Search Posts

Nyheder2021december17

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at udpege vigtigste nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP CHOOSE THE MOST IMPORTANT SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

'Anti-5G' necklaces are radioactive and dangerous, Dutch nuclear experts say
Officials issue product alert and say 'quantum pendants' could damage DNA with prolonged use People who wear "anti-5G" pendants to "protect" themselves from radio frequencies emitted by phone masts have been told by the Dutch nuclear authority that their necklaces are dangerously radioactive. Owners of "quantum pendants" and other "negative ion" jewellery have been advised to store them away, as
10h
I Canceled My Birthday Party Because of Omicron
I turn 40 today, and I was planning to have a party. The Delta surge made me nervous about it. The arrival of Omicron made me cancel it. The plan was to have an extended house party, with a couple dozen people popping by over the weekend. On the one hand, it would have been an unmasked, indoor event—the kind in which the coronavirus, in all its incarnations, spreads most easily. On the other hand
10h

LATEST

Wood burners cause nearly half of urban air pollution cancer risk – study
Exclusive: Wood smoke is a more important carcinogen than vehicle fumes, finds Athens analysis Wood burning stoves in urban areas are responsible for almost half of people's exposure to cancer-causing chemicals found in air pollution particles, new research has shown. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tiny pollution particles are produced by burning fuels and have long been known to
14h
The CDC's Flawed Case for Wearing Masks in School
The debate over child masking in schools boiled over again this fall, even above its ongoing high simmer. The approval in late October of COVID-19 vaccines for 5-to-11-year-olds was for many public-health experts an indication that mask mandates could finally be lifted. Yet with cases on the rise in much of the country, along with anxiety regarding the Omicron variant, other experts and some poli
1d
Genius Builds Computer Inside Minecraft That Can Run Its Own Games
Big CHUNGUS 2 A Minecraft player has successfully built an 8-bit processor inside the video game in an impressive and meta demo, as spotted by PCWorld . The master crafter, who goes by the handle "Sammyuri," built the processor, dubbed Chungus 2 (Computation Humongous Unconventional Number and Graphics Unit) over a span of seven long months. The resulting virtual processor — assuming that each bl
4h
'Extraordinary' restoration of Roman rock crystal jar from Galloway hoard
Exclusive: Vessel may have held a perfume or other potion used to anoint kings or in religious ceremonies When the Galloway hoard was unearthed from a ploughed field in western Scotland in 2014 , it offered the richest collection of Viking-age objects ever found in Britain or Ireland. But one of the artefacts paled in comparison with treasures such as a gold bird-shaped pin and a silver-gilt vess
11h
Astronomers spy quartet of cavities from giant black holes
Scientists have found four enormous cavities, or bubbles, at the center of a galaxy cluster using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This unusual set of features may have been caused by eruptions from two supermassive black holes closely orbiting each other.
1d
How the humble limpet helped humans develop, survive and thrive
The humble limpet generally doesn't attract much attention. Most of us remember them from childhood as tenacious little creatures clinging to rocks, impossible to prise off. But this familiar, cone-shaped animal has played an important part in the development of humans across the globe.
10h
Coast redwood and sequoia genome sequences completed
Scientists have completed the sequences for the coast redwood and giant sequoia genomes. The research, officially published this week in the journal G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, helps to better explain the genetic basis for these species' ability to adapt to their changing environments. The research indicates that the coast redwood genome evolved from a single ancestral species.
1d
Magnetic 'hedgehogs' could store big data in a small space
Atomic-scale magnetic patterns resembling a hedgehog's spikes could result in hard disks with massively larger capacities than today's devices, a new study suggests. The finding could help data centers keep up with the exponentially increasing demand for video and cloud data storage.
6h
Tesla Spotted Cruising Down Highway With Dog in Driver's Seat
Not a Shiba Because nothing matters any more, a dog appears to have taken control of a Tesla vehicle, according to a groundbreaking investigate report by Inside Edition . "This is crazy!" sputtered Blake Missick, from Austin, Texas, incredulously in the video , which shows a shaggy dog going for a spin in a Tesla. "There's nobody in there! Is this legal?" While it's not the most egregious use of
7h
The first true millipede: new species with more than 1,000 legs discovered in Western Australia
Researchers named the subterranean animal Eumillipes persephone after the Greek goddess of the underworld Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing The first ever millipede with more than 1,000 legs been discovered in Western Australia. The species, which is the first "true" millipede, has 1,306 legs and was found up to 60 metres underground in a mining area in the Eastern Goldfields
15h
The Death Toll Says It All
In late May of 2020, the U.S. hit one of what has become so many grim pandemic milestones: our first 100,000 dead from COVID-19. I remember how heartbroken I was then—and how frustrated. The novel coronavirus, a stealthy pathogen, was bound to take a toll no matter how perfect Americans' response was to the crisis. But Americans' response was far from perfect. I was frustrated by people who refus
23h
Researchers Teach Human Brain Cells in a Dish to Play "Pong"
Cyborg Brains Scientists have successfully taught a collection of human brain cells in a petri dish how to play the video game "Pong" — kind of. Researchers at the biotechnology startup Cortical Labs have created " mini-brains " consisting of 800,000 to one million living human brain cells in a petri dish, New Scientist reports . The cells are placed on top of a microelectrode array that analyzes
6h
Amazon Wouldn't Let Driver Stop Deliveries as Tornado Struck
Reports about Amazon's sluggish response to the deadly tornado that collapsed one of its facilities in Illinois just keeps getting worse and worse. The latest comes in the form of a text message exchange between an Amazon driver and her manager. The messages, which were seen and verified by Bloomberg , showcase the confusion and chaos during the weekend's disaster. "Tornado alarms are going off o
6h
We Know Enough About Omicron to Know That We're in Trouble
Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET on December 17, 2021 A lot has changed for Omicron in just two weeks. At December's onset, the variant was barely present in Europe, showing up in 1 to 2 percent of COVID cases . Now it's accounting for 72 percent of new cases in London, where everybody seems to know somebody with COVID . In the U.K. and Denmark, Omicron case numbers are doubling every other day. The same
7h
Why a UK Omicron wave is dangerous – even if we see mostly mild cases
Analysis: If the spread continues at this rate, a small proportion of Covid hospitalisations is a serious matter With the booster programme at full tilt across the UK, immunity against Covid is rising – so it is perhaps not surprising that the concern shown by experts over the steep rise in Omicron infections has left some bemused. For while the new variant is believed to dodge Covid vaccines to
11h
NASA Says Its Mars Helicopter Does Not Have the Log4j Security Flaw
Mars Sec Division Could the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter be hacked? The answer appears to be no. The Register reported this week that circumstantial evidence indicated that the NASA mission may have been vulnerable to the much-publicized exploit . Back in June, the official account for Apache tweeted that the the Ingenuity 2020 mission was powered by its software — and since then, the Register point
1d
Experts: Stop Wearing Radioactive "Anti-5G" Necklaces, Idiots
Nuclear experts in the Netherlands are warning against "anti-5G" pendants that some are wearing with the ridiculous idea that they'll ward off harmful frequencies. The problem? These products emit potentially harmful ionizing radiation — they're literally radioactive, in other words — and could could cause negative health effects in the long run. In short, the irony is palpable. "Exposure to ioni
1h
How to Respond to Omicron Like a Rational, Smart, Non-Hysterical Adult
With a scary-sounding new variant making the rounds, it's easy to panic. But the reality, as usual, is complex. In fact, some initial research suggests that the Omicron variant, while much more transmissible, appears to be significantly milder even than Delta . Although the data is still incomplete, and more deaths will almost certainly emerge, as recently as December 4, the World Health Organiza
8h
Grindr Slammed With Huge Fine for Spying on Users
Turns out you can't even meet hook ups in peace these days. On Wednesday, a Norwegian regulator called the Data Protection Authority hit dating app Grindr with a €6.3 million fine for sharing user data with advertisers without their consent. "Our conclusion is that Grindr has disclosed user data to third parties for behavioral advertisement without a legal basis," said Tobias Judin, head of the N
1d
T-cells in Pfizer Covid jab recipients stay robust against severe illness
Research in South Africa raises hopes that similar responses may be present with other vaccines Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage South African researchers examining how the body's immune system responds to the Omicron variant have identified that T-cells in people who have had the Pfizer vaccine continue to be robust in potentially protecting against severe illness de
6h
Fully Vaccinated Is About to Mean Something Else
For nearly a year now, the phrase fully vaccinated has carried a cachet that it never did before. Being fully vaccinated against COVID-19 is a ticket for a slate of liberties—a pass to travel without testing and skip post-exposure quarantine, per the CDC , and in many parts of the country, a license to enter restaurants, gyms, and bars. For many employees, full vaccination is now a requirement to
11h
Facebook says 50,000 users were targeted by cyber mercenary firms in 2021
Private, mercenary-style surveillance and hacking groups have used Facebook and Instagram to target 50,000 people in over 100 countries, according to a newly published investigation by Meta, Facebook's parent company. The existence of private companies that use sophisticated digital tools to pry secrets from people's work and private lives—sometimes as part of legitimate law enforcement efforts,
1d
Someone's Selling Shockingly Racist NFTs of George Floyd
In the world of blockchain, there's no shortage of dumb ideas , incredible idiots , and bad actors — but one new creator might have just outdone them all. An NFT project selling different illustrations of George Floyd — the unarmed Black man whose brazen murder by a Minneapolis police officer in 2020 launched a series of social uprisings — was released on the OpenSea platform on December 7, Input
4h
'No, Like, Everyone Has COVID Right Now'
"If you live in New York City and you don't have COVID right now, um," one TikTok user said before pausing and tucking her hair behind her ears. "You're lying." Serena Kerrigan, a New York–based influencer who refers to herself as "Samantha Jones IRL," in reference to the Sex and the City character, filmed herself reclining in bed, muttering "gorgeous gorgeous girls have COVID," and then, "No, li
9h
An Ode to America
"P retty good nose you got there! You do much fighting with that nose?" New Orleans, 1989. I'm standing on a balcony south of the Garden District, and a man—a stranger—is hailing me from the street. He looks like Paul Newman, if Paul Newman were an alcoholic housepainter. I don't, as it happens, do much fighting with this nose, but that's not the point. The point is that something about me, the p
11h
Christopher Hitchens Was Fearless
S o how does one come to grips with the whirlpools of insanity that swirl around us these days? Copious amounts of alcohol are certainly a reliable option. An even better alternative is to spend time with wiser heads who are willing to dispense advice on how to navigate the road ahead. In my own case, over the years I've lost a number of friends whose wisdom and reason would be invaluable in tryi
12h
The internet runs on free open-source software. Who pays to fix it?
Right now, Volkan Yazici is working 22 hour days for free. Yazici is a member of the Log4J project, an open-source tool used widely to record activity inside various types of software. It helps run huge swaths of the internet, including applications ranging from iCloud to Twitter, and he and his colleagues are now desperately trying to deal with a massive vulnerability that has put billions of ma
13h
Mike and Jerry Fix Their Exploding Barrel | Moonshiners
Stream Moonshiners on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/moonshiners #Moonshiners #Moonshine #DiscoveryChannel Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Fro
8h
Video Shows Dozens of Feral Hogs Invading Neighborhood
Pork Persuasion The prophecy made in a 2019 meme has come true. A neighborhood has, indeed, been invaded by dozens of feral hogs, as one Twitter user claimed in response to alt-country singer Jason Isbell's tweet all those months ago. But don't panic. It wasn't 30-50 feral hogs, and because the porcine invasion happened around midnight in Sienna, Texas, no children were harmed — just landscaping
9h
In Maryland, the Steep Cost of Delayed Rape Kit Testing
Despite renewed efforts to finish processing one of the country's oldest DNA databases of rape crimes, Maryland officials have tested only a tiny fraction of the state's evidence. As forensic labs are strained by new laws and the pandemic, progress has slowed, but the cost of delay has only become more clear.
13h
Why It's Worthwhile to Debunk Shivambu
Richard Feynman famously said, "The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool". This is the most important lesson skepticism has to offer. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
18h
The Holiday-Rom-Com Fantasy Has Nothing to Do With Romance
Phylis Mitchell is a woman who is transformed, through the magic of the holidays, into a drill sergeant. Early on in The Christmas House , an already classic Hallmark rom-com, she enlists her husband and two adult sons in her mission to revive an old family tradition: creating the aggressively festive home that gives the movie its title. Phylis (played by Sharon Lawrence) devotes herself to the c
6h
The Metaverse Will Need 1,000x More Computing Power, Says Intel
With land in virtual worlds selling for millions of dollars , NFTs flooding the internet, and Meta (formerly Facebook) employees saying the word "metaverse" over 80 times during a keynote presentation last month, it seems like the metaverse is taking off—or at least buzz around the idea of it is. Is it all hype? Does anyone really understand it? When will it get here, if it hasn't already? Accord
7h
The dreams and details of a green shipping revolution | Jim Hagemann Snabe
As chairman of the world's largest maritime shipping company, Jim Hagemann Snabe thinks a lot about how goods get where they need to go and the impact their journey has on the planet. Leading the effort to decarbonize shipping by 2050, he shares a plan to convert green electricity into green liquid fuel to power vessels in a process called "power-to-X" — and urges global leaders to join the voyag
1d
Sauropod dinosaurs were restricted to warmer regions of Earth
Giant, long-necked sauropods, thought to include the largest land animals ever to have existed, preferred to live in warmer, more tropical regions on Earth, suggesting they may have had a different physiology from other dinosaurs, according to a new study led by researchers at UCL and the University of Vigo.
6h
Elon Musk's Mentor Accused of "Brazen" Embezzlement
The ousted CEO of a SpaceX copycat — and the man who gave Elon Musk his first rocketry books — is being sued for, among other things, allegedly embezzling money to fund his vintage racecar obsession. As Ars Technica 's Eric Berger reports , Jim Cantrell, the onetime executive of the micro-launch company Vector Launch, is being sued as part of the company's bankruptcy filings. In the motion filed
5h
This puzzle challenge brings joy to the world of code
By midnight on December 1, 2015, when Eric Wastl first launched his annual Santa-themed puzzle-a-day programming challenge Advent of Code , 81 people had signed up. That pretty much matched his capacity planning for 70 participants. Wastl figured this amusement might be of interest to a few friends, friends of friends, and maybe some of their friends as well. But Wastl, a software engineer who wo
13h
Study re-examines the decay of 185Bi using state-of-the-art technologies
Researchers at University of Surrey, University of York, University of Edinburgh, and Argonne National Laboratory have recently revisited and solved some of the long-standing puzzles associated with the decay of 185Bi, the heaviest known proton-emitting nucleus. Their paper, published in Physical Review Letters, outlines crucial new results obtained using two advanced setups at Argonne National La
7h
Facebook Exec Laments the Company's Bulky, "Wretched" VR Headset
Nick Clegg, Facebook's vice president for global affairs and communications, isn't impressed with the design of the company's Quest virtual reality headset. In a recent interview with the Financial Times , Clegg had a hard time drinking his coffee while wearing the headset — with hilarious consequences, as a clip shared by the publication's Henry Mance shows. The head of Clegg's VR avatar snapped
3h
Did black holes form immediately after the Big Bang?
How did supermassive black holes form? What is dark matter? In an alternative model for how the universe came to be, as compared to the 'textbook' history of the universe, a team of astronomers propose that both of these cosmic mysteries could be explained by so-called "primordial black holes."
7h
Zimbabwe's climate migration is a sign of what's to come
Julius Mutero has harvested virtually nothing in the past six years. For his entire adult life, he has farmed a three-hectare plot in Mabiya, a farming community in eastern Zimbabwe. There he grows maize and groundnuts to feed himself, his wife, and their three children. He sells whatever's left for cash. But over a decade ago, his area started getting less rain and the rivers dried up. What was
12h
The 7 Best Cookbooks of 2021
From Black American barbecue to steaming bowls of Asian dumplings, these recipes are the best way to taste the world without leaving your kitchen.
11h
Opening a 50-year-old Christmas present from the moon
A pretty special gift unwrapping will soon take place—a piercing tool built by ESA will open a moon soil container from Apollo 17 that has gone untouched for nearly 50 years. The opening will allow the extraction of precious lunar gases which may have been preserved in the sample.
7h
Light-controlled spontaneous growth of nanostructures
Ph.D. student Marloes Bistervels from the Self-Organizing Matter research group at AMOLF has managed to use light to very precisely control the formation of nanocomposites in the shape of corals and vases. By illuminating a solution of the right ingredients with UV light, she can control where, when and which structures arise at the micrometer scale. Today, she published her findings in the scient
7h
Testosterone drives the dark side of meerkat success
In a study appearing this week in the journal Nature Communications, a team of researchers led by Christine Drea, professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University, shows that testosterone-fueled aggression may be a crucial part in the evolution of cooperation in meerkat societies.
13h
Brain capacity compared in humans and birds
The working memory is the brain's ability to process information for a short period of time in a retrievable state. It is essential for performing complex cognitive tasks, such as thinking, planning, following instructions or solving problems. A team of researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has now succeeded in investigating this special area of memory in birds in more detail and in compa
8h
After thousands of years, an iconic whale confronts a new enemy
For millennia, vast expanses of the Arctic Ocean have been untouched by humans, ocean where narwhals and other marine mammals lived undisturbed. Now that climate change is causing sea ice to melt, there has been an uptick of human activity in the Arctic. This has resulted in significantly more noise from an array of human sources, including seismic surveys, mine blasts, port projects and cruise sh
6h
Cybersecurity: The long view
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." The history of cybersecurity has been a series of increasingly complex, powerful, and alternating waves of attacks and defenses. To address the increase in threats and costs, the role of the chief information security officer has taken on greater importance in both execution and the boardroom. Click here to continue.
1d
Unraveling a puzzle to speed the development of fusion energy
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have developed an effective computational method to simulate the crazy-quilt movement of free electrons during experimental efforts to harness on Earth the fusion power that drives the sun and stars. The method cracks a complex equation that can enable improved control of the random and fast-moving moving elec
5h
Discovering sources of Roman silver coinage from the Iberian Peninsula
Despite its prior status as a luxury commodity, silver became widely used for coinage in the Roman world from the 7th century BCE onward and provided a standardized monetary system for ancient Mediterranean civilizations. However, the sources of silver used to produce Roman coinage have largely been used up, making it difficult to determine which deposits Roman miners exploited.
6h
Evidence found of diatoms communicating with each other using natural fluorescence
A team of researchers from IFREMER, French Institute for Sea Research and the Mediterranean Institute for Advanced Studies, IMEDEA, has found evidence of diatom communication through the use of natural fluorescence. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the single-celled alga.
8h
Redrawing the lines: Growing inexpensive, high-quality iron-based superconductors
Superconducting materials show zero electrical resistance at low temperatures, which allows them to conduct "supercurrents" without dissipation. Recently, a group of scientists led by Dr. Kazumasa Iida from Nagoya University, Japan, developed an inexpensive, scalable way to produce high-temperature superconductors using "grain boundary engineering" techniques. The new method could help develop str
8h
Schooling teachers in the realities of urban education
When Jesse Solomon '91 first started teaching at a middle school in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the 1990s, he was overwhelmed. "I had 25 students working at eight different grade levels—some that were learning English, some that were on individual education plans," he says. "I wasn't prepared for that level of complexity." Luckily, a veteran teacher was in the next room. "Every day before school
9h
Juno spacecraft 'hears' Jupiter's moon
Sounds from a Ganymede flyby, magnetic fields, and remarkable comparisons between Jupiter and Earth's oceans and atmospheres were discussed during a briefing today on NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans.
2h
Succession Is a Game of Monopoly
The finale for HBO's third season of Succession opens with a family session of Monopoly, a game that offers the perfect summary of the show: Players fight to be the last one standing—trading advantages and risking jail—going around the board over and over without a clear end in sight. But with the season's exhilarating ending, has the game of Succession finally changed? So far, each season has fo
4h
Using sparse data to predict lab quakes
A machine-learning approach developed for sparse data reliably predicts fault slip in laboratory earthquakes and could be key to predicting fault slip and potentially earthquakes in the field. The research by a Los Alamos National Laboratory team builds on their previous success using data-driven approaches that worked for slow-slip events in earth but came up short on large-scale stick-slip fault
2h
Artificial intelligence accurately predicts who will develop dementia in two years
Artificial intelligence can predict which people who attend memory clinics will develop dementia within two years with 92 per cent accuracy, a largescale new study has concluded. Using data from more than 15,300 patients in the US, researchers found that a form of artificial intelligence called machine learning can accurately tell who will go on to develop dementia.
3h
Your Most Controversial Food Opinions
Sign up for Conor's newsletter here . Earlier this week, I highlighted a debate about the merits of the Slow Food movement and asked readers to share any contested opinion about food or foodstuffs that they happen to hold. Some correspondents took aim at particular foods. "Green beans are chalky garbage," Molly asserted, "and no, I don't think that just because I haven't had them the way you prep
3h
Kids books are biased towards male protagonists
A major analysis of children's books published during the last 60 years suggests that a bias persists toward male protagonists—despite an overall trend for an increasing proportion of female leads. The research focused on books that feature a single main character. The bias toward male protagonists remained slight in the books overall, at a rate of 1.2 to 1 in the last decade. When broken down by
4h
Local accumbens in vivo imaging during deep brain stimulation reveals a strategy-dependent amelioration of hedonic feeding [Engineering]
Impulsive overeating is a common, disabling feature of eating disorders. Both continuous deep brain stimulation (DBS) and responsive DBS, which limits current delivery to pathological brain states, have emerged as potential therapies. We used in vivo fiber photometry in wild-type, Drd1-cre, and A2a-cre mice to 1) assay subtype-specific medium spiny…
4h
Transcriptional network orchestrating regional patterning of cortical progenitors [Neuroscience]
We uncovered a transcription factor (TF) network that regulates cortical regional patterning in radial glial stem cells. Screening the expression of hundreds of TFs in the developing mouse cortex identified 38 TFs that are expressed in gradients in the ventricular zone (VZ). We tested whether their cortical expression was altered…
4h
Microbiome-mediated incapacitation of interferon lambda production in the oral mucosa [Immunology and Inflammation]
Here, we show that Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), an endogenous oral pathogen, dampens all aspects of interferon (IFN) signaling in a manner that is strikingly similar to IFN suppression employed by multiple viral pathogens. Pg suppressed IFN production by down-regulating several IFN regulatory factors (IRFs 1, 3, 7, and 9), proteolytically…
4h
N6-methyladenosine (m6A) depletion regulates pluripotency exit by activating signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells [Cell Biology]
N6-methyladenosine (m6A) deposition on messenger RNA (mRNA) controls embryonic stem cell (ESC) fate by regulating the mRNA stabilities of pluripotency and lineage transcription factors (TFs) [P. J. Batista et al., Cell Stem Cell 15, 707–719 (2014); Y. Wang et al., Nat. Cell Biol. 16, 191–198 (2014); and S. Geula et…
4h
Why ex post peer review encourages high-risk research while ex ante review discourages it [Social Sciences]
Peer review is an integral component of contemporary science. While peer review focuses attention on promising and interesting science, it also encourages scientists to pursue some questions at the expense of others. Here, we use ideas from forecasting assessment to examine how two modes of peer review—ex ante review of…
4h
Crystallization kinetics of atomic crystals revealed by a single-shot and single-particle X-ray diffraction experiment [Physics]
Crystallization is a fundamental natural phenomenon and the ubiquitous physical process in materials science for the design of new materials. So far, experimental observations of the structural dynamics in crystallization have been mostly restricted to slow dynamics. We present here an exclusive way to explore the dynamics of crystallization in…
4h
Leveraging nonstructural data to predict structures and affinities of protein-ligand complexes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Over the past five decades, tremendous effort has been devoted to computational methods for predicting properties of ligands—i.e., molecules that bind macromolecular targets. Such methods, which are critical to rational drug design, fall into two categories: physics-based methods, which directly model ligand interactions with the target given the target's three-dimensional…
4h
Genetic studies of human-chimpanzee divergence using stem cell fusions [Genetics]
Complete genome sequencing has identified millions of DNA changes that differ between humans and chimpanzees. Although a subset of these changes likely underlies important phenotypic differences between humans and chimpanzees, it is currently difficult to distinguish causal from incidental changes and to map specific phenotypes to particular genome locations. To…
4h
Human-made noise stresses out narwhals
Noise from cruise ships, mine blasts, port projects, and seismic surveys triggers stress in narwhals, even when it comes from miles away. For millennia, vast expanses of the Arctic Ocean have been untouched by humans, ocean where narwhals and other marine mammals lived undisturbed. Now that climate change is causing sea ice to melt, there has been an uptick of human activity in the Arctic, result
4h
A quantum view of 'combs' of light
Frequency microcombs are specialized light sources that can function as light-based clocks, rulers and sensors to measure time, distance and molecular composition with high precision. New research presents a novel tool for investigating the quantum characteristics of these sources.
4h
Secret embraces of stars revealed by Alma
Unlike our Sun, most stars live with a companion. Sometimes, two come so close that one engulfs the other — with far-reaching consequences. When astronomers used the telescope Alma to study 15 unusual stars, they were surprised to find that they all recently underwent this phase. The discovery promises new insight on the sky's most dramatic phenomena — and on life, death and rebirth among the st
4h
Soft semiconductors that stretch like human skin can detect ultra-low light levels
Researchers have demonstrated a new photodetector material that acts like a second skin layer and is up to 200% more stretchable than its original dimension without significantly losing its electric current. The researchers say the soft flexible photodetectors could enhance the utility of medical wearable sensors and implantable devices, among other applications.
4h
New discovery on how omega-3 fatty acids can reduce atherosclerosis
A receptor activated by substances formed from omega-3 fatty acids plays a vital role in preventing inflammation in blood vessels and reducing atherosclerosis, a new study reports. The discovery can pave the way for new strategies for treating and preventing cardiovascular disease using omega-3 fatty acids.
5h
Gas-passing plankton illumine another piece of the carbon cycle puzzle
A recently discovered species of bacteria consumes an organic compound commonly found in solvents like paint remover, according to a new study. Finding that SAR11 bacteria use acetone adds to evidence suggesting that aspects of the marine carbon cycle, which pulls atmospheric carbon into the sea, are not being considered in the study of the cycle and its ability to buffer climate change, scientist
5h
Using strategy to preserve biodiversity while saving space
The breathtaking variety of life on Earth is in danger; biodiversity is declining rapidly. As many as one million species are at risk; many could become extinct in the next few decades. Accordingly, protected areas are urgently needed, but are often poorly chosen from a strategic perspective. But how can the biological diversity of a given region best be measured? With the aid of an innovative new
5h
Survey: Huge drop in teen drug use during COVID-19 pandemic
Declines in teen use of illicit drugs reported in 2021 during the COVID pandemic were the largest and most sweeping ever recorded in the past 46 years, according to a new survey. The percentage of youth who had ever used any illicit drug other than marijuana decreased by more than 25% in 2021. Specifically, in 12th grade this percentage was 27% smaller in comparison to the previous year, in 10th
5h
12 dead as powerful typhoon batters the Philippines
At least 12 people have died in the strongest typhoon to hit the Philippines this year, the disaster agency said Friday, after the storm swept across the archipelago uprooting trees, toppling power poles and flooding villages.
5h
New study reveals how epithelial cells in the body naturally eliminate 'precancerous' ones
Normal epithelial cells show the ability to push out precancerous ones present in the epithelium, by means of 'cell competition.' But the exact molecular mechanism of this recognition by normal epithelial cells was unknown. Now, researchers have unraveled the interactions and cellular pathways leading to this extrusion, allowing them to identify a candidate for a therapeutic target for future canc
5h
Margaret Waddy obituary
My aunt Margaret Waddy, who has died aged 77 of a pulmonary embolism, was a horticulturist and a teacher, a quiz fan and a committed volunteer with Samaritans in Cambridge. Margaret was born in London but her early life was spent in the Gold Coast, now Ghana, where her parents, Bernard (known as BB) Waddy, a doctor in tropical medicine, and Mary (nee Lawrence), worked for the Colonial Service. At
5h
Harvard drops standardized test requirement through 2026
Students will be able to apply to Harvard University without submitting SAT or ACT scores for at least the next four years, the Ivy League school announced Thursday, extending a policy many colleges have adopted during the pandemic and that a growing number are keeping for years to come.
5h
Using drones to capture coastal heritage before it's lost
Improved understanding is a necessary first step in the process of managing the loss of an archaeological site, and the Seaford Head Project is trialing ways of achieving this including 3D modeling and surveying the site with drones. The project will also trial the use of podcasts and videos to engage local communities in a conversation about coastal change and how they feel about the eventual, in
5h
The climate system relies on microscopic particles
The Earth's climate is an extremely complex system that is driven by the subtle balance of many different processes—a key one of which is the air-sea exchange of CO2. Monitoring the ocean's uptake of CO2 is key to our understanding of climate change, and scientists at EPFL and at the Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO, France) have recently discovered a new part of the process. They iden
6h
Using math to significantly improve modeling of surface and subsurface water flow in complex landscapes
Understanding how surface and subsurface waters are affected by drought, fire, warming, and increased human demand requires computer models that can represent complex environments. Predictions are especially difficult for what scientists call patterned land cover. In Arctic permafrost landscapes, this patterning is caused by intense freezing and subsequent thawing. This can also overturn soil laye
6h
Map of transparent butterflies highlights biodiversity hotspot in the Andes Mountains
In a new study, researchers created the most detailed distribution map to date of butterflies in the American tropics, showing that areas of highest diversity coincide with regions most threatened by deforestation and development. The study specifically focused on Ithomiini, or glasswing butterflies, a large group with nearly 400 species that occur throughout much of Central and South America. The
6h
Climate change is intensifying extremes also in the oceans
While much is known about extreme weather events on land, there has been little research into those that occur in the ocean. A study led by ETH Zurich uses models to show for the first time that marine heatwaves, and extremes with high acidity or low oxygen can also occur conjointly — with difficult to foresee consequences for marine life.
6h
Unfolding the blindness proteins through fly eyes
Every 6 minutes someone is told they're going blind. One of the major causes of human blindness is a disease called Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), which causes progressive degeneration of the retina and vision loss. Approximately one-tenth of Retinitis Pigmentosa cases worldwide are caused by mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Researchers from ITQB NOVA and IGC had now identified a crucial mechanism for
6h
Robots use fear to fight invasive fish
The invasive mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) chews off the tails of freshwater fishes and tadpoles, leaving the native animals to perish while dining on other fishes' and amphibians' eggs. Researchers engineered a robot to scare mosquitofish away, revealing how fear alters its behavior, physiology, fertility — and may help turn the tide against invasive species.
6h
Classrooms with more Black and Latinx kids get less quality teaching
Classes taught by the same teacher receive a lower quality of teaching when they have higher percentages of Black and Latinx students, a new study shows. "Previous research has revealed different forms of racial inequality within the US schooling system, including that youth of color tend to be taught by less experienced and credentialed teachers, but virtually no work has examined inequalities i
6h
JWST Launch Delayed to Christmas Eve
(Photo: Desiree Stover/NASA) Last month, we hoped the James Webb Space Telescope's new December 22 launch date would constitute the last of its delays. Our wish wasn't granted—the eagerly-awaited launch has now been postponed to December 24. "The James Webb Space Telescope team is working a communication issue between the observatory and the launch vehicle system. This will delay the launch date
6h
Scientists Haven't 'Created' a Warp Bubble, But They're a Bit Closer to Testing One
Sorry to our fellow hopeful space nerds, but we have to burst everyone's warp bubble. Despite recent reports that scientists have "accidentally created a warp bubble," it looks like warp speed is still a few baby steps away. But all hope is not lost: a group of scientists led by Dr. Harold G. "Sunny" White has proposed a structure that could actually be built in the real world and used to study t
6h
Paving the way to thriving in space
In late December, SpaceX-24 will deliver a payload to the International Space Station. Three new experiments that will help scientists better understand specific biological and physical phenomena will be on board.
7h
Get Some New Perspective With the Best Drones
Drones are an essential piece of technology for aerial videography and photography, but you don't have to be a professional photographer to geek out on the latest and greatest drones. These airborne technology toys allow you to experience the exhilaration of flight and capture images from hundreds of feet in the air while keeping your feet firmly planted on the ground. There is a wide range of dr
7h
A biopolymer hydrogel with amino-functionalized bioactive glass for accelerated bone regeneration
Composite hydrogels can incorporate natural polymers and bioactive glass as promising materials for bone regeneration. However, the applications of such constructs are limited by poor compatibility between organic and inorganic phases. In a new study now published in Science Advances, Xinxin Ding, and a research team in medicine, in Shanghai China, formed an electrostatically reinforced hydrogel (
7h
Teaching map literacy is important part of having an informed public
When the average person consumes information through sources like television, radio, a website, or a newspaper, they might do it with a critical eye. What is the viewpoint of the news outlet? Has it been trustworthy in the past? Is there another source for this information to get a second opinion?
7h
Hydroelectric dams take toll on endangered big cats, study shows
Big cats are among the most widespread top predators on Earth. Lions stalk zebra in the African savanna, tigers ambush antelope in the forests of Asia and jaguars hunt deer in the jungles of South America. They play an important role in ecosystems by regulating the numbers of these herbivores, in turn, reducing the deterioration of vegetated habitats and maintaining species diversity.
7h
Soil formation of the Galápagos Islands
The Galápagos Islands are known for their extreme isolation and unusual animal life, with rare species inhabiting the islands. But little was known about the soils until a group of scientists began studying them in earnest in 2016. The December 15th Soils Matter blog describes the soil formation on this remote archipelago of nineteen islands.
7h
Mouse guard hair found to resemble manmade optical sensors, suggesting heat sensing ability
Ian Baker, a physicist specializing in camera imaging, who works for Leonardo U.K. Ltd., a British defense company, has discovered that a bristly type of mouse hair has structures that resemble those in some manmade optical sensors. In his paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Baker suggests that mouse and other mammalian fur may serve as infrared antennas—allowing its owner t
7h
Novel fluorescent hydrogel for soft, biomimetic color-changing skins
The Smart Polymer Materials group led by Prof. Chen Tao at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has synthesized a supramolecular multicolor fluorescent polymeric hydrogel for soft biomimetic skins with adaptive color-changing behaviors. The study was published in Advanced Functional Materials.
7h
Differentiating friends from foes in the fungal root microbiome
Complex microbial communities inhabit plants and modulate their development. Roots especially, host a wide diversity of micro-organisms—including bacteria and fungi—that directly influence plant health. Researchers from the MPIPZ previously discovered that these fungi are important members of the root microbiome that can promote plant growth, but only when they are kept in check by the combined ac
7h
How did lockdown affect people's sex lives in Britain?
Lockdown affected people's sex lives in a variety of ways, with young people and those not living with a partner reporting the greatest changes, according to researchers from UCL, the University of Glasgow and the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen).
7h
Major US electric utility companies may reduce power sector emissions by one-third, if they stick with climate pledges
Voluntary pledges by major U.S. electric utility companies could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the equivalent of one-third of 2018 U.S. power sector emissions, on top of reductions these companies must already make to comply with government policies, according to researchers at North Carolina State University and Columbia University. While it remains uncertain whether these companies can or w
7h
Binary mesocrystals from the nano-building kit
Mesocrystals are a class of solids formed by the regular arrangement of nanocrystals, which are tiny nanoparticles that have unique properties due to their small size. In mesocrystals, these take on a highly organized, superordinate form in a densely packed grid. A German-Swiss research team led by Professor Helmut Cölfen, a chemist from Konstanz, has now succeeded in synthesizing particularly com
7h
In last 15 years, deforestation made outdoor work unsafe for millions
The tropics is becoming hotter due to a combination of warming associated with deforestation and climate change—and that can reduce the ability of outdoor workers to perform their jobs safely. Researchers reporting in the journal One Earth on December 17 estimate how many safe working hours people living in the tropics have lost due to local temperature change associated with loss of trees during
7h
The Atlantic Daily: What Makes Omicron Dangerous
The United States is—once again—unprepared to protect itself against the coronavirus, my colleague Ed Yong warns in a sweeping new feature on Omicron and the future of the pandemic. "The variant's threat," Ed writes, "is far greater at the societal level than at the personal one." To better understand what he means by that, read the new report . We've also summarized three takeaways from his repo
7h
Archaeologist's book examines human adornment
Across countries, continents, and centuries, humans have felt compelled to adorn themselves. A new book edited and co-authored by Hannah Mattson, Southwestern archaeologist and an assistant professor of Anthropology at The University of New Mexico, explores personal adornment as components of human identity and practice, as well as symbols of wealth, power, and status.
8h
Adding depth to the popular discussion of transgender rights
In 2016, the state of North Carolina passed bill HB2, a controversial measure that barred most transgender people from using multiple-occupancy public restrooms. The legislation mandated that access for people was "based on their biological sex," and relied on a particular and contested definition of gender, namely, "the condition of being male or female" as stated on a birth certificate.
8h
Tip Line: Submit the 'dark patterns' you see online
A new tip line lets people submit examples of dark patterns online. Here's what that means. Many companies routinely rely on design features that deceive, coerce, or manipulate us online. They ask us to sync our contact list or allow cookie tracking while hiding options that would enable us to decline; they convince us to buy things by pitching a product as available in limited supply or "for a l
8h
Microbes reduce methane coming from Amsterdam's canals
According to researchers from Radboud University and Utrecht University, Amsterdam's canals emit relatively little methane. Methane-eating microbes that make their home on the canal walls probably play an important role. There is also remarkably little contamination of nitrogen, phosphate and organic matter in the canals. The researchers published the results in the Environmental Microbiology jour
8h
Two eyes better than one: An innovative strategy for precision agriculture
The agricultural field is a testbed for rapidly developing technologies involving unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and image processing techniques, which are quickly becoming indispensable tools for efficient precision agriculture and plant phenotyping (assessment of observable plant traits). Using aerial images obtained from UAV-mounted multispectral cameras, experts can quickly obtain useful info
8h
Smooth hydrophobic coatings may be more effective for aircraft de-icing
Icing poses a hazard to aircraft and is usually prevented with anti-icing fluids and hydrophobic coatings that reduce wettability and do not allow water to freeze on the aircraft surface. Yet little is known about whether combining these two methods is effective. Russian researchers have found out how hydrophobic coatings influence the efficiency of anti-icing fluids. Their experimental findings i
8h
'A moral imperative': Monastic sisters in rural Midwest make faith-based case for climate action
By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central). With reporting and news segment by Amber Strong (Newsy) Massive bee hives can be found on the grounds of Mount St. Scholastica, a 158-year-old Benedictine monastery in Atchison, Kansas. Image Credit: Stephanie Sandoval/ Newsy A TCHISON, KAN. — Nearly 100 sisters make up Mount St. Scholastica, a Benedictine monastery in a city of 10,000 in northwestern Ka
8h
Group develops world's first DMA for hard materials
Recently, the Li Faxin Research Group of Peking University College of Engineering developed the world's first dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) suitable for hard materials (metals, ceramics, etc.). The instrument is based on the electro-mechanical impedance method which can quickly, accurately, and automatically measure Young's modulus, shear modulus, and corresponding internal friction of materia
8h
Millet bread and pulse dough from Early Iron Age South India
Prof. Jennifer Bates and her coworkers, Kelly Wilcox Black and Prof. Kathleen Morrison, published a new archaeobotanical article, "Millet Bread and Pulse Dough from Early Iron Age South India: Charred Food Lumps as Culinary Indicators, " in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Jennifer is a former Postdoc in the Penn Paleoecology Lab, now an Assistant Professor at Seoul National University, Kell
8h
Superficial Interests Don't Matter for Friends Who Agree on the Big Things
Each installment of " The Friendship Files " features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with three people who met at a college-campus ministry. Although they don't share superficial interests, such as movie tastes, they share a commitment to their faith and to one another. Th
8h
Mussel 'AC' shields other species on hot days
Some marine species like mussels can help protect others from climate change by shielding them from heat, according to a new study. Researchers studied how tiny crabs and isopods—marine versions of pill bugs—that live on rocky shores react to warming of their natural rocky shore habitats. They found that the mussel beds these animals live in protect them from temperature swings and keep them from
8h
The science events to watch for in 2022
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03772-0 Omicron, Moon missions and particle physics are among the themes set to shape research in the coming year.
8h
Amy Webb: A Glimpse Into The Future
This hour, futurist Amy Webb guides us through innovations that give a glimpse into the future of transportation, wellness, tech, commerce, and travel … and the impacts they'll have on our lives. (Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED)
9h
Does having a raised heart rate alter our perception of time?
On several occasions while running and listening to music simultaneously, I've had the feeling that the music I'm listening to sounds slower than it normally does – So much so that I initially thought there might be some issue with the playback on my phone. These would be pieces of music that I'm quite familiar with, and I'd estimate that they appear to feel somewhere between 5-10% slower. I am a
9h
A campus exhibition
"Leslie Thornton: Begin Again, Again ," at the MIT List Center through February 13, is the artist's first US solo museum exhibition. It includes a new installation of Peggy and Fred in Hell (1983–2015).
9h
Raj Tahil '81 and Mary Jo Wrenn
Raj Tahil credits MIT with sparking his entrepreneurial instincts. "I learned to see problems as interesting opportunities," says the president of Torpac Capsules, which specializes in custom capsules and pharmaceutical equipment. In the spirit of creating opportunities, Tahil and his spouse, Mary Jo Wrenn, have created an MIT donor-advised fund (DAF)—an increasingly popular way to simplify chari
9h
Improving access to healthy, fast-casual food
Cassandria Campbell, MCP '11, traces her interest in food to her first summer job working with the Food Project on farms in Lincoln, Massachusetts, and Roxbury, the Boston neighborhood where she grew up. "I really enjoyed that experience of seeing things grow," she recalls, "and I appreciated how much change it was creating in Roxbury by bringing people together and turning vacant lots into produ
9h
Energy from the earth, for the earth
Geothermal power is a promising energy source limited by factors including the need to locate plants in areas where reservoirs of hot water deep below the earth's surface are easily accessible. Carlos Araque is looking to change that through his company, Quaise, using a groundbreaking technology developed at MIT. "We need to go deeper and hotter to truly make geothermal a global source, so it's n
9h
Ensuring a bright future for Seattle
In 1982, when Lynn Best '69 joined the public utility Seattle City Light, her team faced an immediate challenge: evaluating the environmental, cultural, and financial impacts of its three dams generating electricity on the Skagit River in northwest Washington State. As acting director, she was able to persuade City Light to allow the environmental team to lead negotiations. "Of course," Best says
9h
The art of bonsai, according to an engineer
Julian Adams remembers clearly the first time he saw a bonsai. He was wandering a botanical garden as a young man when, among the orchids, cacti, and acres of vegetables, he stumbled on a room full of the diminutive and ancient trees. Adams had always felt a respect for older things, he says. Something about the bonsai struck a profound chord for him. "They changed my way of perceiving things," h
9h
Serving as "a force multiplier for good"
"At MIT, we believe that public service can be—and should be—as intense, meaningful, and intellectually rigorous as academic work. MIT alumni help convey this philosophy … that serving others is not an activity separate from academic and professional pursuits; it is a vital element of a wise, creative life." Institute president L. Rafael Reif shared those thoughts with alumni volunteers during a
9h
The work of the future
Editor's Note: In 2020, an MIT Task Force produced a comprehensive report on the Work of the Future. Since then, the global pandemic has had a significant effect on work and businesses, providing the impetus for The Work of the Future , by the same authors. The book, from which the following excerpt is adapted, will be published by MIT Press on January 25, 2022. A decade ago, powerful mobile phon
9h
Better democracy through technology
When Mike Koval, the police chief of Madison, Wisconsin, abruptly resigned on a Sunday in September 2019, the community's relationship with its men and women in blue was already strained. Use-of-force issues hung over the department after the killing of a Black teenager in 2015. Then, months before Koval left, another Black teenager, in the middle of a mental health crisis, was beaten on the head
9h
A partridge in hand on the Spanish steppe
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03712-y As part of his PhD research into the effects of farming and hunting on endangered bird populations in Spain, Xabier Cabodevilla tracked birds and collected faecal samples from roosting sites.
10h
Omega-3-fetter kan motverka åderförkalkning
En receptor som aktiveras av omega-3 har en viktig roll för att stoppa inflammation i kärlen och motverka åderförkalkning. Fynden kan bana väg för nya sätt att behandla och förebygga hjärt-kärlsjukdom. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Kost vid IBS spelar mindre roll än väntat
Ett högt intag av gluten leder oftast inte till ökade IBS-symptom, visar en studie från Chalmers och Uppsala universitet. Tarmbesvären förvärras dock av en viss typ av kolhydrater, så kallade fodmaps, men effekten var mindre än förväntat. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Julen doftar – även efter covid-19
Julen är full av dofter. Men den behöver inte vara fördärvad för den som tappat luktsinnet, till exempel på grund av covid-19. Även om dofterna dämpas kan vi uppleva dem på flera sätt. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Daily briefing: COVID vaccines in eight powerful charts
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03790-y Graphics explain how vaccines shaped the year. Plus we meet Nature's 10: profiles of people who helped shape science in 2021, and hear that the Arctic is warming twice as fast as reported.
10h
Climate change may bungle weather forecasts
Climate change could be shifting the limits of weather predictability and pushing reliable 10-day forecasts out of reach, report researchers. The limit of reliable temperature, wind, and rainfall forecasts falls by about a day when the atmosphere warms by even a few degrees Celsius. "Our results show the state of the climate in general has implications for how many days out you can say something
10h
Is Santa's sleigh zero carbon? The answer lies in reindeer poo
Santa's sleigh is famously pulled by eight reindeer, nine if you include the luminous Rudolf who pitches in when it's foggy. The classic eight are Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Vixen and Blitzen. Those last two are an easy-on-the-ear translation of Dutch, but the whole eight sound like a fun stag party.
11h
The scientific workplace in 2021
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03710-0 The impact on careers of a lingering pandemic and industrial unrest were among the challenges faced by working scientists in the past 12 months
11h
Meta-analysis of two types of molecular stresses reveals common factors
Stress can impact sleep, focus and more—down to our molecules. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance of oxidants and antioxidants, caused by an increase of free radicals, or reactive oxygen species, that can damage cells and their components. Observed in several diseases, from Parkinson's disease to hepatitis to cancer, chronic oxidative stress also appears to cause hypoxia, another kind of s
11h
Ny klinisk lektor ved Sydvestjysk Sygehus
Lea Ladegaard Grønkjær er med til at skrive historie. Den 1. december 2021 tiltrådte hun stillingen som klinisk lektor ved Sydvestjysk Sygehus og blev dermed den første med sygeplejefaglig baggrund til at bestride stillingen.
11h
Psoriasispatienter: Vi er altså kronikere
Hudlidelsen psoriasis er en kronisk sygdom, der alt for ofte behandles som det modsatte, påpeger Lars Werner, direktør i Psoriasisforeningen. I en ny hvidbog efterlyser foreningen en række tiltag til at styrke behandlingen, først og fremmest for de komplicerede tilfælde.
12h
Uenighed blandt hudlæger: Hvem skal ordinere til patienter med psoriasis?
Meningerne er delte blandt hudlæger om Psoriasisforeningens forslag om at lade privatpraktiserende speciallæger udskrive biologiske og biosimilære lægemidler. »Jeg tror, at det bliver vanskeligt at håndtere, for de privatpraktiserende har ikke erfaringen,« siger Claus Zachariae, ledende overlæge på afdelingen for dermatologi og allergologi på Gentofte og Herlev Hospital.
12h
Exercise researcher earns more retractions as investigations mount
Retractions are slowly stacking up for an exercise researcher in Brazil whose work has come under scrutiny by data sleuths, including a couple of his erstwhile co-authors. The concerns prompted an investigation by his former institution into one of his academic supervisors, who may be facing sanctions, Retraction Watch has learned. In June 2020, the … Continue reading
12h
Integrated single-cell transcriptome analysis reveals heterogeneity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma microenvironment
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27599-5 The microenvironment of oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) is heterogeneous and can strongly impact response to treatment. Here, the authors characterize the ESCC tumour microenvironment with single-cell RNA-seq, finding CST1 + myofibroblasts with potential biological and prognostic significance as
13h
Cubic 3D Chern photonic insulators with orientable large Chern vectors
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27168-w Chern number controls the number of surface state channels in topological insulators. Here the authors propose 3D Chern insulating cubic photonic crystals with orientable and arbitrarily large Chern numbers demonstrating topologically protected photonic surface states.
13h
Overemphasis on recovery inhibits community transformation and creates resilience traps
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27359-5 Building community resilience in the face of climate disasters is critical to achieving a sustainable future. Here, using the case study of community resilience during Hurricane Michael in 2018, the authors show that an overemphasis on recovery entrench 'resilience traps'.
13h
An intergenerational androgenic mechanism of female intrasexual competition in the cooperatively breeding meerkat
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27496-x 'In some mammals, matriarchal status can be conferred with androgens. Here, the authors identify effects of androgens that implicate androgen-mediated aggression in female sexual selection in meerkats and intergenerational transmission of masculinised phenotypes in the evolution of meerkat cooperative breedi
13h
EpoR stimulates rapid cycling and larger red cells during mouse and human erythropoiesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27562-4 Maturing erythroblasts become smaller with every cell division. Here, the authors show that Epo stimulation promotes cell division and also generates larger red cells, and that this occurs in mouse and human cells, suggesting that red cell size could be a diagnostic marker for hypoxic stress.
13h
Investigating immune and non-immune cell interactions in head and neck tumors by single-cell RNA sequencing
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27619-4 The tumor microenvironment (TME) has an important role in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) progression. Here, using single-cell RNA sequencing and multiplexed imaging, the authors report the cellular complexity of the TME in patients with HNSCC, exploring inflammatory status, stromal heterogenei
13h
Heterocellular OSM-OSMR signalling reprograms fibroblasts to promote pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27607-8 Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major component of the desmoplastic stroma in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Here the authors report the importance of macrophage-derived Oncostatin M in reprogramming CAFs to drive a pro-tumorigenic environment in PDA.
13h
Landets kirurger i fælles opråb over presset sundhedsvæsen
Mangel på personale, sygeplejestrejke, flere års manglende kapacitet og en pukkel efter coronapandemiens første tid har presset sygehusvæsenet i knæ. Landets kirurger er nu et sted, hvor de er nødt til at prioritere mellem selv akutte patienter. Og det skal der, ifølge et brev fra Kirurgisk Forum, sættes en stopper for.
13h
Hösten 2021: Nya professorer berättar om sin forskning
De berättar om forskning kring hur hjärnan påverkas av fysisk aktivitet, om sällsynta sjukdomar och varför de uppstår och om fettceller som fyller en livsviktig funktion i vår kropp. Vi får också insyn i vikten av bra vårdmiljö, om vad ett EKG kan avslöja, om nya tekniker som hittar cancern i tid och hur artificiell intelligens kan bidra till bättre sjukvård. Låter det intressant? Det är ett axplo
14h
Maskininlärning för informationsdriven vård
Den informationsdrivna vården vill i allt större utsträckning använda data för att fatta mer precisa beslut. Mattias Ohlsson forskar om maskininlärning med ett specifikt intresse kring de metoder som går under namnet artificiella neuronnät, som idag ofta kallas "deep learning". Hans huvudsakliga tillämpningsområde är hälso- och sjukvård. Förhoppningarna är att AI och maskininlärning kan hjälpa til
14h
Uppdrag: att hitta cancern i tid
Sophia Zackrissons forskargrupp undersöker nya metoder för cancerdiagnostik, i första hand bröstcancerdiagnostik. l en stor screeningstudie som jämförde vanlig mammografi (2D) och brösttomosyntes (3D), som är en slags skiktröntgen av bröstet, kunde de visa att man med 3D-mammografi kan hitta 34 procent fler tumörer. Just nu studerar de om artificiell intelligens, kan vara lika bra eller bättre än
14h
Från hjärtats elektriska signaler till stavfel i arvsanlag
Även små avvikelser i EKG kan innehålla mycket information och moderna datorbaserade analysmetoder kan ge möjlighet att karakterisera hjärtats egenskaper på ett helt nytt sätt. Den röda tråden i Pyotr Platonovs forskning har varit att öka förståelsen av hjärtats elektriska signalers betydelse för diagnos, riskprediktion och val av behandling. På senare tid har han även börjat fördjupa sig i hur st
14h
Forskning som rör vårdmiljön
Fokus för Berit Lindahls forskning är vårdmiljön i patientrummet inom intensivvård respektive miljö och livssituation för personer som lever hemma med långvarig assisterad andning, dvs. respiratorbehandling. När teknik, och med den vårdpersonal, flyttar in blir det privata hemmet personalens arbetsplats – något som det behövs skapas kunskap om. En pågående studie belyser palliation, dvs. lindrande
14h
Nya upptäckter kring fettcellers funktion
Mycket är fortfarande oklart kring hur fettcellens olika funktioner styrs på ett molekylärt plan. Olga Göranssons forskargrupp strävar efter att öka kunskapen om hur hormoner, till exempel insulin, reglerar fettlagringen samt vilka proteiner i fettcellen som är viktiga för detta. Genom dessa studier hoppas de komma närmare ett svar på hur lagring av fett regleras och varför vissa blir sjuka av sin
15h
Neurogenetiska och neurometabola sjukdomar
Nya genetiska analystekniker har gjort det möjligt att identifiera allt fler gener som ligger bakom olika sällsynta genetiska sjukdomar. Tom J de Konings forskning handlar om dessa sällsynta genetiska sjukdomar hos barn och unga vuxna, särskilt sådana sjukdomar som ger upphov till ofrivilliga rörelser eller rörelsestörningar. Målet är att ge familjer kunskap om vad deras sjukdomar beror på och äve
15h
*Hjärnforskning bortom nervcellerna
Tomas Deierborg forskar på inflammatoriska stödjeceller, de så kallade mikrogliacellerna, och deras funktion vid olika sjukdomar, såsom Alzheimers sjukdom, Parkinsons sjukdom och stroke. Han vill bättre förstå deras roll och specifika funktion i samband med dessa sjukdomar. Här skriver han själv om sin forskning.
15h
Schneider Shorts 17.12.2021 – Bully for You!
Schneider Shorts 17.12.2021 – Russian mathematicians plead for support of abused colleague, bullying MRC boss to head EMBO, two scientists retracting their second paper, another Uyghur genomics paper retracted, mass-retractions at papermill-infested journal, COVID-19 cure from Florida, and a dead harasser's sister fundraising to sue his victims.
17h
'Drink your peas!' Benefits of supplementing cow milk with plant protein
Scientists have developed a novel method of supplementing cow milk with vegetable protein using readily available current dairy processing equipment. A new report presents the study, which may open opportunities to create new functional, multisourced dairy products that could help bolster declining fluid milk sales in the United States.
1d
Scientists Discover Hellish Bug With 1300 Creepy Little Legs
Creepy Crawler Until now, a "true" millipede had never been found. But a newly-discovered critter not only meets the proper criteria, but also looks like it originated from the bowels of hell. A study published in the journal Scientific Reports introduces the world to Eumillipes persephone , an eyeless wonder who boasts a whopping 1,306 legs — making it the first real 1,000-plus-legged "millipede
1d
Air pollution exposure is more likely for people of color
Overall air pollution in the United States has decreased since 1990, but people of color are still more likely to be exposed to pollutants than white people, regardless of income level, new research shows. Air pollution is linked to multiple health conditions, including heart disease, cancer, and cognitive decline. These effects vary depending on the source of air pollution. And not everyone is e
1d
Using the Earth's noise to see beneath the Greenland ice sheet
The noise created by the Earth's movements has been used to build up a detailed picture of the geological conditions beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet and the impact on ice flow, in new research. The team studied Rayleigh waves — seismic waves generated by movements such as earthquakes — to produce high-resolution images of the rocks underneath the ice sheet, helping to identify which areas are mo
1d
Mitigating the environmental impact of herbicides
In recent years, soybean fields and other crops and trees across the Midwest have been experiencing more damage from drift of herbicides, particularly those plants grown from seeds that have not been genetically modified to be herbicide-tolerant. The drift onto unintended plants causes leaves to curl and shrivel and may permanently damage a crop.
1d
Deep mantle krypton reveals Earth's outer solar system ancestry
Krypton from the Earth's mantle, collected from geologic hot spots in Iceland and the Galapagos Islands, reveals a clearer picture of how our planet formed, according to new research. The findings indicate Earth's volatile elements — essentials such as carbon, water and nitrogen — arrived as Earth was growing and becoming a planet, rather than being delivered by meteorites after the collision th
1d
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Leave a Reply