Search Posts

Nyheder2021december28

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at udpege vigtigste nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP CHOOSE THE MOST IMPORTANT SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Research inspects very high energy emission from Messier 87
An international team of astronomers has investigated a very high energy (VHE) emission from the radio galaxy Messier 87. Results of the study, published December 16 on arXiv.org, could help us better understand the nature of M87 and the processes responsible for VHE emission from this source.
43min

LATEST

Scientists build new atlas of ocean's oxygen-starved waters
Life is teeming nearly everywhere in the oceans, except in certain pockets where oxygen naturally plummets and waters become unlivable for most aerobic organisms. These desolate pools are "oxygen-deficient zones," or ODZs. And though they make up less than 1 percent of the ocean's total volume, they are a significant source of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas. Their boundaries can also limit
15h
Some Covid masks are better than others. I know – I'm the Mask Nerd | Aaron Collins
Cloth or surgical masks just don't cut it – respirators are far more effective, and they're comfortable too Aaron Collins is a engineer who tests and reviews masks As a mechanical engineer with a background in aerosol science, I often wondered why months into the pandemic we were still using cloth masks. People used similar coverings during the Spanish flu pandemic in 1919, more than 100 years ag
21h
NASA Paid Priests to Figure Out How to Deal With Aliens
Life in the Heavens Whether it's angels coming down from heaven or ET coming in peace, NASA wants to know how exactly world religions would react if it finds evidence of alien life. That's why the agency funded a program to find out just that. NASA brought together 24 theologians at the Center for Theological Inquiry at Princeton for a year-long program called "The Societal Implications of Astrob
18h
China Created an AI 'Prosecutor' That Can Charge People with Crimes
Machine-Learning Justice In a scenario that's part "Robocop" and part "Minority Report," researchers in China have created an AI that can reportedly identify crimes and file charges against criminals. The AI was developed and tested by the Shanghai Pudong People's Procratorate, the country's largest district public prosecution office, South China Morning Post reports . It can file a charge with m
20h
Give FFP3 masks to NHS staff during Omicron, doctors say
Medical bodies say thin surgical masks do not provide adequate protection for frontline personnel NHS staff treating Covid patients should be given much more protective facewear than thin surgical masks to help them avoid getting infected during the Omicron rise, doctors say. The British Medical Association (BMA), Hospital Consultants and Specialists Association (HCSA) and Doctors' Association UK
1d
These numbers show just how impactful the latest COVID-19 surge is
Most states are at the highest level of COVID risk and hot spots are emerging across the country as the omicron variant takes hold. Here are the latest numbers by state. (Image credit: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, Census Bureau 2019 population estimates, 2020 Census (U.S. territories))
14h
All Hail Dead Week, the Best Week of the Year
Christmas is over and we have arrived at the most wonderful time of the year—nominally still the holidays, but also the opposite of a holiday, a blank space stretching between Christmas and New Year's Eve when nothing makes sense and time loses its meaning. For many of us, this is the only time of year when it feels possible, and even encouraged, to do nothing. I look forward to it all year long.
21h
Egyptian pharaoh's mummified body gives up its secrets after 3,500 years
Amenhotep I 'unwrapped' digitally by Cairo scientists, revealing details from his grave jewellery to his teeth With his narrow chin, small nose and curly hair he physically resembles his father, said radiologist Sahar Saleem. Perhaps surprisingly for someone who lived about 3,500 years ago, he also has strikingly good teeth. Saleem is talking about the mummified body of the pharaoh Amenhotep I ,
6h
China anger after space station forced to move to avoid Elon Musk Starlink satellites
China said its space station deployed prevention collision avoidance control measures in July and October and called on the US to 'bear responsibility' Beijing has called on the UN to remind the US to abide by the treaty regulating outer space after space satellites launched by tech tycoon Elon Musk's aerospace company SpaceX almost collided with its space station twice in the past year. China sa
10h
Questions over data transparency around Australian doctor's $1m GoFundMe Covid-19 vaccine
Professor Nikolai Petrovsky has been criticised for advocating for Covax-19 vaccine to be approved for use in Australia without making publicly available substantial peer-reviewed clinical evidence to support its efficacy Download the free Guardian app ; get our morning email briefing A South Australian doctor who has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars in crowdfunding for a potential Covid-1
18h
Conservatives and Liberals Are Wrong About Each Other
Every movement contains a range of viewpoints, from moderate to extreme. Unfortunately, Americans on each side of the political spectrum believe—incorrectly—that hard-liners dominate the opposite camp. After the killing of George Floyd last year, for example, liberal protesters across the nation pushed for criminal-justice reform, and many of the specific changes they sought enjoyed a lot of popu
22h
The 50 Best Podcasts of 2021
Editor's Note: Find all of The Atlantic 's "Best of 2021" coverage here . We take podcast ranking seriously. Our process starts with a search. We seek shows anywhere we can find them—sometimes hearing about them directly from producers, other times from a friend of a friend's mother's uncle, or sometimes through our own secret methods of rooting out gems. Then we dig in. (Of course, with more tha
23h
Rare 'thunder bird' fossil gives researchers clue to demise of Australian species of megafauna
At 230kg Genyornis newtoni weighed around five or six times as much as an emu and stood about two metres tall Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Flinders University researchers may have discovered what ultimately led to the extinction of the last of Australia's massive thunder birds, Genyornis newtoni . The clue came with the discovery of a rare fossil. The find, by researcher
1d
Pfizer/BioNTech tax windfall brings Mainz an early Christmas present
German city where early Covid vaccine was developed uses its new-found wealth to slash debt and attract other biotech firms The Pfizer/BioNTech jab is having an unexpected side-effect on the German municipality where scientists first developed it: for the first time in three decades the city of Mainz expects to become debt-free thanks to the tax revenues generated by the company's global success.
23h
Engineering the future: meet the Africa prize shortlist innovators
Turning invasive plants into a force for good and powering healthcare with solar – here are three of the 2022 nominees From a solar-powered crib that treats jaundiced babies to fibre made from water hyacinth that absorbs oil spills, innovators from nine African countries have been shortlisted for the Royal Academy of Engineering's 2022 Africa prize . This year half of the shortlist of 16 are wome
1d
Researchers develop structural blueprint of nanoparticles to target white blood cells responsible for lung inflammation
The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the devastating impact of acute lung inflammation (ALI), which is part of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that is the dominant cause of death in COVID-19. A potential new route to the diagnosis and treatment of ARDS comes from studying how neutrophils—the white blood cells responsible for detecting and eliminating harmful particles in the body—diffe
14h
Thomas Lovejoy, biologist who championed biodiversity, dies at age 80
Founder of the Amazon Biodiversity Center, he discovered that habitat destruction, pollution and global heating were killing species worldwide Thomas Lovejoy on Covid: 'We did it to ourselves' Thomas E Lovejoy , a leading conservation biologist who was credited with popularizing the term "biological diversity", has died. He was 80. His death was announced by George Mason University, where he was
15h
How DNA is preserved in archaeological sediments for thousands of years
Sediments in which archaeological finds are embedded have long been regarded by most archaeologists as unimportant by-products of excavations. However, in recent years it has been shown that sediments can contain ancient biomolecules, including DNA. "The retrieval of ancient human and faunal DNA from sediments offers exciting new opportunities to investigate the geographical and temporal distribut
15h
2021: The Year in Volcanic Activity
This has been a big year for the world's active volcanoes. Out of an estimated 1,500 active volcanoes, about 50 erupt every year, spewing steam, ash, toxic gases, and lava. In 2021, erupting volcanoes included the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the Canary Islands, Mount Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Fagradalsfjall volcano in Iceland, Pacaya volcano in Guatemala, Mount Semeru and Mount
17h
Grisnjure väcker hopp – kan gå att transplantera till människor
Varje vecka dör en svensk i väntan på organdonation. I decennier har vetenskapen drömt om kunna transplantera organ från djur, men problemen var oöverstigliga – tills nu. En grisnjure har fått hoppet att vakna hos världens transplantationskirurger. — Att pröva ett djurorgan i en människa är ett stort steg, säger Bo-Göran Ericzon, professor i transplantationskirurgi vid Karolinska sjukhuset.
19h
Researchers construct a framework to solve bound and scattering state problems in quantum mechanics education
In a study published in Physical Review-Physics Education Research, a research team led by Academician Guo Guangcan from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has successfully constructed a theoretical framework of Activation-Construction-Execution-Reflection as well as a thinking mechanism model based on Overgeneralization to help students sol
16h
Exploring the genetic basis of the root economics spectrum
By analyzing the acquisition-conservation tradeoff in root systems among different plants, ecologists have put forward the root economics spectrum (RES) hypothesis. Some plant species have finer and cost-effective absorptive roots that contribute to rapid nutrient uptake but have shorter lifespans, whereas others have thicker and less cost-effective absorptive roots marked by slower nutrient acqui
17h
Guidance v rules: which Covid measures work better?
Analysis: the Tories are arguing against further restrictions – but what do scientists think works best to prevent the spread of Covid? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage They are questions that have cast a shadow over the festive season: will new Covid measures be needed, and if so, when and what form will they take? The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE)
19h
Astronomers Detect an Exoplanet's Magnetic Field for the First Time
All we can say about most of the 4,000+ known exoplanets is that they exist. Their physical characteristics are unknowable with current technology, but a few have given up some secrets. Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have identified a magnetic field around the exoplanet HAT-P-11b. Earth's magnetic field is essential for our continued existence, and this is the first time we've confi
20h
A desert robot depicts AI's vast opportunities
When Hongzhi Gao was young, he lived with his family in Gansu, a province located in the center of northern China by the Tengger Desert. Thinking back to his childhood, he recalls the constant, steady wind of dirt outside their house, and that during most months of the year it didn't take more than a minute after stepping outside before sand would fill any empty space and creep into his pockets,
20h
It Keeps on Raining Too Much Too Fast
This was a year of too much rain. It rained too much in the Northeast. It rained too much in the Pacific Northwest, where, after a hazy summer of record wildfires, record rainfall temporarily rendered Vancouver impassable by road or rail. On the Gulf Coast and in the mid-Atlantic, the wettest days keep getting wetter . This is one of climate change's twisted bits of logic: Where it was dry, it wa
22h
Team proposes 'nano-chocolates' as a new way to store hydrogen
An innovative approach could turn nanoparticles into simple reservoirs for storing hydrogen. The highly volatile gas is considered a promising energy carrier for the future, which could provide climate-friendly fuels for airplanes, ships and trucks, for example, as well as allowing climate-friendly steel and cement production—depending on how the hydrogen gas is generated. However, storing hydroge
15h
Research team demonstrates angular-spectrum-dependent interference
Optical interference is not only a fundamental phenomenon that has enabled new theories of light to be derived, but it has also been used in interferometry for the measurement of small displacements, refractive index changes, and surface irregularities. The Michelson interferometer is a commonly used interferometer, by which the equal-inclination and equal-thickness interference fringes of light c
17h
Covid live news: travel chaos as 3,500 more flights cancelled; fresh curbs in France
France cuts wait time for booster shots ; US surge cause for concern, not panic, says Biden ; Johnson rules out new year restrictions in England England's bars and restaurants cheer absence of Covid rules 'I thought I could plough through the pandemic without burnout' Tell us how you have been affected See all our coronavirus coverage France has reduced the waiting time for a third booster shot t
9h
Lipid droplets as endogenous intracellular microlenses
With the demand in real-time monitoring of endoplasmic variations and rapid detection of extracellular signals, a great number of approaches to bioimaging have been developed. The past few decades have witnessed a dramatic progress in optical imaging, especially with the emerging of microsphere-assisted techniques that have the excellent ability of signal collection and enable real-time and super-
17h
Contorted oceanic plate caused complex quake off New Zealand's East Cape
Subduction zones, where a slab of oceanic plate is pushed beneath another tectonic plate down into the mantle, cause the world's largest and most destructive earthquakes. Reconstructing the geometry and stress conditions of the subducted slabs at subduction zones is crucial to understanding and preparing for major earthquakes. However, the tremendous depths of these slabs make this challenging—sei
15h
Like a red rag to a Tiger: can shirt colours really affect results in sport? | Sean Ingle
Seesawing studies find that red is for winners or black results in more penalties – while others find effects murky at best Here's one to ponder while gazing at another dull and drabby December sky. Can colour affect sporting performance? Tiger Woods certainly thinks so. "I wear red on Sundays because my mom thinks that's my power colour," he said, while blasting his way to 15 majors. So does Sir
1d
This is one reason why being online felt so bad in 2021
New data shows that the polarization of political discourse online has remained largely unchanged since the end of 2020. That's probably not surprising if you've looked at the internet at all in the past year. But the data also shows an underlying pattern in which individual topics—like abortion and immigration—took turns driving divisiveness. While people were consistently mad online about polit
1d
Are my kids getting carried away in their flights from reality? | Sophie Brickman
I asked a child psychologist if I should be worried about the extent of their make-believe worlds Never confuse fantasy and "realty". It's a sentence that has floated, jokingly, around my family ever since my father's colleague uttered the bungle to him years ago. We New Yorkers, of course, never confuse fantasy and realty. But in our house we happily confuse the two all the time. Sophie Brickman
1d
Nikola Hit with $125M Fine For Lying to Investors
(Photo: Nikola) Electric truck maker Nikola has been slammed with a $125 million fine by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for lying to investors and falsely inflating its stock price. Following a year-long investigation into the company's representation of its business practices, the SEC found that Nikola lied about its products' and facilities' technical capabilities, leading investo
20h
Bioptron: Too Silly to Write about
A correspondent from Friends of Science in Medicine in Australia sent me information about the Bioptron, suggesting it would make for a colorful article. Their organization has succeeded in getting it removed from Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration listings. But, to our shame, it's still available in the US. She points out that "devices with FDA numbers give companies like Bioptron an [
3h
Överläkaren: Kan också bli aktuellt med grishjärtan
Experimentet där en grisnjure för andra gången inte blev bortstött av en mänsklig kropp är ett betydelsefullt steg för forskningen, enligt Lars Wennberg, docent och överläkare vid Karolinska universitetssjukhuset. Men en bredare användning av grisorgan inom vården ligger långt fram i tiden. – Det är mycket arbete kvar, säger Lars Wennberg i Aktuellt.
15h
'Highly professional, but the process seems to take a long time': Is this the best way to correct the record?
A Nature journal has retracted a 2021 paper which made a bold claim about certain chemical reactions after several researchers raised questions about the analysis – but not before another group pulled their own article which built on the flawed findings. The first article, "The amine-catalysed Suzuki–Miyaura-type coupling of aryl halides and arylboronic acids," appeared … Continue reading
39min
How the Texas Abortion Law Affects Transgender People
For transgender and nonbinary people already facing discrimination in their daily lives, the stigma around being pregnant greatly affects their safety and mental and physical health. But the impact of the new Texas law on this community has scarcely been addressed by the state's policymakers.
1h
The hacker-for-hire industry is now too big to fail
A shock has reverberated inside Israel in the last few months. NSO Group, the billion-dollar Israeli company that has sold hacking tools to governments around the world for more than a decade, has drawn intense scrutiny after a series of public scandals. The company is in crisis. Its future is in doubt. But while NSO Group's future is uncertain, governments are more likely than ever to buy cyber
1h
Need help understanding the term "demonstrative reference"
It doesn't appear to be a Googleable phrase. Here's the context, It's a Vervaeke conversation: "Right, so think about demonstrative reference. Any attempt to categorize things presupposes demonstrative reference. If I'm going to say: I'm going to group these things together and say they're all cats. First I have to go "this, this, this" Points at 3 things in 3 directions . That's salience tagging
2h
Scientists digitally 'unwrap' mummy of pharaoh Amenhotep I for the first time in 3,000 years
All the royal mummies found in the 19th and 20th centuries have long since been opened for study. With one exception: egyptologists have never been bold enough to open the mummy of Pharaoh Amenhotep I. Not because of any mythical curse, but because it is perfectly wrapped, beautifully decorated with flower garlands, and with face and neck covered by an exquisite lifelike facemask inset with colorf
5h
From the archive: Carlo Rovelli on the weirdness of quantum mechanics (part one) – podcast
It has been more than a century since the groundwork of quantum physics was first formulated and yet the consequences of the theory still elude both scientists and philosophers. Why does light sometimes behave as a wave, and other times as a particle? Why does the outcome of an experiment apparently depend on whether the particles are being observed or not? In the first of two episodes, Ian Sampl
6h
From the archive: Carlo Rovelli on the weirdness of quantum mechanics (part one)
It has been more than a century since the groundwork of quantum physics was first formulated and yet the consequences of the theory still elude both scientists and philosophers. Why does light sometimes behave as a wave, and other times as a particle? Why does the outcome of an experiment apparently depend on whether the particles are being observed or not? In the first of two episodes, Ian Sample
6h
Twilight of the Nautilus – Issue 111: Spotlight
Happy Holidays. In this special issue we are reprinting our top stories of the past year. This article first appeared online in our "Harmony" issue in August, 2021. We were all very tired. My crew and I had been tracking nautiluses off tiny Ndrova Island in Papua New Guinea for close to a week. Every day we spent 16 hours on small dugout canoes and then got eight hours of fitful sleep on the deck
9h
How "My Octopus Teacher" Defied Convention – Issue 111: Spotlight
Happy Holidays. In this special issue we are reprinting our top stories of the past year. This article first appeared on Nautilus in our "Universality" issue in April, 2021. It all started with an odd pile of shells: a pile that, upon closer inspection, fell apart like a flower losing its petals, introducing a burned-out nature documentarian named Craig Foster—and, in time, the world—to the octop
9h
The Man Who Seduced the World with Whale Songs – Issue 111: Spotlight
Happy Holidays. In this special issue we are reprinting our top stories of the past year. This article first appeared online in our "Whale Songs" issue in September, 2021. It's been more than 50 years since biologist Roger Payne brought whale song into the lives of millions via the popular album, Songs of the Humpback Whale . At the time, commercial whaling had decimated global whale populations,
9h
Machine learning used to predict synthesis of complex novel materials
Researchers have successfully applied machine learning to guide the synthesis of new nanomaterials, eliminating barriers associated with materials discovery. The highly trained algorithm combed through a defined dataset to accurately predict new structures that could fuel processes in clean energy, chemical and automotive industries.
12h
Contorted oceanic plate caused complex quake off New Zealand's East Cape
Researchers used a novel finite-fault inversion method with seismometer data from around the world to investigate a deep intraslab earthquake that occurred on March 4, 2021, off the northeastern tip of New Zealand's North Island. This imaging revealed complex rupture geometry that included shallow faulting with trench-perpendicular extension and unusual deep faulting with trench-parallel compressi
13h
Radioactive radiation could damage biological tissue also via a previously unnoticed mechanism
When cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, more destructive chain reactions may occur than previously thought. An international team led by researchers has now observed intermolecular Coulombic decay in organic molecules. This is triggered by ionizing radiation such as from radioactivity or from space. The effect damages two neighboring molecules and ultimately leads to the breaking of bonds –
13h
White matter microstructure reveals developmental risk for psychosis
Brain imaging studies have shown structural and functional abnormalities in people with psychosis in the connections between the cortex and the thalamus, the major waystation for incoming sensory information and a critical regulator of cortical activity. A new study shows that those differences are not present during development, but that the integrity of the connections is compromised in youth wi
13h
T cells: No time to die
They are at the forefront in the fight against viruses, bacteria, and malignant cells: the T cells of our immune system. But the older we get, the fewer of them our body produces. Thus, how long we remain healthy also depends on how long the T cells survive. Researchers have now uncovered a previously unknown signaling pathway essential for T cell viability.
14h
Scientists invent a protein-rich product made from plants that could replace dairy and eggs in certain foods
Scientists have developed a plant-based emulsifier that is not only rich in protein and antioxidants, but has the necessary properties to replace eggs or dairy in food staples such as mayonnaise, salad dressings, and whipped cream. The emulsifier also helps cut down on food waste, as it is made by fermenting brewers' spent grain, a by-product of the beer-making industry.
14h
Cognitive science PhD vs. Neuroscience PhD
I am trying to determine if a PhD in Cognitive Science rather than a PhD in Neuroscience is right for me… I recently graduated college with a degree in Neuroscience, and I always loved the psychology/behavioral side of neuroscience rather than anything wet lab. With a PhD in Cognitive Science program, will I get any wet lab? It seems like most of the labs I'm finding in various cogsci programs
15h
Physics analogies help gamify classroom quizzes and enhance student learning
The concept of gamification is increasingly gaining popularity—tourists frequently traveling overseas earn frequent flier points from their preferred airline; customers purchasing apparel from their favorite fashion outlet accumulate customer loyalty points. Both of these examples involve gamification: The inclusion of game-like features (points) to increase the odds of a desired outcome (a future
16h
Bird flu detected in dead knots washed up on the Wadden Sea
On 17 and 18 December 2021, a few hundred dead knots (Calidris canutus) were discovered on Schiermonnikoog and in Oost-Groningen. At the behest of the Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR) examined a few dead knots, an oystercatcher, and a curlew who were found in the same location. The avian influenza H5N1 virus was detected in the birds
16h
How do the James Webb Space Telescope's infrared 'eyes' work?
The technology onboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which launched on December 26, makes it the most powerful space telescope in history. University of Arizona researchers led the design of the telescope's Near-Infrared Camera, and they also lead the science team for its Mid-Infrared Instrument. These powerful infrared cameras can help astronomers peer into the universe like never before, t
16h
International team of scientists proposes a global network to monitor major threats on our environment
Earth's ecosystems and human activities are threatened by a broad spectrum of hazards threatening ground infrastructures, space systems and space flight: Solar activity, earthquakes, atmospheric and climatic disturbances, changes in the geomagnetic field, fluctuations of the global electric circuit. These hazards leave distinguishable characteristic imprints on a critical layer of geospace: The Ea
16h
The future of 3D display and the emergence of holographic television
The pioneers of holography (Gabor, Leith, Upatnieks, and Denisyuk) predicted very early that the ultimate 3D display will be based on this technique. This conviction was rooted in the fact that holography is the only approach that can render all optical cues interpreted by the human visual system. Holographic 3D displays have been a dream chased after for many years, facing challenges on all front
16h
Team develops kilohertz label-free non-contact quantitative mapping of optical properties for strongly turbid media
The ability to quantify optical properties (i.e., absorption and scattering) of strongly turbid media has major impacts on the characterization of biological tissues, fluid fields, and many others. However, the task of quantitative imaging of optical properties for strongly turbid media is intrinsically challenging, as photon scattering hinders direct measurement over length scales larger than the
17h
Harnessing 'big data' via meta-analysis of commercial Pt/C measurements for oxygen reduction reaction
Developing low-cost and highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to replace commercial Pt/C has always been desired to greatly reduce the cost of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The parameter of half-wave potential (E1/2) obtained from linear-sweep voltammetry (LSV) in O2-saturated acid/alkaline medium on a rotating disk electrode (RDE) is commonly used
17h
Fluorescence lifetime imaging for studying DNA compaction and gene activities
Studies of the genomic DNA compaction in the cell nucleus and dynamic reorganization during physiologic processes or disease development in live cell environments are exceedingly challenging. This complexity stems from a high degree of compaction required to accommodate ~2 meters of genomic DNA within the cell nucleus, which typically is 5 to 10 micrometers in diameter. In addition, the chromatin
17h
Allying meta-structures with diverse optical waveguides for integrated photonics and more
Comprised of judiciously engineered microscopic photonic structures with subwavelength features, the concepts of metasurface and metamaterials have proven fruitful results in the realm of meta-optics. Previous research attentions are mainly devoted to applying meta-structures to tailor light in free space and develop relevant devices and applications. However, recent research is revealing the prom
17h
Cylindrical vector beam multiplexer/demultiplexer using off-axis polarization control
Cylindrical vector beam (CVB) multiplexing has emerged as a powerful technique to boost signal channels. Coupling and separating CVBs are two pivotal elements in CVB multiplexing communication. Although off-axis control technologies such as miniature Dammann vortex gratings have been investigated to couple and separate light beams, it is usually limited to light beams with homogeneous polarization
17h
How asthma may cut brain tumor risk
People with asthma seem to be less likely to develop brain tumors than others and now researchers believe they've discovered why via a study of mice. It comes down to the behavior of T cells, a type of immune cell. When a person—or a mouse—develops asthma, a breathing disease in which the airways become narrowed and inflamed, their T cells become activated. "These findings open the door to new ki
17h
"Alexa: What Are the Best Smart Home Devices?"
Smart devices keep you informed on the status of your laundry, garage door, lights, and even room temperature. Keep tabs on who's entering your home or create custom settings based on your schedule. A home filled with the best smart home devices provides extra security and control over almost every gadget and appliance in your house. You've got some decisions to make, though, from the smart devic
19h
Disarming a blood-clotting protein prevents gum disease in mice
Blocking function of a blood-clotting protein, called fibrin, prevented bone loss from periodontal (gum) disease in mice, according to new research. The study suggests that suppressing abnormal fibrin activity could hold promise for preventing or treating periodontal disease, as well as other inflammatory disorders marked by fibrin buildup, including arthritis and multiple sclerosis.
19h
Coating keeps snow and ice from piling up on solar panels
Researchers have demonstrated an inexpensive, clear coating that reduced snow and ice accumulation on solar panels, enabling them to generate up to 85% more energy in early testing. The advance could dramatically improve the productivity of solar panels in cold climates, the researchers report. "Solar panels might lose 80 or 90% of their generating capacity in the winter." The coating is made chi
19h
Former Googler and Facebooker Launches COVID Testing Startup
The world is currently reeling from the rapid expansion of yet another COVID variant, but the timing couldn't be better for a startup called Detect. The company, helmed by former Google and Facebook executive Hugo Barra, offers a system for at-home COVID testing , but unlike other home options, Detect uses the more advanced PCR method of detection. Demand has been so high, Detect has had to limit
20h
Cannabis-related fatal car crashes double in 20 years
Deadly car crashes involving both cannabis and alcohol consumption have more than doubled in the United States in the past two decades, as have car crash deaths involving just cannabis, researchers report. "There has been progress in reducing deaths from alcohol-impaired driving, but our study suggests that cannabis involvement might be undercutting these public health efforts," says study senior
20h
Permafrost Makes 200-Ounce Gold Haul Almost Impossible | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #ParkerSchnabel #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discove
20h
Chasing Energy's Holy Grail: Was 2021 Fusion Power's Breakthrough Year?
Few technologies encapsulate the techno-utopian dream as much as fusion power, but its promise of limitless renewable energy has always remained tantalizingly out of reach. A flurry of developments in the last six months suggest that might be starting to change. The old joke is that fusion power is 30 years away, and always will be. Nonetheless, there's growing optimism that more than 70 years af
20h
Some dinosaurs rocked pops of color to woo mates
Extinct dinosaurs may have rocked pops of color on different parts of their bodies and flashed those colors to entice mates, just like birds do today, a new study shows. Most birds aren't as colorful as parrots or peacocks. But if you look beyond the feathers, bright colors on birds aren't hard to find: Think pink pigeon feet, red rooster combs, and yellow pelican pouches. "Living birds use an ar
21h
Ring in the New Year with less food waste
While fighting food waste is a year-round mission, it's more important than ever around the holidays. This is something to consider during this year's festivities, typically known for an abundance of food.
21h
Större fokus på negativa usläpp
I mars släpper den internationella klimatpanelen, IPCC, en ny delrapport om hur klimatförändringarna kan begränsas. Större fokus än tidigare kommer att ligga på negativa utsläpp, det vill säga olika metoder för att fånga in koldioxid från atmosfären, berättar Mathias Fridahl, forskare i klimatpolitik vid Linköpings universitet. – Det blir ett ökat fokus på minusutsläpp eftersom vi ligger så långt
1d
Mot en elbaserad ekonomi
Den svenska elanvändningen har legat ganska konstant sedan 1980-talet. Men år 2045 kommer den vara dubbelt så stor som i dag enligt nya scenarier och prognoser, bland annat den senaste från Svenska kraftnät, som ansvarar för det svenska transmissionsnätet för el. Mer el behövs för att ladda elfordon och ställa om industrin, men även till växande nya verksamheter som serverhallar och batterifabrike
1d
Nya steg mot organ från djur
I slutet av september genomfördes en unik operation vid NYU Langone Transplant Institute i New York. För första gången testades en njure från en genförändrad gris på människa. Njuren kopplades till blodkärl på benet till en hjärndöd kvinna som hölls vid liv med ventilator. Under 54 timmar kunde läkarna observera hur njuren producerade urin utan att stötas bort.
1d
Stamceller testas mot ögonsjukdom
Förändringar i gula fläcken är den vanligaste orsaken till att äldre blir blinda. Mot den vanligaste formen finns än så länge ingen behandling. Men i framtiden kan sjukdomen åtminstone bromsas med hjälp av stamceller. Det hoppas i alla fall forskaren och ögonkirurgen Anders Kvanta, verksam vid Karolinska institutet och S:t Eriks ögonsjukhus i Stockholm. Under nästa år planerar han att operera in n
1d
Gyllene år för känd mumie
Ett dubbelt jubileum sätter egyptologin i rampljuset under 2022. Det är 100 år sedan upptäckten av Tutankhamuns intakta grav och 200 år sedan Jean-François Champollion löste Rosetta-stenens gåta och gjorde det möjligt att läsa hieroglyfer. – Vi kan vänta oss en hel del utställningar, publikationer, konferenser och festligheter under året och det kulminerar med invigningen av Grand Egyptian Museum,
1d
Virtuell ABBA-konsert ett tecken i tiden
I maj är det premiär för ABBA:s digitala konserter i London. Tack vare teknik som är vanlig inom spel- och filmindustrin, där rörelser fångas med speciella dräkter, ska avatarerna på scen se ut och röra sig som de verkliga ABBA-medlemmarna. Lars Hanson, professor i integrerad produktutveckling på Högskolan i Skövde, ser virtuella konserter som ett tecken i tiden. Inom industrin har digitala modell
1d

 

Leave a Reply