyuz spacecraft for a 12-day vacation on the orbital outpost. It may be a warmup for his eventual journey on board a SpaceX Starship around the Moon — but that doesn't mean he can't have a little fun this time around. In a new
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The Coronavirus Turned a Rural County Into a Battleground for Millionaires
J oni Reynolds often wonders how things in Gunnison County got so out of hand. How did she, the top health official of a sparsely populated county deep in the Rocky Mountains, end up the target of national fury, and frightened enough to sleep with a gun on her nightstand? Joni and her husband, Dennis, moved to Gunnison in 2015 to be closer to nature: the smooth waters of the Blue Mesa Reservoir;
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Elon Musk Says SpaceX Is Going to Start Sucking CO2 Out of the Air and Turning It Into Rocket Fuel
Air Delivery SpaceX is embarking on a bold new adventure: making rocket fuel out of thin air. "SpaceX is starting a program to take CO2 out of atmosphere & turn it into rocket fuel," CEO Elon Musk tweeted on Monday . "Please join if interested." Such a process — using in-situ resources to generate fuel — could have great implications during our transition to becoming interplanetary, according to
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A Perfect—And Cyclical—Succession Finale
This article contains spoilers through the ninth episode of Succession Season 3. If the broad strokes of Succession season finales can feel familiar by now—Kendall will be emotionally wrecked, the org chart will shift, and people will sell their soul for the promise of power—the show always excels at the details. Like that of Kendall, at the end of Season 1, returning to a wedding after witnessin
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Boris Johnson's amorality has been proven beyond doubt | Letters
It is no surprise that he is proving unfit to be prime minister, writes Paul Connew , while Kevin Donovan points out the PM's hypocrisy with regard to the NHS It is hard to disagree with John Harris's devastating assessment of Boris Johnson ( Boris Johnson's crises boil down to one thing: contempt for the rest of us, 12 December ). Except, perhaps, when he writes that Johnson is "so arrogant and
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Tony Beets's $5 MILLION Fleet of Machines | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #TonyBeets #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discovery
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Geminid meteor shower 2021: how to see the spectacular event in Australia
The Geminids are expected to be most visible between 3am and 4am across the country Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing The night sky is set to be illuminated across Australia this week, as the annual Geminid meteor shower begins peaking on Tuesday morning. The meteor shower is expected to be at its most visible between 3am and 4am in every major city, and although the meteor s
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Microbes Are Evolving to Eat Plastic Pollution, Scientists Say
Plastic Planet In a study that truly underscores the profound and devastating impact humans have on the environment, researchers have found that microscopic bugs are evolving to eat plastic. The study, published in the journal Microbial Ecology , found a growing number of microbes that have evolved to carry a plastic-degrading enzyme. These bugs could hold the key to creating enzymes that break d
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When the Myth of Voter Fraud Comes for You
W hen I met with Crystal Mason recently at her home in Rendon, Texas, we sat on a wide couch that served as the center of her domain, with plenty of space for children, grandchildren, nephews, and nieces. Their photographs filled the house . Mason's mother called to her from another room, needing advice; later, her eight-month-old grandson, Carter, joined us on the couch after waking up from an a
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More Covid curbs possible but families can have Christmas together – Raab
Deputy prime minister offers reassurance over gatherings as government faces record rebellion Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Further Covid restrictions between Christmas and New Year are under discussion in government, Dominic Raab has said, but stressed he believed plan B measures should be enough to allow people to spend the season with loved ones. Raab's comments
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Cosmologists Parry Attacks on the Vaunted Cosmological Principle
The latest attempt to rattle the foundations of cosmology appeared as a smattering of dots pulled upward into a cosmic sneer. The arc of distant galaxies, which Alexia Lopez presented at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in June, sprawls so far across the sky that it would take 20 full moons to hide it. Spanning an estimated 3.3 billion light-years of space, the smile-shaped structure..
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'Colossal waste': Nobel laureates call for 2% cut to military spending worldwide
Governments urged to use 'peace dividend' to help UN tackle pandemics, climate crisis and extreme poverty More than 50 Nobel laureates have signed an open letter calling for all countries to cut their military spending by 2% a year for the next five years, and put half the saved money in a UN fund to combat pandemics, the climate crisis, and extreme poverty. Coordinated by the Italian physicist C
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Tech Bro Thinks He's Close to Cheating Death
A bold proposal: that by 2050, a 70-year-old will look and feel like they're 50. That's the gamble that 35-year-old James Peyer is taking with this Cambrian Biopharma "longevity startup," the Times of London reports . "Of our 100,000-year-plus history as a species, it's been for only about 75 years that these diseases of ageing have been the primary predators of humankind," he told the newspaper.
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The richest countries are vaccine hoarders. Try them in international court | Anthony Costello
Millions have died unnecessarily of Covid and millions more will in 2022 unless something changes. Justice must be done Millions more people will die from Covid-19 in the coming year, and most will be unvaccinated. The vaccines that could save millions of lives are not reaching the poor majority of the world's population. The contrast is stark: the current share of people fully vaccinated in high
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3 ways to prepare society for the next pandemic | Jennifer B. Nuzzo
What if we treated the risk of pandemics the same way we treat the risk of fires? In this eye-opening talk, infectious disease epidemiologist Jennifer B. Nuzzo unpacks how the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 sparked a cultural shift in how we defend against fires — and explains why pandemics demand the same sort of reaction. She breaks down the data we need to gather when facing possible danger, the
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Tropical fish… up north? How ocean physics alters water temperature and salinity
A study led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution scientists is explaining why warm and salty water along with warm water fish species, such as the deep-sea dwelling Gulf Stream flounder and Black Sea bass, were found far inshore in New England in the middle of winter 2017. How did this happen? Researchers say it is due to an intrusion of offshore water from the open ocean onto the Northeast U.S
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How rising groundwater caused by climate change could devastate coastal communities
Fae Saulenas does not want your sympathy. Saulenas, along with her 46-year-old daughter Lauren, spent last winter—their covid winter—in Saugus, Massachusetts, in a house without a working furnace. Saulenas is in her 70s. Lauren, because of brain injuries she experienced in the womb, is quadriplegic, blind, and affected by a seizure disorder, among other disabilities. In winter, it's not unusual f
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Quantum algorithms bring ions to a standstill
Laser beams can do more than just heat things up; they can cool them down too. That is nothing new for physicists who have devoted themselves to precision spectroscopy and the development of optical atomic clocks. But what is new is the extremely low temperature that researchers at the QUEST Institute at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have been able to reach with their highly char
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New supernova remnant detected by astronomers
Astronomers from Costa Rica and Australia have reported the detection of a new supernova remnant (SNR) by inspecting a gamma-ray source known as FHES J1723.5−0501. The researchers found that this source is an SNR and it has been designated G17.8+16.7. The finding is detailed in a paper published December 3 on arXiv.org.
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New crystal structure for hydrogen compounds for high-temperature superconductivity
Superconductivity is the disappearance of electrical resistance in certain materials below a certain temperature, known as "transition temperature." The phenomenon has tremendous implications for revolutionizing technology as know it, enabling low-loss power transmission and maintenance of electromagnetic force without electrical supply. However, superconductivity usually requires extremely low te
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New research explains Earth's peculiar chemical composition
Earth's surface environment hosts large reservoirs of hydrogen (H, mainly in the form of water, H2O), nitrogen (in atmospheric N2) and carbon (mainly in carbonate rocks). H, N and C are sometimes called "volatile" elements, or simply "volatiles," by geoscientists because many of the simple compounds they form are gases at standard temperature and pressure. However, the distribution of these volati
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Can you solve it? From Russia with logic
Mathematicians get ready to party UPDATE: The solutions can be read here. The largest and most important event in the mathematical calendar will take place next July in St Petersburg. The International Congress of Mathematicians is a quadrennial gathering at which many of the subject's most prominent thinkers give lectures and the winners of maths' most prestigious prize, the Fields Medal, are an
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Nike Buys NFT Company that Made the Elon Musk "Cybersneaker"
A sneaker company known for photoshopping a "cybershoe" onto Elon Musk has been purchased by Nike — in yet another sign, arguably, that the relationship between the physical and digital worlds is changing forever. As The Verge reports , Nike has acquired the sneaker company RTFKT (which is supposedly pronounced like "artifact," though it's more fun to say "ratfucked") for an undisclosed sum, with
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How big is the risk of Omicron in the UK and how do we know?
Analysis: Sajid Javid estimates there are 200,000 new cases a day – here's why the experts suggest that number will soon multiply Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage When Savid Javid revealed on Monday that an estimated 200,000 people a day are getting infected with Omicron, it brought understandable concern – especially as just 4,713 cases of the variant had been confir
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Pfizer says pill is effective in protecting against severe disease from Covid
Experimental antiviral pill Paxlovid is also effective against the Omicron variant, company announces A pill manufactured by the prominent Covid-19 vaccine provider Pfizer is highly effective in protecting against severe disease from coronavirus , the company said on Tuesday. The experimental antiviral pill Paxlovid is also effective against the Omicron variant that is spreading rapidly across th
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T Cells Might Be Our Bodies' Best Shot Against Omicron
Killer T cells, as their name might imply, are not known for their mercy. When these immunological assassins happen upon a cell that's been hijacked by a virus, their first instinct is to butcher. The killer T punches holes in the compromised cell and pumps in toxins to destroy it from the inside out. The cell shrinks and collapses; its perforated surface erupts in bubbles and boils, which slough
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UK Covid live: Sajid Javid says Omicron cases doubling every two days as MPs debate plan B restrictions
Health secretary says scientists have never seen variant that can spread so quickly; MPs debate Covid passports and other rules ahead of crunch vote UK PM warns of 'huge spike' of Omicron cases ahead of Commons vote Sunak warns over multibillion pound cost of booster programme Sajid Javid clears England's travel red list as Omicron takes hold Nicola Sturgeon announces new Covid advice for Scotlan
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The Atlantic's vital currents could collapse. Scientists are racing to understand the dangers.
On a Saturday morning in December of 2020, the RRS Discovery floated in calm waters just east of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the massive undersea mountain range that runs from the Arctic nearly to the Antarctic. The team onboard the research vessel, mostly from the UK's National Oceanography Centre, used an acoustic signaling system to trigger the release of a cable more than three miles long from it
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Swirling bacteria mimic Van Gogh's 'The Starry Night'
Scientists have discovered a way to transform millions of predatory bacteria into swirling flash mobs reminiscent of painter Vincent Van Gogh's "The Starry Night" as the unexpected result of experiments on a genetic circuit the creatures use to discern friend from foe.
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New Sexual Harassment Lawsuit Alleges Disgusting Behavior at Tesla Factory
Lawsuit Madness Tesla has been hit with a sexual harassment suit by a factory worker — for the second time in two weeks. As Reuters and others report , a woman who worked on the assembly line at Tesla's Fremont, California factory said she suffered "sexual harassment on a near-daily basis" from her manager. Along with repeated inappropriate behavior that included unwanted massages and comments ab
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To accelerate business, build better human-machine partnerships
Businesses that want to be digital leaders in their markets need to embrace automation, not only to augment existing capabilities or to reduce costs but to position themselves to successfully maneuver the rapid expansion of IT demand ushered in through digital innovation. "It's a scale issue," says John Roese, global chief technology officer at Dell Technologies. "Without autonomous operations, i
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How Ethical Hackers Could Help Us Build Trust in AI
AI is exerting an ever greater influence on our lives, which is leading to growing concern over whether we can trust it to act fairly and reliably. E thical hackers , AI audits, and "bias bounties" could help us keep a lid on the potential harms , say researchers. There's increasing awareness of the dangers posed by our reliance on AI. These systems have a worrying knack for picking up and replic
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Making and manipulating capsule-like DNA structures for use in artificial molecular systems
Biophysicists in Japan have found ways to make and manipulate capsule-like DNA structures that could be used in the development of artificial molecular systems. Such systems could function, for example, inside the human body. The study was a collaboration between Yusuke Sato of Tohoku University and Masahiro Takinoue of the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), and the findings were publishe
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Corner Stores Are the New Darlings of the Global Tech Industry
Corner stores don't look like much. Maybe the one nearest to you has dusty shelves lined with bags of chips and cookies, and the cashier sitting next to the cigarettes and mini–shampoo bottles only takes cash. In some places, these mom-and-pop shops are simple roadside stalls or kiosks. They have largely operated the same way for decades: Many still order their products over the phone and manage
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Researcher uses fake email address to submit a paper mill manuscript without corresponding author's knowledge
A Springer Nature journal has retracted a paper sourced from a paper mill – not an uncommon occurrence nowadays. What adds a bit of intrigue is that the manuscript was submitted with a fake email address to keep the alleged corresponding author from knowing about it. The paper, "Electrophysiological Follow-Up of Patients with Chronic Peripheral … Continue reading
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Why America Can't Test Like Europe
Except for maybe pasta and work-life balance, no topic makes liberal Americans wish they were European more than health care. So when President Joe Biden announced a plan earlier this month mandating that private insurers reimburse people for rapid coronavirus tests that they take at home, some commentators cried out that his plan was not enough . The new rule won't help everyone, and getting rei
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800,000 Deaths
Last week, at a small funeral home in Northwest Washington, D.C., I attended the funeral of a teacher I knew from my time working in Prince George's County schools eight years ago, Yvonne Brown. Ms. Brown loved literature. She wrote and self-published a novel. She started her school's poetry club. She loved the magic of words. She loved her students. During the service, one young man discussed ho
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When the Whole World Is a Playground
The winning images have been announced in the sixth edition of the Red Bull Illume Image Quest photo competition. The contest invited photographers to submit images of the world of action-and-adventure sports in one of 10 categories, including Energy, Playground, and Raw. This year the competition received 41,447 entries from photographers around the world. Red Bull was kind enough to share some
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Medieval pendant is millionth archaeological find by British public
Object is among nearly 50,000 finds by hobbyists in 2020, according to Portable Antiquities Scheme report Rare runes and Roman hoards: five treasures discovered in UK last year Some spent the lockdowns of 2020 baking bread, perfecting yoga poses or learning a few words of Japanese. Others got into a slightly more unusual hobby: amateur treasure hunting. These people contributed to the 50,000 arch
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Paper claiming a lack of evidence COVID-19 lockdowns work is retracted
This is an evolving story, and we will update as we learn more. A paper in Springer Nature's Scientific Reports claiming there was essentially no evidence that lockdowns prevented COVID-19 deaths has been retracted. As of late Tuesday US Eastern time, while the PDF of the paper was marked "RETRACTED ARTICLE," a link to the … Continue reading
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How We Swallowed Redpilled Whole
Sign up for Caleb's newsletter here . In The Matrix , Morpheus, a cool bald guy wearing sunglasses and a black crocodile trench coat, offers Keanu Reeves (and, by extension, the audience) a choice. Morpheus has just shown us that the world we thought was real is merely a simulation, and that the actual real world is mired in an interminable, violent power struggle between robots and humans. He pr
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Ex-SpaceX Engineer Says She Was Constantly Sexually Harassed by Coworkers
Rife with Sexism A former SpaceX engineer claims that the company fostered a culture of misogyny and wanton sexual assault that forced her to eventually quit. Ashley Kosak, a former mission integration engineer at SpaceX, penned an essay in Lioness in which she described the company as "so rife with sexism, the only remedy is for women to leave." She says it was a work environment in which "count
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New spin amplifier accelerates search for dark matter
Despite astrophysical evidence for the existence of dark matter, direct detection of its interaction with particles and fields of the standard model has not been achieved. Illuminating dark matter is the best hope of making progress in understanding the universe and would provide insights into astrophysics, cosmology and physics beyond the standard model.
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Marathon experiment reveals quirks of quarks
University of Adelaide experts, who are part of the international community of researchers investigating the fundamental physical properties of atoms, may have come across a new paradigm for the way atomic nuclei are built.
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Coal in America: A Legacy of Environmental Catastrophe
Scenes from the end of coal: A blasted mountaintop in Kentucky, an underground inferno in Pennsylvania, slowly dying maples in New Hampshire, and a toxic pile of waste in Florida. By law, mining companies are supposed to ameliorate the damage they cause, but in many cases, that reclamation never happens.
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A computer made of floppy rubber
A piece of corrugated rubber can function as a simple computer, displaying memory and displaying the ability to count to two. Leiden physicists researching mechanical metamaterials publish about the computing rubber in the journal PNAS. "Simple materials can process information, and we want to find the principles behind that."
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The trial of Charles Lieber is also a test of the China Initiative
In January of 2020, agents arrived at Harvard University looking for Charles Lieber, a renowned nanotechnology researcher who chaired the school's department of chemistry and chemical biology. They were there to arrest him on charges of hiding his financial ties with a university in China. By arresting Lieber steps from Harvard Yard, authorities were sending a loud message to the academic communi
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Covid-19: Will boosters be enough to slow down Omicron? | podcast
As England moves to plan B, Boris Johnson has announced that all adults will be offered a booster vaccine by the end of December. But will that be enough to protect the NHS from being overwhelmed? Madeleine Finlay speaks to the Guardian's science editor, Ian Sample, about the spread of Omicron, and what we can do to prevent a tidal wave of cases Archive: The Guardian, The Sun Continue reading…
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An enemy within: Pathogens hide in tissue
Antibiotics cure many bacterial infections. However, some patients suffer a relapse. A research group at the University of Basel has now discovered why some bacteria can survive antibiotic therapy. The team uncovered where the bacteria hide in the body and how the body's own immune system also plays an important role.
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China's Big New Idea
A common refrain among Americans when faced with China's export machine—which pumps out 5G telecoms gear, plastic Christmas trees, and just about everything in between—is the complaint that the United States "doesn't make anything anymore." Yet the U.S. retains a commanding advantage in one, especially critical export: ideas. From inalienable rights to Iron Man, Americans churn out the concepts a
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NASA's 'Eyes on Asteroids' tool reveals near-Earth object neighborhood
Through a new 3D real-time visualization tool, you can now explore the asteroids and comets that approach Earth's orbital neighborhood—and the spacecraft that visit these objects—with a click or a swipe. NASA's Eyes on Asteroids brings this data to any smartphone, tablet, or computer with an internet connection—no download required.
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A missing link in the MHC class divergence puzzle: Class II came first
Which came first, MHC class I or MHC class II? For decades, it has been debated which of these two similar classes came first in evolution. Now, Keiichiro Hashimoto and his group at Fujita Health University, Japan, in collaboration with European research groups, have provided an answer to this question in a new article in PNAS. They discovered an ancient category of MHC molecules, MHC-W, that repr
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Researchers show why heat may make weather less predictable
A new Stanford University study shows rising temperatures may intensify the unpredictability of weather in Earth's midlatitudes. The limit of reliable temperature, wind and rainfall forecasts falls by about a day when the atmosphere warms by even a few degrees Celsius.
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Who Killed the Robot Dog?
The robotic companion was once a dream of techno-utopianism, but has instead become a terrifying weapon. What happened?
5h
John Ioannidis and the Carl Sagan effect in science communication about COVID-19
We have been critical about John Ioannidis over a number of his statements about the COVID-19 pandemic. Now he's done it again, producing a poor-quality paper whose unwritten assumptions suggest that the Carl Sagan effect, in which scientists are penalized professionally by their peers for becoming popular science communicators, still holds considerable sway in science and medicine. The post fir
1d
Want to limit carbon and curb wildfire? Create a market for small trees
Clearing California's forests of dense overgrowth is a critical first step for curbing catastrophic wildfire in the state. But forest restoration—whether through prescribed burning or thinning—comes at a high price: Not only are these treatments costly, but cutting down or burning vegetation can release stored carbon dioxide, accelerating the impacts of climate change.
1d
A missing genetic switch at the origin of malformations
Embryonic development follows delicate stages: for everything to go well, many genes must coordinate their activity according to a very meticulous scheme and tempo. This precision mechanism sometimes fails, leading to more or less disabling malformations. By studying the Pitx1 gene, one of the genes involved in the construction of the lower limbs, a team has discovered how a small disturbance in t
1d
A gender dimension of energy: Modern cooking fuels connected to quicker demographic transition
Switching to modern cooking fuels like gas or to electricity can improve the well-being of women in the global South, and eventually be connected to falling birth rates, a new study by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research shows. This highlights, for the first time, a connection between the global energy transition and the demographic transition in poorer countries.
1d
Artificial intelligence can create better lightning forecasts
Lightning is one of the most destructive forces of nature, as in 2020 when it sparked the massive California Lightning Complex fires, but it remains hard to predict. A new study led by the University of Washington shows that machine learning—computer algorithms that improve themselves without direct programming by humans—can be used to improve lightning forecasts.
1d
Did you solve it? From Russia with logic
The solutions to today's problems Earlier today I set you three questions from a Russian maths competition used to promote the International Congress of Mathematicians, which will be held in July next year in St Petersburg. 1. Pet swap Continue reading…
1d
Cannabis use could cause harmful drug interactions
Using cannabis alongside other drugs may come with a significant risk of harmful drug-drug interactions, new research suggests. The researchers looked at cannabinoids–a group of substances found in the cannabis plant — and their major metabolites found in cannabis users' blood and found that they interfere with two families of enzymes that help metabolize a wide range of drugs prescribed for a v
1d
Researchers find climate change record in clam shells
The tiny, pale surf clam about the size of a fingernail that most people have seen and collected on beaches around the world holds clues in its shell to Earth's past. For the first time, researchers have been able to identify the monthly, and even weekly, ocean temperatures recorded in these smooth clam shells. Because ancient civilizations consumed these ubiquitous clams and left the shells at ar
3h
When a Genetic Disorder Discovery Is Unwelcome News
Back in 2020, Cristen Willer, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, was leading her laboratory on a search for the genetic underpinnings of an often deadly heart condition called aortic dissection. As the results came in, she was troubled by some of the answers she was getting. They were quite clear — but they had the potential both to help and hurt…
1h
Worldwide study finds differences in avian fear of the unknown
Balancing the exploration of unfamiliar stimuli with a fear of the unknown—neophobia—can help animals maximize the benefits of novel opportunities while minimizing the risks of novel threats from toxic foods, potential predators and the like. Understanding neophobia, then, can yield insights into how species adapt to new or changing environments.
1d
Starwatch: how to see the Geminid meteor shower
Prolific meteor activity that originates from asteroid reaches its peak in early hours of 14 December The usually reliable and prolific Geminid meteor shower reaches its peak tonight. In the early hours of 14 December, one hundred or more meteors are expected to flash across the sky. Visibility this year is hampered by a waxing gibbous moon that is just four days away from being full. Yet, despit
1d
Life arose on hydrogen energy, researchers suggest
How did the first chemical reactions get started at the origin of life and what was their source of energy? Researchers have reconstructed the metabolism of the last universal common ancestor, LUCA. They found that almost all chemical steps used by primordial life to piece together the molecular building blocks of cells are energy releasing reactions. This identified the long-sought source of ener
1d
Five weird things that happen in outer space
It doesn't take a rocket scientist to know space is weird. But just how weird might surprise you. Space is dominated by invisible electromagnetic forces that we typically don't feel. It's also full of bizarre types of matter that we never experience on Earth. Here's five unearthly things that happen almost exclusively in outer space.
1d
Experiment reveals social conventions between baboons
A research team from the CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université has demonstrated that members of a group of baboons can establish shared social conventions—in this case, by all agreeing on how to solve a problem in order to get a reward faster. This is the first time that such conventions have been studied experimentally in an animal species. The results of this groundbreaking work are published in Phi
1d
Newly discovered cave snail with spiky teeth
Finding transparent snails with a length of only a few millimeters on muddy cave walls is no easy feat. "Nevertheless, we succeeded in collecting 57 gastropod populations from various caves in northern Spain. We have now studied them, both in terms of morphology and molecular genetics," explains Dr. Adrienne Jochum of the Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum in Frankfurt and t
5h
NASA to launch four Earth science missions in 2022
NASA will launch four Earth science missions in 2022 to provide scientists with more information about fundamental climate systems and processes including extreme storms, surface water and oceans, and atmospheric dust. Scientists will discuss the upcoming missions at the American Geophysical Union's (AGU) 2021 Fall Meeting, hosted in New Orleans between Dec. 13 and 17.
22h
Life arose on hydrogen energy
How did the first chemical reactions get started at the origin of life and what was their source of energy? Researchers at the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have reconstructed the metabolism of the last universal common ancestor, LUCA. They found that almost all chemical steps used by primordial life to piece together the molecular building blocks of cells are energy-releasing reactio
1d
Baby it's cold inside, especially for women in offices
Air conditioning systems use vast amounts of energy to maintain comfortable indoor temperatures in offices. This expense is justified by the need for satisfactory indoor environments to ensure the well-being and performance of office workers. Yet our appetite for cooling is growing—air conditioning represents the fastest-growing source of energy use in buildings, with cooling energy tripling betwe
1d
The rise and fall of monoculture farming
By growing just one crop species in a field at a time, monocultures enable farmers to use machinery, increasing the efficiency of activities like planting and harvesting. But despite supplying the lion's share of the world's food, monocultures are amongst the most controversial features of today's agriculture.
1d
Physics of coral as an indicator of reef health
New research shows that physics measurements of just a small portion of reef can be used to assess the health of an entire reef system. The findings may help scientists grasp how these important ecosystems will respond to a changing climate.
8min
Creating the human-robotic dream team
Using autonomous vehicle guidelines, a team has developed a system to improve interactions between people and robots. The way people interact safely with robots is at the forefront of today's research related to automation and manufacturing, explains a researcher. She is one of several researchers who are working to develop systems that allow humans and robots to interact safely and efficiently.
8min
Why we think of the Queen of Sheba as Black
New research clarifies the legend behind the Queen of Sheba, and why we tend to think of her as Black. Halle Berry played her in a 1995 made-for-TV movie. On her album Black Is King, Beyoncé described herself as an heir to her legacy. And a recent article at the online Jewish feminist site Alma declared her the "Black Jewish queen … you probably didn't learn about in Hebrew school." "…in the 'Keb
14min
Deepest images yet of Milky Way's supermassive black hole
Astronomers have obtained the deepest and sharpest images to date of the region around the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. The new images zoom in 20 times more than what was possible before the VLTI and have helped astronomers find a never-before-seen star close to the black hole. By tracking the orbits of stars at the centre of our Milky Way, the team has made the most precis
44min
Earliest adorned female infant burial in Europe significant in understanding evolution of personhood
Ten thousand years ago, a group of hunter-gatherers buried an infant girl in an Italian cave with a rich selection of their treasured beads and pendants, showing that even the youngest females were recognized as full persons in their society. The excavations and analysis of the discovery offer insight into the early Mesolithic period, from which few recorded burials are known.
44min
Large-scale genomic study reveals robust activation of the immune system following advanced Inner Engineering meditation retreat [Systems Biology]
The positive impact of meditation on human well-being is well documented, yet its molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. We applied a comprehensive systems biology approach starting with whole-blood gene expression profiling combined with multilevel bioinformatic analyses to characterize the coexpression, transcriptional, and protein–protein interaction networks to identify a meditation
50min
The TPLATE complex mediates membrane bending during plant clathrin-mediated endocytosis [Plant Biology]
Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major route of entry of cargos into cells and thus underpins many physiological processes. During endocytosis, an area of flat membrane is remodeled by proteins to create a spherical vesicle against intracellular forces. The protein machinery which mediates this membrane bending in plants is unknown. However,…
50min
Oxidative regulation of chloroplast enzymes by thioredoxin and thioredoxin-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]
Thioredoxin (Trx) is a protein that mediates the reducing power transfer from the photosynthetic electron transport system to target enzymes in chloroplasts and regulates their activities. Redox regulation governed by Trx is a system that is central to the adaptation of various chloroplast functions to the ever-changing light environment. However,…
50min
Photosynthetic reaction center variants made via genetic code expansion show Tyr at M210 tunes the initial electron transfer mechanism [Chemistry]
Photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were engineered to vary the electronic properties of a key tyrosine (M210) close to an essential electron transfer component via its replacement with site-specific, genetically encoded noncanonical amino acid tyrosine analogs. High fidelity of noncanonical amino acid incorporation was verified with mass spectrometry…
50min
Ultrasound elasticity of diamond at gigapascal pressures [Physics]
Diamond is the hardest known material in nature and features a wide spectrum of industrial and scientific applications. The key to diamond's outstanding properties is its elasticity, which is associated with its exceptional hardness, shear strength, and incompressibility. Despite many theoretical works, direct measurements of elastic properties are limited to…
50min
The Future of Work Is a 60-Year Career
If 5-year-olds could read academic research reports, they might be alarmed by what they'd find in a recent one from the Stanford Center on Longevity. It opened with a bit of promising news: "In the United States, demographers predict that as many as half of today's 5-year-olds can expect to live to the age of 100." But that was followed, several pages down, by a haunting prediction: "Over the cou
1h
The Supreme Court Is Playing Constitutional Calvinball
Gavin Newsom wants to believe that what's good for Texas is good for California. Shortly after the conservative majority on the Supreme Court allowed a narrow challenge to Texas's anti-abortion law to go forward while the law remains in force, the Golden State governor vowed that he would pursue passage of gun restrictions modeled on the Texas law's unusual structure . "If that's the precedent th
1h
Study combines climatic, tectonic models to explain Andean conundrum
The Andes Mountains are much taller than plate tectonic theories predict they should be, a fact that has puzzled geologists for decades. Mountain-building models tend to focus on the deep-seated compressional forces that occur when tectonic plates collide and send rocks skyward. A new study demonstrates how modern top-down models that account for climate-related factors combined with traditional b
1h
How to turn tension into transformation
One could imagine when researchers and people outside academia work together in a "co-production" process, things do not always run smoothly. With competing interests, agendas and ways of seeing the world, tensions can certainly arise. Think about high-level climate meetings like COP26. But with the right approach, tension can be used to create broad ownership and action for transformative change,
1h
NASA's Webb telescope will have the coolest camera in space
Set to launch on Dec. 22, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is the largest space observatory in history, and it has an equally gargantuan task: to collect infrared light from the distant corners of the cosmos, enabling scientists to probe the structures and origins of our universe and our place in it.
1h
Top Ten Emerging Tech of 2021
The World Economic Forum and Scientific American team up to highlight technological advances that could change the world–from self-fertilizing crops, on-demand drug manufacturing,… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Experiments riding 24th SpaceX cargo mission to space station study bioprinting, crystallization, laundry
The 24th SpaceX cargo resupply services mission, targeted to launch in late December from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carries scientific research and technology demonstrations to the International Space Station. The experiments aboard include studies of bioprinting, crystallization of monoclonal antibodies, changes in immune function, plant gene expression changes, laundering clothes i
1h
Scientists connect diet and temperature to metabolism in opaleye fish
Whether it's warm outside or cold, people generally eat about the same amount. But a fish's appetite can vary enormously with the temperature. As coldblooded animals, their metabolism is governed by external conditions: It's slow going for a cold fish, but high temperatures kick them into high gear.
1h
Mutant bacteria morph into a tiny 'Starry Night'
Scientists have discovered a way to transform millions of predatory bacteria into swirling flash mobs reminiscent of painter Vincent Van Gogh's The Starry Night. The transformation is the unexpected result of experiments on a genetic circuit the creatures use to discern friend from foe. Researchers have studied Myxococcus xanthus for decades as a model system for social cooperation and bacterial
2h
Embracing the promise of a compute-everywhere future
The internet of things and smart devices are everywhere, which means computing needs to be everywhere, too. And this is where edge computing comes in, because as companies pursue faster, more efficient decision-making, all of that data needs to be processed locally, in real time—on device at the edge. "The type of processing that needs to happen in near real time is not something that can be haul
2h
Direct writing of customized structural-color graphics with colloidal photonic inks
Colloidal crystals and glasses are tunable, iridescent, nonfading and nontoxic materials that can be used to develop structural colors. In a new report now published in Science Advances, Jong Bin Kim, and a team of researchers in chemistry and advanced materials in the Republic of Korea, developed direct writing of structural color graphics with high brightness and saturation using colloidal inks.
2h
Tiny meteors leave smoke in the atmosphere, and NASA's studying it
It's time for the Geminids, the annual December meteor shower! Every year, Earth passes through the debris trail from the asteroid 3200 Phaethon. The pea-sized rocks it leaves behind burn up in our atmosphere, producing glowing trails in the night sky. People around the world will stare skyward and marvel at these meteors, also known as shooting stars.
2h
Best of last year: The top Phys.org articles of 2021
2021 was a good year for research of all kinds. The strongest coronal mass ejection in years made headlines this past May, prompting experts around the world to urge world leaders to take it as a warning. Future storms, many noted, could wreak havoc on electrical grids, satellites and the internet. The time to act is now, they strongly suggested.
2h
How we measure the effects of methane matters for climate policy
How effective is the promotion of low-meat diets at reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to carbon pricing when the effectiveness of mitigation policies is measured against methane's long-term behavior? An international team of researchers explored how focusing either on the short- or long-term warming effects of methane can affect climate mitigation policies and dietary transitions in agric
3h
Anti-gay slurs not targeted just at gay men
The childhood playground can be a tough place with insults flying faster than dodgeballs, and while some children outgrow the name calling, others never seem to. Hurling slurs as adults only exacerbates problems. The use of anti-gay slurs by heterosexual men against other heterosexual men is the focus of a new study by Nathan Grant Smith, an associate professor of counseling psychology and chair o
3h
Ancient, hidden dust could reveal the secrets of the moon's past
An ancient layer of rocky, dusty material, covered by periodic lava flows and now buried under the lunar surface, could provide new insight into the moon's deep past, according to a new research. "Using careful data processing, we found interesting new evidence that this buried layer, called paleoregolith, may be much thicker than previously expected," says Tieyuan Zhu, assistant professor of geo
3h
Researchers develop platform to screen for new class of coronavirus antiviral compounds
Researchers investigating ways to develop a novel class of antiviral drugs to treat coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, have developed a platform that can rapidly screen thousands of compounds to identify potential candidates. The team, led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, used their new high-throughput platform to screen drug compounds
3h
Plastic-degrading enzymes increasing in correlation with pollution
The number of microbial enzymes with the ability to degrade plastic is growing, in correlation with local levels of plastic pollution. That is the finding of a new study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, that measured samples of environmental DNA from around the globe. The results illustrate the impact plastic pollution is having on the environment, and hint at potential new solution
3h
Small groups lead; large ones control
How are relationships established between groups? And how do we learn to distinguish who leads and who controls? A publication led by researchers from the Department of Psychology at the University of Chicago with the collaboration of the postdoctoral researcher Jesús Bas from the UPF Center for Brain and Cognition (CBC) found that it is more intuitive to understand who is in control in a conflict
3h
Decade-old photographs shared on social media give away a new species of pygmy grasshopper
While scrolling through iNaturalist—a social network where professional and citizen scientists share their photographs, in order to map biodiversity observations from across the globe—a group of students from Croatia discovered a couple of curious pictures, taken in 2008 in the Peruvian rainforest and posted in 2018. What they were looking at was a pygmy grasshopper sporting a unique pattern of li
3h
PCR tests activated by light
A new approach by LMU chemists could help to significantly improve diagnostic tests based on PCR. The enzymes used are triggered by light pulses.
3h
Researchers test physics of coral as an indicator of reef health
Vast amounts of energy flow around the ocean as waves, tides and currents, eventually impacting coasts, including coral reefs that provide food, income and coastal protection to more than 500 million people. This water movement is foundational to reef success, bringing nutrients and food and removing waste, yet far less research has been focused on the physics in comparison to the biology of these
3h
'Crazy' light emitters: Physicists see an unusual quantum phenomenon
A highly unusual movement of light emitting particles in atomically-thin semiconductors was experimentally confirmed by scientists from the Würzburg–Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat–Complexity and Topology in Quantum Matter. Electronic quasiparticles, known as excitons, seemed to move in opposite directions at the same time. Professor Alexey Chernikov–newly appointed physicist at the Technisc
3h
Implementing sustainable nitrogen use in smallholder rice
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems has published the results of a "mini-review" examining 46 peer-reviewed studies that compared site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) approaches for rice against existing farmer fertilization practices. The study's scope included research examples extracted from 11 countries conducted between 2001 and 2020—using 43 studies from Asia and 3 from Africa.
3h
New technologies usher in an era of virtuous growth in the discipline of marketing
Madison, Erasmus University Rotterdam, and University of Maryland introduce the special issue on "New Technologies in Marketing" in the Journal of Marketing and provide several frameworks for thinking about how new technologies affect the marketing discipline. These frameworks identify potential gaps worthy of further study and propose an agenda for future research.
3h
Illegal gold mining continues to harm Amazon ecosystem
A major intervention against a global hotspot for illegal river gold mining proved to be only narrowly effective at halting environmental degradation in the Madre de Dios region of Peru, according to new research that will be presented on Wednesday, 15 December at AGU Fall Meeting 2021.
3h
FDA Approves New Eye Drops that Could Replace Glasses for Millions
(Image: Vuity.com) One inescapable fact of life, alongside death and taxes, is once you careen over the hill into your 40s your vision starts to get a little blurry. For a lot of people this newfound condition requires the use of reading glasses, which magnify things that are close to your face, such as phones, computer, and those things people call books. This requires over one hundred million A
3h
Toyota Now Charges a Subscription Fee to Use Remote Start Functionality
When a company decides it wants to launch a subscription service and convert free users to paying customers, there are two basic ways to go about it. One method is to create new product features or service tiers that are only available to subscribers while keeping free benefits the same as they were before. Another is to remove services that were formerly free and lock them behind a paywall. The
3h
More microbes that can degrade plastics in places with heavy plastic pollution
The number of microbial enzymes with the ability to degrade plastic is growing, in correlation with local levels of plastic pollution. That is the finding of a new study that measured samples of environmental DNA from around the globe. The results illustrate the impact plastic pollution is having on the environment, and hint at potential new solutions for managing the problem.
3h
Gaia finds fossil spiral arms in Milky Way
An international team of astronomers, led by researcher Chervin Laporte of the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona (ICCUB-IEEC), has used data from the Gaia space mission to create a new map of the Milky Way's outer disc. Intriguingly, newly found structures include evidence for fossil spiral arms. The team published the new work in a paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal A
3h
Stellar 'ashfall' could help distant planets grow
The world's first 3D simulation simultaneously considering dust motion and growth in a disk around a young star has shown that large dust from the central region can be entrained by and then ejected by gas outflows, and eventually fall back onto the outer regions of the disk where it may enable planetesimal formation. This process can be likened to volcanic "ashfall" where ash carried up by gas du
3h
3D imaging enhances checks for aggressive prostate cancer
A new 3D imaging method may help doctors more accurately determine the aggressiveness of a person's prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men and, for men in the United States, it's the second leading cause of death. Some prostate cancers might be slow-growing and can be monitored over time whereas others need to be treated right away. To determine how aggressive someone'
3h
Watch stars move around the Milky Way's supermassive black hole in deepest images yet
The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (ESO's VLTI) has obtained the deepest and sharpest images to date of the region around the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The new images zoom in 20 times more than what was possible before the VLTI and have helped astronomers find a never-before-seen star close to the black hole. By tracking the orbits
4h
A vision of sustainable housing for all of humanity | Vishaan Chakrabarti
By 2100, the UN estimates that the world's population will grow to just over 11 billion people. Architect Vishaan Chakrabarti wants us to start thinking about how we'll house all these people — and how new construction can fight climate change rather than make it worse. In this visionary talk, Chakrabarti proposes a "Goldilocks" solution to sustainable housing that exists in the sweet spot betwee
4h
The science news that shaped 2021: Nature's picks
Nature, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03734-6 From Omicron to a Mars helicopter to an Alzheimer's firestorm, our news editors choose the defining moments in science and research this year.
4h
Gender balance at Nature Conferences: an update
Nature, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03735-5 Nature has made progress in improving the representation and participation of women at scientific conferences — but there is still much more to do.
4h
To get airborne, giant pterosaur took an 8-foot leap
The mammoth pterosaur Quetzalcoatlus probably jumped at least 8 feet into the air before lifting off by sweeping its wings, according to new research. With a wingspan nearing 40 feet, Quetzalcoatlus is the largest known animal to take to the sky. But just how such a massive animal got airborne has been mostly a matter of speculation. Some think it rocked forward on its wingtips like a vampire bat
4h
Air pollution may cancel out benefits of exercise on brain health
In a new study, researchers did not observe the benefits of physical activity on brain volume and health when the environment had higher levels of polluted air. The study of more than 8,000 people also shows that air pollution is associated with a decrease in brain volume and health. "This study shows that air pollution is associated with worse brain health, including white matter lesions, which
4h
The Atlantic Daily: The Nightmare Scenario Looming in Ukraine—And Beyond
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Russia and Ukraine remain on the edge of conflict; opposing forces are reportedly facing each other from just 50 yards apart . The standoff threatens to engulf the international community at a pre
4h
Cancer-spotting AI and human experts can be fooled by image-tampering attacks
Artificial intelligence (AI) models that evaluate medical images have potential to speed up and improve accuracy of cancer diagnoses, but they may also be vulnerable to cyberattacks. Researchers simulated an attack that falsified mammogram images, fooling both an AI breast cancer diagnosis model and human breast imaging radiologist experts.
4h
Learning and protecting itself: How the brain adapts
If there is an injury to the central nervous system such as after a stroke, the brain needs to compensate for this by reorganising itself. To do this, a dense network of molecules between the nerve cells — known as the extracellular matrix — must loosen. This is the job of a wide variety of enzymes that ultimately regulate how plastic or how stable the brain is. Researchers studied what happens
4h
Thousands of tons of bread are wasted every year: The first quantitative study in Sweden
Large amounts of bread are wasted every year and are at most used for biogas production. This is a shame, says Pedro Brancoli, who recently received his doctorate at the University of Borås, Sweden, in the research area Resource Recovery. The results of his doctoral project show that bread waste would do more good for the environment and the economy if it were instead transformed into new food and
4h
Patricipants Needed: Student Study on Spatial Working Memory
Hi, we're students from the Cognitive Science programme at University of Gothenburg, Sweden. We would need more patricipants in our study we're doing for a memory module. The study is about spatial working memory and all you need is 5-10 min, a computer and a pair of headphones. Click the link to participate, thank you! https://www.psytoolkit.org/c/3.4.0/survey?s=ueFC3 submitted by /u/Wide-Top-21
4h
Vi har mistet 6.000 sengepladser på 15 år
At et offentligt sundhedsvæsen til en årlig pris på ca. 170 mia. kr. kan være under hårdt pres af 450 indlagte coronapatienter, viser med al tydelighed, at der er noget fundamentalt galt med kapacitet, struktur og prioritering i sundhedsvæsenet, skriver Bodil Lyngholm og Kristian Sandvej, praktiserende læger.
4h
Avstå barn – för klimatets skull?
Att dra ner på flygandet och rösta på ett parti man tycker för en vettig klimatpolitik kan många tänka sig. Men att avstå från att skaffa barn i klimatets namn är svårare. I den här antologins avslutande essä borrar filosofen Timothy Campbell ner sig i argumenten kring den mest existentiella av klimatfrågor – och kommer fram till att svaret på frågan om att "ha eller inte ha barn" inte är så enkel
4h
Gripande om organdonation
Trots att 80 procent av svenskarna är positiva till att bli donator är organbristen stor. I snitt dör nästan en person i veckan i kön till en transplantation. Varför är det så? I boken Ur döden liv berättar vetenskapsjournalisten Lisa Kirsebom om de hinder som kan förklara Sveriges mediokra placering på listan över antal donatorer per miljon invånare.
4h
Människan som invånare i universum
Den amerikanske fysikern Brian Greene har skrivit flera populärvetenskapliga böcker med tyngdpunkt på strängteori och kosmologi. I sin senaste bok, Till tidens slut, tar han ett stort grepp på världsalltet, men sätter människan själv i centrum. Genom allt går det han kallar för entropins tvåstegsdans som en röd tråd, där lokala mönster av ordning kan uppstå genom att oordningen ökar ännu mer någon
4h
The 'Twilight Zone' Before Deep Sleep Could Boost Your Creativity
Sleep on it. That's the advice we've all heard when challenged with a seemingly impossible dilemma. A new study suggests it's not just folklore. When over 100 volunteers were given the chance to nap, if just for a few minutes, their ability to creatively solve a taxing mathematical problem improved. But there's a twist. The trick only worked before drifting off into deeper stages of sleep. In oth
4h
UN weather agency affirms 2020 Arctic heat record in Siberia
The U.N. weather agency said Tuesday it has certified a 38-degree Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) reading in the Russian town of Verkhoyansk last year as the highest temperature ever recorded in the Arctic, the latest in a string of "alarm bells about our changing climate."
4h
Melting sea ice forces polar bears to travel farther for food
In recent years, polar bears in the Beaufort Sea have had to travel far outside of their traditional arctic hunting grounds which has contributed to an almost 30% decrease in their population. The bears' home range, or the amount of space they need for food and other resources, was around 64% larger from 1999-2016 than it was in 1986-1998, according to a recent study.
4h
Should We Call Out Cheating? | Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings #StreetOutlawsNoPrepKings #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on
4h
'Undtagelsestilstand' på intensivafdelinger skal besluttes af sundhedsdirektører og Sundhedsstyrelsen
Vejledning fra Danske Regioner og Sundhedsstyrelsen fastslår, at hvis der opstår mangel på intensivpladser på sygehusene, så hviler ansvaret for generel 'bortrationering' af behandling af kritisk syge patienter ikke på den enkelte læge. Det er Christian Wamberg, formand for intensivlægerne, tilfreds med, men han mener, at vejledningen i praksis er ubrugelig, når der konkret skal prioriteres på af
5h
Women say they do most chores, child care: AP-NORC poll
When it comes to household duties such as changing diapers, handling chores and meals and managing family schedules and activities, many couples who don't have children expect that they will more or less share the work equally should they have kids one day.
5h
Video: Double drop test success for ExoMars parachutes
The largest parachute set to fly on Mars has completed its first successful high-altitude drop test, a critical milestone for ensuring the ExoMars mission is on track for launch in 2022. Both the first and second stage parachutes have now successfully flown this year.
5h
Antarctic seabird faces declining populations
Data collected from a long-term study by British Antarctic Survey (BAS) scientists shows declining populations of an already relatively rare Antarctic seabird, the South Georgia shag. Published in the journal Polar Biology, a 40-year census from Signy Island in the remote South Orkney Islands and a 30-year census from Bird Island, close to the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, have shown sign
5h
Can the world change course on climate?
Nazli Choucri is a professor of political science and an expert on climate issues, who also focuses on international relations and cyberpolitics. She is the architect and director of the Global System for Sustainable Development, an evolving knowledge networking system centered on sustainability problems and solution strategies. The author and/or editor of 12 books, she is also the founding editor
5h
First optical oscilloscope
Engineers have developed the first optical oscilloscope, an instrument that is able to measure the electric field of light. The device converts light oscillations into electrical signals, much like hospital monitors convert a patient's heartbeat into electrical oscillation.
5h
What a warming world means for deadly twisters and the type of storms that spawn them
The deadly tornado outbreak that tore through communities from Arkansas to Illinois on the night of Dec. 10–11, 2021, was so unusual in its duration and strength, particularly for December, that a lot of people including the U.S. president are asking what role climate change might have played—and whether tornadoes will become more common in a warming world.
5h
Live cell DNA architecture in real time
Inside the nucleus of a human cell, there are approximately two meters of DNA folded into a multi-layered 3D structure called chromatin, which allows all of our genetic information to be compacted into a tiny little space.
5h
Toxic air endangers 600 million people in South Asia
With another smoggy winter hanging over the vast and thickly populated Indo-Gangetic plains, there are fears of serious health consequences to more than 600 million people living in northern India and Nepal as well as in eastern Pakistan and Bangladesh.
5h
How organic neuromorphic electronics can think and act
The human brain works differently than a computer – while the brain works with biological cells and electrical impulses, a computer uses silicon-based transistors. Scientists have equipped a toy robot with a smart and adaptive electrical circuit made of soft organic materials, similarly to the biological matter. With this bio-inspired approach, they were able to teach the robot to navigate indepen
6h
Zoom Fatigue
I love the fact that three years ago no one would have any idea what the title of this post meant, and now pretty much everyone does. It's a testament to the rapid pace of cultural change driven by digital technology. Over the last two years of the pandemic many people have become familiar with the app Zoom, which is a video conferencing app that was in the right place at the right time with the
6h
Så länge tar det för ungskog att bli kolsänka igen
Hur lång tid tar det innan en avverkad och återplanterad skog tar upp mer koldioxid än den släpper ut? Det är en omdebatterad fråga som är viktig för både skogsbruket och miljön. Forskare vid Linnéuniversitetet har svaret. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
6h
First comprehensive study on gun violence in Europe identifies alarming trends
The steady decline in lethal gun violence in the EU came to halt in 2012 and some countries, such as Sweden, have even noticed an increase since then. An arms race among drug criminals and an increase in the availability of illegal firearms could lead to more criminal and gun violence. This is one of the noteworthy conclusions from Project TARGET, a new, extensive European study coordinated by the
6h
Sour things reveal commonality between us and flies
A taste receptor sensitive to acidity in fruit flies is in the same group as human sour receptors, research finds. The new study identifies and describes a taste receptor sensitive to acidity in fruit flies . The protein is in the same group as a family of ion channels in humans known as otopetrins. The results will appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . "What's exciting
6h
Iconic reef giants not immune to climate's harmful touch
Museum of Tropical Queensland and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University (Coral CoE at JCU), Senior Curator of Marine Invertebrates, Dr. Sue-Ann Watson said that to date, Australia has done a good job in protecting giant clams that inhabit the Great Barrier Reef.
7h
Daily briefing: Merck downgrades COVID pill results
Nature, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03754-2 Merck's oral COVID drug appears to be less effective than originally thought. Plus, promising vaccines for the respiratory virus RSV, and the most stunning science photos of the year.
8h
The 10 Best Albums of 2021
Strange year. A year of starts and stops , of feeling better but still bad , of muffled crises and a hazy future . Who can maintain focus when viruses are mutating along with the currency system ? How did anyone have patience for the sobfests and statement albums that dominated the pop-music discourse? I needed songs that itched for attention, that evaded routines, that could tell a joke, and tha
8h
A randomized study to evaluate safety and immunogenicity of the BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine in healthy Japanese adults
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27316-2 Here the authors provide the interim analysis of an ongoing phase 1/2 study of the BNT162b2 vaccine in healthy Japanese adults. They report mainly mild to moderate local reactions and no serious adverse events as well as good antibody induction one month after the second dose.
9h
Tracking excited state decay mechanisms of pyrimidine nucleosides in real time
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27535-7 The photophysical mechanism by which nucleosides dissipate energy after UV light irradiation is still under debate. Here the authors, using ultrafast time resolved optical spectroscopies and quantum chemical computations, resolve the early steps of such mechanism in uridine and 5-methyluridine in aqueous sol
9h
Social stratification without genetic differentiation at the site of Kulubnarti in Christian Period Nubia
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27356-8 Little is known about the genetic landscape of people living in the Nile region prior to the Islamic migrations of the late 1st millennium CE. Here, the authors report genome-wide data for 66 ancient individuals to investigate the genetic ancestry of a Christian Period group from Kulubnarti.
9h
Biomimetic nanoparticles deliver mRNAs encoding costimulatory receptors and enhance T cell mediated cancer immunotherapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27434-x Antibodies targeting OX40 or CD137, two T cell costimulatory receptors, have been shown to improve antitumor immunity. Here the authors design a phospholipid-derived nanoparticle to deliver OX40 or CD137 mRNA to T cells in vivo, improving efficacy of anti-OX40 and anti-CD137 antibody therapy in preclinical t
9h
Rapid increase in dichloromethane emissions from China inferred through atmospheric observations
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27592-y Dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) is an unregulated ozone depleting substance whose emissions have strongly increased in recent years. Here, the authors show that rising emissions of dichloromethane in China between 2011 and 2019 can explain much of this global increase.
9h
Deep neural network models reveal interplay of peripheral coding and stimulus statistics in pitch perception
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27366-6 The neural and computational mechanisms underpinning pitch perception remain unclear. Here, the authors trained deep neural networks to estimate the fundamental frequency of sounds and found that human pitch perception depends on precise spike timing in the auditory nerve, but is also adapted to the statisti
9h
Covid-19: Will boosters be enough to slow down Omicron?
As England moves to plan B, Boris Johnson has announced that all adults will be offered a booster vaccine by the end of December. But will that be enough to protect the NHS from being overwhelmed? Madeleine Finlay speaks to the Guardian's science editor, Ian Sample, about the spread of Omicron, and what we can do to prevent a tidal wave of cases. Help support our independent journalism at theguard
14h
PyTorch Connectomics: A Scalable and Flexible Segmentation Framework for EM Connectomics
We present PyTorch Connectomics (PyTC), an open-source deep-learning framework for the semantic and instance segmentation of volumetric microscopy images, built upon PyTorch. We demonstrate the effectiveness of PyTC in the field of connectomics, which aims to segment and reconstruct neurons, synapses, and other organelles like mitochondria at nanometer resolution for understanding neuronal communi
15h
New hope for people living with a genetic cause of autism
Researchers report they were able to ameliorate Fragile X syndrome symptoms after inserting the Fmr1 gene into the brains of very young transgenic mice that had been genetically engineered to lack this gene. When the researchers measured brain activity for signs of anxiety and hyperactivity in response to stimuli such as stresses and sounds, they found that the reactivation of the gene in these mi
18h
Mannen femtio plus har mest arbetstid
Kvinnors arbetstid påverkas mest av att ha barn. Och de har svårast att gå upp i önskad arbetstid när barnen blir större. Män jobbar ungefär lika mycket som innan de fick barn, men allra mest jobbar män över femtio fast de kanske inte borde.. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Värme vid operationer sparar lidande och liv
Kroppstemperaturen får inte sjunka under 36 grader. Att hålla patienter varma före, under och efter kirurgi är livsviktigt. Men i Sverige år det få patienter som värmebevarande åtgärder. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Så markerar makthavare sin status i digitala möten
Hur gjorde Donald Trump för att visa upp USA:s militära muskler under ett digitalt möte med övriga G20-länder förra året? Det har forskaren Elsa Hedling visat i en studie av hur makthavare demonstrerar sin status i digitala möten. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Pepparkakan går tillbaka till framtiden
Den 9 december firas pepparkakans dag. Även om den inte slagit igenom lika starkt som kanelbullens dag, är december tveklöst pepparkakans månad för svenska folket. Läs måltidsforskaren Richard Tellströms betraktelse över pepparkakan genom tiderna. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Kritisk läsning inte bara källkritik
Ofta när elever i svenskämnet blir ombedda att göra en kritiskt granskning av en text pekar de på om källan är pålitlig eller ej. Textens innehåll lämnas däremot i många fall utanför granskningen. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Så smittar corona i inomhusluften
Människor infekterade med corona släpper ut massor av pyttesmå virusladdade partiklar bara genom att andas. De kallas aerosoler och kan hålla sig svävande i luften länge. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
När får vi ett tillgängligt samhälle för alla?
Det finns ett glapp mellan politiska ambitioner om tillgänglighet och hur verkligheten faktiskt ser ut. Trots lagstiftning och löften så kvarstår många hinder och många känner sig utestängda. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Så säkerställs människors integritet i maskininlärning
Maskininlärning för att analysera persondata inom verksamheter som e-handel, sjukvård och inom finansiella tjänster. Men känsliga personuppgifter kan läcka i processen. Forskare vid Högskolan i Skövde, föreslår nu bättre sätt att anonymisera data Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Ta av lurarna när du ska tänka
En del föredrar att jobba eller plugga med musik. Andra vill ha tyst. Hur vi uppfattar ljud är väldigt individuellt. Musik sägs ofta öka kreativiteten, men nu tyder forskning på att det kan vara precis tvärtom. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Självkörande bilar tryggare med smart AI
En ny metod gör att självkörande fordon kan visa en förmåga att resonera som liknar människans sunda förnuft – något som inte har gått att åstadkomma i självkörande fordon eller andra AI-tekniker som enbart baseras på maskininlärning. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Har julgranen rättigheter?
Vi klär den, dansar runt den och slänger ut den. Ingen jul utan gran. Men har du funderat på om granen har några rättigheter? Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
19h
Climate change record in clam shells
The tiny, pale surf clam about the size of a fingernail that most people have seen and collected on beaches around the world holds clues in its shell to Earth's past. For the first time, researchers have been able to identify the monthly, and even weekly, ocean temperatures recorded in these smooth clam shells. Because ancient civilizations consumed these ubiquitous clams and left the shells at ar
21h
Zooming in on tiny defects
Researchers have looked at what limits the efficiency of a promising solar material to reveal the nature of multiple different kinds of defects, their varied roles in device efficiency and their responses to treatment.
22h
Waning COVID super-immunity raises questions about Omicron
Nature, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03674-1 The pairing of SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination against it confers powerful protection, but data from Israel show that that protection gradually declines.
22h
Lithium superoxide encapsulated in a benzoquinone anion matrix [Chemistry]
Lithium peroxide is the crucial storage material in lithium–air batteries. Understanding the redox properties of this salt is paramount toward improving the performance of this class of batteries. Lithium peroxide, upon exposure to p–benzoquinone (p–C6H4O2) vapor, develops a deep blue color. This blue powder can be formally described as [Li2O2]0.3…
23h
Genomic basis of fishing-associated selection varies with population density [Genetics]
Fisheries induce one of the strongest anthropogenic selective pressures on natural populations, but the genetic effects of fishing remain unclear. Crucially, we lack knowledge of how capture-associated selection and its interaction with reductions in population density caused by fishing can potentially shift which genes are under selection. Using experimental fish…
23h
Substantial accumulation of mercury in the deepest parts of the ocean and implications for the environmental mercury cycle [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Anthropogenic activities have led to widespread contamination with mercury (Hg), a potent neurotoxin that bioaccumulates through food webs. Recent models estimated that, presently, 200 to 600 t of Hg is sequestered annually in deep-sea sediments, approximately doubling since industrialization. However, most studies did not extend to the hadal zone (6,000-…
23h
Health benefits of decreases in on-road transportation emissions in the United States from 2008 to 2017 [Sustainability Science]
Decades of air pollution regulation have yielded enormous benefits in the United States, but vehicle emissions remain a climate and public health issue. Studies have quantified the vehicle-related fine particulate matter (PM2.5)-attributable mortality but lack the combination of proper counterfactual scenarios, latest epidemiological evidence, and detailed spatial resolution; all needed…
23h
Discovery of an ancient MHC category with both class I and class II features [Evolution]
Two classes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, MHC class I and class II, play important roles in our immune system, presenting antigens to functionally distinct T lymphocyte populations. However, the origin of this essential MHC class divergence is poorly understood. Here, we discovered a category of MHC molecules (W-category)…
23h
The cyclic dinucleotide 2'3'-cGAMP induces a broad antibacterial and antiviral response in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis [Immunology and Inflammation]
In mammals, cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) bind and activate STING to initiate an antiviral type I interferon response. CDNs and STING originated in bacteria and are present in most animals. By contrast, interferons are believed to have emerged in vertebrates; thus, the function of CDN signaling in invertebrates is unclear. Here,…
23h
Competitive dynamics underlie cognitive improvements during sleep [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
We provide evidence that human sleep is a competitive arena in which cognitive domains vie for limited resources. Using pharmacology and effective connectivity analysis, we demonstrate that long-term memory and working memory are served by distinct offline neural mechanisms that are mutually antagonistic. Specifically, we administered zolpidem to increase central…
23h
Screening human lung cancer with predictive models of serum magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolomics [Medical Sciences]
The current high mortality of human lung cancer stems largely from the lack of feasible, early disease detection tools. An effective test with serum metabolomics predictive models able to suggest patients harboring disease could expedite triage patient to specialized imaging assessment. Here, using a training-validation-testing-cohort design, we establish our high-resolution…
23h
Historical redlining and cardiovascular health: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [Statistics]
We investigated historical redlining, a government-sanctioned discriminatory policy, in relation to cardiovascular health (CVH) and whether associations were modified by present-day neighborhood physical and social environments. Data included 4,779 participants (mean age 62 y; SD = 10) from the baseline sample of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA; 2000 to…
23h
Can auxiliary indicators improve COVID-19 forecasting and hotspot prediction? [Statistics]
Short-term forecasts of traditional streams from public health reporting (such as cases, hospitalizations, and deaths) are a key input to public health decision-making during a pandemic. Since early 2020, our research group has worked with data partners to collect, curate, and make publicly available numerous real-time COVID-19 indicators, providing multiple…
23h
The US COVID-19 Trends and Impact Survey: Continuous real-time measurement of COVID-19 symptoms, risks, protective behaviors, testing, and vaccination [Social Sciences]
The US COVID-19 Trends and Impact Survey (CTIS) is a large, cross-sectional, internet-based survey that has operated continuously since April 6, 2020. By inviting a random sample of Facebook active users each day, CTIS collects information about COVID-19 symptoms, risks, mitigating behaviors, mental health, testing, vaccination, and other key priorities….
23h
Global monitoring of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic through online surveys sampled from the Facebook user base [Social Sciences]
Simultaneously tracking the global impact of COVID-19 is challenging because of regional variation in resources and reporting. Leveraging self-reported survey outcomes via an existing international social media network has the potential to provide standardized data streams to support monitoring and decision-making worldwide, in real time, and with limited local resources….
23h
Epidemic tracking and forecasting: Lessons learned from a tumultuous year [Medical Sciences]
Epidemic forecasting has garnered increasing interest in the last decade, nurtured and scaffolded by various forecasting challenges organized by groups within the US federal government, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (1–3), Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) (4), and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)…
23h
Complete biosynthesis of the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids guattegaumerine and berbamunine in yeast [Applied Biological Sciences]
Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a diverse class of medicinal plant natural products. Nearly 500 dimeric bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (bisBIAs), produced by the coupling of two BIA monomers, have been characterized and display a range of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antiarrhythmic activities. In recent years, microbial platforms have been engine
23h
High-impact rare genetic variants in severe schizophrenia [Genetics]
Extreme phenotype sequencing has led to the identification of high-impact rare genetic variants for many complex disorders but has not been applied to studies of severe schizophrenia. We sequenced 112 individuals with severe, extremely treatment-resistant schizophrenia, 218 individuals with typical schizophrenia, and 4,929 controls. We compared the burden of rare,…
23h
Fractalkine-induced microglial vasoregulation occurs within the retina and is altered early in diabetic retinopathy [Cell Biology]
Local blood flow control within the central nervous system (CNS) is critical to proper function and is dependent on coordination between neurons, glia, and blood vessels. Macroglia, such as astrocytes and Müller cells, contribute to this neurovascular unit within the brain and retina, respectively. This study explored the role of…
23h
Multiplexed sensing of biomolecules with optically detected magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond [Applied Physical Sciences]
In the past decade, a great effort has been devoted to develop new biosensor platforms for the detection of a wide range of analytes. Among the various approaches, magneto-DNA assay platforms have received extended interest for high sensitive and specific detection of targets with a simultaneous manipulation capacity. Here, using…
23h
Adaptations in metabolism and protein translation give rise to the Crabtree effect in yeast [Systems Biology]
Aerobic fermentation, also referred to as the Crabtree effect in yeast, is a well-studied phenomenon that allows many eukaryal cells to attain higher growth rates at high glucose availability. Not all yeasts exhibit the Crabtree effect, and it is not known why Crabtree-negative yeasts can grow at rates comparable to…
23h
Herpesvirus-mediated stabilization of ICP0 expression neutralizes restriction by TRIM23 [Microbiology]
Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection relies on immediate early proteins that initiate viral replication. Among them, ICP0 is known, for many years, to facilitate the onset of viral gene expression and reactivation from latency. However, how ICP0 itself is regulated remains elusive. Through genetic analyses, we identify that the viral…
23h
Constructing local cell-specific networks from single-cell data [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Gene coexpression networks yield critical insights into biological processes, and single-cell RNA sequencing provides an opportunity to target inquiries at the cellular level. However, due to the sparsity and heterogeneity of transcript counts, it is challenging to construct accurate gene networks. We develop an approach, locCSN, that estimates cell-specific networks…
23h
Genome instability drives epistatic adaptation in the human pathogen Leishmania [Evolution]
How genome instability is harnessed for fitness gain despite its potential deleterious effects is largely elusive. An ideal system to address this important open question is provided by the protozoan pathogen Leishmania, which exploits frequent variations in chromosome and gene copy number to regulate expression levels. Using ecological genomics and…
23h
Components of the phosphatidylserine endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane transport mechanism as targets for KRAS inhibition in pancreatic cancer [Cell Biology]
KRAS is mutated in 90% of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). To function, KRAS must localize to the plasma membrane (PM) via a C-terminal membrane anchor that specifically engages phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). This anchor-binding specificity renders KRAS–PM localization and signaling capacity critically dependent on PM PtdSer content. We now show that…
23h
Theta activity paradoxically boosts gamma and ripple frequency sensitivity in prefrontal interneurons [Statistics]
Fast oscillations in cortical circuits critically depend on GABAergic interneurons. Which interneuron types and populations can drive different cortical rhythms, however, remains unresolved and may depend on brain state. Here, we measured the sensitivity of different GABAergic interneurons in prefrontal cortex under conditions mimicking distinct brain states. While fast-spiking neurons…
23h
hox gene expression predicts tetrapod-like axial regionalization in the skate, Leucoraja erinacea [Developmental Biology]
The axial skeleton of tetrapods is organized into distinct anteroposterior regions of the vertebral column (cervical, trunk, sacral, and caudal), and transitions between these regions are determined by colinear anterior expression boundaries of Hox5/6, -9, -10, and -11 paralogy group genes within embryonic paraxial mesoderm. Fishes, conversely, exhibit little in…
23h
Structure and RNA template requirements of Arabidopsis RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 [Biochemistry]
RNA-dependent RNA polymerases play essential roles in RNA-mediated gene silencing in eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 (RDR2) physically interacts with DNA-dependent NUCLEAR RNA POLYMERASE IV (Pol IV) and their activities are tightly coupled, with Pol IV transcriptional arrest, induced by the nontemplate DNA strand, somehow enabling RDR2 to…
23h
Enhanced heterozygosity from male meiotic chromosome chains is superseded by hybrid female asexuality in termites [Evolution]
Although males are a ubiquitous feature of animals, they have been lost repeatedly in diverse lineages. The tendency for obligate asexuality to evolve is thought to be reduced in animals whose males play a critical role beyond the contribution of gametes, for example, via care of offspring or provision of…
23h
SARS-CoV-2 expresses a microRNA-like small RNA able to selectively repress host genes [Biochemistry]
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), continues to be a pressing health concern. In this study, we investigated the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on host microRNA (miRNA) populations in three human lung-derived cell lines, as well as in nasopharyngeal swabs from SARS-CoV-2–infected…
23h
3 things affect whether young adult kids talk to parents about health
New research shows open dialogue and information sharing between parents and young adults reduces barriers for talking about health, which can lead to better overall health outcomes for emerging adults. For many emerging adults, the period between 18 and 25 years of age marks a stage of life to explore what matters to them and assume new legal rights and responsibilities, including their own priv
1d
Losing isn't always bad: Gaining topology from loss
Losing particles can lead to positive, robust effects. An international collaboration has demonstrated a novel topology arising from losses in hybrid light-matter particles, introducing a new avenue to induce the highly-prized effects inherent to conventional topological materials, which can potentially revolutionise electronics. The study represents an experimental observation of a non-Hermitian
1d
Daily briefing: Earliest remains of domestic dogs in the Americas
Nature, Published online: 10 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03737-3 The earliest reported remains of domestic dogs in the Americas have been found in a cave in western Canada. Plus, how an AI has tackled one of chemistry's most valuable techniques, and how to talk to your PhD adviser.
1d
Brood X Cicadas left their mark on soils
Long after the deafening cacophony of the Brood X cicadas ended in mid-June, their ecological legacy was still playing out underground, according to a new study of cicada burrow-riddled ground being presented at the AGU Fall Meeting. The research found that the little holes in the ground left behind by emerging cicadas had a significant impact on how water penetrated soils, with the greatest effec
1d
Gunfire or plastic bag popping? Trained computer can tell the difference
Engineering researchers have developed a gunshot detection algorithm and classification model that can discern similar sounds such as gunfire or a plastic bag popping. Discerning between a dangerous audio event like a gun firing and a non-life-threatening event, such as a plastic bag bursting, can mean the difference between life and death. Additionally, it also can determine whether or not to dep
1d
Best Space Gifts: Brilliant Ideas For Astronomy Lovers
With so much variety in the galaxy, it may seem daunting to find the right gift for your space-obsessed friend or family member. While space is vast and complex, you definitely don't need a physics degree to make the right gift choice. There are plenty of options out there that can range from sparking a young astronomer's mind to challenging a PhD student to double check that dissertation. Take a
1d
Baby talk may prep infants to produce their own speech
When parents baby talk to their infants, they might be helping them learn to produce speech, a new study suggests. The way we instinctively speak to babies—higher pitch, slower speed, exaggerated pronunciation—not only appeals to babies, but likely helps them learn to understand what we're saying. Baby talk can have another, previously unknown benefit: helping babies learn to produce their own sp
1d
US tornado deaths at 78, likely to rise
At least 64 people died in Kentucky from devastating tornadoes that left a trail of destruction across the US state, the governor said Monday, with 14 people confirmed killed in other states.
1d
Experiment gives rise to social conventions between baboons
A research team has demonstrated that members of a group of baboons can establish shared social conventions — in this case, by all agreeing on how to solve a problem in order to get a reward faster. This is the first time that such conventions have been studied experimentally in an animal species.
1d
Challenging Einstein's greatest theory with extreme stars
Researchers have conducted a 16-year long experiment to challenge Einstein's theory of general relativity. The international team looked to the stars – a pair of extreme stars called pulsars to be precise — through seven radio telescopes across the globe. And they used them to challenge Einstein's most famous theory with some of the most rigorous tests yet. The study reveals new relativistic effe
1d
Discovery of 'split' photon provides a new way to see light
Nearly a century after Italian physicist Ettore Majorana laid the groundwork for the discovery that electrons could be divided into halves, researchers predict that split photons may also exist. The finding advances the fundamental understanding of light and how it behaves.
1d
NHTSA Opens Probe into Tesla Gaming While Driving
(Photo: Tesla) The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) is opening an investigation into Tesla drivers' newfound ability to play video games via the dashboard while driving. According to a slew of claims originally reported by the New York Times , Tesla vehicles currently allow video games to be played on their sizable touchscreen infotainment systems while said vehicles
1d
Climate isn't enough to predict extinction risk
To accurately predict species' distributions and risk of extinction, models must include more than just climate, according to new research. Ecologists estimate that 15 to 37% of plant and animal species will go extinct as a direct result of the rapidly changing climate. "The predictions from climate-only models represent the end point you would expect if nothing complicated happened, but that isn
1d
Claudine Ebeid Joins The Atlantic as Executive Producer of Audio, Andrea Valdez Named a Managing Editor
Claudine Ebeid, who has spent her career shaping some of the most influential audio journalism and narrative podcasts, is coming to The Atlantic to lead audio as executive producer. The Atlantic is also announcing that Andrea Valdez is taking on a new role as a managing editor in the newsroom, having first joined the company earlier this year as senior vice president of audience strategy. Ebeid c
1d
Farmed seafood supply at risk if we don't act on climate change
The supply of farmed seafood such as salmon and mussels are projected to drop 16 per cent globally by 2090 if no action is taken to mitigate climate change, according to a new study. Ocean-farmed seafood or mariculture is often seen as a panacea to the problems of depleted stocks of wild fish and growing human demand, and is expected to grow substantially in the coming years. But the new modelling
1d
Climate-driven disease devastates seagrass health
In an oceanic omen for climate change's intensifying effects, new research shows that seagrass suffers from a lesion-filled wasting disease through large swaths of intertidal meadows in the Pacific Northwest. The grasses' once-vibrant plant root systems are deteriorating, too.
1d
Wind turbines kill mostly female and juvenile bats
Many bats die at wind turbines when colliding with the spinning blades. Currently it is unclear whether all age cohorts or sexes are equally vulnerable. A comparison of age, sex and geographic origin of Nathusius' pipistrelles killed at wind turbines and living conspecifics from nearby populations now reveals that juveniles are killed more frequently than adults compared to their proportion in loc
1d
Ultrarapid cooling enables the observation of molecular patterns of life
Fluorescence light microscopy has the unique ability to observe cellular processes over a scale that bridges four orders of magnitude. Yet, its application to living cells is fundamentally limited by the very rapid and unceasing movement of molecules that define its living state. What is more, the interaction of light with fluorescent probes that enables the observation of molecular processes caus
1d
From flashing fireflies to cheering crowds — Physicists unlock secret to synchronization
Physicists have unlocked the secret that explains how large groups of individual 'oscillators' — from flashing fireflies to cheering crowds, and from ticking clocks to clicking metronomes — tend to synchronize when in each other's company. This new discovery has a suite of potential applications, including developing new types of computer technology that uses light signals to process information
1d
What Sci-Hub's latest court battle means for research
Nature, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03659-0 Delhi court will scrutinize whether the pirate paper website falls foul of India's copyright law. The verdict could have implications for academic publishers further afield.
1d
Arts programs boost student social injustice awareness
Participation by youth of color in arts programming can enhance awareness of social injustice and increase engagement in social action, according to a new study. The findings also show that white youth who engage in arts programming experience greater awareness and understanding of social inequity. "Critical consciousness is a framework for understanding youth's beliefs, feelings, and actions aro
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Online interventions can ease teen depression
Just two online single-session interventions can help curb teen depression, a new study of more than 2,400 adolescents ages 13 to 16 shows. The tool is very much needed given a rise in teen depression and loss of some in-person mental health services during the COVID-19 pandemic . Teenagers who experience depression symptoms often cannot access professional help. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic
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A missing genetic switch at the origin of embryonic malformations
Embryonic development follows delicate stages: For everything to go well, many genes must coordinate their activity according to a very meticulous scheme and tempo. This precision mechanism sometimes fails, leading to more or less disabling malformations. By studying the Pitx1 gene, one of the genes involved in the construction of the lower limbs, a team from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), in S
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Scientists envision what Mars would look like as an exoplanet
In science fiction movies and television shows, real-life locations on Earth, such as California's Redwood National Forest and the Sahara Desert, have long been used to represent alien worlds. But recently, in a Star Trek-style twist, a group of scientists, including researchers at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado Boulder, have been using a plan
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Pressure on river management leads to more frequent flooding
In his new book "Flooding and Management of Large Fluvial Lowlands," Paul Hudson Associate Professor of Physical Geography at Leiden University College in The Hague, examines human impacts on lowlands rivers. The past twenty years the pressure on large fluvial lowlands has increased tremendously because of flood control, urbanization and increased dependence upon floodplains and deltas for food pr
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Certain hair products may alter hormones in pregnancy
Certain personal care products may affect the hormone levels of pregnant people, according to a new study. Personal care and beauty products contain several ingredients that often include a wide range of endocrine-disrupting chemicals like phthalates, parabens , phenols, and toxic metals. These chemicals interact with hormone systems, influencing synthesis, regulation, transport, metabolism, and
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Mechanical forces shape the 'immortal' hydra
Hydras are tiny creatures with regenerative superpowers: they can renew their stem cells and replace damaged body parts in only a few days. Now, researchers in the Tsiairis group have found that mechanical forces turn on key genes as the mighty Hydras regenerate their entire bodies from scraps of tissue. Understanding how mechanical forces guide stem cells toward their fates could help to reveal h
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B cells need the help of other memory cells to defend against chronic viruses
Viruses such as HIV or the pathogen that causes hepatitis C can overwhelm the immune system. One approach to developing vaccines for these chronic infections has until now been aimed exclusively at what are known as the memory B cells, a specific type of immune cells. Researchers at the University of Basel now report that these cells need the help of other memory cells to effectively defend the bo
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Using cold to enhance microscopy
Fluorescence light microscopy has the unique ability to observe cellular processes over a scale that bridges four orders of magnitude. Yet, its application to living cells is fundamentally limited by the very rapid and unceasing movement of molecules that define its living state. What is more, the interaction of light with fluorescent probes that enables the observation of molecular processes caus
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Upcycling method reduces environmental footprint of plastic waste stream
Plastics found in electronic waste (e-waste) are rarely recycled due to their complex composition and hazardous additives, but scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a new use for them—by repurposing them as an alternative to the plastics used in laboratory cell culture containers, such as petri dishes.
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Galaxies with active cores may undergo a period of rapid star birth before shutting down
A team of astronomers propose a scenario in which galaxies with active cores may undergo a period of rapid star birth before shutting down completely. The research, conducted by astronomers from the University of Southampton, the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, and the Institute of Space Sciences, was published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.
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Key mechanism of photosynthesis elucidated
Some plants master a special form of solar energy utilization that offers great advantages under warm conditions. A recent study now provides new insights into an enzyme that plays a central role in this so-called C4 photosynthesis. The work, led by the University of Bonn, also involved researchers from Argentina, Canada and the University of Düsseldorf. It has been published in the journal The Pl
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Origin of Life: Peptide formation in liquid sulphur dioxide on early Earth
The formation of peptide bonds—the chemical bond between amino acids—in protein synthesis is one of the most important biochemical reaction steps. Without the development of structurally and catalytically active polymers, there would be no life on our planet. However, the formation of large, complex oligomer systems is prevented by the high energetic barrier of peptide condensation in aqueous solu
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Novel model can aid decisions in electricity generation, stream water quality
Switching from coal to natural gas in power plants can reduce how much sulfur dioxide, a gas that smells like a freshly struck match, is emitted into the atmosphere and ultimately how much sulfate pollution enters waterways, according to a Penn State-led research team that has developed a model to detect if the recent switch from coal to gas is affecting streams.
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Intel Releases Gameplay Teaser for Its Upcoming Arc GPUs
(Image: Concept image by Intel's Cristiano Siqueira (@CSiqueira97) Intel has been keeping all the details about its foray into the discrete GPU market quite close to its vest, despite the fact that it plans to launch in Q1 2022. That's why it is kind of a big deal that the company showed some gameplay at this year's Game Awards, although like most teaser videos it leaves us with more questions th
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Consumption work in the circular economy: A research agenda
Circular Economy frameworks have become central to debates and interventions that aim to reduce global resource use and environmental despoilment. As pathways to both systemic and micro-scale transformations, there remain many challenges to making circular economy actionable.
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Bundle up for the 2021 Geminid meteors
Ready to brave the cold? If you're like us, you haven't wasted an early clear sky morning to get out and see Comet C/2021 A1 Leonard before it heads southward. The coming days offer another early AM celestial sight: the Geminid meteors. To be sure, 2021 sees the Geminid meteors transpire under somewhat challenging conditions. But fear not: With a little planning and patience, you too can witness t
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Eavesdropping on messy monkeys points the way to free fruit
Eavesdropping doesn't just belong in the playbooks of spies. It is also a phenomenon that plays out among animals. Previous studies have shown that certain species, especially birds, listen to each other for warnings of nearby predators. But a new study reveals that a variety of mammals eavesdrop on one another when it comes to finding food. "Monkeys are messy eaters." For the new study, two biol
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To improve city life, plant these 17 'super trees'
A new study establishes live oaks and American sycamores as champions among 17 "super trees" that will help make cities more livable. The paper also lays out a strategy to improve climate and health in vulnerable urban areas. The researchers are already implementing their plan in Houston, Texas, and now offer what they've learned to others. The study in the journal Plants People Planet —led by Ho
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Significant energy savings when electric distribution vehicles take their best route
Range anxiety with electric commercial vehicles is real, since running out of battery can have serious consequences. Researchers have developed tools to help electric delivery-vehicles navigate strategically to use as little energy as possible. The secret lies in looking beyond just the distance traveled, and instead focusing on overall energy usage — and has led to energy savings of up to 20 per
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Om vi ska jobba längre, måste arbetsgivaren få oss att vilja stanna
Politikerna har länge jobbat för att befolkningen ska arbeta fler år – eftersom vi lever allt längre. Men det räcker inte. Arbetsgivarna måste också anpassa verksamheten efter arbetstagarnas behov och önskemål, för att den äldre personalen ska stanna. – I Sverige har frågan om ett längre arbetsliv kommit att handla mycket om statlig styrning via arbetsmarknadslagstiftning och justeringar i social
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Why the southern US is prone to December tornadoes
On the night of Dec. 10–11, 2021, an outbreak of powerful tornadoes tore through parts of Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and Illinois, killing dozens of people and leaving wreckage over hundreds of miles. Hazard climatologists Alisa Hass and Kelsey Ellis explain the conditions that generated this event—including what may be the first "quad-state tornado" in the U.S.—and why t
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An alternative to faster-than-light travel
Well even if we can't travel faster-than-light we might be able to turn into light itself. If you did not already know, it is possible to synthesize metals through nuclear transmutation. By changing the number of protons, neutrons or electrons in the atoms of one type of element, they can be transmuted into the atoms of another element. Currently this can be done with particle accelerators and nu
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Forensic science is unlocking the mysteries of fatal lightning strikes
Lightning is one of the most powerful sources of energy in the natural environment. As anyone who has spent time in Johannesburg during the South African summer will attest, there is nothing as spectacular as a Highveld thunderstorm at the end of a long, hot day: the scent of petrichor, torrents of cooling rain, booms of thunder and great spears of lightning across the sky.
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Researchers enhance thermoelectric performance of SnTe
Thermoelectric material (TE) realizes the conversion of electricity from waste heat. Since SnTe contains toxic-free elements and possesses the high-symmetry rock salt crystal structure, it has gained much attention in the thermoelectric field. However, the pristine SnTe compound suffers from the poor electrical properties due to the high intrinsic carrier concentration, the small band gap, and lar
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Blaming the Victim
If someone gets seriously ill from COVID, to the point that they need to be hospitalized and even placed in ICU, and they were unvaccinated, how much should we blame them for their illness? This question can have practical implications, if we base decisions on allocating limited resources and insurance coverage of vaccine status. I wrote about this dilemma recently on Science-Based Medicine ( and
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Five questions about space weather and its effects on Earth answered
Open the weather app on your phone or glance at the news and you can quickly find a detailed forecast for the weather in your location. The report is likely to affect your behavior for the day: if you put on sandals or snow boots, if you exercise indoors or jog around the block, if you walk to work or take the bus.
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Image: Hubble snaps a stunning spiral's side
This astronomical portrait from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope showcases an edge-on view of the majestic spiral galaxy UGC 11537. The infrared and visible light capabilities of Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 have captured the galaxy's tightly wound spiral arms swirling around its heart. The image reveals the bright bands of stars and the dark clouds of dust threading throughout the galaxy.
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Scientists use NASA data to predict corona of Dec. 4 Antarctic eclipse
Few were in the path of the world's latest total solar eclipse, which swept across Antarctica in the early morning hours of Dec. 4. With or without a crowd, the eclipse took place according to a tale as old as time: The moon passed between the sun and Earth, casting its shadow and briefly revealing the corona, the sun's pearly outer atmosphere.
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Neutralizing antibodies for emerging viruses
Researchers at Sandia have created a platform for discovering, designing and engineering novel antibody countermeasures for emerging viruses. This new process of screening for nanobodies that "neutralize" or disable the virus represents a faster, more effective approach to developing nanobody therapies that prevent or treat viral infection.
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Alle under ét tag
Efter flytningen til Herlev modtager Steno Diabetes ­Center Copenhagen (SDCC) nu både børn, unge og voksne med diabetes. Det giver muligheder og udfordringer for såvel patienter som ansatte.
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Stenos nye hus
Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen (SDCC) har netop indviet sit splinternye domicil i Herlev lidt vest for København. Stedet ligger lunt i adskillige trends, både hvad angår form og indhold.
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A mechanical metamaterial with reprogrammable logical functions
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27608-7 Mechanical logic, while slower than its electronic counterpart, has the potential to be integrated into mechanical devices and a robustness in extreme environments. In this manuscript, Mei et al demonstrate reprogrammable mechanical logic which can perform combinatorial and sequential logic.
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Comparison of potential drinking water source contamination across one hundred U.S. cities
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27509-9 In the U.S. today nearly no surface waters are drinkable without treatment. Here, the authors demonstrate that four-fifths of cities that withdraw surface water are supplying water that includes a portion of treated wastewater, concentrated in the Midwest, the South, and Texas.
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Evolution of the conductive filament system in HfO2-based memristors observed by direct atomic-scale imaging
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27575-z Understanding the mechanism of the formation and rupture of conductive filaments in HfO2-based memristors is essential to solve the problem of scalability of the devices. Here, Zhang et al. visualize this process by tracking atomic-scale evolution of conductive filaments during resistive switching cycles.
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Existence of a continental-scale river system in eastern Tibet during the late Cretaceous–early Palaeogene
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27587-9 This study provides evidence for a continental-scale river system that existed in eastern Tibet before the India-Asia collision. The river system developed an extensive low-relief landscape, which was uplifted and dissected during the late Cenozoic.
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Clonal architecture predicts clinical outcomes and drug sensitivity in acute myeloid leukemia
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27472-5 Individual studies have been underpowered to draw clear associations between clonal heterogeneity and response to therapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, the authors aggregate multiple AML cohorts and are able to correlate the clonal abundance of somatic mutations with clinical outcomes and drug sensi
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Conference at intersection of Machine Learning (specifically Reinforcement Learning), psychology and neuroscience?
Hey all! I've got some work at the intersection of all of the above that I think has merit. I'd like to submit my work to a conference, but I'm not sure what a "good" one is. I've seen a few interesting papers I'm citing from frontiersinX, but reviews seem to be mixed with some people saying that it has become predatory. I'd appreciate your thoughts! submitted by /u/iamquah [link] [comments]
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Siare
© Australian Skeptics Inc. Att förutse framtiden – apropå en ny stor under­sökning från Australien En siare (även sierska, spågubbe, spågumma) är en person som påstår sig kunna se in … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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How machine learning holds a key to combating misinformation
"A lie can travel halfway around the world before the truth can get its boots on." This quote appears in many forms . In some variants, the quote involves footwear. In other cases, the truth is struggling to get its pants on. Regardless of the details, the sentiment encapsulates a key challenge of misinformation. By the time the meticulous task of fact-checking is complete and the correction has
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Melatonin exacerbates asthma, study finds
Asthma sufferers generally find their condition gets worse at night. Now researchers may understand why. Melatonin, a sleep hormone that is sometimes prescribed to treat insomnia, exasperates the constriction of the bronchus — the pathway that moves air to and from your lungs, according to a new study.
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scientific research
Hi all, I'm doing some research on cognition (Project ID: 30287) and I was hoping that it might be of interest to some of you. If you enjoy answering questions and doing thinking tasks, take this 15 minute survey (including a 10 minute audio listening task-you will need headphones or speakers) to contribute to psychological research. Upon completion of the survey you will go into a draw to win a
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A longer-lasting COVID vaccine? New study points the way
Researchers have identified rare, naturally occurring T cells that are capable of targeting a protein found in SARS-CoV-2 and a range of other coronaviruses. The findings suggest that a component of this protein, called viral polymerase, could potentially be added to COVID-19 vaccines to create a longer-lasting immune response and increase protection against new variants of the virus.
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