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News2022December01

Scientists simulate 'baby' wormhole without rupturing space and time
Theoretical achievement hailed, though sending people through a physical wormhole remains in the realms of science fiction It's a mainstay of science fiction, it's tiny and it doesn't exist in physical space, but researchers say they've created what is, theoretically, a worm hole. Researchers have announced that they simulated two miniscule black holes in a quantum computer and transmitted a mess
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New data set improves modeling of supersonic flows around a cantilever
Extreme pressures come with high-speed flight. The resulting aerodynamic forces can bring significant risk to deforming the components of the vehicle in motion — even to the point of aeroelastic deformation — when solids behave more like liquids. This can jeopardize stability or controllability of the entire vehicle.
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Potential genetic variants linked to increased cancer risk in children with birth defects
Researchers have identified several genetic variants associated with increased risk of cancer in children with non-chromosomal birth defects, such as congenital heart disease and defects of the central nervous system. While the risk of developing cancer is not as high as children with chromosomal birth defects, it is significantly higher than children with no birth defects at all, and the findings
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Homelessness researchers get real-time data from mobile phone surveys
Few laws from Los Angeles City Hall spark as much debate as those dealing with homelessness. Look no further than the city's controversial ordinance banning camping in certain public places, which became a hot-button issue ahead of the municipal election. Yet missing from many policy discussions are the perspectives of those most affected: people experiencing homelessness.
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The good and the bad of COVID-19 response in multi-level governance
How did multi-level governance in Europe influence the overall effectiveness of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and what was its impact? A recent study carried out as part of the PERISCOPE project analyzes the COVID-19 response of governance by different levels and highlights some best practices and aspects requiring improvement.
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Food early warning systems could stave off famines
As reliable sources of quality food diminish and record numbers of people are driven to hunger due to conflicts, climate change and economic downturns, feeding the global population of eight billion poses a major challenge that demands better food early warning information systems.
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NASA researcher's AI 'eye' could help robotic data-gathering
When it comes to making real-time decisions about unfamiliar data—say, choosing a path to hike up a mountain you've never scaled before—existing artificial intelligence and machine learning tech doesn't come close to measuring up to human skill. That's why NASA scientist John Moisan is developing an AI "eye."
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Hubble captures the stars of globular cluster NGC 6440
Looking like a glittering swarm of buzzing bees, the stars of globular cluster NGC 6440 shine brightly in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image. The cluster is located some 28,000 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius, the Archer.
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Brains of post-pandemic teens show signs of faster ageing, study finds
Study also found poorer mental health but it is unclear whether this is linked to brain age difference The brains of teenagers who lived through the Covid pandemic show signs of premature ageing, research suggests. The researchers compared MRI scans of 81 teens in the US taken before the pandemic, between November 2016 and November 2019, with those of 82 teens collected between October 2020 and M
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The coordination of anti-phage immunity mechanisms in bacterial cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35203-7 Bacteria are equipped with diverse immune strategies to fight bacteriophage infections, including restriction nucleases, abortive infection and CRISPR-Cas systems. Here, Arias et al. use mathematical models of immune responses in individual bacterial cells to highlight the importance of the timing and coordi
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Hot-button political issues are having a chilling effect on public schools
Researchers at UCLA and UC Riverside today released a nationally representative survey of 682 high school principals, making clear that political conflicts impacting schools are pervasive and growing, with more than two-thirds of principals surveyed reporting substantial political conflict over hot- button issues. Almost half (45%) of principals said the amount of community level conflict during t
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Novel complex may help to modulate lipid metabolism
A research team led by Prof. Wang Guangce from the Institute of Oceanology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has discovered that the complex of phycobiliproteins, fucoxanthin, and krill oil (PFK) can modulate lipid metabolism and improve obesity.
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Did physicists create a wormhole in a quantum computer?
Nature, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04201-6 An unusual teleportation experiment is just ordinary quantum physics, but was inspired by tunnels through an exotic 'toy universe'.
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Discovery boosts fight against deadly koala virus
A mysterious AIDS-like virus affects koala populations differently across state lines, according to a new study. The finding uncovers another piece of the puzzle in researchers' quest to halt the retrovirus known as KoRV—a condition strongly associated with diseases that cause infertility and blindness. "We've learned that the retrovirus is far more prevalent in New South Wales and Queensland koa
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Elon Musk Shows Off Monkey That Can Type With Brain Implant Instead of Typewriter
During a demo on Thursday evening, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk showed off what his brain computer interface (BCI) startup Neuralink has been working on. The company showed footage of a monkey that he said was able to "type" on an on-screen keyboard by using a coin-sized chip embedded in its brain, in an apparent riff about the old adage about monkeys and typewriters. No, the monkey wasn't able
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Chemists Develop Process to Turn Previously Unrecyclable Plastics Into Propane
(Photo: Nick Fewings/Unsplash) Most of us have by now realized that conventional plastic recycling is more fantasy than reality. Despite our best attempts at separating out product packaging in the hope that some of it will be reused later, only 6 percent of the United States' plastic waste is ever recycled. The rest of it ends up in landfills, in the ocean, or in other undesirable locations wher
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Scientists develop smartwatch-like health trackers for cows
Wearable devices powered by kinetic energy of cows will gather data to help track cattle wellbeing Cows on farms could soon have their health, reproductive readiness and location monitored by smart technology powered by the kinetic energy of the animal's movements. Devices that monitor the health of each cow or keep them within invisible fences are already used on farms but these smart tools are
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Making sense of coercivity in magnetic materials with machine learning
Soft magnetic materials, i.e., materials that can be easily magnetized and demagnetized, play an essential role in transformers, generators, and motors. The ability of a magnetic material to resist an external magnetic field without changing its magnetization is known as "coercivity," a property closely linked to the energy loss. In applications such as electric cars, low-coercivity materials are
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Why walking on deforming surfaces uses more energy
A team of researchers at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Life Course & Medical Sciences, working with a colleague from Liverpool John Moores University, has discovered why people use more energy when walking on surfaces that deform (such as sand) than on hard, cement-like surfaces. In their study, published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group studied the behavior of mus
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Positively charged nanomaterials treat obesity anywhere you want
Researchers have long been working on how to treat obesity, a serious condition that can lead to hypertension, diabetes, chronic inflammation, and cardiovascular diseases. Studies have also revealed a strong correlation of obesity and cancer—recent data show that smoking, drinking alcohol, and obesity are the biggest contributors to cancer worldwide.
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Ranches of the future could be home to cows wearing smart-watch-style sensors powered by their movements
Using smart technology to monitor the health, reproductivity, location, and environmental conditions of cattle can help with food safety and supply chain efficiency, but this monitoring adds energy cost to an already highly emissive industry. To combat this, researchers publishing in the journal iScience on December 1 have designed a wearable smart device for cows that captures the kinetic energy
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Owl-shaped plaques may have been on Copper Age children's wish list
Ancient owl-shaped slate engraved plaques, dating from about 5,000 years ago in the Iberian Peninsula, may have been created by children as toys, suggests a paper published in Scientific Reports. These findings may provide insights into how children used artifacts in ancient European societies.
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A sustainable path for energy-demanding photochemistry
Many photochemical processes rely on UV light from inefficient or toxic light sources that the LED technology cannot replace for technical reasons. An international team of scientists led by Professor Christoph Kerzig of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany and Professor Nobuhiro Yanai of Kyushu University in Japan has now developed the first molecular system for the conversion of
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Individual tree-based model constructed for multiscale forest carbon dynamics prediction
Forests contribute an enormous carbon flux to terrestrial ecosystems. Thus, accurate estimation and prediction of forest dynamics both play an important role in understanding the carbon cycle in the background of global change. Process-based ecological models have been often considered effective tools for evaluating forest dynamics at multiple scales.
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Why walking on deforming surfaces uses more energy
A team of researchers at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Life Course & Medical Sciences, working with a colleague from Liverpool John Moores University, has discovered why people use more energy when walking on surfaces that deform (such as sand) than on hard, cement-like surfaces. In their study, published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group studied the behavior of mus
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Ranches of the future could be home to cows wearing smart-watch-style sensors powered by their movements
Using smart technology to monitor the health, reproductivity, location, and environmental conditions of cattle can help with food safety and supply chain efficiency, but this monitoring adds energy cost to an already highly emissive industry. To combat this, researchers publishing in the journal iScience on December 1 have designed a wearable smart device for cows that captures the kinetic energy
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Crucial Computer Program for Particle Physics at Risk of Obsolescence
Recently, I watched a fellow particle physicist talk about a calculation he had pushed to a new height of precision. His tool? A 1980s-era computer program called FORM. Particle physicists use some of the longest equations in all of science. To look for signs of new elementary particles in collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, for example, they draw thousands of pictures called Feynman diagram
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Too Wild to Love
This article was originally published by Texas Highways . L ike most everything concerning Texas, leaving the place is too vast a thing to comprehend all at once. I was standing at my kitchen window in New England the day I finally realized I had left the state, some dozen years after my departure. My mother had called to say she and my father had packed their things, pulled up stakes in Fort Wor
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How to tackle the stigma of living with HIV | Gareth Thomas
After his HIV diagnosis, former pro rugby player Gareth Thomas set out on a mission to tackle the stigma and shame that prevent people from getting the testing and care they need. In this empowering talk, Thomas shares his mission to demystify and redefine what it means to live with HIV — and shares how each of us can normalize conversations around all vilified conditions.
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G protein-coupled receptor 151 regulates glucose metabolism and hepatic gluconeogenesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35069-9 Rare variants in the G-protein coupled receptor 151 (GPR151) gene in humans are associated with lower odds ratio for type 2 diabetes, but the mechanism behind this association has remained elusive. Here, the authors show that GPR151 regulates the process of hepatic gluconeogenesis and affects whole-body gluc
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Half of the world experiences periods. We don't like to talk about them though. That's a problem.
Science knows shockingly little about menstrual health. But now, endometriosis patients are changing that. It's estimated that about one in 10 people who menstruate suffer from endometriosis, which occurs when tissue that grows in the uterus migrates to other parts of the body, becomes inflamed in response to cyclical hormonal changes and forms painful lesions. One recent study put the cost per p
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Scientists uncover novel DNA repair mechanism for key cancer target
Scientists have identified how an enzyme involved in DNA repair (POLQ), becomes vital to the survival of certain cancers, if the cancer cells lose the ability to use a more common method of DNA repair. The work uncovers an unappreciated role for POLQ in responding to DNA replication stress, providing the scientific underpinnings for a Phase I clinical trial evaluating the effects of blocking this
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New and more detailed map of antimicrobial resistance
During the COVID-19 pandemic, the world has become aware of the value of using sewage analyses to monitor disease development in an area. However, at DTU National Food Institute, a group of researchers has been using sewage monitoring from throughout the world since 2016 as an effective and inexpensive tool for monitoring infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance.
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Former NASA Guy Drops Egg Out of Space, Tries to Keep It From Breaking
Egg Drop Coup What would happen if you dropped an egg out of space? It's the ultimate take on the age-old challenge you may already know from primary school: how do you design a contraption to gently land an egg from a steep drop without breaking? In a new video , YouTuber extraordinaire and NASA alum Mark Rober took it upon himself, with help from self-taught aerospace engineer Joe Bernard from
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Billionaire Private Astronaut Suggests Reviving Dinosaurs
Inspiration Strikes Earlier this week, news broke that a team of European scientists (who may or may not have ever pretty much any zombie movie ever made) had unthawed an ancient " zombie virus ," discovered beneath a frozen Siberian lake. The report went viral, with netizens (who presumably have seen zombie movies) poking obvious fun at the fact that unfreezing ancient zombie viruses sounds like
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New and more detailed map of antimicrobial resistance
During the COVID-19 pandemic, the world has become aware of the value of using sewage analyses to monitor disease development in an area. However, at DTU National Food Institute, a group of researchers has been using sewage monitoring from throughout the world since 2016 as an effective and inexpensive tool for monitoring infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance.
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Whispering gallery modes with fractional optical angular momentum in photonic crystal micro-rings
Whispering gallery modes, a type of wave that can travel around concave surfaces, have proved to be promising for the development of new technologies, particularly in photonics. Due to geometrical limitations, in circularly symmetric optical microresonators (i.e., micrometer-scale structures that can confine light) these modes exhibit integer quantized angular momentum values. While numerous effec
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Could swelling on axons cause Alzheimer's disease?
The swelling caused by a byproduct of amyloid plaques in the brain may be the true cause of Alzheimer's disease, say researchers. Their work, published in Nature , also identifies a biomarker that may help physicians better diagnose Alzheimer's disease and provide a target for future therapies. The formation of amyloid plaques in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease . But drugs designed
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More likes up the chance people believe fake news
New research finds that the more likes people got when retweeting negative fake news, the more they agreed with the content—and hated the (fake) politician—in the story. A new experiment by communication professor Joseph B. Walther and graduate students at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Center for Information Technology and Society (CITS), published in the Journal of Communication
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NASA Gave ICON $57 Million to Build a 3D Printer for Structures on the Moon
Austin, Texas-based 3D printing construction company ICON has gotten some pretty significant projects off the ground in recent years, from a 50-home development in Mexico to a 100-home neighborhood in Texas . This week the company won a NASA contract that will help it get an even bigger project much further off the ground—all the way to the moon, in fact. The $57.2 million contract is intended to
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SMS-livräddare snabbt på plats vid hjärtstopp
Snabb hjälp är livsavgörande vid plötsligt hjärtstopp. Nu visar en studie att frivilliga personer – som larmas via sms i mobilen – ofta är först på plats för att utföra hjärt- och lungräddning. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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San Francisco Legislators Approve Use of Lethal Police Robots
(Photo: Max Fleischmann/Unsplash) The San Francisco Police Department, one of the country's largest municipal law enforcement agencies, recently revised its equipment use policy to include its surprisingly diverse robot stockpile. Though most of its robots disarm bombs or conduct reconnaissance in dubious conditions, some ground-based robots can be used to carry active explosives. Inevitably, thi
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Tony Beets' "Cursed" Facility's Impressive Gold Haul | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #Discovery #discoveryplus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discover
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'Digital footprints' central to new approach for studying post-disturbance recreation changes
A new social media-based study of recreation visitation in the Gorge following the Eagle Creek Fire expands on research launched in 2016 — and holds promise for other large, multi-ownership landscapes. The study shows how using new approaches that draw from social media data can help us better understand the complex relationships between wildfire, natural resource management, and people.
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Stabilizing lithium-ion batteries with microbially synthesized electrolyte additive
Lithium-ion batteries with high-energy-density cathodes are necessary to meet the energy demands of next-generation electronics and electric vehicles. At high voltages, however, the battery electrolyte undergoes excessive decomposition, compromising cathode performance. To tackle this, researchers have now synthesized a bio-based, non-toxic additive material that stabilizes the cathode by forming
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Clouds less climate-sensitive than assumed
Cumulus clouds in trade-wind regions cover nearly 20 percent of our planet, producing a cooling effect. Until recently, it was assumed that global warming would reduce the surface covered by these clouds, amplifying the warming. However, a team has now refuted that assumption.
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Tin from shipwreck reveals surprising trade network
New research identifies where some of the metal cargo on the Uluburun shipwreck came from. More than 2,000 years before the Titanic sank in the North Atlantic Ocean, another famous ship wrecked in the Mediterranean Sea off the eastern shores of Uluburun—in present-day Turkey—carrying tons of rare metal. Since its discovery in 1982, scientists have been studying the contents of the Uluburun shipwr
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How could climate change alter our diets?
As climate change alters rainfall and temperatures, and provokes heat waves and droughts, the quality and quantity of crops suffer. Such changes to yields could significantly jeopardize food security for the world's growing population.
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New theory explains magnetic trends in high-temperature superconductors
In just about any situation in which electricity is being used, whether it is lighting a bedroom at night, keeping frozen food cold, or powering a car that is taking a commuter to work, some of that electrical energy is lost as heat. This is called resistance. Materials with lower resistance are better at conducting electricity while materials with higher resistance are worse at it.
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Stabilizing lithium-ion batteries with microbially synthesized electrolyte additive
Lithium-ion batteries with high-energy-density cathodes are necessary to meet the energy demands of next-generation electronics and electric vehicles. At high voltages, however, the battery electrolyte undergoes excessive decomposition, compromising cathode performance. To tackle this, researchers have now synthesized a bio-based, non-toxic additive material that stabilizes the cathode by forming
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How Many COVID Deaths Will Chinese Protesters Accept?
Anti-lockdown protests erupted across China following a deadly apartment fire in Xinjiang last week. The country's zero-COVID policy may have been to blame, as first responders were apparently restricted from accessing the scene. Heavy-handed quarantines and endless testing are causing many harms, including food shortages and widespread unemployment. But they're also keeping China's COVID death t
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A targeted approach to reducing the health impacts of crop residue burning in India
To clear the way for planting wheat in November, a farmer in Punjab, India, sets aflame the leftover straw, or stubble, of a harvested rice paddy crop in October. The burning residue fills the air with carbon monoxide, ozone, and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that will make it harder to breathe for days afterward and for miles around. It's a scene that's replicated on about 2 million farms in th
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Baker Miller Pink
Asking around, one would be hard pressed to find an individual who's never fielded the question, "what's your favorite color?" Some people prefer shades of yellow reminiscent of sunshine, hues of red that evoke a feeling of power, or calming tones of blue. Though one's favorite color is not a reliable metric for determining facts […]
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Tricky terrain is no problem for this four-legged robot
Researchers have designed a system that enables a low-cost and relatively small legged robot to get around even in the face of obstacles. The robot can climb and descend stairs nearly its height; traverse rocky, slippery, uneven, steep, and varied terrain; walk across gaps; scale rocks and curbs; and even operate in the dark. "Empowering small robots to climb stairs and handle a variety of enviro
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Researchers decrypt transport dynamics of porous media
What laws govern how chemicals pass through filters? How do droplets of oil move through layers of stone? How do blood cells travel through a living organism? A team of researchers has discovered how pore space geometry impacts transport of substances through fluids.
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The Download: Neuralink updates, and GPT-3 fixes
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Elon Musk's Neuralink hopes to test its brain implant in a human next year Elon Musk's brain-computer interface company Neuralink is planning to test a brain implant in humans in six months, the company has announced. At a 'show and tell' event yesterday, Musk
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Funny, unexpected, original applications of Cognitive Science?
Everyone knows that you can use findings from CogSci for AI, neuroscience, psychology etc. But for my presentation at a partner school I wanted to highlight some unexpected, funny or simply original ways you can incorporate cognitive science into not-so-obvious research, real life use or anything that doesn't immediately comes to mind when you think of cognitive science. Like for example this: ht
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John Vervaeke – Cognitive Scientist or Mystic?
Disclaimer, I will be sharing bitter criticisms of Vervaeke here. Part of the bitterness stems from bad experiences I've had with people on the AFTMC Discord server. I've been thanked for articulating my criticism by others who've had doubts about Vervaeke's agenda. I would be happy if someone benefits from my critique. But I can tell that my thinking is colored by my bitterness. I'd especially l
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No Exit From Zero COVID for Xi Jinping
T he death of China's former leader Jiang Zemin after a week of countrywide demonstrations of popular discontent with Xi Jinping's signature zero-COVID policy, adds one more potentially potent factor to a volatile political situation. Xi has built a cult of personality around himself that resembles that of Mao Zedong. Jiang, who ruled as the party's general secretary from 1989 to 2002, may not ha
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The Bottom-Up Election-Denial Strategy
As millions of Americans returned to their jobs this week after the Thanksgiving holiday, several of the elected leaders of Cochise County, Arizona, opted not to do theirs. The board of supervisors in this sparsely populated southeastern chunk of the state refuses to certify the county's midterm-election results. Of course, nothing actually went wrong in Cochise County's election. Instead, on Mon
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Ancient Shipwreck Reveals Complex Trade Network
People tend to understand the world through the development of narratives – we tell stories about the past, the present, ourselves, others, and the world. That is how we make sense of things. I always find it interesting, the many and often subtle ways in which our narratives distort reality. One common narrative is that the past was simpler and more primitive than it actually was, and that progr
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Are women brewing a backlash to drinking culture?
A recent book uses interviews to explore women's relationships with alcohol. During the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, a flurry of studies made it into the news cycle: Heavy drinking and alcohol-related deaths were spiking in the United States. Susan Stewart, professor of sociology at Iowa State University, said the increase was particularly noticeable for women. Her own research last
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Ultrakänslig sensor kan minska risker med vätgas
En stor utmaning kantar satsningar på vätgas för att ersätta fossila bränslen. Gasen kan bli explosiv i kontakt med luft. Forskare vid Chalmers har nu tagit fram en optisk sensor som kan upptäcka rekordlåga halter läckande vätgas. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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How 'Buy Now, Pay Later' Really Works
This week on Gadget Lab, we chart the rise of services that let you pay for purchases in interest-free installments, and what they mean for the future of shopping.
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Max Levchin's War on Credit Cards
The PayPal cofounder on why his "buy now, pay later" company Affirm is a healthier way to borrow, what caused the techlash, and Elon Musk's Twitter.
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Erosionskartor över åkermark kan hjälpa mot övergödning
Diken och bäckar runt jordbrukslandskapet för med sig fosforhaltigt slam till åar och sjöar, vilket i sin tur kan ge algblomning. Nu har SLU-forskare vidareutvecklat en metod att ta fram erosionskartor som visar var riskerna är störst. Målet är att åtgärder ska sättas in där nyttan är störst. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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A self-powered ingestible wireless biosensing system for real-time in situ monitoring of gastrointestinal tract metabolites
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35074-y Metabolic dynamics within the small intestine are difficult to study due to the lack of in situ access. Here, the authors report an ingestible, self-powered, and wireless biosensing system, demonstrating proof-of-principle real-time glucose monitoring in the small intestines of pigs.
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Erosionskartor kan minska övergödning och algblomning
Diken och bäckar runt jordbrukslandskapet för med sig fosforhaltigt slam till åar och sjöar, vilket i sin tur kan ge algblomning. Nu har SLU-forskare vidareutvecklat en metod att ta fram erosionskartor som visar var riskerna är störst. Målet är att åtgärder ska sättas in där nyttan är störst. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Förändring i blodet sågs före cancer i bukspottskörteln
Hos vissa patienter med bukspottskörtelcancer stiger ett ämne i blodet redan två år före diagnosen. Det visar en studie vid Umeå universitet. Upptäckten är viktig för att framtiden hitta sätt att tidigt spåra den fruktade cancerformen. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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SpaceX Fires 11 Raptor Engines as It Prepares for Orbital Starship Test
SpaceX has seen enormous success with the Falcon 9 and Dragon combo, which are certified to carry both cargo and astronauts into space. Its follow-up will be the Starship, which has conducted a few short suborbital test flights. To leave Earth behind, though, Starship needs the Super Heavy booster. SpaceX has just conducted the longest-yet firing test of the Super Heavy's Raptor engines, and noth
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Visual motion perception as online hierarchical inference
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34805-5 How the human visual system leverages the rich structure in object motion for perception remains unclear. Here, Bill et al. propose a theory of how the brain could infer motion relations in real time and offer a unifying explanation for various perceptual phenomena.
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Musk announces human trial of Neuralink chips in six months.
After implanting gadgets in the backs of the heads of pigs and primates, the death of 15 of 23 test subjects, and allegations of animal cruelty, Elon Musk said that a new version of the Neuralink chip in six months would be ready for human clinical trials. Now Neuralink is going through the stage of all permissive certificates. According to the director of Twitter, implantable chips will help pat
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Your Creativity Won't Save Your Job From AI
This is Work in Progress, a newsletter by Derek Thompson about work, technology, and how to solve some of America's biggest problems. Sign up here to get it every week . In 2013, researchers at Oxford published an analysis of the jobs most likely to be threatened by automation and artificial intelligence. At the top of the list were occupations such as telemarketing, hand sewing, and brokerage cl
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Stubborn, Determined, and Dying
In a 2004 essay , the late writer Hilary Mantel considered the story of Gemma Galgani, a 19th-century Italian mystic who refused food, bore wounds on her hands and feet that she claimed were stigmata—a doctor declared them to be self-inflicted with a sewing needle—and believed that enduring periods of intense physical suffering could expiate all the sins ever committed by priests. There is someth
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The People Cheering for Humanity's End
"Man is an invention of recent date. And one perhaps nearing its end." With this declaration in The Order of Things (1966), the French philosopher Michel Foucault heralded a new way of thinking that would transform the humanities and social sciences. Foucault's central idea was that the ways we understand ourselves as human beings aren't timeless or natural, no matter how much we take them for gr
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In defense of plastic (sort of)
This article is from The Spark, MIT Technology Review's weekly climate newsletter. To receive it in your inbox every Wednesday, sign up here. I'm coming in with a hot take this week: plastics might just be the most useful inventions of the 20th century. Before you get out the pitchforks, let me take you on a tour of just a few of the ways that people's lives are better because of plastics. Plasti
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Buzzy Lancet long COVID paper under investigation for 'data errors'
An early and influential paper on long COVID that appeared in The Lancet has been flagged with an expression of concern while the journal investigates "data errors" brought to light by a reader. An editorial that accompanied the paper when it was published in January of last year described it as "the first large cohort … Continue reading
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A new Progressive Management Pathway for improving seaweed biosecurity
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34783-8 The rapid expansion and globalization of the seaweed production industry, combined with rising seawater temperatures and coastal eutrophication, has led to an increase in infectious diseases and pest outbreaks. Here, we propose a novel Progressive Management Pathway for improving Seaweed Biosecurity.
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Catalytic nitrogen fixation using visible light energy
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34984-1 The development of a nitrogen fixation process that relies on the renewable energy, such as visible light, is an important goal in sustainable chemistry. Here, authors establish an iridium and molybdenum-catalysed ammonia formation from dinitrogen driven by visible light under ambient reaction conditions.
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Genomic analysis of sewage from 101 countries reveals global landscape of antimicrobial resistance
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34312-7 Understanding the emergence, evolution, and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is essential to combat antimicrobial resistance. Here, Munk et al. analyse ARGs in hundreds of sewage samples from 101 countries and describe regional patterns, diverse genetic environments of common ARGs, and ARG-
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Researchers report finding first bidirectional color-changing flower variety
We all like flowers, and one of the most appealing things about flowers is presumably the wide array of shapes, sizes, and of course, colors in which they come. But did you know that some flowers can change their colors? Although it's not all flowers, this trait has been observed in hundreds of different species for at least a number of decades.
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Researchers report finding first bidirectional color-changing flower variety
We all like flowers, and one of the most appealing things about flowers is presumably the wide array of shapes, sizes, and of course, colors in which they come. But did you know that some flowers can change their colors? Although it's not all flowers, this trait has been observed in hundreds of different species for at least a number of decades.
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Golgipathies reveal the critical role of the sorting machinery in brain and skeletal development
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35101-y Association genetic studies and genome-scale CRISPR screens have recently identified ARF3 and TMEM251/LYSET/GCAF as Golgi-resident factors essential to brain and skeletal development. Here we discuss how even though the consequences of mutations in these genes affect endosomal and lysosomal compartments, the
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Scientists produce nanobodies in plant cells that block emerging pathogens
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) recently announced that plants could be used to produce nanobodies that quickly block emerging pathogens in human medicine and agriculture. These nanobodies represent a promising new way to treat viral diseases, including SARS-CoV-2.
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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #48 2022
Open access notables: Kunio Kaiho is a leading expert on past extinction events. In Extinction magnitude of animals in the near future just published in Nature Scientific Reports, Kaiho draws on mechanisms of prior mass extinction events to prognosticate on what effect Homo bolidus [our term] might impose on Earth's living species. "It depends," with the news starting at "only" 10-15% species los
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Study illuminates molecules aiding communication inside cells
New research from the Lippincott-Schwartz Lab at HHMI's Janelia Research Campus being presented at Cell Bio 2022 provides a close-up look at the individual molecules that facilitate communication between cellular structures. The new research, which is also posted as a preprint on bioRxiv, shows that these molecular tethers are much more dynamic and complex than previously thought, revealing new in
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Män tittade mindre på övergrepp mot barn efter anonym KBT
Forskare vid Karolinska institutet har utvärderat anonym kognitiv beteendeterapi på nätet för personer som tittar på bilder eller videor där barn utnyttjas sexuellt. Efter behandlingen tittade deltagarna mindre, enligt dem själva, på sådant övergreppsmaterial. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Study illuminates molecules aiding communication inside cells
New research from the Lippincott-Schwartz Lab at HHMI's Janelia Research Campus being presented at Cell Bio 2022 provides a close-up look at the individual molecules that facilitate communication between cellular structures. The new research, which is also posted as a preprint on bioRxiv, shows that these molecular tethers are much more dynamic and complex than previously thought, revealing new in
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Qubit vitrification and entanglement criticality on a quantum simulator
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34982-3 Non-equilibrium quantum many-body systems undergoing repeated measurements exhibit phase transitions in their entanglement properties. Here the authors use a superconducting quantum simulator to demonstrate an entanglement phase transition that can be mapped to a vitrification transition in the spin glass th
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'A possible extinction event': the UK's worst bird flu outbreak – podcast
The UK is in the middle of its worst outbreak of bird flu. The current strain of H5N1 avian influenza has devastated wild bird populations, killing thousands and affecting threatened species such as puffins and hen harriers. Bird flu has also been wreaking havoc on poultry, and since 7 November, all captive birds in England have been kept indoors to prevent them catching the virus. How are both w
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'A possible extinction event': the UK's worst bird flu outbreak
The UK is in the middle of its worst outbreak of bird flu. The current strain of H5N1 avian influenza has devastated wild bird populations, killing thousands and affecting threatened species such as puffins and hen harriers. Bird flu has also been wreaking havoc on poultry, and since 7 November, all captive birds in England have been kept indoors to prevent them catching the virus. How are both wi
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Diagrammatic War, 1858
Pioneering nurse Florence Nightingale had an eye for creating memorable graphics that helped convince the general population that including sanitation reforms as part of public health policy would save British soldiers' lives.
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Elon Musk Hopes to Test a Brain Implant in Humans Next Year
The tech multibillionaire said his company, Neuralink, was seeking government approval to test his device in people, and predicted it could happen in six months. Others have been conducting similar tests for years, but no device has been marketed commercially.
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Intermittent scavenging of storage lesion from stored red blood cells by electrospun nanofibrous sheets enhances their quality and shelf-life
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35269-3 In situ generated lesion of red blood cells decreases the quality of stored blood and limits its shelf-life. Here, the authors demonstrate that intermittent scavenging of storage lesions using electrostatic interactions by nanofibrous sheets could enhance the quality and shelf-life of stored blood.
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Azoarene activation for Schmidt-type reaction and mechanistic insights
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35141-4 The Schmidt reaction enables nitrogen insertion across an aldehyde or ketone substrate by frequently using azide reagents. Here, the authors show a Schmidt reaction of aryldiazonium salts as a replacement of azide reagents to access skeletally diverse cyclic lactams.
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Male orb-weaving spiders fight less in female-dominated colonies
Orb-weaving spiders cooperate for more peaceful colonies, a surprising revelation given that most spiders live solitarily. In the colonies that researchers observed, male spiders fought less with one another when there were more female spiders in a colony. But colonies with large numbers of larger and medium-sized female spiders tended to have more aggressive environments.
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Nanodiamonds can be activated as photocatalysts with sunlight
Nanodiamond materials have potential as low-cost photocatalysts. But until now, such carbon nanoparticles required high-energy UV light to become active. The DIACAT consortium has therefore produced and analysed variations of nanodiamond materials. The work shows: If the surface of the nanoparticles is occupied by sufficient hydrogen atoms, even the weaker energy of blue sunlight is sufficient for
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New monochromator optics for tender X-rays
Until now, it has been extremely tedious to perform measurements with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution using X-ray light in the tender energy range of 1.5 — 5.0 keV. Yet this X-ray light is ideal for investigating energy materials such as batteries or catalysts, but also biological systems. A team has now solved this problem: The newly developed monochromator optics increase the photo
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Designing better water filters with AI
Even the best water filters let some things through, but designing improved materials and then testing them is time consuming and difficult. Now, researchers report that artificial intelligence (AI) could speed up the development of promising materials. In a proof-of-concept study, they simulated different patterns of water-attracting and water-repelling groups lining a filter's porous membrane an
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Gorgeous rainbow-colored, stretchy film for distinguishing sugars
Rainbows and sugar may conjure up images of a certain leprechaun-branded breakfast cereal. But now, researchers report a kaleidoscope-like film for telling different sweeteners apart that displayed multiple colors when stretched by hand. When evenly stretched with a simple apparatus, the material enhanced the unique shifts in fluorescence intensity of 14 sugars tagged with a dye, distinguishing be
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Novel 3D printing method to fabricate complex metal-plastic composite structures
In recent years, research interest in the 3D printing of metal patterns on plastic parts has grown exponentially, due to its high potential in the manufacturing of next-generation electronics. But fabricating such complex parts through conventional means is not easy. Now, researchers have developed a new 3D printing process for the fabrication of 3D metal-plastic composite structures with complex
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More control over plasma accelerators
If one particle accelerator alone is not enough to achieve the desired result, why not combine two accelerators? Physicists have now implemented this idea. They combined two plasma-based acceleration methods for electrons, namely a laser-driven wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with a particle-beam-driven wakefield accelerator (PWFA). With this combination, the physicists achieve better stability and h
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Tropical cyclones on the rise in low- and middle- income countries yet remain least studied of climate-related events
A new article illustrates the increases in adverse public health outcomes following tropical cyclones, especially in communities with existing health conditions. The paper explains that the focus should be on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), rather than the U.S. Until now a majority of research on outcomes from tropical cyclones have centered on high income countries.
16h
Designing better water filters with AI
Even the best water filters let some things through, but designing improved materials and then testing them is time consuming and difficult. Now, researchers report that artificial intelligence (AI) could speed up the development of promising materials. In a proof-of-concept study, they simulated different patterns of water-attracting and water-repelling groups lining a filter's porous membrane an
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Crowding makes time seem to pass more slowly
Testing time perception in an unusually lifelike setting — a virtual reality ride on a New York City subway train — an interdisciplinary research team found that crowding makes time seem to pass more slowly.
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Mammoth problem with extinction timeline
Paleontologists say environmental DNA is not always helpful in identifying when animals like mammoths went extinct because genetic material found in sediment could have come from animals that died thousands of years earlier.
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Antibiotics' effect on the mycobiome varies from person to person
Antibiotic treatment disrupts the balance of beneficial and harmful bacteria in a person's gut. That disruption can lead to the overgrowth of fungal species in the gut mycobiota, including the common intestinal yeast Candida albicans. However, researchers only have a limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Researchers now report on how treatment with a common beta-lactam antibiotic led
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The Future of this World Will Be…
Everyone together with each other in Heaven! This is the future, guaranteed. God's true love will save everyone! Trust in Christ Jesus. Psalm NEB 17:7 Show me how marvelous thy true love can be. ​ Salvation is for the whole world through faith in Jesus Christ! Everyone goes to Heaven! Psalm 13:5 I trust in your unfailing love; my heart rejoices in your salvation. ​ Believe in Christ, be saved. Ev
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Expiration Dates Are Meaningless
For refrigerators across America, the passing of Thanksgiving promises a major purge. The good stuff is the first to go: the mashed potatoes, the buttery remains of stuffing, breakfast-worthy cold pie. But what's that in the distance, huddled gloomily behind the leftovers? There lie the marginalized relics of pre-Thanksgiving grocery runs. Heavy cream, a few days past its sell-by date. A desolate
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The State of Free Speech
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . One year ago, our staff writer Conor Friedersdorf started the newsletter Up for Debate , a forum that gives the ideas of media commentators and Atlantic readers equal weight and aims to represent the
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Researchers introduce an energy-efficient method to enhance thermal conductivity of polymer composites
Thermally conductive polymer composites consist of fillers oriented in certain directions that form pathways for heat flow. However, conventional methods to control the orientation of these fillers are energy-intensive and require surface modifications that can deteriorate the quality and properties of these materials. Now, researchers have developed an energy-efficient method to control the orien
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Making 'transport' robots smarter
Imagine a team of humans and robots working together to process online orders — real-life workers strategically positioned among their automated coworkers who are moving intelligently back and forth in a warehouse space, picking items for shipping to the customer. This could become a reality sooner than later, thanks to researchers who are working to speed up the online delivery process by develo
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