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'Force of nature': ex-rugby player Doddie Weir leaves lasting legacy, say admirers
Scotland and British and Irish Lions legend died over the weekend from motor neurone disease Doddie Weir , the former Scotland and British and Irish Lions rugby union player who died over the weekend from motor neurone disease, leaves "a lasting legacy" and will, admirers said, be remembered as a man who helped transform people's understanding of the disease. Weir's death aged 52 was announced by
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How Emily Wilson turned her teenage X Factor humiliation into comedy gold
A brutal take-down on the TV talent show led Emily Wilson into therapy. A decade later, she has turned her grim experience into award-winning standup It's not that Emily Wilson used to be secretive about the fact that, as a teenager, she'd appeared on the American incarnation of the X Factor . Rather, it hadn't exactly gone well for her – awfully, actually – and by the time she was a 20-something
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Understanding the Cell: The Elementary Building Block From Which Life Emerges
In his latest book, the oncologist and acclaimed writer Siddhartha Mukherjee focuses his narrative microscope on the cell, the elementary building block from which complex systems and life itself emerge. It is the coordination of cells that allow hearts to beat, the specialization of cells that create robust immune systems, and the firing of cells that form thoughts. "We need to understand cells
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Bereavement often ruptures our sense of self – but we can find our feet again | Gill Straker and Jacqui Winship
We may be forever altered by the death of a loved one, but we will eventually be able to reintegrate into life The modern mind is a column where experts discuss mental health issues they are seeing in their work Get our morning and afternoon news emails , free app or daily news podcast The experience of grief following bereavement is ubiquitous and falls within the normal range of human experienc
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Readers reply: will we ever set up an outpost on another planet?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts This week's question: Will there ever be world government, and would we want it? Will we ever set up an outpost on another planet? Finnley Clarkson, Sheffield Send new questions to nq@theguardian.com . Continue reading…
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Father of Clarity
Each day the same now: I wake her up—she's a woman in the making, and me, I'm still a boy, given this responsibility of another, and my boy, he's visiting his mother, one thousand miles away. We drive to school each morning, discussing the state of all things— how she will need to use my razor blades, for my legs , she says, and armpits, except she doesn't say armpits, she says for under my arms
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Football Has Found Its New Bogeyman
An analytics revolution comes for every sport sooner or later. MLB had Moneyball in the early 2000s and has moved well beyond it in the years since. The NBA has used efficiency to all but kill the mid-range jump shot. Soccer has seen an influx of countless new ways to measure passes and scoring chances down to the finest detail. The NFL's change became most evident in 2018. Computer models that l
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The Generation
Editor's Note: Read an interview with Hernan Diaz about his writing process. We're gathered around Victor's body. I can't look at his face and don't want to look down like the others. Find myself staring at the glass of water on the counter. The nervous little ripples. This is why I know the hum is there, although I can't hear it. None of us has ever heard the hum, because we were born into it. B
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Hernan Diaz on Erasing Subjectivity
Editor's Note: Read Hernan Diaz's new short story " The Generation ." "The Generation" is a new story by Hernan Diaz. To mark the story's publication in The Atlantic , Diaz and Oliver Munday, the associate creative director of the magazine, discussed the story over email. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity. Oliver Munday: Your story "The Generation" follows a 13-year-old in a
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The Song of the Cell by Siddhartha Mukherjee review – mysteries of the building blocks of life
The prizewinning author's timely, precise study traces our attempts to understand the units that have such an impact on our health In spring 1858, the German scientist Rudolf Virchow published an unorthodox vision of the nature of living organisms. In his book, Cellular Pathology , he argued that the human body was simply "a cell state in which every cell is a citizen". From a single originator,
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What the Body Means to Say
Patient: Mechanism of injury: self-immolation. Pt conscious upon EMT arrival. Lighter fluid and matches on scene. When asked about the incident, pt reported intent to "turn herself into a phoenix." Psych eval ordered. The summer before last, I met a woman who lit herself on fire. I'll call her R. One evening in June, she poured lighter fluid over and into her body—down her mouth and up her rectum
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Whoops, I Deleted My Life
W hen the ominous warnings started hitting my inbox a few months ago, I tried to ignore them. The emails contained none of the humor or playfulness of the early Gmail ethos. Instead, they were terse and vaguely threatening, seeming to channel the depressing spirit of financial collapse and austerity present everywhere around us. The subject line: "Your Gmail is almost out of storage." The body, i
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Lost city of Atlantis rises again to fuel a dangerous myth
Millions have watched Netflix hit Ancient Apocalypse, which is just the latest interpretation of an enduring tale. But in its appeal to 'race science' it's more than merely controversial For a story that was first told 2,300 years ago, the myth of Atlantis has demonstrated a remarkable persistence over the millennia. Originally outlined by Plato, the tale of the rise of a great, ancient civilisat
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Wellcome Collection in London shuts 'racist, sexist and ableist' medical history gallery
Medicine Man exhibits included painting of a black African kneeling in front of a white missionary A museum in London run by the Wellcome foundation health charity is to close one of its key galleries because it perpetuates "a version of medical history that is based on racist, sexist and ableist theories and language". The Wellcome Collection 's announcement on Saturday affects a free permanent
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Modular stimuli-responsive hydrogel sealants for early gastrointestinal leak detection and containment
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34272-y Digestive surgical leaks manifesting days after a successful surgery can lead to severe complications and affect healthcare worldwide. Here, the authors address the problem holistically with a hydrogel patch capable of sealing tissues, while detecting imminent leaks via a smartphone-operated ultrasound probe
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Predicting protein function and orientation on a gold nanoparticle surface using a residue-based affinity scale
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34749-w The orientation of proteins on nanoparticle surfaces is important to the nanoparticle's fate in vivo. Here, the authors use competitive binding between protein variants to develop a residue-based affinity scale to develop a model for the binding and orientation of proteins on gold nanoparticles
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Improved bounds on Lorentz violation from composite pulse Ramsey spectroscopy in a trapped ion
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34818-0 Breaking of Lorentz symmetry is related to the unification of fundamental forces and the extension of the standard model. Here the authors provide updated bounds on the Lorentz violation, by using measurements with trapped Yb+ ion, that represent an improvement over existing results.
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Artificiality Independence
Disclaimer:I am still a high school student and don't know much about this subject. This is just a thought I had) I don't think we have achieved artificial intelligence. Alexa, Google, or any of these algorithms dependent programs don't seem like true AI to me. Is Siri really AI? What it is basically doing is hearing your command and putting it into a google search bar. I don't think that is AI.
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A diverse Ediacara assemblage survived under low-oxygen conditions
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35012-y Geochemical data from sedimentary rocks in Siberia indicate that members of the soft-bodied Ediacara biota (the earliest macroscopic life on Earth) were tolerant of low-oxygen conditions, suggesting they had the capacity for anaerobic metabolisms.
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Energy cascades in donor-acceptor exciton-polaritons observed by ultrafast two-dimensional white-light spectroscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35046-2 Exciton-polaritons are hybridized light-matter states that exhibit intriguing phenomena that are unobserved in purely excitonic states. Here, the authors elucidate the photophysical mechanism of polariton-assisted long-range energy transfer in carbon nanotubes using two-dimensional white-light spectroscopy a
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Greater genetic diversity is needed in human pluripotent stem cell models
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34940-z While there are a growing number of human pluripotent stem cell repositories, genetic diversity remains limited in most collections and studies. Here, we discuss the importance of incorporating diverse ancestries in these models to improve equity and accelerate biological discovery.
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Decoding molecular programs in melanoma brain metastases
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34899-x Melanoma brain metastases (MBM) show heterogeneous therapeutic response determined by incompletely understood mechanisms. Here, the authors use a multi-OMICS approach and targeted sequencing (TargetSeq) to decipher programs that may define molecular subsets of MBM and their response to therapy.
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Observation of a transient intermediate in the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of the excess electron in strong-field-ionized liquid water
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34981-4 A unified picture of the electronic relaxation dynamics of ionized liquid water remains elusive despite decades of study. Here, the authors use few-cycle optical pump-probe spectroscopy and ab initio quantum dynamics to unambiguously identify a new transient intermediate in the relaxation pathway.
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ARID1A loss induces polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cell chemotaxis and promotes prostate cancer progression
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34871-9 The accumulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) has been associated with prostate cancer progression and castration resistance. Here the authors show that loss of ARID1A, a subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, results in polymorphonuclear-MDSC infiltration and cooperates with Pten
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Chiral aldehyde-nickel dual catalysis enables asymmetric α−propargylation of amino acids and stereodivergent synthesis of NP25302
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35062-2 The combination of transition metal catalysis and organocatalysis can afford both good reactivity and selectivity. Here, the authors present an α − propargylation of N-unprotected amino acid esters with propargylic alcohol derivatives via dual nickel and chiral aldehyde catalysis.
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Structural characterization of protective non-neutralizing antibodies targeting Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34923-0 There are currently no approved treatments for Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) infection. In this study, the authors structurally characterize the epitope targeted by protective non-neutralizing mouse and human antibodies and provide insights into their broad range potential against various CCH
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Transfer efficiency of organic carbon in marine sediments
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35112-9 The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments regulates Earth's carbon cycle and climate. Here, authors present 'transfer efficiencies' as a new framework for quantifying the sedimentary portion of the marine organic carbon cycle.
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Chiral nanocrystals grown from MoS2 nanosheets enable photothermally modulated enantioselective release of antimicrobial drugs
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35016-8 Chirality transfer from molecules to nanomaterials enables advanced optical functionalities. Here, the authors use exfoliated MoS2 nanosheets to seed the growth of chiral Au nanoparticles to form Au/MoS2 heterostructures for enantioselective drug release.
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2022 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #48
A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, Nov 20, 2022 thru Sat, Nov 26, 2022. Story of the Week The Art at COP27 Offered Opportunities to Move Beyond 'Empty Words' In Egypt, visitors encountered creative works about climate anxiety, sustainability and ecosystem loss. While the goal of effecting decisive global change proved
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Fred's Only Dozer Breaks Down! | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #Discovery #discoveryplus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discover
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Mind the gaps: The world needs to radically transform its educational systems, not just upgrade them
In September 2022 the United Nations organized the first-ever high-level Transforming Education Summit, inviting stakeholders to put forward commitments and tackle the challenges we face. Once again we heard how staggering the needs are: in lower-income countries, 25% of young people and just over 55% of adults are still illiterate, while 250 million children remain out of primary school.
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Life as an Autopoietic System – Attempt of a Structural Realistic Enlightenment – Part 1
Life as an #Autopoietic #System – Attempt of a #Structural #Realistic #Enlightenment – Part 1 The guest article "Self-organization seen from the inside – or: how does life work" by Dr. Wolfgang Stegemann represents the first part of our planned joint venture. The project pursues the ambitious goal of the self-organization of life as an autopoietic system, but in the sense of a demarcation from th
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What if the dinosaurs hadn't gone extinct? Why our world might look very different
Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid hit the Earth with the force of 10 billion atomic bombs and changed the course of evolution. The skies darkened and plants stopped photosynthesising. The plants died, then the animals that fed on them. The food chain collapsed. Over 90% of all species vanished. When the dust settled, all dinosaurs except a handful of birds had gone extinct.
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What if the dinosaurs hadn't gone extinct? Why our world might look very different
Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid hit the Earth with the force of 10 billion atomic bombs and changed the course of evolution. The skies darkened and plants stopped photosynthesising. The plants died, then the animals that fed on them. The food chain collapsed. Over 90% of all species vanished. When the dust settled, all dinosaurs except a handful of birds had gone extinct.
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Some Archaea found to have integrons, allowing cross-domain gene transfer
A team of researchers at Macquarie University, in Australia, has found evidence showing that some Archaea have integrons. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they used a recently developed technique called metagenome-assembled genomes (MAG) to study the genomes of Archaea samples in a new way, and what they learned by doing so.
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Some Archaea found to have integrons, allowing cross-domain gene transfer
A team of researchers at Macquarie University, in Australia, has found evidence showing that some Archaea have integrons. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they used a recently developed technique called metagenome-assembled genomes (MAG) to study the genomes of Archaea samples in a new way, and what they learned by doing so.
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Dolphins Might Have Elite Spice Tolerance
This article was originally published in Hakai Magazine . Fishers around the world are desperate for a reliable way to stop dolphins from plundering their catch. Dolphins' net burgling—known as depredation—costs fishers income and also puts dolphins at risk of injury and entanglement. Proposed solutions, such as using noisemakers, have had mixed results. So researchers in Greece went back to the
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Skull and partial skeleton found in Morocco helps link ancient whale species
Three researchers, one with the University of Michigan, the other two with the University of Casablanca, have found a skull and partial skeleton in Morocco that they suggest link together several species of ancient whales. In their paper published in the open access journal PLOS ONE, Philip Gingerich, Ayoub Amane and Samir Zouhri describe the fossils and how they tie together the evolution of land
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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through November 26)
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Meta's 'Cicero' AI Trounced Humans at Diplomacy Without Revealing Its True Identity Mack DeGeurin | Gizmodo "Meta says Cicero more than doubled the average score of human players across 40 anonymous online Diplomacy games and ranked in the top 10% of players who played more than one game. Cicero even placed 1st in an eight game tournament involving 21 participants. …Cicero
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Skull and partial skeleton found in Morocco helps link ancient whale species
Three researchers, one with the University of Michigan, the other two with the University of Casablanca, have found a skull and partial skeleton in Morocco that they suggest link together several species of ancient whales. In their paper published in the open access journal PLOS ONE, Philip Gingerich, Ayoub Amane and Samir Zouhri describe the fossils and how they tie together the evolution of land
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Study investigates a rare Type Icn supernova
An international team of astronomers has conducted optical and near-infrared observations of a rare Type Icn supernova known as SN 2022ann. The results of the study, published November 9 on the preprint server arXiv, shed more light on the nature of this supernova and its unique properties.
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Physicist Sabine Hossenfelder: 'There are quite a few areas where physics blurs into religion'
To answer life's biggest questions, says the German theoretical physicist and YouTuber, we need to abandon unscientific ideas such as the multiverse Sabine Hossenfelder is a German theoretical physicist who writes books and runs a YouTube channel (with 618,000 subscribers at time of writing) called Science Without the Gobbledygook . Born in Frankfurt, she studied mathematics at the Goethe Univers
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Nasa's Orion spacecraft enters lunar orbit as test flight nears halfway mark
Nasa considers capsule's flight a dress rehearsal for the next moon flyby in 2024, with astronauts Nasa's Orion capsule has entered an orbit stretching tens of thousands of miles around the moon, as it neared the halfway mark of its test flight. The capsule and its three test dummies entered lunar orbit more than a week after launching on the $4bn demo that's meant to pave the way for astronauts.
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We Still Don't Know What Fundamentally Causes Canker Sores
A canker sore—a painful white ulcer inside the mouth—might be brought on by stress. Or the wrong toothpaste. Or certain foods: tomatoes, peanuts, cinnamon. Or an iron deficiency. Or an allergy. Or a new prescription. Or an underlying autoimmune disease. Even though millions of people suffer from them every year, researchers still don't know much about what fundamentally causes these sores. This l
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Harassment in Economics Doesn't Stay in Economics
Betsey Stevenson, a professor at the University of Michigan and a former chief economist at the U.S. Department of Labor, told me that when she hit her mid-40s, she had an "aha moment." "I was thinking, It's so great having gotten to this stage of my career where I'm a little more established. It's very freeing ," she told me. "And I realized: Oh, I think I just aged out of sexual harassment ." T
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'The sheer scale is extraordinary': meet the titanosaur that dwarfs Dippy the diplodocus
One of the largest creatures to have walked the Earth is to become the Natural History Museum's new star attraction It will be one of the largest exhibits to grace a British museum. In spring, the Natural History Museum in London will display the full cast of a skeleton of a titanosaur, a creature so vast it will have to be shoehorned into the 9-metre-high Waterhouse gallery. One of the most mass
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Weekend reads: What should happen to a paper by Theranos?; Diederik Stapel continues to be cited; a scientist accused of hiding China ties wins $2 million
Would you consider a donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Our list of retracted or withdrawn COVID-19 papers is up to 276. There are more than 37,000 retractions in our database — which powers retraction alerts in EndNote, LibKey, Papers, and Zotero. And have you seen our leaderboard of authors with the most … Continue rea
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'Surprisingly tasty': putting Neanderthal cooking to the test
Evidence has been found of complex cooking by Neanderthals. Our writer finds out how their meals might have tasted Pity the Neanderthal chef. With only rudimentary cooking implements – a hot rock, some scraps of animal skin, perhaps a favoured prodding stick, plus stones for pounding, cutting, scraping and grinding – their hands must have been a scarred mess, and the woodsmoke from the hearth mus
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Who wants to live to 100 on a diet of lentil and broccoli slurry? Mostly rich men | Gaby Hinsliff
Instead of searching for the key to immortality, what if we tried to make people's lives better in the here and now? Shortly after waking, Bryan Johnson drinks a murky concoction involving olive oil, cocoa flavanols and something derived from algae. Breakfast will be a blended green slurry of lentils, broccoli and mushrooms, with lunch and dinner not much different. The 45-year-old American entre
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Why growing fungi at home is beginning to mushroom
Home fungus growers can boost soil quality in small gardens and cultivate exotic varieties using coffee grounds and online kits An increasing number of gardeners are growing mushrooms in their vegetable patches to improve soil quality and grow food in small spaces. Mushrooms are now cultivated in the kitchen garden at Kew Gardens in south-west London and visitors have been keen to know how they m
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The Society of Mind – Ch 4 The Self
"So how can any long-range plan succeed? The easiest path to 'self-control' is doing only what one is already disposed to do." What does it mean to have self-control? When we fail to live up to some goal, we must ask: who's mad at whom? When we look inside our mind & brain it's hard to identify a single constant entity. We often think of ourselves as having conflicting goals and desires, and, ind
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At Last, the Americans Have Arrived
The worst American soccer chant goes, "I … I believe … I believe that we will win." It betrays the anxieties of those who bellow it; far from arrogantly assuming victory, it seems to argue that the success of the United States men's soccer team is a matter of prayerful thinking. Beating England is not a dream, if you will it. But the chant, for many years, was also an honest assessment of the qua
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PICH acts as a force-dependent nucleosome remodeler
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35040-8 In anaphase, any unresolved DNA entanglements between the segregating sister chromatids can give rise to chromatin bridges. Here, the authors present an in vitro single-molecule assay that mimics chromatin under tension, to show that PICH is a tension- and ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeler.
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Unexpectedly efficient ion desorption of graphene-based materials
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35077-9 Desorption of ions from sorbents generally involves high acid or base concentrations and long desorption times, especially for multivalent ions. Here the authors report a rapid and efficient desorption of Co2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ adsorbed on magnetite-graphene oxide that occurs by adding low amounts of Al3+, whi
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ZMP recruits and excludes Pol IV–mediated DNA methylation in a site-specific manner | Science Advances
Abstract In plants, RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) uses small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to target transposable elements (TEs) but usually avoids genes. RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) shapes the landscape of DNA methylation through its pivotal role in siRNA biogenesis. However, how Pol IV is recruited to specific loci, particularly how it avoids genes, is poorly understood. Here, we identified a
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Salt-induced ductilization and strain-insensitive resistance of an intrinsically conducting polymer | Science Advances
Abstract High mechanical ductility and high mechanical strength are important for materials including polymers. Current methods to increase the ductility of polymers such as plasticization always cause a remarkable drop in the ultimate tensile strength. There is no report on the ductilization of polymers that can notably increase the elongation at break while not lowering the ultimate tensile str
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Flow-induced "waltzing" red blood cells: Microstructural reorganization and the corresponding rheological response | Science Advances
Abstract We investigate flow-induced structural organization in a dilute suspension of tumbling red blood cells (RBCs) under confined shear flow. For small Reynolds ( Re = 0.1) and capillary numbers ( Ca ), with fully coupled hydrodynamic interaction (HI) and without interparticle adhesion, we find that HI between the biconcave discoid particles prompts the formation of layered RBC chains and syn
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A tumor vasculature–based imaging biomarker for predicting response and survival in patients with lung cancer treated with checkpoint inhibitors | Science Advances
Abstract Tumor vasculature is a key component of the tumor microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. We present a new imaging biomarker, quantitative vessel tortuosity (QVT), and evaluate its association with response and survival in patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) therapies. A total of 507 cases
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Control of Gαq signaling dynamics and GPCR cross-talk by GRKs | Science Advances
Abstract Numerous processes contribute to the regulation of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), but relatively little is known about rapid mechanisms that control signaling on the seconds time scale or regulate cross-talk between receptors. Here, we reveal that the ability of some GPCR kinases (GRKs) to bind Gα q both drives acute signaling desensitization and regulates functional interactions b
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Real-space imaging and control of chiral anomaly induced current at room temperature in topological Dirac semimetal | Science Advances
Abstract Chiral fermions (CFs) in condensed matters, distinguished by right (+) or left (−) handedness, hold a promise for emergent quantum devices. Although a chiral anomaly induced current, J chiral = J (+) − J (−), occurs in Weyl semimetals due to the charge imbalance of the CFs, monitoring spatial flow and temporal dynamics of J chiral has not been demonstrated yet. Here, we report real-space
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Tolerogenic nanoparticles induce type II collagen–specific regulatory T cells and ameliorate osteoarthritis | Science Advances
Abstract Local inflammation in the joint is considered to contribute to osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Here, we describe an immunomodulating nanoparticle for OA treatment. Intradermal injection of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) loaded with type II collagen (Col II) and rapamycin (LNP-Col II-R) into OA mice effectively induced Col II–specific anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells, substantially incre
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Extensive crystal fractionation of high-silica magmas revealed by K isotopes | Science Advances
Abstract Fractional crystallization plays a critical role in generating the differentiated continental crust on Earth. However, whether efficient crystal-melt separation can occur in viscous felsic magmas remains a long-standing debate because of the difficulty in discriminating between differentiated melts and complementary cumulates. Here, we found large (~1 per mil) potassium isotopic variatio
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Host nucleases generate prespacers for primed adaptation in the E. coli type I-E CRISPR-Cas system | Science Advances
Abstract CRISPR-Cas systems provide prokaryotes with adaptive immunity against foreign nucleic acids. In Escherichia coli , immunity is acquired upon integration of 33-bp spacers into CRISPR arrays. DNA targets complementary to spacers get degraded and serve as a source of new spacers during a process called primed adaptation. Precursors of such spacers, prespacers, are ~33-bp double-stranded DNA
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What is the meaning of "decreased functional connectivity in the left superior parietal cortex," as a result of Dual-N back Training?
In this study: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-77310-9 it says that Dual-N back shows a "significant effect in left superior parietal cortex… indicating a decreased connectivity of the dual-task training group over time." What does this mean? I am practicing Dual-N back for the positive effects on working memory and intelligence, but this sounds like a negative side effect. submitted
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AI tailors artificial DNA for future drug development
With the help of an AI, researchers have succeeded in designing synthetic DNA that controls the cells' protein production. The technology can contribute to the development and production of vaccines, drugs for severe diseases, as well as alternative food proteins much faster and at significantly lower costs than today.
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Stop counting cups: There's an ocean of difference in our water-drinking needs
A new study of thousands of people reveals a wide range in the amount of water people consume around the globe and over their lifespans, definitively spilling the oft-repeated idea that eight, 8-ounce glasses meet the human body's daily needs. Differences in environment, body composition and activity level contribute to daily water turnover of as little as 1 liter and as much as 10 liters.
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Researchers find repeated gene duplications and genetic diversification in protein kinase R in mouse-eared bats
An international team of researchers has found evidence of repeated genomic duplications and genetic diversification in protein kinase R (PKR) in mouse-eared bats. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their genomic study of multiple species of mouse-eared bats and their sequencing of 15 of them.
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What octopus and human brains have in common
Cephalopods like octopuses, squids and cuttlefish are highly intelligent animals with complex nervous systems. In Science Advances, a team led by Nikolaus Rajewsky of the Max Delbrück Center has now shown that their evolution is linked to a dramatic expansion of their microRNA repertoire.
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Project aims to use concrete reefs to increase marine biodiversity off the Danish coast
When cycling across the Bryggebroen bridge at Fisketorvet, you see three concrete sculptures emerging from the water surface in the inner harbor of Copenhagen. But it is actually only when you get under water that the work of art really begins to come to life. Here you can see that the sculptures are filled with cracks that will eventually become a habitat for seaweed and fish.
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Project aims to use concrete reefs to increase marine biodiversity off the Danish coast
When cycling across the Bryggebroen bridge at Fisketorvet, you see three concrete sculptures emerging from the water surface in the inner harbor of Copenhagen. But it is actually only when you get under water that the work of art really begins to come to life. Here you can see that the sculptures are filled with cracks that will eventually become a habitat for seaweed and fish.
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525-million-year-old fossil defies textbook explanation for brain evolution
According to a new study, fossils of a tiny sea creature with a delicately preserved nervous system solve a century-old debate over how the brain evolved in arthropods, the most species-rich group in the animal kingdom. Combining detailed anatomical studies of the fossilized nervous system with analyses of gene expression patterns in living descendants, they conclude that a shared blueprint of bra
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Synchronizing chaos through a narrow slice of the spectrum
The abstract notion that the whole can be found in each part of something has for long fascinated thinkers engaged in all walks of philosophy and experimental science, from Immanuel Kant on the essence of time to David Bohm on the notion of order, and from the self-similarity of fractal structures to the defining properties of holograms.
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Developing a sensor to detect disease-transmitting mosquitoes
Mosquitoes inhabit various world regions, with more than 3,000 species already identified. Some of these are transmission vectors of several diseases, such as malaria, yellow fever, or dengue. According to the World Health Organization, 627,000 people died of malaria in 2020.
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Study: Climate change is increasing the frequency and temperature of extreme heat waves
As California awakens to the worsening risk of extreme climate events, researchers are shedding new light on last year's anomalous and extreme Pacific Northwest heat wave. One study published this week said such heat waves could become 20 times more likely to occur if current carbon emissions continue unabated. Another said they may also be nearly 10 degrees hotter.
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Empires of Soccer
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. Day six of the World Cup and it's the United States versus England, big Satan versus little Satan in the great battle of the evil imperialists. At stake, a place in the next round of a competition that would likely never have existed without the soccer-spreading British emp
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Crypto Contagion Is Spreading, Fast
The collapse of FTX has set off a chain reaction that threatens to topple one of crypto's oldest and most respected institutions.
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Wolves infected with a common parasite may be much more likely to become pack leaders
A team of researchers with the Yellowstone Wolf Project at the Yellowstone Center for Resources, in Yellowstone National Park, in Wyoming, has found that wolves in the park who become infected with Toxoplasma gondii, a common parasite, are much more likely to become leaders of their pack. In their study, reported in the journal Communications Biology, the group analyzed data from studies of the wo
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Wolves infected with a common parasite may be much more likely to become pack leaders
A team of researchers with the Yellowstone Wolf Project at the Yellowstone Center for Resources, in Yellowstone National Park, in Wyoming, has found that wolves in the park who become infected with Toxoplasma gondii, a common parasite, are much more likely to become leaders of their pack. In their study, reported in the journal Communications Biology, the group analyzed data from studies of the wo
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Animals are key to restoring the world's forests, long-term data set reveals
As UN climate talks close in Egypt and biodiversity talks begin in Montreal, attention is on forest restoration as a solution to the twin issues roiling our planet. Forests soak up atmospheric carbon dioxide and simultaneously create habitat for organisms. So far, efforts to help forests bounce back from deforestation have typically focused on increasing one thing—trees—over anything else.
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Animals are key to restoring the world's forests, long-term data set reveals
As UN climate talks close in Egypt and biodiversity talks begin in Montreal, attention is on forest restoration as a solution to the twin issues roiling our planet. Forests soak up atmospheric carbon dioxide and simultaneously create habitat for organisms. So far, efforts to help forests bounce back from deforestation have typically focused on increasing one thing—trees—over anything else.
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DNA sequence enhances our understanding of the origins of jaws
The vast majority of vertebrate species living today, including humans, belong to the jawed vertebrate group. The development of articulating jaws during vertebrate evolution was one of the most significant evolutionary transitions from jawless to jawed vertebrates, taking place at least 423 million years ago. The lower and upper jaws were initially connected by the primary jaw joint. However, dur
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Oyster reef restoration rapidly increases marine biodiversity: Study
Global assessments of historical oyster reef distribution have estimated that over 85% of oyster reefs have been lost to overfishing and coastal development. In recent decades, enormous effort has been put into developing and implementing different methods for restoring oyster reefs globally.
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Bioarchaeologist comes face-to-face with King Tut
Andrew Nelson studies bioarchaeology, in part, because it allows him to understand how people lived thousands of years ago. And while he has traveled the world investigating ancient mummies, his latest adventure with King Tut is one for the ages.
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What is ethical animal research? A scientist and veterinarian explain
A proposed measure in Switzerland would have made that country the first to ban medical and scientific experimentation on animals. It failed to pass in February 2022, with only 21% of voters in favor. Yet globally, including in the United States, there is concern about whether animal research is ethical.
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DNA sequence enhances our understanding of the origins of jaws
The vast majority of vertebrate species living today, including humans, belong to the jawed vertebrate group. The development of articulating jaws during vertebrate evolution was one of the most significant evolutionary transitions from jawless to jawed vertebrates, taking place at least 423 million years ago. The lower and upper jaws were initially connected by the primary jaw joint. However, dur
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How bacteriophage resistance shapes Salmonella populations
Researchers from the Quadram Institute and the University of East Anglia have uncovered how resistance has helped drive the emergence of dominant strains of Salmonella. In addition to antimicrobial resistance, resistance to bacteriophages may give these bugs a boost, in the short-term at least.
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Direct observations of a complex coronal web uncover an important clue as to what mechanism drives solar wind
Using observational data from the U.S. weather satellites GOES, a team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany has taken an important step toward unlocking one of the sun's most persevering secrets: How does our star launch the particles constituting the solar wind into space? The data provide a unique view of a key region in the solar corona to wh
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Review of nanomaterials for antiviral coatings
Antiviral coatings based on nanomaterials could help reduce the risk of transmission of infectious diseases, according to new work in the International Journal of Surface Science and Engineering. The Indian team has reviewed the field in the context of COVID-19.
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Trends and biases in African large carnivore population assessments
African large carnivores have undergone significant range and population declines over recent decades. Although conservation planning and the management of threatened species requires accurate assessments of population status and monitoring of trends, there is evidence that biodiversity monitoring may not be evenly distributed or occurring where most needed.
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Trends and biases in African large carnivore population assessments
African large carnivores have undergone significant range and population declines over recent decades. Although conservation planning and the management of threatened species requires accurate assessments of population status and monitoring of trends, there is evidence that biodiversity monitoring may not be evenly distributed or occurring where most needed.
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Bioorthogonal introduction of nitrite ions into cells for cancer therapy
A team of researchers writing in the journal Angewandte Chemie has developed a bioorthogonal molecular system for the targeted introduction of nitrite ions into cells. Their system releases nitrite ions in cancer cells using a "click-to-release" strategy and these ions, along with other active ingredients, help to initiate cell death. The system could improve the synergistic effects of various can
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Bioorthogonal introduction of nitrite ions into cells for cancer therapy
A team of researchers writing in the journal Angewandte Chemie has developed a bioorthogonal molecular system for the targeted introduction of nitrite ions into cells. Their system releases nitrite ions in cancer cells using a "click-to-release" strategy and these ions, along with other active ingredients, help to initiate cell death. The system could improve the synergistic effects of various can
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Electron pairing in quantum dots as a new approach to qubit research
Scientists from QuTech and Eindhoven University of Technology have taken a next step in qubit research. Qubits are one of the building blocks of a future quantum computer. The researchers—including Sasa Gazibegovic, Ghada Badawy and Erik Bakkers from TU/e—have published their results in Nature on November 23, 2022.
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Unraveling secrets of microplastics released by tires
In Switzerland, tire and road wear particles are one of the biggest sources of microplastics released into the environment, yet the chemical compounds contained in those particles—and their effects—remain largely a mystery. To remedy that knowledge gap, scientists at EPFL and two other Swiss research institutes are conducting a study of the toxicity of tire-particle compounds and how readily they'
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8 Billion People: How Evolution Made It Happen
November 15, 2022 marked a milestone for our species, as the global population hit 8 billion . Just 70 years ago—within a human lifetime—there were only 2.5 billion of us. In AD1, fewer than one-third of a billion. So how have we been so successful? Humans are not especially fast, strong, or agile. Our senses are rather poor, even in comparison to domestic livestock and pets. Instead, large brain
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Geo-tracking apps: how are parent-child relations bearing up?
Geo-tracking apps such as Find My Kids, Google Family Link and Apple's FindMy are fast growing in popularity, handing parents unprecedented powers to monitor their offspring. But how are the latter experiencing what previous generations might have labelled as an intrusion into their privacy? Could these devices even hurt youths' sense of independence?
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Structure of the cluster NGC 2264 explored by researchers
By analyzing the data from ESA's XMM-Newton and Gaia satellites, astronomers have investigated a young star cluster known as NGC 2264. Results of the study, published November 16 on the arXiv pre-print repository, shed more light on the structure of this object and could be helpful in advancing our knowledge about stellar evolution.
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TMBIM5, an important piece of the mitochondrial exchange puzzle discovered
Mitochondrial Ca2+ ions are crucial regulators of bioenergetics and cell death pathways. Essential in this context are so-called Ca2+ transporters. In recent decades, the major players responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release have been identified, with the exception of the mitochondrial Ca2+/H+ exchanger (CHE).
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Evidence of Higgs boson contributions to the production of Z boson pairs at high energies
The Higgs boson, the fundamental subatomic particle associated with the Higgs field, was first discovered in 2012 as part of the ATLAS and CMS experiments, both of which analyze data collected at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the most powerful particle accelerator in existence. Since the discovery of the Higgs boson, research teams worldwide have been trying to better understand this unique
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Cheaper, tougher, less toxic: new alloys show promise in developing artificial limbs
Titanium is a strong, resilient and relatively light metal. Its properties have also been well studied; scientists know a great deal about it. All of this makes it the ideal base for fashioning artificial limbs—particularly knees and hips—and teeth. It is less likely than other metals to rust and, as research has shown, it is more compatible with the human body than, for instance, stainless steels
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Visual behavior during the manufacture of stone tools is analyzed for the first time
The Paleoneurology Group at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) has just published a new study in the Journal of Paleolithic Archaeology which, for the first time, analyzes visual behavior during the manufacture of Lower Paleolithic stone tools. The results show that the visual behavior depends on the tool being made.
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AI tailors artificial DNA for future drug development
With the help of an AI, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in designing synthetic DNA that controls the cells' protein production. The technology can contribute to the development and production of vaccines, drugs for severe diseases, as well as alternative food proteins much faster and at significantly lower costs than today.
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Scientists make it easier and safer to use carbon nanotubes in polymer nanocomposite materials
A research team from Skoltech, Aalto University, and Kurnakov Institute has recently developed a new, versatile and simple approach to using carbon nanotubes for manufacturing carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. The method is reported in Carbon and involves making briquettes—dense packages of carbon nanotube powders. Nanocomposites made with briquettes perform equally well as those made from t
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A single-step water treatment for arsenic decontamination
A team of researchers from Imperial College London led by Prof. Dominik Weiss has been working with Diamond Light Source, the UK's national synchrotron on a new material (TiO2/Fe2O3 nanomaterial) combining photocatalytic oxidation with adsorption, which allows a one-step treatment of contaminated water.
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Artemis: why it may be the last mission for NASA astronauts
Neil Armstrong took his historic "one small step" on the moon in 1969. And just three years later, the last Apollo astronauts left our celestial neighbour. Since then, hundreds of astronauts have been launched into space but mainly to the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. None has, in fact, ventured more than a few hundred kilometres from Earth.
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AI tailors artificial DNA for future drug development
With the help of an AI, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in designing synthetic DNA that controls the cells' protein production. The technology can contribute to the development and production of vaccines, drugs for severe diseases, as well as alternative food proteins much faster and at significantly lower costs than today.
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A topological nonlinear parametric amplifier
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34979-y Here the authors report the development of a topological nonlinear parametric amplification in a dimerized, Su-Schrieffer-Heeger waveguide. Kerr-induced chiral symmetry breaking is demonstrated, showcasing how nonlinearities may control transitions of topological modes to bulk states.
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High-throughput screening of caterpillars as a platform to study host–microbe interactions and enteric immunity
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34865-7 Here, combining diagnostic imaging modalities and in vivo assays, Windfelder and colleagues established tobacco hornworm larvae Manduca sexta as an alternative high-throughput platform to study the innate immunity of the gut and host-pathogen interactions. Using the platform, the authors identify mediators o
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Specialized cities
Nature, Published online: 25 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02880-9 Breakthroughs in the life sciences have boosted US output of high-quality science, but advances in the physical sciences have done the same for China.
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A guide to the Nature Index
Nature, Published online: 25 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02886-3 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality that is available free online at natureindex.com.
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Fireworks have long-lasting effects on wild birds
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior in Konstanz, Germany, and the Netherlands Institute of Ecology GPS tracked Arctic migratory geese in Germany, Denmark, and the Netherlands over the New Year period to examine the long-term impact of fireworks. Their study appears in Conservation Letters.
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The Download: AI conquers Minecraft, and babies after death
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. A bot that watched 70,000 hours of Minecraft could unlock AI's next big thing The news: An AI that binged on 70,000 hours of people playing Minecraft has learned how to play the game better than any AI before. The bot, created by OpenAI, showcases a powerful n
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When Black Friday Is Your Super Bowl
After the turkey comes the pumpkin pie; after the pumpkin pie, the sales. Black Friday is America's biggest shopping day, with some consumers lining up in the wee hours of the morning to get first grabs at the discounts. But an equally chaotic celebration takes place online. To help readers make sense of this universe of discounts, editorial shopping websites such as The Strategist and Wirecutter
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Vampyrer, zombies och väsen hjälper oss hantera vår egen skräck
Svensk skräck har rönt framgång internationellt, som John Ajvide Lindqvists vampyrroman Låt den rätte komma in. Något som utmärker skräckgenren är att den ofta speglar människors ångest. Men den kan också hjälpa människor att hantera egen ångest. Det framgår av en ny vetenskaplig bok om den svenska skräckgenren. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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AMPK induces degradation of the transcriptional repressor PROX1 impairing branched amino acid metabolism and tumourigenesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34747-y Energy stress activates AMPK leading to metabolic plasticity and therapy resistance in cancer. Here, the authors show that AMPK activation decreases Prospero-related homeobox 1 (PROX1) levels impairing branched amino acid metabolism and tumourigenesis in liver and lung cancer models.
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A bot that watched 70,000 hours of Minecraft could unlock AI's next big thing
OpenAI has built the best Minecraft-playing bot yet by making it watch 70,000 hours of video of people playing the popular computer game. It showcases a powerful new technique that could be used to train machines to carry out a wide range of tasks by binging on sites like YouTube, a vast and untapped source of training data. The Minecraft AI learned to perform complicated sequences of keyboard an
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A #MeToo Movie Devoid of Sensationalism
Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey's 2017 Pulitzer Prize–winning exposé of the producer Harvey Weinstein was undeniably consequential. Their investigative reporting for The New York Times helped kick-start a cultural reckoning over sexual harassment and abuse across a wide range of industries. In 2019, the duo chronicled their work in the book She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped
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New York's Grand Dame of Dog Poisoning
In a ritzy Park Avenue apartment, Juliet Tuttle posed in front of a birdcage, staring into the eyes of a parrot. She wore an elegant silk robe and a cloche hat. A photographer snapped a picture, and soon Tuttle appeared in newspapers around the country under the headline "Not Afraid of Parrot Disease." The year was 1930 and a panic had erupted over an illness spread by birds. Though only a few hu
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The Future of American Warfare Is Unfolding in Ukraine
American military aid to Ukraine has been remarkably effective, especially in comparison with the long, ill-fated U.S. military intervention in Afghanistan. A recent statement by General Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, helps explain why. "Ukrainians are not asking for anyone to fight for them," Milley said . "They don't want American soldiers, or British, or German, or Fre
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Unchecked Carbon Dioxide Is Shrinking Earth's Upper Atmosphere
(Photo: Astro Alex/Wikimedia Commons) We're already aware of the consequences of unmitigated carbon emissions, particularly as they relate to climate change here on Earth. But according to two new studies, greenhouse gas buildup affects more than just our immediate surroundings. Researchers have found that rising carbon dioxide levels are causing Earth's upper atmosphere to contract, which could
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Universal flu vaccine may be available within two years, says scientist
Vaccine against all strains of virus hailed as major step in protecting against potentially devastating flu pandemic A universal flu vaccine that protects against all strains of the virus could be available in the next two years, according to a leading scientist. An experimental vaccine based on the same mRNA technology used in the highly successful Covid jabs was found to protect mice and ferret
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Restoring cellular magnesium balance through Cyclin M4 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver damage
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34262-0 Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause acute liver failure. Here the authors report that serum Mg2+ serum levels decrease in patients with DILI as well as in preclinical animal models treated with acetaminophen overdose, and that early intervention targeting the Mg2+ transporter Cyclin M4 may
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Tvätta rent utan tvättmedel – så gör forskarna
Kan man tvätta kläder i vatten, utan tvättmedel eller tvål, och få tvätten lika ren som annars? Det ska forskare i Malmö ta reda på. Och de försök som hittills gjorts ser lovande ut, enligt forskarna. Så här har de gjort. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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We can now use cells from dead people to create new life. But who gets to decide?
This article is from The Checkup, MIT Technology Review's weekly biotech newsletter. To receive it in your inbox every Thursday, sign up here . Peter Zhu was just 19 years old when he died following a skiing accident in West Point, New York. His donor card made clear he had wanted to donate his organs. But his parents wanted to collect his sperm, too. His parents told a court that they wanted to
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Less intensively managed grasslands have higher plant diversity and better soil health, research shows for first time
Researchers have shown—for the first time—that less intensively managed British grazed grasslands have on average 50% more plant species and better soil health than intensively managed grassland. The new study could help farmers increase both biodiversity and soil health, including the amount of carbon in the soil of the British countryside.
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Treating Long Covid Is Rife With Guesswork
Dozens of major medical centers have established specialized Covid clinics around the country. A crowdsourced project counted more than 400. But there's no standard protocol for treating long Covid. And experts are casting a wide net for treatments, with few ready for formal clinical trials.
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Photos of the Week: World Cup, Plymouth Pilgrim, German Sunlight
A sunset in the Caribbean, blackouts in Ukrainian cities, swimming with sharks in Israel, a deadly earthquake in Indonesia, a Thanksgiving turkey at the White House, a coronavirus surge in Guangzhou, a memorial for the victims of a shooting in Colorado Springs, Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, and much more
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Schneider Shorts 25.11.2022 – Imperial Standards
Schneider Shorts 25.11.2022 – how money trumps basic medical ethics for elite London universities, a Belgian failed scientist doing business in Korea, retractions overdue, forgiven or unavoided, plus horse racing, an Israeli image integrity software doing what it should, and a cool research integrity workshop in Liverpool.
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Daily briefing: How to track the mind-boggling extent of plastic pollution
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04128-y Researchers are sweeping beaches and using satellites to gather data that will support a landmark anti-plastic pollution treaty. Plus, preventive antibiotics for sexually transmitted infections and the future of animal-to-human transplants.
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Daily briefing: The Great Depression shaped people's DNA
Nature, Published online: 22 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03829-8 People conceived during the Great Depression show signs of ageing faster than they should. Plus, new prefixes for really big numbers and 'a new era of behavioural climate research'.
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Daily briefing: Bronze hand might rewrite the history of Basque
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03803-4 Engraved artifact could prove the existence of written Vasconic — the language that developed into Basque. Plus, COP27 blasts through its deadline and the JWST spots some of the most distant galaxies ever seen.
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»Filosofi gør mig klogere på verden og mig selv«
KULTURKANYLEN: Som neurolog interesserer Charlotte Dornonville de la Cour sig for samspillet mellem tanker og trivsel. Det undersøger hun igennem filosofi, som hun læser en bachelor i. Når hun ikke kobler af med antikkens filosoffer, bruger hun tid på at strikke og læse skønlitteratur.
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Tak til alle jer, der får sundhedsvæsenet til at hænge sammen
Kommentar: Én ting har 25 år som journalist på Dagens Medicin lært mig, nemlig at nære en dyb respekt for den kæmpe indsats, som titusinder af læger, sygeplejersker, djøf'ere, terapeuter, psykologer, sosu'er, sekretærer, ­portører og alle jer andre yder hver eneste time, hver eneste dag året rundt.
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Unge læger: Sådan skal fremtidens ­sundhedsvæsen se ud
I anledningen af Dagens Medicins 25-års jubilæum har vi bedt fire repræsentanter for den kommende generation af læger om at komme med deres bud på, hvordan sundhedsvæsenet skal se ud i de næste 25 år. De håber bl.a. på at få en hverdag med mere tid til patienten og på et opgør med lægerollen som 'et kald'.
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PAIN AND PLEASURE SIMPLIFIED by Marvin Minsky Review
Excerpt form Society of Mind essay 3.6: "When you're in pain, it's hard to keep your interest in other things. You feel that nothing's more important than finding some way to stop the pain. That's why pain is so powerful: it makes it hard to think of anything else. Pain simplifies our point of view. "Pain's power to distract us from our other goals is not an accident; that's how it helps us to su
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The unknown biogeochemical impacts of drying rivers and streams
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34903-4 Rivers and streams are increasingly drying with climate change and biogeochemical impacts may be important. In this comment the authors discuss the challenges to the biogeochemistry of non-perennial rivers and streams, and what can be done to tackle them.
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