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Speeding the development of fusion energy
Profile of path-setting method to simulate the crazy-quilt movement of free electrons during experimental efforts to harness on Earth the fusion power that drives the sun and stars. The method cracks a complex equation that can enable improved control of the random and fast-moving moving electrons in the fuel for fusion energy.
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3D printing approaches atomic dimensions
In recent years 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has established itself as a promising new manufacturing process for a wide variety of components. Dr. Dmitry Momotenko, a chemist at the University of Oldenburg, has now succeeded in fabricating ultrasmall metal objects using a new 3D printing technique. In a paper published together with a team of researchers from ETH Zurich (Swit
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Computer simulation models potential asteroid collisions
An asteroid impact can be enough to ruin anyone's day, but several small factors can make the difference between an out-of-this-world story and total annihilation. In AIP Advances, a researcher from the National Institute of Natural Hazards in China developed a computer simulation of asteroid collisions to better understand these factors.
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Microplastic discovered in 'pristine' Pyrenees mountain air
Previously detected in rivers, oceans, and snow, microplastic has now been found in the high-altitude air surrounding the Pic du Midi (2,877 m)—by an international research team including scientists from the CNRS, Université Grenoble Alpes, and the University of Strathclyde (Scotland).
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Biosensors using field-effect transistors show great promise
Demand for sensitive and selective electronic biosensors—analytical devices that monitor a target of interest in real time—is growing for a wide range of applications. They are ideal for health care within clinical settings, drug discovery, food safety and quality control, and environmental monitoring.
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People feel lonelier in crowded cities, but green spaces can help
All of us can probably remember a time when we felt lonely. In the UK, around 45% of people report experiencing loneliness—with 5% of people experiencing severe loneliness. With reports that loneliness has been on the rise since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are concerns that it could reach epidemic proportions by 2030, unless action is taken.
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Protein domain structures affect the quality of stem cells
The original iPS cells were reprogrammed by transducing four genes: OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. Later experiments would show that c-MYC can be replaced with MYCL. Both are MYC proteins and thus oncogenes, but animal experiments have demonstrated that iPS cells reprogrammed using MYCL are less likely to cause tumors than iPS cells reprogrammed with c-MYC. Furthermore, MYCL enhances the reprogram
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Researchers develop new measurements for designing cooler electronics
When cell phones, electric vehicle chargers, or other electronic devices get too hot, performance degrades, and eventually overheating can cause them to shut down or fail. In order to prevent that from happening researchers are working to solve the problem of dissipating heat produced during performance. Heat that is generated in the device during operation has to flow out, ideally with little hin
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Crows keep special tools extra safe
Just like humans, New Caledonian crows are particularly careful when handling their most valuable tools, according to a new study by researchers from the University of St Andrews and the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior in Konstanz, Germany. The research reveals that crows are more likely to store relatively complex and efficient foraging tools for future use than more basic tools.
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ESA to pick up as Webb phones home
The James Webb Space Telescope has been almost 30 years in the making, a collaborative endeavor between ESA, NASA and the Canadian Space Agency to shed light on our cosmic origins.
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Viruses can hitch a ride on bacteria
The interaction of fungi and bacteria in the transport of viruses in the soil ecosystem has been examined by a UFZ research team in a study recently published in The ISME Journal. The scientists showed a novel mechanism of viral transport by bacterial shuttles traveling along fungal hyphae. Bacteria thereby benefit from taking along viruses on the conquest of new habitats.
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Old protein, new function: tBID can directly trigger cell death
The protein tBID can trigger programmed cell death (apoptosis) by inducing damage in the energy suppliers of the cells, the mitochondria. Apoptosis is essential for maintaining tissue balance. In addition, apoptosis plays a critical role as a defense mechanism and in the elimination of damaged or redundant cells in our bodies. Impaired apoptosis has been linked to many human diseases, from cancer
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Novel transcription factor inhibits flavone and anthocyanin biosynthesis in chrysanthemum at high temperatures
Plant flavonoid accumulation is promoted by various environmental factors, including excess light, UV radiation, drought, and low temperatures. Increased flavonoid content helps plants to maintain normal growth and development by eliminating excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced under adverse conditions. Intriguingly, high temperature, a common environmental stress, induces ROS production
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Establishing an elemental structure that facilitates high-intensity broadband spin waves
A research team including Assistant Professor Taichi Goto of Toyohashi University of Technology has conducted simulations to demonstrate that using a substrate that combines the semiconductor silicon (Si) and the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG) can realize an element that facilitates excitation and detection of high-intensity broadband spin waves, even when miniaturized like chips. It
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Kye Kelley Races His Fiancé Lizzie Musi | Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings #StreetOutlawsNoPrepKings #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on
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Scientists Used CRISPR Gene Editing to Perfectly Determine the Sex of Mice
"Do you want a boy or a girl?" can be an awkward question. But in certain circles, it's a question that's asked every day. Take agriculture. In a perfect world, most cows would only birth females. Chicks would grow up to be all hens. "Sexing" a farm animal when they're at a young age wouldn't be a thing—especially when it means male animals, without the ability to produce milk or eggs, are often
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Idag skjuts världens dyraste teleskop upp
Halv två idag skjuts James Webb Space teleskop upp med en Ariane-raket från Franska Guyana. Teleskopet ska kunna titta på ljus från de allra första stjärnorna i universum och in i främmande planeters atmosfärer. 13:30 i eftermiddag är det dags! Spela videon för att se Webbteleskopets kommande resa.
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Ekologisk odling inte alltid bättre för miljön
Är ekologisk odling bättre för miljön än konventionell odling? Svaret beror på hur man mäter. Tittar man på mängden livsmedel kan ekologisk odling till och med leda till större mängd växthusgaser. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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IVF-barn mår prima som unga vuxna
Det finns ingen anledning till oro för att barn som blir till med assisterad befruktning (ART) skulle ha större risk att drabbas av psykisk ohälsa senare i livet. Det menar forskarna bakom en stor observationsstudie från Karolinska Institutet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Liten insats gör mycket för barn till deprimerade mammor
Barn till mammor som mår psykiskt dåligt riskerar att halka efter i sin kognitiva utveckling, visar flera studier. Men det räcker med väldigt små förändringar för att sambandet ska brytas och barnen återgå till sin normala utvecklingsnivå. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Konsumtionens vinnare och förlorare under pandemin
Alkohol, mat och bostaden, det är vad vi lagt våra pengar på under pandemin. Vi har spenderat mindre än vanligt på kläder och skor, restaurangbesök och resor. Det visar Konsumtionsrapporten 2021. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Norsk lax på rymmen hotar svensk vildlax
Norsk odlad lax rymmer från nätkassar i havet, vandrar upp i västsvenska vattendrag och parar sig med lokal vild lax. Det ställer till problem i det svenska laxbeståndet, då barn till kassodlad lax som föds och växer upp i naturen har svårare att överleva än laxungar med vilda föräldrar. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Atom-strid på Borgen
PLUS. Formanden for Liberal Alliance har ikke opgivet håbet om, at kernekraft fremover skal spille en rolle i den danske energiforsyning. Klimaminister Dan Jørgensen afviser tanken.
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New muscle layer discovered on the jaw
Human anatomy still has a few surprises in store for us: researchers have discovered a previously overlooked section of our jaw muscles and described this layer in detail for the first time.
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Frankincense and myrrh have been revered since ancient times, but now they're under threat
Right now, Christmas nativity scenes across the world feature three kings—also known as the "wise men" or Magi—bringing gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh to the newborn baby Jesus in Bethlehem. In the Bible, Matthew's gospel tells us that the wise men "saw the child with his mother Mary, and they bowed down and worshiped him. Then they opened their treasures and presented him with gifts of gol
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What fault surface features can tell us about future earthquakes
Earthquakes cannot be forecast like weather, but fault line characteristics, such as structural maturity, can give hints about how a future earthquake may act. Structural maturity is related to the age of the fault, but especially important is its "experience," how much a fault has developed and changed over time and activity.
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Our lakes are losing their ice cover faster than ever
Every winter when Lake Suwa in Japan freezes, locals believe that the Shinto male god Takeminakata crosses the frozen lake with his dragon to visit the female god Yasakatome. He leaves only his footsteps on the ice in the form of a sinusoidal ice ridge called the omiwatari.
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Two teams report on study of Hayabusa2 asteroid samples
Two teams of researchers are publishing their findings thus far after initial study of samples collected from the asteroid Ryugu and returned to Earth last year by the Japanese space probe Hayabusa2. Both teams are large and both are made up mostly of researchers from institutions in Japan. Both teams have also published their findings in Nature Astronomy.
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Trees contribute to cleaner air in cities
Air pollution levels vary greatly between different places in Gothenburg. This is the finding of a new study led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg, which concludes that trees contribute to cleaner air in cities.
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Floating 'aerobats' could be the best way to explore the cloud tops of Venus
According to multiple lines of evidence, Venus was once a much different planet than it is today. But roughly 500 million years ago, a massive resurfacing event triggered a runaway greenhouse effect that led to the poisonous and hellish environment we see there today. Therefore, the study of Venus presents an opportunity to model the evolution of planetary environments, which can serve as a refere
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Hjælp os: Hvor godt fungerer internettet i DSB's tog?
Efter fem år og mere end en halv milliard kroner er der nu mobil- og wifi-dækning på 98,6 procent af de danske fjern- og lokalstrækninger. Men hvor god er forbindelsen egentlig? Det kan Banedanmark og DSB ikke fortælle detaljeret, og derfor spørger vi nu Ingeniørens læsere om hjælp.
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Behov for opgør med kassetænkning og ulighed i adgang til diabetesteknologi
Regeringens visioner om at mindske uligheden i sundhedsvæsenet, klinger hult, når personer med type 1-diabetes fortsat overses som patientgruppe. Det er tid til et opgør med geografisk ulighed i adgang til diabetesteknologi. Lad os derfor få genforhandlet en ny national diabeteshandlingsplan, hvor lige adgang til sensorbaseret diabetesteknologi er i fokus, skriver Tine Filges, formand for Type1 –
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Fiber Batteries
Technophiles talk a lot about batteries because they are so essential to our electrified and green future. By historical standards we have cheap and powerful batteries today, but because they are so critical to our technological infrastructure, any way they can be incrementally advanced is welcome, and some advances may be game-changers. While there is a lot of focus on energy density (energy sto
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Study: US gun sales have been surging
An estimated 7.5 million U.S. adults became new gun owners over a recent 28-month span, sharply increasing the prospects for home accidents or people taking their own lives, according to research by Matt Miller, a professor of health sciences and epidemiology at Northeastern.
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Giant NASA telescope to open new vistas of space
A giant telescope to be launched into space this week will be the biggest ever and will orbit around the sun about 1 million miles from the Earth. It will be able to capture the farthest depths of the universe ever achieved and could tell us secrets about the origins of the universe from 13.5 billion years ago, said a Texas A&M University physicist.
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Fiction Meets Chaos Theory
W hile reading To Paradise , Hanya Yanagihara's gigantic new novel, I felt the impulse a few times to put down the book and make a chart—the kind of thing you see TV detectives assemble on their living-room walls when they have a web of evidence but no clear theory of the case. To Paradise , which is in fact three linked novels bound in a single volume, is constructed something like a soma cube,
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The Story of Alden Global Capital Illustrates Deep American Problems
The Men Who Are Killing America's Newspapers In November, McKay Coppins wrote about Alden Global Capital, the secretive hedge fund gutting newsrooms and damaging democracy. I'm from Chicago originally and still a close reader of the Tribune . It's astonishing how bad things have gotten for a once-vibrant institution. The pages are thinner. Associated Press wire stories have replaced original repo
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Researchers 'devastated' after finding manipulated data in study of pediatric brain tumors
An international group of cancer researchers has lost an influential 2020 paper in Nature Neuroscience after finding problems with the data that triggered an institutional investigation. The article, "Tumor necrosis factor overcomes immune evasion in p53-mutant medulloblastoma," represented a potentially major advance in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors, according to Robert Wechsler-Reya, t
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Lipid droplet availability affects neural stem/progenitor cell metabolism and proliferation
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27365-7 Lipid droplets (LDs) are central to lipid metabolism, which is known to regulate neural stem cell behavior. Here, the authors show that LDs influence neural stem cell proliferation and metabolic activity and change upon differentiation or quiescence.
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Environment stories you might have missed in 2021
Cop26 may have dominated the headlines this year, but there have been lots of other fascinating, devastating and hopeful environment stories over the past 12 months. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Guardian environment editor Damian Carrington and biodiversity reporter Phoebe Weston about some of their favourites, from reintroducing wild bison to the fields of Kent to climate crisis tipping points. Hel
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Engineers produce the world's longest flexible fiber battery
Researchers have developed a rechargeable lithium-ion battery in the form of ultra-long fiber that could be woven into fabrics. The battery could enable a wide variety of wearable electronic devices, and might even be used to make 3D-printed batteries in virtually any shape.
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That Is Not How Your Brain Works – Issue 111: Spotlight
Happy Holidays. In this special issue we are reprinting our top stories of the past year. This article first appeared online in our "Mind" issue in March, 2021. The 21st century is a time of great scientific discovery. Cars are driving themselves. Vaccines against deadly new viruses are created in less than a year. The latest Mars Rover is hunting for signs of alien life. But we're also surrounde
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The Trouble with Brain Scans – Issue 111: Spotlight
Happy Holidays. In this special issue we are reprinting our top stories of the past year. This article first appeared online in our "Mind" issue in March, 2021. One autumn afternoon in the bowels of UC Berkeley's Li Ka Shing Center, I was looking at my brain. I had just spent 10 minutes inside the 3 Tesla MRI scanner, the technical name for a very expensive, very high maintenance, very magnetic b
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We Are Beast Machines – Issue 111: Spotlight
Happy Holidays. In this special issue we are reprinting our top stories of the past year. This article first appeared online in our "The Edge" issue in October, 2021. I have a childhood memory of looking in the bathroom mirror, and for the first time realizing that my experience at that precise moment—the experience of being me—would at some point come to an end, and that "I" would die. I must ha
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Smart bandage checks chronic wounds in real-time
A new smart wearable sensor can conduct real-time, point-of-care assessment of chronic wounds wirelessly via an app, according to a new study. The sensor detects temperature, pH, bacteria type, and inflammatory factors specific to chronic wounds within 15 minutes, allowing for fast and accurate wound assessment. Given the rapidly aging population, healthcare providers are seeing more patients suf
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From the eMail Bag: the Beer-Lambert Law and CO2 Concentrations
We occasionally receive excellent questions and/or comments by email or via our contact form and have then usually corresponded with the emailer directly. But, some of the questions and answers deserve a broader audience, so we decided to highlight some of them in a new series of blog posts. Recently, an email asked about CO 2 and the absorption of infrared (IR) radiation (specifically mentioning
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My prediction for the year 2222
Solar energy is probably the best candidate in my opinion to power the world in the future but I think the solar panels won't be placed on earth at all. They will be placed on satellites in space orbiting the sun. Hundreds of thousands of them if not millions. We will gather the materials to build those satellites from mars, the moon, asteroids and other celestial bodies including earth of course
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Older adults report stress and joy during pandemic
A sizable minority of people over 50 are feeling lots of stress, including about their risk of getting COVID-19, a recent poll shows. While most people polled are finding joy and staying resilient amid the pandemic, women and those in their 50s and early 60s are more likely to report feeling a lot of stress. Those stress levels were highest—and joy levels lowest—among people who say their overall
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Affordable genome sequencing for pathogen analysis to help tackle global epidemics
A worldwide consortium of scientists, led by the Earlham Institute and the University of Liverpool in the UK, mark a significant milestone in equipping researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with cheap and accessible methods for sequencing large collections of bacterial pathogens—at a cost of less than $10USD per genome.
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The meat, the muscle, and the motion of cell fusion
One day Prof. Eldad Tzahor peered into a microscope in his lab and saw steak. As part of Tzahor's research into repairing muscle tissue, Dr. Tamar Eigler, a postdoctoral fellow in his lab at the Weizmann Institute of Science, had been experimenting with cultured muscle stem cells. One of these experiments had produced the surprising sight that appeared before Tzahor's eyes: The cells had started f
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EXPLAINER: What is a derecho?
Multiple tornadoes and thunderstorms that struck the Great Plains and upper Midwest on Dec. 15 were the result of a rare event called a derecho, according to the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center. It was the first on record in December in the United States.
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Study finds news media has amplified rather than rectified misleading health information from TV personality Dr. Oz
Consumers' choices about health products are influenced heavily by public information. A new study analyzed how media outlets responded to the endorsement of weight-loss products by TV personality Dr. Oz. The study found that media tended to amplify rather than rectify misleading information, resulting in the further spread of misinformation. The authors call for government oversight to lessen the
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New research moves closer to harnessing viruses to fight bacteria and reduce antibiotic use
A new study has cast new light on how to best combine antibiotics and phage therapy. Researchers conducted laboratory experiments on Pseudomonas aeruginosa a bacterium which causes disease in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis patients. They exposed the bacterium to eight types of antibiotics — and found differences in the mechanisms by which the bacteria evolve resistance to phages, which aff
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Racial discrimination may affect whether people respond to email
Racial bias can unconsciously seep into many aspects of life, causing people to unknowingly act in discriminatory ways. Even when not ill-intentioned, this type of discrimination can still have serious consequences—and a new study suggests this can extend to how we communicate electronically.
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Small measures can be a big help for children of mothers with depression
Several new studies among Syrian refugee families in Turkey and families with infants in Sweden and Bhutan show that children of mothers in poor mental health risk falling behind in their cognitive development. However, very small changes can suffice to break this correlation and enable the children to return to their normal developmental level. Having plenty of people around them and an available
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Himalayan glaciers melting at 'exceptional rate'
The accelerating melting of the Himalayan glaciers threatens the water supply of millions of people in Asia, new research warns. The study concludes that over recent decades the Himalayan glaciers have lost ice ten times more quickly over the last few decades than on average since the last major glacier expansion 400-700 years ago, a period known as the Little Ice Age.
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14 cybersecurity predictions for 2022 and beyond
While the covid-19 pandemic upended workplaces and ushered in rapid digital transformation, the turmoil around cybercrime has remained constant: attackers are always changing tactics to evade detection. Flexible, customer-first solutions have emerged to meet ever-changing circumstances to keep organizations secure and confident against cyber threats. In the new year and beyond, as technology and
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Breakthrough identification of proteins necessary for muscle regeneration
A researcher at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy has identified the proteins necessary for efficient regeneration of skeletal muscles after acute injury and in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Ashok Kumar, Else and Philip Hargrove Endowed Professor of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is reporting his findings in eLife.
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Step forward in quest to develop living construction materials
Some engineered living materials can combine the strength of run-of-the-mill building materials with the responsiveness of living systems. Think self-healing concrete, paint that changes color when a specific chemical is detected or material that could reproduce and fill in a crack when one forms. This would revolutionize construction and maintenance, with wide-reaching economic and environmental
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Study: 'Photosynthetic' algae can survive the dark
More than 66 million years ago, an asteroid impact led to the extinction of almost three-quarters of life on Earth. The little life that was left had to struggle, and research into its tenacity can provide key insights into how organisms survive environmental challenges. In a new study, scientists at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences discovered how some species of single-celled algae lived thr
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How politicians project their status in virtual meetings
During the pandemic, physical summits were replaced by Zoom meetings, and global political leaders had to quickly adjust. How did they visually convey their status in this new world of digital diplomacy? A new study from Lund University in Sweden analyzed over 50 photos from the first virtual G20 meeting in 2020.
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Radiation damage due to intermolecular Coulombic decay
When cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, more destructive chain reactions may occur than previously thought. An international team led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg has for the first time observed intermolecular Coulombic decay in organic molecules. This is triggered by ionizing radiation such as from radioactivity or from space. The effect dam
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Mirror-image peptides form 'rippled sheet' structure predicted in 1953
By mixing a small peptide with equal amounts of its mirror image, scientists have created an unusual protein structure known as a 'rippled beta sheet' and obtained images of it using x-ray crystallography. The rippled sheet is a distinctive variation on the pleated beta sheet, which is a well-known structural motif found in thousands of proteins, including important disease-related proteins. Linus
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Discovering sources of Roman silver coinage from the Iberian Peninsula
Despite its prior status as a luxury commodity, silver became widely used for coinage in the Roman world from the 7th century BCE onward and provided a standardized monetary system for ancient Mediterranean civilizations. However, the sources of silver used to produce Roman coinage have largely been used up, making it difficult to determine which deposits Roman miners exploited.
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Using ergonomics to reduce pain from technology use
The use of smartphones, tablets and laptops has become commonplace throughout the world and has been especially prevalent among college students. Recent studies have found that college students have higher levels of screen time, and they utilize multiple devices at higher rates compared to previous generations.
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In last 15 years, deforestation made outdoor work unsafe for millions
The tropics is becoming hotter due to a combination of warming associated with deforestation and climate change — and that can reduce the ability of outdoor workers to perform their jobs safely. Researchers estimated how many safe working hours people living in the tropics have lost due to local temperature change associated with loss of trees during the past 15 years.
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Research reveals features that influence phase separation
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Washington University in St. Louis are dissecting the fundamental principles of biological phase separation, a process that is a major mechanism governing how cells are organized. The latest findings highlight the role that protein solubility and charge play in the process. A paper on the work was published today in Nature Chemistry.
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Voluntary pledges could cut utility GHG emissions by a third
An analysis of pledges made by many of the largest U.S. electric utilities to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions suggests that pledged reductions could reduce power sector emissions by a third as compared to 2018 levels. The study also found that about one-seventh of the cuts utilities have promised are reductions they would have to make anyway due to existing state requirements.
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Beads reveal long-distance connections in early Africa
Nature, Published online: 20 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03681-2 Beads made from ostrich eggshells, produced by people over the past 50,000 years, provide evidence for a long period of social connection between eastern and southern Africa, followed by isolation and then reconnection.
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Dominate the Competition with the Best Nintendo Switch Controllers
Offering unprecedented versatility, the Nintendo Switch has enabled you to take your game room into the wilds (or the subway) since 2017, and then bring it home to finish up on the TV. A handheld gaming console's controls have never been so multifaceted. The Switch gives you many ways to play right out of the box. You can attach the Joy-Con controllers to the device's sides for hand-held mobile p
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NASA says glitch on Boeing rocket delays launch again
NASA plans to replace an engine controller aboard its massive SLS rocket after finding a communications glitch with the system's avionics during preflight testing, the latest setback in a program for which Boeing Co. is the main contractor and that has been plagued by years of delays and billions of dollars in costs beyond its initial budget.
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Understanding cobalt's human cost
After studying the impacts of mining cobalt — a common ingredient in lithium-ion batteries — on communities in Africa's Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), an interdisciplinary team of researchers is calling for more data into how emerging technologies affect human health and livelihoods.
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How populists' election results lead to far-right demonstrations
In liberal-leaning municipalities, there is an increased probability of far-right demonstrations in the wake of unexpectedly strong election results by right-wing populists. This is one of the insights from an investigation based on electoral results of the AfD party in Germany. The study reveals a surprise effect on the part of people who previously believed that their attitudes were less sociall
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3D-printed shoes treat Walter the vulture's 'bumblefoot'
Silicone shoes cast from 3D-printed molds treat pododermatitis, or "bumblefoot," in birds of prey in a wildlife park. Pododermatitis results in pressures sores, tissue swelling, and callouses, and if left untreated, could become disabling and even fatal. The protective silicone shoes were designed to relieve and redistribute pressure on the weight-bearing surface of the patient's feet, as well as
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Boosters may be vital for Omicron protection
Booster vaccines fortify the antibody response sufficiently to deliver a substantial increase in protection against the Omicron variant, researchers say. The Omicron variant is more prone to escape antibodies produced after vaccination or an infection than previous variants of SARS-CoV-2. As the world faces an impending wave of COVID cases due to Omicron, scientists are racing to assess vaccine e
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Mark Leibovich Joining The Atlantic as Staff Writer
Mark Leibovich, of The New York Times and The New York Times Magazine , is joining The Atlantic as a staff writer, Editor in Chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today. Leibovich, one of the country's premier political reporters and profile writers, will join The Atlantic at a time when the magazine is training its editorial focus on the crisis facing democracy in America and across the globe. "Mark
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Staying a step ahead of invasive insect species with computer simulations
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a simulation predicting the spread of an invasive beetle species harming local flora. They tried models based on road lengths, river lengths and recorded cherry tree numbers in square "cells" over Saitama Prefecture. They found that a simple model based on river lengths gave results which compared favorably with real world data. Good pr
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Space and time: How to better understand biological processes in plants
If the perspective of space and time is not properly applied to plant research, the understanding of biological processes is limited as well as the response to the threats that endanger the life of plants worldwide. This is one of the main conclusions of an article published in the journal Trends in Plant Science by Professor Sergi Munné-Bosch, from the Faculty of Biology, the Biodiversity Researc
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Arsenic in Connecticut wells may be a legacy of past pesticide use on orchards
The rolling hills of Connecticut were once home to tens of thousands of fruit orchards—47,000 by the 1930s. Anyone who has ever grown fruit trees, like apples, knows that insects love fruit as much as humans, and until the 1950s orchards were heavily fortified with lead arsenate-based pesticides to keep the bugs at bay—chemicals that were eventually banned because of their potential for harmful ef
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h-BN/NiS2/NiS nanocatalysts for removing rhodamine B and Cr(VI) in wastewater
The human health is suffering from effluent containing heavy metal ions (such as Cr(VI)) and organic dyes (such as rhodamine B). Among numerous strategies to remove pollutants from water, photocatalysis has attracted extensive attention due to its low energy consumption, simple operation and environmental friendliness. Bimetallic sulfides are apt to form the heterointerfaces which is able to modif
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An aptasensor has been designed to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus in saliva
Scientists at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have developed the first photo-electrochemical aptasensor that detects the SARS-CoV-2 virus in a saliva sample. This sensor, which uses aptamers (a type of artificial antibody), is more sensitive that antigen-based sensors and detects the virus more quickly and cheaply than PCR tests. These new devices can be incorporated into portable diag
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Pain and anxiety impact breathing on a cellular level
A team of scientists has uncovered a neural network in the brain that coordinates breathing rhythm with feelings of pain and fear. Along with contributions to the fields of pain management, psychological theories of anxiety, and philosophical investigations into the nature of pain, their findings could lead to development of an analgesic that would prevent opioid-induced respiratory depression (OI
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Water nanoproperties as a key factor for sanitation
Living organisms, viruses, and technological devices, have water layers between their cells or parts and can die or stop working when dehydrated. But why water and not any other fluid? What makes water unique under such conditions when it is in these tiny structures?
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Boundaries between work and family life disrupted by COVID-19 pandemic
According to mothers' experiences, the daily life during the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown in the spring of 2020 blurred the boundaries between work and family responsibilities and roles. In families where the division of childcare responsibilities was unequal before the pandemic and where only the mother switched to working from home, mothers were especially likely to feel that they shouldere
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Satellite data used to assess tornado damage, understand storms
As people across the Midwestern U.S. take stock of the devastation from a Dec. 10 trail of tornados that blew across the region, data and images from NASA Earth-observing satellites aid first responders and recovery agencies in assessing the damage and help researchers understand the nature of these unusually powerful storms.
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Image: Hubble views a galaxy with an explosive past
In this image, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures a side-on view of NGC 3568, a barred spiral galaxy roughly 57 million light-years from the Milky Way in the constellation Centaurus. In 2014 the light from a supernova explosion in NGC 3568 reached Earth—a sudden flare of light caused by the titanic explosion accompanying the death of a massive star. While most astronomical discoveries ar
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ALMA's most scientifically productive receiver will soon see further than ever before
The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the board of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have approved a multi-million dollar upgrade project for the Observatory's 1.3mm (Band 6) receivers through the North American ALMA Development Program. The receivers—originally built, and to be upgraded, by the Central Development Laboratory (CDL) at the National Radio Astronomy Observat
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New view of deep rock fractures for geothermal energy
Scorchingly hot granite deep underground can be tapped for energy by opening up cracks in the rock. This potential resource, known as enhanced geothermal energy, requires a clear sense of changes happening in the rock over time—a complex picture that can be difficult to capture.
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New rubber material's impact resistance surpasses that of glass-fiber reinforced plastic
Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs—sometimes called thermoplastic rubbers) are a chemically-bonded combination of multiple polymers ("copolymer")—typically a plastic and a rubber—that have both thermoplastic and elastomeric properties. The thermoplastic property is useful in injection molding, while the elastomeric property gives the object the ability to stretch and return to nearly its original shap
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New major discovery in the animal kingdom: 14 new species of shrews
Researchers recently made a major discovery — 14 new species of shrews, which is the largest number of new mammals described in a scientific paper since 1931. After a decade-long journey taking inventory of Indonesian shrews living on the island of Sulawesi, a group of scientists has identified 14 new endemic species.
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Research takes early step towards drug to treat common diabetes complication hypoglycemia
New research has taken an important step towards the goal for a treatment for the common diabetes complication hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Researchers found a way help to defend against hypoglycemia by boosting hormonal defense systems. The team believes they have identified a promising target in the brain could be useful for future drug development to create an anti-hypoglycemia drug.
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Redrawing the lines: Growing inexpensive, high-quality iron-based superconductors
Superconducting materials show zero electrical resistance at low temperatures, which allows them to conduct 'supercurrents' without dissipation. Recently, a group of scientists developed an inexpensive, scalable way to produce high-temperature superconductors using 'grain boundary engineering' techniques. The new method could help develop stronger, inexpensive, and high operating temperature super
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Rubber production: How can soil health be restored after clear-cutting a 40-year-old plantation?
Returning the biomass from logging to the soil and planting legume cover crops enable rapid restoration of the main soil functions, just 18 months after clear-cutting of an aging rubber plantation. A team of scientists has demonstrated this in two sites in Côte d'Ivoire since 2017. While pressure on land and the fight against deforestation mean producers are obliged to continuously replant on the
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Developmental origins of tooth classes in vertebrates
The researchers from the HiLIFE Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki compared two central bearded dragon lizards (Pogona vitticeps): a normal one and a mutant with no body scales. They identified striking differences in the development of teeth. The teeth of the mutant lizard exhibited a large size and an unusual attachment type in specific locations along the jaw.
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Researchers enhance charge density waves by moiré engineering in twisted hterostructures
When stacking two layers of van der Waals (vdW) materials, a moiré pattern is produced by the modulation of the long wavelength periodic potential. The moiré pattern is a promising means in engineering both the atomic geometry and electronic structure. A variety of emergent phenomena have been discovered in twisted vdW bilayers of graphene or semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide (2H-TMD)
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Boeing Wants to Design Planes in the Metaverse
(Photo: Boeing) The word "metaverse" has been uttered more times in the last few months than any of us would have expected, but Facebook — sorry, Meta is a powerful force on the internet. If Mark Zuckerberg wants the metaverse, Facebook is probably going to make it happen in some capacity, and Boeing wants in. The troubled aerospace firm hopes to improve its design process by doing it in the meta
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Scientists Warn of 'Doomsday Glacier' that Could Raise Sea Levels Two Feet
Far, far away from the presumably toasty place you're reading this, on the Walgreen Coast of Antarctica, there's a massive chunk of ice known as the Thwaites Glacier. It's the widest glacier in the world, and scientists are worried that a large volume of its ice could end up in the oceans very soon. This has earned Thwaites a nickname: Doomsday Glacier. Researchers from the American Geophysical U
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Rollercoaster of emotions: Exploring emotions with virtual reality
To the left and right, the landscape drifts idly by, the track in front of you. Suddenly, a fire. The tension builds. The ride reaches its highest point. Only one thing lies ahead: the abyss. Plummeting down into the depths of the earth. These are scenes of a rollercoaster ride as experienced by participants in a recent study. However, not in real life, but virtually, with the help of virtual real
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Election campaigns and platforms do have an impact on public policy
Do election campaigns shape public policy as they are supposed to in a democracy? Do the laws passed during a mandate really address the issues debated during elections? For countries with political systems as varied as Germany, Denmark, France and Italy, political scientists Isabelle Guinaudeau (CNRS) and Emiliano Grossman (Sciences Po)1 answer in the affirmative. To reach this conclusion, they u
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Possible first evidence of coronal rain on a cool, small M-dwarf star
High-resolution spectroscopic observations of a stellar flare on a small, cool star indicate the possibility of coronal rain, a phenomenon that has been observed on our sun but not yet confirmed on a star of this size. This faint star, known as vB 10, which is about a tenth the size of the sun and produces less than 1% of the sun's energy, was studied using the Penn State Habitable-zone Planet Fin
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Explaining the growing disillusionment with business as usual
The villainous boss memes, workday gripes, and big corporation throwdowns shoot fast and furious on the Reddit forum r/antiwork, which has become a viral post Howitzer. In one recent post, a Calm app tweet poses this well-meaning question: "What could your employer do to better support your mental health?" The Redditor slyly responded with "Double my salary." Another Redditor lamented being told t
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Ny modell ska underlätta hälsofrämjande samtal om barns övervikt
Övervikt hos barn går att förebygga, och ju tidigare man börjar desto bättre. Det visar Mariette Derwig i sitt avhandlingsarbete i vilket hon utvecklat en samtalsmodell att använda inom barnhälsovården för att förebygga övervikt och främja sunda levnadsvanor. Drygt 6000 fyraåringar och deras föräldrar på 35 barnhälsovårdsenheter i Skåne har deltagit i studien.
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Debate Over Octopus Farm
Spanish company Nueva Pescanova is close to opening a commercial octopus farm in the Canary Islands. The purpose of this farm is to raise octopuses (and yes, that is an acceptable plural) for food, sparking another round in the debate over the ethics of raising animals for food. This also comes on the heels of the UK adding the octopus to the list of "sentient" animals , garnering for them certai
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How measuring emissions in real time can help cities achieve net zero
Like many cities across the world, Glasgow—host to the UN climate conference COP26—has a target to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. This is a massive undertaking for any city. It means emissions from homes, businesses, waste and transport have to be reduced or offset as much possible.
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That Feeling When You 'Feel Seen'
Sign up for Caleb's newsletter here. If I were Dr. Seuss, I would simply begin: "What does it mean / When I look at the screen / at a show or a meme / and I say 'I feel seen'?" I know what it means when someone says they feel heard—they feel like someone has really listened to them, as if their words have been paid attention to. I know what it means when someone says they feel touched—they feel l
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Conformational dynamics of the Beta and Kappa SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins and their complexes with ACE2 receptor revealed by cryo-EM
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27350-0 Here, the authors provide insights into the conformational dynamics of the Beta and Kappa SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) proteins by determining their cryo-EM structures, which revealed a distribution shift towards the open state for both variants compared to the wild-type S protein. They also present the structures o
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Finding genetically-supported drug targets for Parkinson's disease using Mendelian randomization of the druggable genome
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26280-1 There is currently no disease-modifying treatment for Parkinson's disease, a common neurodegenerative disorder. Here, the authors use genetic variation associated with gene and protein expression to find putative drug targets for Parkinson's disease using Mendelian randomization of the druggable genome.
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Decreasing extents of Archean serpentinization contributed to the rise of an oxidized atmosphere
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27589-7 Throughout the Archean, H2 generation via low-temperature ultramafic serpentinization likely helped prevent atmospheric O2 accumulation and continued until the abundance of ultramafic rocks diminished setting the stage for the Great Oxidation Event.
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Influence of shape resonances on the angular dependence of molecular photoionization delays
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27360-y It is an interesting topic to find the time it takes for an electron to escape an atom or a molecule after photoionization. Here the authors measure the angular dependence of photoionization time delay in the molecular frame and discuss the role of shape resonances.
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Research breakthrough could see HIV drugs used to treat low-grade brain tumors
Drugs developed to treat AIDS and HIV could offer hope to patients diagnosed with the most common form of primary brain tumor. The breakthrough is significant because, if further research is conclusive, the anti-retroviral drugs could be prescribed for patients diagnosed with meningioma and acoustic neuroma brain tumors (also known as schwannoma).
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After thousands of years, an iconic whale confronts a new enemy
The iconic tusked whale of the Arctic has a new enemy — noise. A unique study shows that narwhals are highly affected by noise from ships and seismic airgun pulses — even at 20-30 kilometers away. As ice melts, noise levels in the Arctic are rising, worrying scientists about the future of narwhals.
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Addiction relapse driven by drug-seeking habit, not just drug
Why are some individuals able to use recreational drugs in a controlled way, whereas others switch to the compulsive, relapsing drug-seeking and -taking habits that characterize substance use disorder (SUD)? Despite more than six decades of extensive research, the question remains unanswered, hampering the development of targeted prevention and therapeutic strategies. Now, a new study in rats has
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Perovskite solar cell with ultra-long stability
Perovskites are the great hope for further increasing the efficiency of solar modules in the future. Until now, their short service life has been considered the biggest hurdle to their practical use, but this could soon change. Researchers now present a variant that stands out for its stability.
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New hiding place for antibiotic resistance
Genes that make bacteria resistant to antibiotics can persist longer than it was previously believed. This was recently shown in a new study that reports a previously unknown hiding place for these genes. The finding represents a new and important piece in the puzzle to understand how bacterial antibiotic resistance works.
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Insects: How farmers can be better engaged in species conservation
While farmers have the capacity to drive species conservation worldwide, their true potential is yet to be fully realized. An international team of researchers shows how this can change. The researchers interviewed 560 farmers around the world to find out what they know about their local pollinator diversity and their engagement in the issue. The results offer important insights for politics and s
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Stem cells organize themselves into embryoid
Researchers have developed a method to generate embryo-like cell complexes from the stem cells of mice. The method provides new insights into embryonic development. In the medium term, it might also be suitable for developing tests for substances that could be harmful to fertility.
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The 4 pillars of intelligence
I know intelligence is poorly understood, but do you think we could simplify it down to 4 different areas of function ? How much information do you take in ? (Pattern recognition) How fast do you take in information ? (Processing speed) How much information can you store ? (Memory) What can you do with that information ? (Creativity) I care to mention that having above average ability in one of t
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How would you push your cognitive/perceiving skills to the limit?
I am no means an expert and am looking for answers from people who know more 🙂 If you can practice shooting 3's in basketball via repetition. How would you push your brain's ability to do things like decision making, perception, etc? Imagine you're trying to make a human be a super quick reacting and decision making machine. A person who would get 99th percentile on all humanbenchmark.com tests.
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