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I'm Starting to Give Up on Post-pandemic Life
"Today was great !" my 7-year-old exclaimed recently when I came home from work. By cosmic standards, her day wasn't that special. She went to the playground, where she finally mastered the monkey bars. She visited the history museum—or at least its gift shop. She got "really big" nachos. She went to the kids' art studio. Two years ago, visiting a museum and a nacho joint was so common, it wouldn
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NASA Brags That Its Bone-Covered Probe Officially Touched the Sun
Cracking the Corona A NASA probe has done the seemingly impossible and "touched" the Sun. NASA has officially acknowledged that its Parker Solar Probe dipped below the upper part of the Sun's atmosphere known as the corona and "touched the Sun," in the agency's phrasing . It actually made its momentous flight in April , but it took months for the data to relay back to Earth and for researchers to
2h
Scientists Are "Terrified" of NASA's James Webb Telescope Launch
Terror Launch NASA is about to blast a massive space telescope into space that has cost the agency approximately $10 billion and more than 20 years to build — meaning that astronomers are absolutely horrified by the possibility that something could go wrong during the launch later this month, The New York Times reports . "I will almost certainly watch the launch and be terrified the entire time,"
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High Testosterone Linked to F**kboy Behavior, Scientists Say
Researchers looking into the interplay between hormones and ethics discovered something that will shock nobody who dates men: that those with high testosterone levels end up being bigger jerks. As PsyPost reports , a recent study out of HEC Montréal complicates previous research associating high T-levels with business success by linking the hormone with unethical behavior in sexual scenarios — or
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Worker Murdered at Tesla Factory
Suspicious Death The local police department in Fremont, California has reported a "suspicious death " that occurred on December 13 in the parking lot of Tesla's factory in the area. According to a statement received by CNBC , a Tesla worker "had just finished a shift at the Tesla manufacturing factory before being shot in the parking lot as he left." It's even more grim news involving Tesla's op
4h
The Most Beloved Christmas Specials Are (Almost) All Terrible
This article originally appeared in Tom Nichols' newsletter, Peacefield, available with an Atlantic subscription . Sign up here . I just turned 61 years old, and people my age know what that means at Christmas. No, it's not about remembering to double up on our statins before chugging the eggnog. Very funny. Ha ha. I mean, of course, that my age makes me a member of Generation Jones , a child of
6h
Doctor Horrified by That Pivotal Scene in "Sex and the City" Reboot
Spoilers abound for the shock ending of the first episode of the "Sex and the City" reboot, "And Just Like That…" A cardiologist has affirmed what every "Sex and the City" fan suspected after watching the end of the first episode of the reboot "And Just Like That…": Carrie Bradshaw just may have committed manslaughter on her husband. To recap, Mr. Big, played by Chris Noth, dies of a heart attack
23h
Astronomers May Have Spotted a Black Hole Being Born
Cow Spotting Scientists may have caught a black hole — or possibly a neutron star — in the act of being born. In 2018, astronomers spotted a mysterious signal coming from some 200 million light years away. At first, they thought it was a supernova, but it was far brighter and quicker than any previous explosion. The event, later given the suitable nickname "the Cow," has puzzled scientists for ye
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Furious at the Concept of Paying Taxes, Elon Musk Lashes Out at Elizabeth Warren
The world's richest man had yet another temper tantrum on Twitter yesterday when a US lawmaker had the audacity to *checks notes* suggest that he should actually pay taxes. On Tuesday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk raged at Senator Elizabeth Warren after she tweeted , "Let's change the rigged tax code so The Person of the Year will actually pay taxes and stop freeloading off everyone else." Not one to take
3h
Oops, NASA Delays James Webb Telescope Launch Due to Technical Glitch
Merry Scrubmas Well, turns out those scientists were right to be nervous . NASA delayed the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) on Tuesday after engineers discovered a communications glitch "between the observatory and the launch vehicle system," according to a blog update from the agency . Thomas Zurbuchen, associate admin for NASA's science mission directorate, told Spaceflight Now
5h
Elon Musk Says Tesla Will Accept Dogecoin for Merch, Crypto Prices Spikes
Doge Addict Dogecoin prices spiked on Tuesday after newly-annointed Time Magazine Person of the Year Elon Musk announced that Tesla would be accepting the crypto in its merch store. "Tesla will make some merch buyable with Doge and see how it goes," Musk tweeted . Prices for the meme cryptocurrency immediately surged , hitting as high as $0.23 in the hours following the post. However, that price
20h
Don't Be Surprised When You Get Omicron
My breakthrough infection started with a scratchy throat just a few days before Thanksgiving. Because I'm vaccinated, and had just tested negative for COVID-19 two days earlier, I initially brushed off the symptoms as merely a cold. Just to be sure, I got checked again a few days later. Positive. The result felt like a betrayal after 18 months of reporting on the pandemic. And as I walked home fr
3h
Omicron likely to accelerate death rate in Europe, says health agency
EU risk assessment advises against Christmas mixing owing to new Covid variant's high transmissibility Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Christmas get-togethers may need to be downsized as Omicron is now "very likely" to increase the death toll in Europe even if it proves to be less severe, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control has said. The new Covid
7h
Arguably the Best of Christopher Hitchens
Christopher Hitchens died on December 15, 2011, 10 years ago today. He had been a columnist for The Atlantic for more than a decade, writing exclusively about books. (His reporting and other essays appeared in Vanity Fair .) Books being what they are, the Atlantic column gave Hitchens the freedom to write, in effect, about anything, and his range was wide: from Orwell and Trotsky to Lolita and Je
10h
Omicron variant expected to become dominant strain in Australia as NSW records 1,360 new Covid cases
Vaccine boosters may be required every six months to protect against the variant, virologists from the Kirby Institute say Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing A third booster Covid-19 vaccine dose will be essential to get high protection against symptoms from the Omicron variant and it appears likely the variant will become the dominant strain in Australia, virologists from the
19h
Scientists Spot Hidden Water in Mars' Grand Canyon
With the help of the European Space Agency's ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), a team of scientists has made a fascinating discovery: a huge deposit of water at the bottom of the Valles Marineris, one of the planet's deepest canyon systems and which is ten times as long and five times as deep as the Grand Canyon. The orbiter's Fine Resolution Epithermal Neutron Detector (FREND) instrument mapped t
48min
A Guide to Mixed-Vaccination-Status Holidays
This time last year, health officials were advising Americans to stay home for the holidays. The CDC cautioned against travel; Anthony Fauci announced that he would be spending Christmas apart from his children for the first time in 30 years. But that grim advice was accompanied by hope for a normal 2021 holiday season: Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine was authorized for emergency use in adults on Decem
4h
UK Covid live: Delta and Omicron are 'two epidemics on top of one another' as record 78,610 cases reported
Chief medical officer Chris Whitty says UK facing challenging situation after UK records highest number of cases in a day since beginning of pandemic Boris Johnson too weak to lead UK through Omicron crisis, says Starmer Expect mass staff absences and major shortages, UK ministers told 'Rudderless outfit': conservative press turn on Boris Johnson Shaun Bailey quits London assembly role after lock
5h
'Omni is everywhere': why do so many people struggle to say Omicron?
The error is to be expected, say linguists, as we don't often have cause to introduce novel words to our vernacular as adults Rupert Murdoch's New York Post criticized Joe Biden and his chief medical adviser, Anthony Fauci, for both mispronouncing the new Covid variant as "Omnicron" rather than "Omicron". Biden's detractors have seized on the mispronunciation as evidence of some sort of cognitive
7h
The Paperwork Coup
This is a tale of two coups—or rather, two attempted coups. One is the well-known January 6 insurrection, memorialized in iconic photographs, gripping videos, and minute-by-minute reconstructions, and followed by hundreds of arrests, more than 50 convictions, and a House select-committee investigation. The other attempt took place over weeks and was mostly waged in closed-door meetings, legal mem
9h
Plantwatch: how in winter, bark can act like leaves for trees
For some trees, photosynthesis can take place in the bark, letting the tree supplement its food reserves The broadleaf trees are now standing bare without their leaves and they look fairly lifeless, but appearances can be surprisingly deceptive. The aspen has striking white bark but that of the younger trees tends to have a greenish tinge thanks to chloroplasts buried in the inner layer. When sun
15h
A Huge Wave of Sexual Harassment Allegations Just Hit SpaceX and Tesla
Former SpaceX engineer Ashley Kosak isn't the only person claiming that the space company's work culture is rotten with misogyny and sexual harassment. The Verge reports that four other former SpaceX employees have come forward detailing similar complaints, including unwanted sexual advancements by male coworkers and other harassment. And that's not all. A mere hour after The Verge published the
23h
A new way to help young people with their mental health | Tom Osborn
TED Fellow Tom Osborn wants more young people to have access to the mental health support they need. With the Shamiri Institute, he and his team are training 18- to 22-year-olds to deliver evidence-based mental health care to their peers in Kenya — which has only two clinicians for every million people. Hear how their community-first, youth-oriented model could become a template to help kids acro
5h
A New Estimate of the 'Most Effective' Way to Fight Climate Change
On a dollar-for-dollar basis, where will your money do the most to fight climate change? The economist Daniel Stein has a clear answer: You should give to groups that lobby for aggressive climate policies. And if you're an American, he has three such groups in mind: the Evergreen Collaborative, Carbon180, and the Clean Air Task Force. "If you're like Joe Schmo, and you're looking to do something
10h
The fears of five-year-olds: how young children cope with Covid anxiety
Older children had exams cancelled and their futures thrown into doubt. But what has been the toll on primary pupils who began school during the pandemic? Let me introduce you to a little girl called Miriam. She's five years old and attends a primary school in north-east London. The adults who know her describe her as a confident, outgoing child. "She has a hugely adventurous spirit; she wants to
11h
Finding new potassium channels to selectively target pest insects
Ion channels in the nervous system are among the most important targets for insecticides. Understanding the structure of the channels is key for the identification of novel species-specific binding sites of agrochemicals. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund, Germany, joined forces with protein manufacturing company Cube Biotech and Bayer's Crop Science divis
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The Soviets turned the Volga River into a machine. Then the machine broke.
You can find Dubna, a small town three hours away from Moscow by train, both on a map and in the periodic table: dubnium, element number 105, was discovered at a research center there, and named after the town. A hasteless town, Dubna is defined as much by the surrounding forests as by the water: it sits on the banks of the Ivankovskoe Reservoir, the first part of a massive hydropower project cal
9h
Exotic quantum particles—less magnetic field required
Exotic quantum particles and phenomena are like the world's most daring elite athletes. Like the free solo climbers who scale impossibly steep cliff faces without a rope or harness, only the most extreme conditions will entice them to show up. For exotic phenomena like superconductivity or particles that carry a fraction of the charge of an electron, that means extremely low temperatures or extrem
5h
Mathematician Hurls Structure and Disorder Into Century-Old Problem
The mathematician Ben Green of the University of Oxford has made a major stride toward understanding a nearly 100-year-old combinatorics problem, showing that a well-known recent conjecture is "not only wrong but spectacularly wrong," as Andrew Granville of the University of Montreal put it. The new paper shows how to create much longer disordered strings of colored beads than mathematicians had.
5h
Four new giant exoplanets detected
An international team of astronomers reports the detection of four new giant alien worlds as part of the HATSouth photometric survey. The newfound exoplanets are the size of Jupiter and received designations HATS-74Ab, HATS-75b, HATS-76b and HATS-77b. The finding was detailed in a paper published December 3 on arXiv.org.
6h
Analysis of 88,000 matches shows soccer outcomes have become increasingly predictable
A pair of researchers at the University of Oxford has found that over the past few decades, the outcome of European League professional football (soccer in the U.S.) matches has become more predictable. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Victor Martins Maimone and Taha Yasseri, describe how they analyzed the outcome of 88,000 matches over the years 1993 to 2019 for
6h
Advanced analysis of Apollo sample illuminates Moon's evolution
Sophisticated analysis of a rock sample taken from the Moon during the Apollo 17 mission revealed new information about the complex cooling and evolutionary history of the Moon. The findings, from University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa researchers, were published today in Nature Communications.
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As Earth warms, safe times for outdoor work will shrink
As heat and humidity levels rise throughout the day because of climate change, options for moving outdoor labor to cooler hours will dramatically shrink, leading to significant worldwide labor losses, a new study led by Duke University researchers finds.
9h
This huge Chinese company is selling video surveillance systems to Iran
A Chinese company is selling its surveillance technology to Iran's Revolutionary Guard, police, and military, according to a new report by IPVM , a surveillance research group. The firm, called Tiandy, is one of the world's largest video surveillance companies, reporting almost $700 million in sales in 2020. The company sells cameras and accompanying AI-enabled software, including facial recognit
10h
Flawed diamonds may provide perfect interface for quantum computers
Flaws in diamonds—atomic defects where carbon is replaced by nitrogen or another element—may offer a close-to-perfect interface for quantum computing, a proposed communications exchange that promises to be faster and more secure than current methods. There's one major problem, though: These flaws, known as diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers, are controlled via magnetic field, which is incompatible w
6h
GSK/Sanofi Covid booster delayed by lack of uninfected people to test it on
Early trials show jab effective in people of all ages who have already received doses of any vaccine Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Efforts by the British and French drugmakers GSK and Sanofi Pasteur to produce a Covid-19 vaccine have suffered a further setback, with final clinical data on the jab and a potential launch delayed until next year as they struggle to fi
4h
The People Using Role-Play to Prepare for the Future
The spotlight falls on the stage, where two women are in the middle of a confrontation. On one side is Yolanda, an assembly-line worker at a houseware factory. She is speaking with her boss, first nervously and then with growing conviction, about a co-worker who has been flouting mask mandates. Yolanda lives with older family members in fragile health and she wants to feel safe on the job. After
8h
Princeton Researchers Create Terrifying VR Simulation of Nuke Attack to Train US Officials
If Russia launches nuclear missiles at the US, the president — or whoever has the authority at the moment — has just minutes to react. As the clock ticks down, they'll be forced to make what's arguably the most consequential decision in human history. How would you handle the situation? That's the question behind "Nuclear Biscuit," a virtual reality simulation depicting what a president would go
1h
Why UK has been less keen than US to give Covid jab to children
Differing adult uptakes, healthcare systems and cultures of medicine have played role in approaches Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK and US may have many things in common, but when it comes to vaccinating children against Covid, the approach has been markedly different. In May, the US Food and Drug Administration 's emergency use authorisation of the Pfizer/Bio
8h
Vaccine Successfully Stalls Elements of Aging in Mice
Scientists are working on a vaccine that stops so-called "zombie cells" from making us age — and early studies on mice have shown that it kind of works. Published in the journal Nature Aging , the study out of Tokyo's Juntendo University looked at aging-associated senescent cells, known affectionately by researchers as "zombie cells," in hopes of identifying mechanisms to slow down their accumula
1h
Yair Lapid: Extremist Violence Is a 'Stain on Israel'
Yair Lapid will become Israel's prime minister on August 27, 2023, if things go according to plan—which, in Israeli politics, they almost never do. But when Lapid—the architect of Israel's current coalition, its foreign minister, and the leader of its largest party—speaks, it matters. Most of the time, his job is to serve as the adult in the room, a sensible spokesperson for the country's fractio
3h
2021 Will Set an All-Time Record for New Renewable Energy
Many of the headlines that followed this year's UN Climate Change Conference (also called the COP26) were pretty grim, with the overarching message being that we've done a lot of damage to the planet and it's going to be hard to fix . But a report published this month by the International Energy Agency says there's reason to be optimistic, because the world's renewable energy capacity is explodin
6h
Joy, tears and emotional support puppies: Aucklanders get the green light to travel
Residents of the wider Auckland region, closed off in August as the city tried to contain an outbreak of Covid-19, finally allowed to leave Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage There were tears of joy, long embraces and sighs of relief, as thousands of New Zealanders boarded flights or hit the road on Wednesday, in what was, for many, the first reunion with friends and fa
20h
How do you study facial bias without bias?
When we encounter an unfamiliar face, we tend to make snap judgments. Does the person look smart, attractive, or young? Are they trustworthy or corrupt? Neuroscientists and psychologists study how our brains form these facial biases, and how the judgments ultimately influence the way people behave.
8h
Color-sorting metalenses boost imaging sensitivity
Researchers have shown that newly designed pixel-scale metasurface lenses—flat surfaces that use nanostructures to manipulate light—can be used to make imaging sensors that are roughly three times more sensitive than those used today. The new sensor architecture could enable digital cameras that can image faster or in conditions with less light.
9h
Innovative textile vents to release heat when you sweat
Materials Scientists at Duke University have developed a lightweight material that traps thermal energy when dry, but opens a series of tiny vents to let heat escape when a person starts sweating. The vents close again to retain heat once they are dry.
2h
Global loss of floristic uniqueness due to spread of alien plants
When alien plants integrate into an existing ecosystem and successfully spread, in rare cases, it can contribute to the increased uniqueness of the regional flora. However, much more often, this process—known as naturalization—leads to a homogenization of regional floras and thus to a net loss of global floristic uniqueness. Super-invaders, which are highly effective at colonizing new territory an
6h
Soils in old-growth treetops can store more carbon than soils under our feet
New research reveals a previously underappreciated way old-growth forests have been recycling and storing carbon: Treetop soils. Branches in forest canopies can hold caches of soil that may store substantially more carbon than soils on the ground beneath them, and scientists are just beginning to understand how much carbon canopy soils—which exist on every continent except Antarctica—could store.
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Stronger drought resistance of urban vegetation due to higher temperature, CO2 and reduced O3
Globally, plants are reaping the benefits of elevated CO2 levels in the atmosphere by increasing photosynthesis rates, a phenomenon known as the CO2 fertilization effect. However, those benefits might be offset by drier and warmer climates caused by global warming and extreme climate events. Using data collected from urban environments, researchers at Illinois have been able to study dueling effec
5min
Climate change is intensifying extremes, even in the oceans
While much is known about extreme weather events on land, there has been little research into those that occur in the ocean. A study led by ETH Zurich uses models to show for the first time that marine heatwaves, and extremes with high acidity or low oxygen can also occur conjointly—with difficult to foresee consequences for marine life.
11min
Neanderthals changed ecosystems 125,000 years ago
Hunter-gathers caused ecosystems to change 125,000 years ago. These are the findings of an interdisciplinary study by archeologists from Leiden University in collaboration with other researchers. Neanderthals used fire to keep the landscape open and thus had a big impact on their local environment. The study will be published in the journal Science Advances on 15 December.
11min
The Case for Industrial Food
Sign up for Conor's newsletter here. Question of the Week: Food for Thought This week I want to know your most contested opinion on food. Do you eat meat? Hate cheese? Are you a vegetarian or a vegan? Is organic produce worth it or a waste of money? Do you care if crops are genetically modified? Would you eat veal? Octopus? Whale? How much do you tip in restaurants? This is your chance to share a
20min
Spontaneous seizure and memory loss in mice expressing an epileptic encephalopathy variant in the calmodulin-binding domain of Kv7.2 [Neuroscience]
Epileptic encephalopathy (EE) is characterized by seizures that respond poorly to antiseizure drugs, psychomotor delay, and cognitive and behavioral impairments. One of the frequently mutated genes in EE is KCNQ2, which encodes the Kv7.2 subunit of voltage-gated Kv7 potassium channels. Kv7 channels composed of Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 are enriched at…
54min
Combinations of slow-translating codon clusters can increase mRNA half-life in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The presence of a single cluster of nonoptimal codons was found to decrease a transcript's half-life through the interaction of the ribosome-associated quality control machinery with stalled ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The impact of multiple nonoptimal codon clusters on a transcript's half-life, however, is unknown. Using a kinetic model, we…
54min
Neural circuit mechanisms of sensorimotor disability in cancer treatment [Neuroscience]
Cancer survivors rank sensorimotor disability among the most distressing, long-term consequences of chemotherapy. Disorders in gait, balance, and skilled movements are commonly assigned to chemotoxic damage of peripheral sensory neurons without consideration of the deterministic role played by the neural circuits that translate sensory information into movement. This oversight precludes…
54min
A gene-centric approach to biomarker discovery identifies transglutaminase 1 as an epidermal autoantigen [Medical Sciences]
Autoantigen discovery is a critical challenge for the understanding and diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. While autoantibody markers in current clinical use have been identified through studies focused on individual disorders, we postulated that a reverse approach starting with a putative autoantigen to explore multiple disorders might hold promise. We here…
54min
Structure-based identification of sensor species for anticipating critical transitions [Applied Mathematics]
Ecological systems can undergo sudden, catastrophic changes known as critical transitions. Anticipating these critical transitions remains challenging in systems with many species because the associated early warning signals can be weakly present or even absent in some species, depending on the system dynamics. Therefore, our limited knowledge of ecological dynamics…
54min
Triple oxygen isotope constraints on atmospheric O2 and biological productivity during the mid-Proterozoic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Reconstructing the history of biological productivity and atmospheric oxygen partial pressure (pO2) is a fundamental goal of geobiology. Recently, the mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes (O-MIF) has been used as a tool for estimating pO2 and productivity during the Proterozoic. O-MIF, reported as Δ′17O, is produced during the formation of…
54min
Magnetoelastic standing waves induced in UO2 by microsecond magnetic field pulses [Physics]
Magnetoelastic dilatometry of the piezomagnetic antiferromagnet UO2 was performed via the fiber Bragg grating method in magnetic fields up to 150 T generated by a single-turn coil setup. We show that in microsecond timescales, pulsed-magnetic fields excite mechanical resonances at temperatures ranging from 10 to 300 K, in the paramagnetic…
54min
Cell wall composition determines handedness reversal in helicoidal cellulose architectures of Pollia condensata fruits [Plant Biology]
Chiral asymmetry is important in a wide variety of disciplines and occurs across length scales. While several natural chiral biomolecules exist only with single handedness, they can produce complex hierarchical structures with opposite chiralities. Understanding how the handedness is transferred from molecular to the macroscopic scales is far from trivial….
54min
Specific hypomethylation programs underpin B cell activation in early multiple sclerosis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Epigenetic changes have been consistently detected in different cell types in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, their contribution to MS pathogenesis remains poorly understood partly because of sample heterogeneity and limited coverage of array-based methods. To fill this gap, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in four…
54min
MEKK3-TGF{beta} crosstalk regulates inward arterial remodeling [Medical Sciences]
Arterial remodeling is an important adaptive mechanism that maintains normal fluid shear stress in a variety of physiologic and pathologic conditions. Inward remodeling, a process that leads to reduction in arterial diameter, plays a critical role in progression of such common diseases as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Yet, despite its pathogenic…
54min
Low-energy electron holography imaging of conformational variability of single-antibody molecules from electrospray ion beam deposition [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Imaging of proteins at the single-molecule level can reveal conformational variability, which is essential for the understanding of biomolecules. To this end, a biologically relevant state of the sample must be retained during both sample preparation and imaging. Native electrospray ionization (ESI) can transfer even the largest protein complexes into…
54min
Single-cell quantification of a broad RNA spectrum reveals unique noncoding patterns associated with cell types and states [Cell Biology]
The ability to interrogate total RNA content of single cells would enable better mapping of the transcriptional logic behind emerging cell types and states. However, current single-cell RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) methods are unable to simultaneously monitor all forms of RNA transcripts at the single-cell level, and thus deliver only a partial…
54min
Tissue compartmentalization enables Salmonella persistence during chemotherapy [Microbiology]
Antimicrobial chemotherapy can fail to eradicate the pathogen, even in the absence of antimicrobial resistance. Persisting pathogens can subsequently cause relapsing diseases. In vitro studies suggest various mechanisms of antibiotic persistence, but their in vivo relevance remains unclear because of the difficulty of studying scarce pathogen survivors in complex host…
54min
Invasion genomics uncover contrasting scenarios of genetic diversity in a widespread marine invader [Evolution]
Invasion rates have increased in the past 100 y irrespective of international conventions. What characterizes a successful invasion event? And how does genetic diversity translate into invasion success? Employing a whole-genome perspective using one of the most successful marine invasive species world-wide as a model, we resolve temporal invasion dynamics…
54min
Human leukocytes selectively convert 4S,5S-epoxy-resolvin to resolvin D3, resolvin D4, and a cys-resolvin isomer [Biochemistry]
Human phagocytes have key functions in the resolution of inflammation. Here, we assessed the role of the proposed 4S,5S-epoxy-resolvin intermediate in the biosynthesis of both resolvin D3 and resolvin D4. We found that human neutrophils converted this synthetic intermediate to resolvin D3 and resolvin D4. M2 macrophages transformed this labile…
54min
Prediction errors disrupt hippocampal representations and update episodic memories [Neuroscience]
The brain supports adaptive behavior by generating predictions, learning from errors, and updating memories to incorporate new information. Prediction error, or surprise, triggers learning when reality contradicts expectations. Prior studies have shown that the hippocampus signals prediction errors, but the hypothesized link to memory updating has not been demonstrated. In…
54min
How to transform silicon carbide vacancies into quantum information
"Vacancy" is a sign you want to see when searching for a hotel room on a road trip. When it comes to quantum materials, vacancies are also something you want to see. Scientists create them by removing atoms in crystalline materials. Such vacancies can serve as quantum bits or qubits, the basic unit of quantum technology.
1h
NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter reaches a total of 30 minutes aloft
The 17th flight of NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter on Dec. 5 pushed the total flight time past the 30-minute mark. The 117-second sortie brought history's first aircraft to operate from the surface of another world closer to its original airfield, "Wright Brothers Field," where it will await the arrival of the agency's Perseverance Mars rover, currently exploring "South Séítah" region of Mars's J
1h
Quantum theory needs complex numbers
An international team of researchers shows through a concrete theoretical experiment that the prediction by standard complex quantum theory cannot be expressed by its real counterpart and ratifies its need of complex numbers.
1h
A mathematical model may give more efficient climate talks
Achieving consensus among countries in global climate negotiations is a long and complicated process. Researchers at Linköping University have developed a mathematical model that describes the achievement of the 2015 Paris Agreement and that may contribute to more efficient negotiations when striving for unanimity.
1h
Identifying schools with high lead levels in drinking water
Consuming lead can cause health problems for anyone, but children are particularly vulnerable because the element can interfere with their growth and development. While water systems will soon be required to measure lead levels in school tap water, it's not clear how these measurements should be interpreted. Researchers have now used real-world data to determine an approach for identifying schools
2h
'Forever chemicals' latch onto sea spray to become airborne
When ocean waves break, microscopic particles break free into the air. For beachgoers, aerosolized sea salts contribute to the tousled 'beach hair' look. But other compounds found in seawater, including perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), could become airborne as bubbles pop at the water's surface. Now, researchers have observed in a thorough field study that sea spray pollutes the air in coastal a
2h
This is the implication of the commercials about society's current regard for "innovation".
Sigh. It will never change for the better. NEVER!, will it?. The old idea of the 21st century future has been scrapped! And replaced with the complete opposite. It's such an insufferable spectacle. Doesn't it bother anyone else that society appears to have declared its complete and utter abandonment of interest in and acceptance of the idea of valuing devices because they look cooler and more fut
2h
NFT explosion: Why are people buying digital art?
Built on the same technology as Bitcoin, NFTs have been a hot topic in 2021. They enable a real market for digital works of art while fueling unprecedented speculation. 2021 might become known as the year when digital art exploded. On March 11, a cryptocurrency investor paid $69 million for the digital painting "Everydays: The First 5000 Days" during an auction organized by Christie's. The blinki
2h
Perseverance Mars rover makes surprising discoveries
Scientists with NASA's Perseverance Mars rover mission have discovered that the bedrock their six-wheeled explorer has been driving on since landing in February likely formed from red-hot magma. The discovery has implications for understanding and accurately dating critical events in the history of Jezero Crater—as well as the rest of the planet.
2h
60 years of children's books reveal persistent overrepresentation of male protagonists
An analysis of thousands of children's books published in the last 60 years suggests that, while a higher proportion of books now feature female protagonists, male protagonists remain overrepresented. Stella Lourenco of Emory University, U.S., and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 15, 2021 and explore the factors associated with representation.
2h
Seagrass is not a miracle solution against climate change
Through the resettlement of seagrass meadows on the coasts, large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere are to be removed in the future to combat climate change. Be aware, however: Seagrass meadows can, under certain conditions, release more carbon dioxide than they absorb, as is now shown by a Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon study published in the scientific journal Science Advances. Whether the
2h
Military sexual assault tied to depression and poor baby bonding
Military sexual assault and harassment are linked to higher rates of depression among new moms and a negative effect on mother-baby bonding, according to a new study. The researchers used self-reported data from a nationally representative sample of 697 pregnant veterans using Veterans Health Administration (VHA) maternity care benefits at 15 VHA medical centers between 2016 and 2020. The study s
2h
The Saga Finds 435 Crabs on ONE Pot | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #TheSaga Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://ww
3h
Parents, beware: Plastic toys may come with risky chemicals
Whether it's a Baby Yoda, a plastic building brick, or a fashion doll, all toys contain chemicals that give them desired properties: the right hardiness or elasticity, bright colors, and fragrances. But these chemicals could also come with health risks, says Olivier Jolliet , professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Earlier this year, Jolli
3h
Microsoft's SpaceEye Uses AI to "See" Through Cloud Cover
(Photo: Jack Barton/Unsplash) Azure Space, one of Microsoft's latest additions to its Azure cloud computing suite, now has the power to "see" through clouds with a new ability called SpaceEye. Cloud cover has historically been a persistent problem for Earth observation, given a majority of the planet is covered in fluff. SpaceEye uses artificial intelligence (AI) to produce daily cloud-free optic
4h
High blood pressure treatment in pregnancy appears safe, prevents maternal heart risks
High blood pressure during pregnancy remains a major cause of maternal and fetal pregnancy-related complications and death, and it increases women's short- and long-term risks for cardiovascular disease. Emerging data from clinical trials and observational research support the benefits and safety of blood pressure treatment during pregnancy. Continued investigation is critical to determine which b
4h
Common 'Core': Using molecular fragments to detect deadly opioids
Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a method to detect trace amounts of synthetic opioids. They plan to combine their approach with miniaturized sensors to create a hand-portable instrument easily used by law enforcement agents for efficient detection in the field.
4h
'Bubbler' breathalyzer could improve SARS-CoV-2 testing
Researchers have developed a unique method for detecting SARS-CoV-2 in breath samples using viral RNA detection. The researchers created a breathalyzer device they call "the Bubbler" that reverse-transcribes RNA from airborne virus particles into DNA, which can then be tested for COVID-19 via a common PCR test. The device uses an enzymatic reaction mixture to detect viral RNA and convert it to DN
4h
'Preach now or mourn in the future': How Key West faith leaders are confronting climate change
By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central). With news segment by Amber Strong (Newsy) St. Paul's Episcopal Key West, which is trying to spur climate action among its congregation. (Photo by Ayurella Horn-Muller) K EY WEST, FLA—Grounds cloaked in greenery weave around a towering ivory chapel in the heart of downtown Key West, Fla. Founded in 1832, St. Paul's Episcopal Key West is not only the oldes
4h
Lanthanoids offer great potential
A quarter of a century after the first creation of Bose-Einstein condensates, the journal Nature Physics publishes a focus issue on developments in the field of ultracold quantum gasses and their potential in the future. For example, in what direction will atomic microscopes, optical tweezers, or new laser traps develop? What potential lies in quantum gasses from lanthanides has been detailed by F
4h
Reconstruction of Cretaceous fossil water plant found in Catalonia using its plant organs
Palaeonitella trifurcate is the name of a new fossil species of a freshwater plant from the Lower Cretaceous found and reconstructed by a team of geologists of the University of Barcelona. The reconstruction of the plant, dating from between 125 and 120 million years ago, has been conducted using the plant organs found separately in a stratum of limestone from the Natural Park of Garraf, in Olivel
4h
Connecting the dots between bacterial genes around the world
Around the world, bacterial communities live in all kinds of habitats, from the human body to water and soil. Each community consists of a unique composition of species, called the microbiome. Each species harbors thousands of genes that encode both common functions and functions specific to the habitat. Scientists around the world have started to sequence microbiomes in individual habitats to und
4h
Factors that determine the success of crowdfunding campaigns
Not just the characteristics of a project, but also the city in which it will be implemented and the diversity of the rewards promised to supporters are the key factors that determine the success of a crowdfunding campaign even before the standard 60-day time limit set by most online entrepreneurial fundraising platforms.
4h
Best Kitchen Gift Ideas For the Chefs in Your Life
Let me start this by saying that I'm no Michelin star chef — the air fryer and slow cooker are my best friends in the kitchen, and most of my cooking-related Google searches are something along the lines of "easy meal prep" or "one pot dinner." If you're like me, you might be at a loss when it comes to finding gifts for the star cooks and foodies in your life. Luckily, I — and a bunch of my kitch
4h
Building the future with software-based 5G networking
Next-generation solutions and products are hitting a wall with wi-fi: it's not fast enough, and latency and connectivity issues mean it's not reliable enough. What's an innovator to do? Focus on what's next: 5G and software-defined networking. Nick McKeown, senior vice president and general manager of the network and edge group at Intel Corporation says this technical leap is what will make futur
5h
HDMI 2.1 Devices Are Not Required to Support Any New HDMI 2.1 Features
The purpose of a standard, from a marketing perspective, is to tell customers what a device can or cannot do in just a few words. It's much faster to read "This device supports DirectX 12" than it would be to scan a table of DirectX 12 requirements to make certain a GPU was compatible with the API. But standards only work if they are designed properly. Based on what we now know about HDMI 2.1, it
5h
Dell's 'Concept Luna' Laptop is a Great Idea. Too Bad It's Made By Dell
Photo: Molly Flores There's a new Dell machine making the rounds this week. Dubbed "Concept Luna," the svelte laptop is a proof-of-concept system designed to make repair and maintenance easy. Every component in the system is intended to be easy to replace. There is no glue used in the device and it also uses far fewer screws than normal. It's clear that Dell's engineers have put a lot of thought
5h
Detecting spins by their fluorescence with a microwave photon counter
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04076-z An ensemble of electron spins is detected by their microwave fluorescence using a superconducting single microwave photon counter, making single-spin electron spin resonance spectroscopy a possible future prospect.
5h
Sublimation-driven convection in Sputnik Planitia on Pluto
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04095-w A modelling study describing the formation of the polygonal surface structures in Sputnik Planitia on Pluto shows that convection driven by ice sublimation can generate planetary-scale surface patterns.
5h
Biogeochemical extremes and compound events in the ocean
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03981-7 High-temperature, high-acidity and low-oxygen extremes may pose a particular threat to marine ecosystems, requiring a major effort to understand them and the ability of marine life to respond to them.
5h
Observation of Feshbach resonances between a single ion and ultracold atoms
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04112-y Magnetically tunable interactions between lithium atoms and barium ions are used to demonstrate and probe Feshbach resonances between atoms and ions, which could have applications in the fields of experimental quantum simulation and fundamental physics.
5h
ER proteins decipher the tubulin code to regulate organelle distribution
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04204-9 The endoplasmic reticulum proteins CLIMP63, kinectin and p180 bind preferentially to subsets of microtubules with different post-translational modifications, thereby linking the 'tubulin code' to the intracellular distribution of membrane organelles.
5h
Fractional Chern insulators in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04002-3 A study using local compressibility measurements reports fractional Chern insulator states at low magnetic field in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene, and establishes the applied magnetic field as a means to tune the Berry curvature distribution.
5h
Towards the biogeography of prokaryotic genes
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04233-4 A survey of species-level genes from 13,174 publicly available metagenomes shows that most species-level genes are specific to a single habitat, encode a small number of protein families and are under low positive (adaptive) pressure.
5h
Uncovering global-scale risks from commercial chemicals in air
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04134-6 A new framework is proposed for assessing the risks of the atmospheric transformation products of commercial chemicals, combining laboratory and field experiments, advanced techniques for screening suspect chemicals, and in silico modelling.
5h
Evidence of racism found at prestigious London university
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03755-1 London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has pledged to revise equity and diversity policies after a review highlighted racial inequality among students and staff.
5h
Stomach cancer gets a triple punch of therapy
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03458-7 Harnessing immune cells to target tumours is a growing trend. The results of a clinical trial combining such treatment with other standard therapies for gastric cancer have altered medical practice — and more changes are to come.
5h
Alternatives to standard quantum theory ruled out
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03678-x Standard quantum theory contains square roots of negative numbers. But how essential are these 'imaginary' numbers? A way of disproving analogous theories that omit them has been proposed — and confirmed experimentally.
5h
A shared origin for cortical excitatory neurons and interneurons
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03664-3 A molecular barcoding tool has been developed to trace the developmental descendants of radial glial cells — the neural progenitors of the human cerebral cortex. The technique shows that these cortical progenitors give rise to both excitatory neurons and interneurons in the human brain.
5h
Using strategy to preserve biodiversity while saving space
In South and Central America, an especially high number of biodiverse areas are in jeopardy. Tropical rainforests are being cleared so that the land can be used for livestock grazing and planting soybeans. To compensate for these losses, other areas need to be placed under protection. The United Nations plans to protect 30 percent of global landmass by 2030; currently, the 17-percent benchmark sti
5h
New research: carbon fee and dividend would reduce poverty and inequality while strengthening the economy
This is a re-post from the CCL blog On November 29, the prominent journal Nature Climate Change published two studies very relevant to CCL's efforts. The title of the first paper nicely summarizes its key findings: Climate action with revenue recycling has benefits for poverty, inequality and well-being . Carbon fee and dividend alleviates poverty and income inequality The study considered a reve
6h
2021 was a remarkable year for Earth's climate
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections The close of another year provides an opportunity to assess what happened in the worlds of climate science and policy in 2021 and to gaze into a proverbial crystal ball to anticipate likely events in 2022. This was a year full of climate-fueled extreme weather events, the publication of important new climate research and synthesis reports, and a cru
6h
Hydrogen Fueled Life's Origins: Study
A thermodynamic analysis of more than 400 chemical reactions that likely took place in the ancestor of all life finds most would spontaneously occur at hydrothermal vents, thanks to the hydrogen these geological formations emit.
6h
24% of new moms skip health care because of cost
Over a five-year period, 24% of pregnant and postpartum women in a study reported unmet health care needs due to cost; 60% reported health care unaffordability. "Our study suggests that financial hardship is exceedingly common among the birthing population in the United States, with many parents experiencing unmet health care need due to cost, health care unaffordability, and general financial st
6h
A new concept for high-performance detectors
When the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory turned on the world's first hard X-ray free-electron laser in 2009, it marked the beginning of a new era in science—one where researchers could directly observe the ultrafast motions of atoms in real time and study how those motions affect the properties of materials and fundamental processes in chemistry and biology.
6h
Meltwater influences ecosystems in the Arctic Ocean
In the summer months, sea ice from the Arctic drifts through Fram Strait into the Atlantic. Thanks to meltwater, a stable layer forms around the drifting ice atop the salty seawater, producing significant effects on biological processes and marine organisms. In turn, this has an effect on when carbon from the atmosphere is absorbed and stored, as a team of researchers led by the Alfred Wegener Ins
6h
The threat from Thwaites: The retreat of Antarctica's riskiest glacier
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier is retreating rapidly as a warming ocean slowly erases its ice from below, leading to a faster flow, more fracturing and a threat of collapse, according to an international team of scientists. The glacier currently contributes four percent of annual global sea level rise. If it does collapse, global sea levels would rise by several feet—putting millions of people livi
6h
Real-time, interactive monitoring of forest health
Interactive online platform uses satellite images to display status of European forests. The output is based on the greenness of trees. With the latest functionality, users can also view and download data for individual countries and selected time ranges to learn more about the condition of forests. The data analysis and visualization tool was developed by scientists at the Technical University of
6h
Forgiveness and well-being at work can boost employee morale
A new theoretical contribution to the research literature published in the International Journal of Business Excellence looks at workplace "forgiveness" and employee wellbeing and happiness. The analysis of the various factors linking forgiveness to wellbeing and the role gender plays was carried out by Rinki Dahiya of the Indian Institute of Management Sirmaur, in Himachal Pradesh, India. It lead
7h
Understanding phase change materials for thermal energy storage
As the world searches for practical ways to decarbonize our activities and mitigate associated climate change, approaches to alternative energy are hampered by the intermittent nature of energy sources, such as solar and wind. One possible solution to help boost reliability and adoption of such renewable energy sources is improved energy storage capabilities.
7h
Making apple spirits taste better
The holiday season is a time of celebrations and festive drinks, some of which are made with apple liquors. These classic spirits have a long history, and surprisingly, many decisions about their processing are still subjectively determined. Now, researchers in ACS Food Science & Technology report that measuring the liquor's conductivity could give a more objective assessment, and they also found
7h
Disaster rituals evolve from speeches and words to actions
Whether it's the tsunami in Japan, the MH17, Bali bombings, Breivik's massacre, or corona, rituals have been devised for disasters worldwide since time immemorial to commemorate the victims. Martin Hoondert, of the Tilburg School of Humanities and Digital Sciences, one of the compilers of the just-published "Handbook of Disaster Ritual," collected stories of rituals, their history and their functi
7h
Daylight causes road damage
The durability of asphalt depends crucially on bitumen—the black binder that holds the small stones in the asphalt together. As the bitumen ages, it can change its properties and become brittle, eventually causing the asphalt to crack. At TU Wien (Vienna), research is being carried out in the "Christian Doppler Laboratory for Chemo-mechanical Analysis of Bituminous Materials," which was establishe
7h
A Close Encounter with a Flame-Bright Egyptian Vulture – Facts So Romantic
Socotra's gregarious Egyptian vultures are a bright spot in an otherwise sobering global story. Photograph by Oriol Alamany On a bright March morning as wildlife photographer Oriol Alamany tucked into breakfast on the island of Socotra, an Egyptian vulture landed on a nearby rock. Caught without proper equipment, Alamany crawled across the ground to photograph the bird from below at close range w
7h
Ovarian cancer
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03713-x Survival rates might still be relatively low, but researchers are making valuable inroads into understanding the disease.
7h
The origins of ovarian cancer
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03717-7 As the fallopian tubes come to the fore as the source of the most common form of ovarian cancer, researchers and clinicians are devising strategies to prevent the disease.
7h
The promise and pitfalls of gene testing for cancer risk
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03720-y Knowing you have a genetic mutation that puts you at risk of ovarian cancer can be life-saving. But with complex decisions awaiting anyone who has a disease variant, many people are choosing not to be tested.
7h
What's next for PARP inhibitors?
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03714-w After their breakthrough approval for ovarian cancer, attention has turned to how these drugs can benefit more people.
7h
Clarifying the burden of ovarian cancer
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03719-5 Standardizing medical data collection across the globe could yield valuable insights into the distribution of this often-fatal disease.
7h
Advanced analysis of Apollo sample illuminates Moon's evolution
Sophisticated analysis of a rock sample taken from the Moon during the Apollo 17 mission revealed new information about the complex cooling and evolutionary history of the Moon. The diffusion patterns preserved in the mineral grains were consistent with a rapid cooling history of no more than 20-million-years at high temperatures. The finding challenges previous estimates of a 100-million-year coo
7h
New guidelines may help reduce tick-borne illness
The number of cases of tick-borne illnesses (TBIs) reported annually to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has more than doubled over the past two decades in the United States. An expert panel has developed a set of clinical practice guidelines that recommends low-risk interventions, employable with minimal resources, to help reduce the number of TBIs.
7h
Träden renar stadsluften
Nils Ericsson terminalen är smutsigast, Angereds stadspark renast. Luftföroreningsnivåerna varierar stort mellan olika platser i Göteborg. Det visar en studie som slår fast att träd bidrar till renare luft i städer. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Hövdingens hall ska grävas fram i Uppåkra
Strax utanför Lund döljer sig resterna av en världsunik järnåldersbosättning, Uppåkra. Bara en bråkdel har undersökts. Nästa höst börjar utgrävningarna av det som bedöms ha varit Uppåkras maktcentrum – hövdingahallen. Nya metoder att analysera jorden ska också ge svar på mer svårfångade lämningar. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Klok strategi ger energisnålare hus
Hur energin i bostadshus används är extra viktig i kalla klimat. Strategin för att reglera energiprestandan vid nybyggen kan därför få stora konsekvenser. Jämförelser mellan olika länders strategier kan hjälpa arbetet med att förbättra energiprestandan. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Särskild undervisningsgrupp – hjälper det eleven?
När en elev placeras i så kallad särskild undervisningsgrupp är det ofta på grund av en oro att eleven annars inte ska orka komma till skolan alls. Men det saknas kunskap om hur stödinsatsen fungerar. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
A new partner
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03742-6 Family heirlooms.
8h
Daily briefing: COVID 'super-immunity' might wane over time
Nature, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03765-z Protection against SARS-CoV-2 might decline over time, even in people who have been infected and vaccinated. Plus, home zookeepers breed insects for rewilding, and Sci-Hub's court battle in India.
8h
Regionsklinik på vej i Nordjylland
6.000 borgere i Pandrup skal have ny læge til sommer, og derfor har Region Nordjylland nu besluttet at oprette en regionsklinik. De indkomne ansøgninger fra læger levede ikke op til ønsket om kontinuitet, lyder forklaringen.
8h
'Forever chemicals' latch onto sea spray to become airborne
When ocean waves break, microscopic particles break free into the air. For beachgoers, aerosolized sea salts contribute to the tousled "beach hair" look. But other compounds found in seawater, including perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), could become airborne as bubbles pop at the water's surface. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have observed in a thorough fie
8h
Increased protection for rare bird species' habitats in Russia
WWF-Russia today released a publicly accessible, easy-to-use interactive map that shows habitats of animals listed in the Red Data Books of Russia's endangered species. The map covers the full territory of the Russian Federation, including the boundaries of forestry units and leased areas of logging companies. It will serve as an important tool to identify and determine whether habitats of rare bi
8h
Overbevisende data fra forsøg med glofitamab
Tidligt klinisk studie med en kombination af glofitamab og polatuzumab til patienter med diffust storcellet b-celle lymfom viser overbevisende effekt på ASH. Studiet blev præsenteret af Martin Hutchings fra Rigshospitalet.
9h
Supposedly similar microplastic particles show different levels of toxicity
More and more studies worldwide are looking into the effects of microplastics, especially with regard to the environment and health. They often use spherical polystyrene microparticles and have arrived at partly contradictory results. An interdisciplinary research team at the University of Bayreuth has discovered a reason for this. Commercially available, supposedly identical polystyrene particles
9h
Nanocomposite provides picture-perfect X-ray capture
A nanocomposite that absorbs X-rays and then, with nearly perfect efficiency, re-emits the captured energy as light, could help to improve high-resolution medical imaging and security screening. The material's near-100 percent energy transfer could bring efficiency gains in devices ranging from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and X-ray imaging scintillators, all the way to solar cells.
9h
New mini-satellite will measure howling winds high in Earth's atmosphere
The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has received $6.5 million in funding from NASA to launch a roughly shoebox-sized satellite into space carrying an instrument designed to measure the howling thermospheric winds, which can gust more than 300 miles per hour through the highest reaches of the Earth's atmosphere.
9h
This siant Sequoia grove was ravaged by wildfire–can others survive amid climate change?
On a dead still November morning in the Sierra Nevada, two researchers walk through a graveyard of giants. Below their feet: a layer of ash and coal. Above their heads: a charnel house of endangered trees. This is Alder Creek Grove, a once idyllic environment for a majestic and massive specimen: the giant sequoia. It is now a blackened monument to a massive wildfire—and humankind's far-reaching i
10h
debunking simulation theory?
I was watching this YouTube video on AI robots and how they were trying to make them real like humans conscious thinking or whatever etc and where one of the robots spelled a word without even spelling it ever before, Basically its just data stored and making decisions on previous stored data thoughts etc. Also when you try to not think about something you think about it more, its amazing how it
10h
Epigenetic loss of heterogeneity from low to high grade localized prostate tumours
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27615-8 High tumour heterogeneity hinders the identification of molecular subtypes in prostate cancer. Here, the authors integrate single-cell chromatin accessibility data with multiplex imaging and reveal distinct chromatin features and transcriptional factor binding signatures in high- and low-grade prostate tumou
11h
Sea-ice derived meltwater stratification slows the biological carbon pump: results from continuous observations
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26943-z The North Atlantic biological pump has the most intense absorption of C globally, but how this will fare in light of climate changes (especially sea-ice melting) is poorly understood. Here the authors present a 24-month continuous time series of physical, chemical, and biological observations in the Fram Str
11h
Copper depletion modulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to impair triple negative breast cancer metastasis
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27559-z Copper depletion has been reported to improve survival in patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Here, the authors show that copper chelation reduces mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation leading to decreased TNBC metastasis.
11h
Critical Assessment of MetaProteome Investigation (CAMPI): a multi-laboratory comparison of established workflows
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27542-8 The authors present CAMPI, a large-scale multi-lab comparison of diverse metaproteomics workflows. CAMPI provides insights into the robustness of current methods, suggests further improvements to the field, and may pave the way for future community-driven metaproteomics projects.
11h
CD137 (4-1BB) costimulation of CD8+ T cells is more potent when provided in cis than in trans with respect to CD3-TCR stimulation
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27613-w Costimulation has been shown to be required for optimal activation of T cells and it could be delivered either in trans with respect to the source of CD3-TCR ligation or in cis on the same cell. Here the authors show that CD137 costimulation is more effective when delivered in cis to enhance T cell prolifera
11h
Spin-dependent vibronic response of a carbon radical ion in two-dimensional WS2
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27585-x Spin-polarized defects in 2D materials are attracting attention for future quantum technology applications, but their controlled fabrication is still challenging. Here, the authors report the creation and characterization of effective spin 1/2 defects via the atomically-precise generation of magnetic carbon
11h
Protein phosphatase 2A inactivation induces microsatellite instability, neoantigen production and immune response
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27620-x Microsatellite instability (MSI), caused by deficiency of the DNA mismatch repair system, has been associated with improved response to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB). Here the authors show that inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A induces a MSI status, promoting cytotoxic T cell infiltration and respons
11h
States to sign voluntary cutbacks of Colorado River water
To help stave off another round of mandatory cutbacks, water leaders for Arizona, Nevada and California are preparing to sign an agreement that would voluntarily reduce Colorado River water to the lower basin states by 500,000 acre-feet—enough to supply about 750,000 households for a year—for both 2022 and 2023.
12h
Silk Road tech transfer: this ancient lyre went global
Nature, Published online: 15 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03685-y A stringed instrument more than 1,000 years old found in what is now Kazakhstan is nearly identical to one from the Sutton Hoo 'ship burial' in Britain.
17h
NASA spacecraft 'touches' the Sun for the first time ever
Nature, Published online: 14 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03751-5 The Parker Solar Probe has passed through a boundary and into the Sun's atmosphere, gathering data that will help scientists better understand stars.
22h
Team engineers directed-evolution of translation system for efficient unnatural amino acids incorporation
The genetic code of all three kingdoms of life is universal and encodes the same 20 natural amino acids for a variety of complex physiological functions. The expansion of the genetic code by incorporating universal amino acids (UAAs) with diverse functional groups has enabled the synthesis of proteins with enhanced or novel functions, and the construction of UAA-dependent synthetic auxotrophs.
1d
NASA selects 4 CubeSats for space weather tech development
Four CubeSats—CubIXSS, SunCET, DYNAGLO, and WindCube—have been selected by NASA's Heliophysics Flight Opportunities in Research and Technology program in cooperation with NASA's Space Weather Science Application. Together, they will comprise a first-generation testbed for space weather innovation through small satellites.
1d
Catalyst turns methane into chemicals for making plastic
Researchers have developed a catalyst that converts methane into chemicals used to make plastics and other materials. Methane produces more warming than other greenhouse gases and is the subject of newly announced US emission restrictions. It's hard to break down and keep out of the atmosphere. "Remarkably, these novel catalysts run for 72 hours of continuous operation without any signs of deacti
1d
A new spin on MRI
Researchers have demonstrated a proof-of-concept modification to enable standard MRI systems to detect frequencies associated with the presence of sodium-23 ions. This low-cost and convenient approach requires the installation of a radio-frequency repeater inside the magnetic bore of an MRI machine. The wide applicability of this method for sodium and other nuclei may allow advanced medical imagin
1d
Common sleep disorder combo could be deadly
People who suffer from both insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea are more likely to suffer from heart problems and are almost 50% more likely to die than those without either condition, say researchers, who advise people being tested for one of the disorders be tested for the other.
1d
The changing patterns of DNA microcapsules
Biophysicists have found ways to make and manipulate capsule-like DNA structures that could be used in the development of artificial molecular systems. Such systems could function, for example, inside the human body.
1d
AI could boost accuracy of lightning forecasts
Machine learning—computer algorithms that improve themselves without direct programming from humans—can improve lightning forecasts, a new study shows. Lightning is one of the most destructive forces of nature, as in 2020 when it sparked the massive California Lightning Complex fires, but it remains hard to predict. Better lightning forecasts could help to prepare for potential wildfires , improv
1d
Cogsci & Philosophy Programs
Hey guys, I'm currently on my first year of studying Cognitive Science&Philosophy in a university in Israel. I want to pursue a degree in this field, but I understood that I want to study abroad. As the English speaking countries are extremely expensive, I'm searching for English taught programs in Europe. (up to 4k euros a year, let's say). The difficulty I encounter is that none of the programs
1d
Finding new channels to selectively target pest insects
Ion channels in the nervous system are among the most important targets for insecticides. Understanding the structure of the channels is key for the identification of novel species-specific binding sites of agrochemicals. Researchers have revealed the structure and function of a potassium ion channel in fruit flies. Their newly obtained insights reveal the differences between human and insect chan
1d
Novel plantibodies show promise to protect citrus from greening disease
Citrus greening, also known as huanglongbing (HLB), has emerged as the most significant disease in citrus (Citrus sp.) agriculture. The disease is associated with the Candidatus Liberibacter species of bacteria. The most prevalent and virulent species in this group is Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). It is primarily vectored by the asian citrus psyllid ACP (Diaphorina citri).
1d
Best Screen Protectors to Safeguard Your Devices in 2022
Whether you're prone to dropping or scratching up your devices (hey, no judgement here) or you're incredibly meticulous when it comes to taking care of them, accidents happen. When it comes to protecting and keeping your phone or tablet clean, it's best to put your best foot forward to promote longevity. A good place to start is one of the best screen protectors. Designed for a multitude of devic
1d
Improving drug options for colorectal cancer patients
Patients with colorectal cancer were among the first to receive targeted therapies. These drugs aim to block the cancer-causing proteins that trigger out-of-control cell growth while sparing healthy tissues. But some patients are not eligible for these treatments because they have cancer-promoting mutations that are believed to cause resistance to these drugs. Now, physician-scientists have used c
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Diet and temperature linked to metabolism in opaleye fish
Whether it's warm outside or cold, people generally eat about the same amount. But a fish's appetite can vary enormously with the temperature. As coldblooded animals, their metabolism is governed by external conditions: It's slow going for a cold fish, but high temperatures kick them into high gear.
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Team pinpoints brain signals tied to OCD symptoms
Researchers have identified brain signals associated with obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms, paving the way for adaptive treatment. The researchers recorded electrical signals in the human brain associated with ebbs and flows in OCD symptoms over an extended period in participants' homes as they went about daily living. The research could be an important step in making an emerging therapy ca
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