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News2022December06

Herschel Walker Is an American Tragedy
Commodity. Chattel. Contraband. Capital. What is a Black body in the South? What is a Black southern man, carted out to work a white-owned field? It's impossible today to talk about Black men and white agendas without talking about Herschel Walker, the Republican candidate for Senate in the runoff election in Georgia. But in order to talk about Walker, I've got to start in what may be his actual
3h
Abandoned: the human cost of neurotechnology failure
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03810-5 When the makers of electronic implants abandon their projects, people who rely on the devices have everything to lose.
11h
Proposing a new idea for spacecraft propulsion that involves dynamic soaring
A team of researchers from McGill University and the Tau Zero Foundation is proposing a new idea for faster spacecraft propulsion that involves dynamic soaring. In their paper published in the journal Frontiers in Space Technology, the group outlines the idea of dynamic soaring as it applies to a speedy way to move through space and other possible uses for it.
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LATEST

How Water Made Fire in an Indonesian Volcano
Heavy rains may have set off an outpouring of ash and gases from Indonesia's volcano Semeru "like uncorking a soda bottle"
6min
The Linguistics of Swearing Explain Why We Substitute Darn for Damn
Languages from Hindi to Korean tone down swear words by inserting gentler consonants into speech. Here's how "Let's go Brandon" got started
6min
As Elon Musk Promises Human Brain Implants in 6 Months, Remember He Promised a Million Tesla Robotaxis by 2020
Last week, Elon Musk said he expected Neuralink to implants its first device in a human brain within "about six months," tweeting that the "device is ready" — but as any close watcher knows, those sorts of promises should always be taken with a grain of salt. Even without getting into the Reuters ' big reveal yesterday of a federal investigation into Neuralink over some very serious animal abuse
15min
Robin road rage: study shows traffic noise makes birds more aggressive
UK-Turkish team think sound of vehicles can interfere with their normal song when trying to warn off nearby rivals It isn't just people who get road rage. Robins in the countryside become more aggressive when they hear the sound of traffic, according to a study. Beloved for their plump appearance, proud bearing and sweet song, European robins are actually fiercely competitive creatures, whose cal
21min
Fun Visual Experiment
Survey Link Hi, I am looking for participants to complete this experiment analysing contributing factors to variation in visual learning. The experiment consists of two short visual games and a personality questionnaire. The full aims of the experiment will be disclosed at the end, Due to its nature, this experiment will not run on mobile devices. This study has also been reviewed and approved by
26min
How Water Made Fire in an Indonesian Volcano
Heavy rains may have set off an outpouring of ash and gases from Indonesia's volcano Semeru "like uncorking a soda bottle"
35min
The Linguistics of Swearing Explain Why We Substitute Darn for Damn
Languages from Hindi to Korean tone down swear words by inserting gentler consonants into speech. Here's how "Let's go Brandon" got started
35min
Forest wildflowers and their overstory trees are changing with climate, but not always keeping pace
For spring ephemerals, timing is everything. These special wildflowers grow in temperate forests around the world, early in spring before the trees leaf out. Come out too early and it's still winter, too late and it's too shady under the forest canopy.
41min
Meet the (protein) neighbors: New method lets researchers detect proteins in close proximity in single cells
Today, most methods to determine the proteins inside a cell rely on a crude census—scientists usually grind a large group of cells up before characterizing their genetic material. But just as a population of 100 single people differs in many ways from a population of 20 five-person households, this kind of description fails to capture information about how proteins are interacting and clumping tog
41min
Forest wildflowers and their overstory trees are changing with climate, but not always keeping pace
For spring ephemerals, timing is everything. These special wildflowers grow in temperate forests around the world, early in spring before the trees leaf out. Come out too early and it's still winter, too late and it's too shady under the forest canopy.
41min
Chemists develop reactions for the general synthesis of promising unexplored compounds
Chemists at Scripps Research have devised the first general method for synthesizing a family of compounds called 1,2,3,5-tetrazines, which hold great promise for making pharmaceuticals, biological probes and other chemical products.
41min
Study: Proximity to senior managers enhances inventors' productivity, creativity
In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, remote work has become increasingly common, but is it productive? New research in Management Science finds proximity to senior managers at corporate headquarters makes inventors in companies' research and development (R&D) functions more productive. Moreover, it makes them more creative, suggesting that senior management oversight does not stifle creativi
41min
Art museums team up with scientists to ferret out fakes
Forgeries are a lucrative global market created by artists so skilled in both their craft and their duplicity that they sometimes fool even the experts.
41min
Tiny, hidden galaxy provides a peek into the past
Peeking out from behind the glare of a bright foreground star, astronomers have uncovered the most extraordinary example yet of a nearby galaxy with characteristics that are more like galaxies in the distant, early universe. Only 1,200 light-years across, the tiny galaxy HIPASS J1131–31 has been nicknamed "Peekaboo" because of its emergence in the past 50-100 years from behind the fast-moving star
41min
Meet the (protein) neighbors: New method lets researchers detect proteins in close proximity in single cells
Today, most methods to determine the proteins inside a cell rely on a crude census—scientists usually grind a large group of cells up before characterizing their genetic material. But just as a population of 100 single people differs in many ways from a population of 20 five-person households, this kind of description fails to capture information about how proteins are interacting and clumping tog
41min
Traveling with friends helps even mixed-up migrators find their way
Some of us live and die by our phone's GPS. But if we can't get a signal or lose battery power, we get lost on our way to the grocery store.
1h
Natural History Museum Names College Leader as New Chief
Sean M. Decatur, the president of Kenyon College and a biophysical chemist, will become the museum's first Black leader when he succeeds Ellen V. Futter.
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Fun Website Lets You Simulate an Asteroid Impact in Your Hometown
Ground Zero If you're in the mood to spiral into existential despair, look no further. Introducing: Asteroid Launcher , an extremely fun, totally chill website that allows you to simulate how, exactly, an asteroid might crush, vaporize, set fire to, and otherwise destroy any given locale. The app — whipped together by developer Neal Agarwal, who has a knack for fascinating data-driven projects —
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Jawbone may represent earliest presence of humans in Europe
For over a century, one of the earliest human fossils ever discovered in Spain has been long considered a Neandertal. However, new analysis from an international research team, including scientists at Binghamton University, State University of New York, dismantles this century-long interpretation, demonstrating that this fossil is not a Neandertal; rather, it may actually represent the earliest pr
1h
Jawbone may represent earliest presence of humans in Europe
For over a century, one of the earliest human fossils ever discovered in Spain has been long considered a Neandertal. However, new analysis from an international research team, including scientists at Binghamton University, State University of New York, dismantles this century-long interpretation, demonstrating that this fossil is not a Neandertal; rather, it may actually represent the earliest pr
1h
Rotten meat could be easier to detect thanks to new biosensor system
The supply chain that brings meat to market worldwide is highly complex and usually very efficient. But when disruptions in one part of the world can result in transportation delays an ocean and a continent away, meat spoilage becomes a very real risk to food producers, vendors and consumers. This is especially true if food inspection protocols are lax.
1h
Warming climate spurs harmful oxygen loss in lakes
Rondaxe Lake in Herkimer County, New York, represents classic Adirondack Park waters. But over the last quarter-century, Rondaxe—like thousands of lakes in temperate zones around the world—has been losing a global-warming battle to maintain oxygen in its waters.
1h
Researchers develop nano-based technology to fight osteoporosis
University of Central Florida researchers have created unique technology for treating osteoporosis that uses nanobubbles to deliver treatment to targeted areas of a person's body.
1h
Can virtual reality play a role in veterinary education? Researchers think so
You're a fourth-year veterinary student, and it's Day 2 of your emergency clinic rotation.
1h
How Cold Weather May Help You Catch a Cold
Warm nasal cells mount stronger defenses against cold-causing coronaviruses and rhinoviruses than those exposed to cooler temperatures, an in vitro experiment finds.
1h
Rare new fossil find the 'Rosetta Stone' of marine paleontology
Queensland Museum Network paleontologists have excavated Australia's first head and associated body of a 100-million-year-old long-necked marine reptile in what has been described as the Rosetta Stone of marine reptile paleontology.
1h
Energy footprint found to be reduced by the alternative community lifestyle
A study conducted by the UPV/EHU's Ekopol and Life Cycle Thinking groups concludes that an alternative community lifestyle can reduce energy consumption due to the significance of the energy used in the goods and services consumed. Specifically, they have estimated that the energy footprint per inhabitant of the Errekaleor neighborhood (in Vitoria-Gasteiz) is 24% lower than the regional average.
1h
How the current Southwestern North American megadrought is affecting Earth's upper atmosphere
New research, based on two decades' worth of data, shows that in the ten years after its onset in 2000, the Southwestern North American (SWNA) megadrought caused a 30% change in gravity wave activity in Earth's upper atmosphere.
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Tracking an invasion: A single Asian hornet may have sparked the ongoing spread across Europe
In Europe, the Asian (or "Yellow-legged") Hornet (Vespa velutina) is a predator of insects such as honeybees, hoverflies, and other wasps, and poses serious risks to apiculture, biodiversity and pollination services. This hornet can measure up to 4 cm in length and, like all other social wasps, is capable of delivering a painful sting, although it is not aggressive by nature.
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How tree species link fungal partners across a large-scale forest ecosystem
In a study published in Science China Life Sciences, a team surveyed hyper-diverse fungal communities in approximately 500 paired leaf and soil samples, which were associated with 55 tree species that are located over 2,000-km span of mountain forests in eastern China.
1h
Apple Music Sing Adds 'Karaoke Mode' to Streaming Songs
America's most popular music streaming service is adding the ability to turn down the vocals and sing along.
1h
Tracking an invasion: A single Asian hornet may have sparked the ongoing spread across Europe
In Europe, the Asian (or "Yellow-legged") Hornet (Vespa velutina) is a predator of insects such as honeybees, hoverflies, and other wasps, and poses serious risks to apiculture, biodiversity and pollination services. This hornet can measure up to 4 cm in length and, like all other social wasps, is capable of delivering a painful sting, although it is not aggressive by nature.
1h
How tree species link fungal partners across a large-scale forest ecosystem
In a study published in Science China Life Sciences, a team surveyed hyper-diverse fungal communities in approximately 500 paired leaf and soil samples, which were associated with 55 tree species that are located over 2,000-km span of mountain forests in eastern China.
1h
Examining the promotion of Arabidopsis immune responses by a rhizosphere fungus
Plants can form diverse intimate relationships with beneficial mycorrhizal, endophytic and or rhizosphere fungi for nutrient trades. It is now known that plants can transfer carbon sources like fatty acids to fungi while the fungi mediate the supply of phosphate and/or nitrogen to plants. The benefits from fungi also include the promotion of plant growth and defenses against different biotic and a
1h
Using 3D metal-printing topological materials to manipulate full-vector elastic waves
A collaboration between Prof. Weiying Deng at South China University of Technology, Prof. Feng Li at Beijing Institute of Technology, and Prof. Zhengyou Liu at Wuhan University was recently published online in National Science Review. There is growing interest in elastic waves manipulated by topological edge modes, which have unparalleled advantages such as lower energy dissipation, higher flexibi
1h
Bioinspired robot skin with mechanically gated electron channels for sliding tactile perception | Science Advances
Abstract Human-like tactile perception is critical for promoting robotic intelligence. However, reproducing tangential "sliding" perception of human skin is still struggling. Inspired by the lateral gating mechanosensing mechanism of mechanosensory cells, which perceives mechanical stimuli by lateral tension–induced opening-closing of ion channels, we report a robot skin (R-skin) with mechanicall
1h
Examining the promotion of Arabidopsis immune responses by a rhizosphere fungus
Plants can form diverse intimate relationships with beneficial mycorrhizal, endophytic and or rhizosphere fungi for nutrient trades. It is now known that plants can transfer carbon sources like fatty acids to fungi while the fungi mediate the supply of phosphate and/or nitrogen to plants. The benefits from fungi also include the promotion of plant growth and defenses against different biotic and a
2h
Enhancing and protecting Canada's carbon stocks is essential but insufficient to meet GHG emission targets: Report
Enhancing carbon storage in natural ecosystems could put a small but significant dent in Canada's GHG emissions, but an aggressive commitment to reducing human-caused emissions remains critically important, according to a new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA). Preserving these existing landscapes, however, is imperative to successful climate action—development and la
2h
Transport of air masses in connection with El Niño decoded
The El Niño phenomenon influences the weather in distant regions, as far away as the U.S., India or the Mediterranean region. But how exactly these so-called teleconnections actually work has not yet been clarified completely.
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Scientists May Have Finally Discovered Why People Get Sick in the Winter
A team of researchers may have finally figured out why people are far more likely to get colds and the flu when temperatures drop during the winter. The new study , which the scientists' peers are calling a breakthrough, draws a link between colder air temperatures and a weakened immune system. "This is the first time that we have a biologic, molecular explanation regarding one factor of our inna
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Publisher Correction: A detailed map of Higgs boson interactions by the ATLAS experiment ten years after the discovery
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05581-5
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Publisher Correction: Entanglement-enhanced matter-wave interferometry in a high-finesse cavity
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05582-4
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NASA Awards $57M Contract to Build Roads on the Moon
submitted by /u/malcolm58 [link] [comments]
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Meta is expanding its use of AI face scanning to verify users' age on Facebook Dating
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Los Angeles Bans Fossil Fuel Extraction Within City Limits | The city council unanimously voted to phase out oil and gas drilling inside LA over the next 20 years, thanks to grassroots environmental justice organizing.
submitted by /u/chrisdh79 [link] [comments]
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A $100 million donation and access to the MeerKAT radio telescope in South Africa is allowing SETI to scale up its search for the techno-signatures of extraterrestrial life on over 1 million stars
submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]
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Experimental implementation of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution
Recently, the research group of Prof. Zeng-Bing Chen and Associate Prof. Hua-Lei Yin (National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University), cooperating with Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and other institutes, proposed
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Microstructured fiber measures the size of nanoparticles
Researchers at Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) developed a new glass fiber design that enables exceptionally long observations of a large number of individual, freely moving nanoparticles in a liquid. This allows the size distribution of nano-objects in a sample to be determined with even higher precision. The scientists are thus laying the foundation for even better resear
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The largest telescope on Earth is coming to hunt radio-waves from the early universe
After 30 years of planning, construction of the SKA Telescope, set to be the world's largest telescope array, began in South Africa on December 5.
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Rhino conservation in Nepal creates a burden for communities, infrastructure and other species, study warns
Efforts to conserve rhinos in Nepal have put a burden on communities, infrastructure and other wildlife in Nepal, a new study warns.
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Researcher creates algorithms to predict arsenic contamination in private wells
Despite the risks to human health, testing for arsenic isn't required for most private drinking wells in New Jersey. To help address this regulatory gap, a Rutgers researcher developed a machine learning model that can estimate arsenic contamination in private wells without the need to sample the water itself.
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Scientists narrow the anchor point in a quantum chromodynamics critical point search
Heavy ion collisions at the highest energies have revealed a new phase of nuclear matter with freely moving quarks and gluons, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The Beam Energy Scan program at the RHIC particle accelerator, a Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science user facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, has enabled the study of the transition between QGP and hadronic matter over a wide
2h
Many kids are struggling. Is special education the answer?
The COVID-19 pandemic sent Heidi Whitney's daughter into a tailspin.
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FDA Report Faults Agency's Food Unit for Leaderless Dysfunction
Spurred by the infant formula crisis, a panel found that the agency shied away from tough decisions, sometimes fearing confrontations with industry over enforcement of critical public health issues.
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Crabs have evolved five separate times—why do the same forms keep appearing in nature?
Charles Darwin believed evolution created "endless forms most beautiful." It's a nice sentiment but it doesn't explain why evolution keeps making crabs.
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Researchers introduce method of coloring microscopic coral larvae to aid tracking for conservation and reef restoration
A new, low-cost staining method enables visual tracking of coral larvae as they disperse and settle in coral reefs, according to a study by Christopher Doropoulos and George Roff at CSIRO Oceans & Atmosphere, Australia, published December 6 in PLOS Biology.
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Statistics star number crunches Christmas, shows how math can help your decorations look tree-mendous
The festive countdown is in full swing and numbers are uppermost in mind, as people manage tighter budgets and fill their social calendars with long-awaited gatherings now the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic has passed.
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Viewpoint: Shipping must accelerate its decarbonization efforts, and now it has the opportunity to do so
Member states of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the UN agency that regulates international maritime affairs, are meeting on December 5-16 to discuss how to accelerate the industry's climate mitigation efforts.
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300,000 households across Britain could be homeless next year if government does not urgently change course
Over 300,000 individuals and families across Britain could be forced into homelessness next year if there is no change to current U.K. government policy, with thousands suffering the worst forms of homelessness including sleeping on the streets, sofa surfing, and living in temporary accommodation such as hostels and B&Bs.
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Man Alarmed to Become Only Guest at $400,000 Metaverse Party
Sad Sad Day Any gathering that no one shows up to is sad enough. The European Union investing $400k into a 24-hour metaverse "beach party" full of "music and fun," only to attract less than ten guests who all peaced out in less than an hour? That's downright depressing. The event, according to Insider , was thrown by the European Commission's foreign aid department, which was hoping to drum up yo
3h
Researchers introduce method of coloring microscopic coral larvae to aid tracking for conservation and reef restoration
A new, low-cost staining method enables visual tracking of coral larvae as they disperse and settle in coral reefs, according to a study by Christopher Doropoulos and George Roff at CSIRO Oceans & Atmosphere, Australia, published December 6 in PLOS Biology.
3h
Woman who spontaneously vomited up to 30 times a day likely had rogue antibodies
A woman's unusual vomiting episodes may be linked to an autoimmune disorder.
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Blame climate change for your runny nose?
A new study demonstrates how the distribution of allergenic pollens could shift in a warming world. The researchers have simulated how climate change will affect the distribution of two leading allergens—oak and ragweed pollens—across the contiguous United States. The results may make your eyes water. Using computer models, the team, led by Panos Georgopoulos, a professor of environmental and occ
3h
Twins study links exercise to lower metabolic disease risk
Consistent exercise can change the molecules in the human body that influence how genes behave, a new study with identical twins indicates. As reported in the journal Scientific Reports , the more physically active siblings in identical twin pairs had lower signs of metabolic disease, measured by waist size and body mass index. This also correlated with differences in their epigenomes, the molecu
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Researchers, community partners tackle health threats from 'forever chemicals'
Nearly every person in the United States has been exposed to per- and polyfluorinated alky substances (PFAS) at some point in their life. These "forever chemicals" are the focus of a targeted investigation by University of Kentucky Superfund Research Center (UKSRC) researchers who are working collaboratively with community partners to protect Kentuckians.
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Successful completion of Lassa fever vaccine trial
The Vaccine Group, a University of Plymouth spinout company, has successfully completed a project to develop a transmissible vaccine for use in the rats that spread Lassa fever and to reduce its threat to humans.
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Estimating forest desiccation to better predict fire danger
Desiccation of tree foliage is a key factor in the spread of fires. However, during droughts, changes in the water content of forest canopies remain poorly understood. Scientists from INRAE and the CNRS have developed the first model to predict canopy water content during drought and heat waves. Their results, published in the journal New Phytologist, could enable the development of fire danger fo
3h
Early and mail-in voting: Research shows they don't always bring in new voters
SciLine interviewed Jan Leighley, professor of government in the School of Public Affairs at American University in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 4, 2022. Leighley discussed how early voting affects turnout, how turnout differs for midterm and presidential elections, how pollsters predict turnout and how to understand the persistent gap between people's intention to vote and actual turnout.
3h
Estimating forest desiccation to better predict fire danger
Desiccation of tree foliage is a key factor in the spread of fires. However, during droughts, changes in the water content of forest canopies remain poorly understood. Scientists from INRAE and the CNRS have developed the first model to predict canopy water content during drought and heat waves. Their results, published in the journal New Phytologist, could enable the development of fire danger fo
3h
Liquid water on cold exo-Earths via basal melting of ice sheets
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35187-4 Liquid water is key for life as we know it. Here, the authors show even with a modest geothermal heat flow, subglacial oceans of liquid water can form at the base of and within the ice sheets on exo-Earths, which may provide habitable conditions for an extended period.
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SESAME-catalyzed H3T11 phosphorylation inhibits Dot1-catalyzed H3K79me3 to regulate autophagy and telomere silencing
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35182-9 How H3T11 phosphorylation exerts biological functions remains poorly understood. Here, authors show that H3pT11 directly inhibits Dot1-catalyzed H3K79 tri-methylation (H3K79me3) and uncover how this histone crosstalk regulates autophagy and telomere silencing.
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Venice may get a temporary respite from rising seas by 2035
High winter sea levels in Venice are linked to warmer sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic Ocean, and cooling in that ocean over coming decades should therefore temporarily compensate for the city's sea level rise
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Retraction Note: Enhanced tensile strength and thermal conductivity in copper diamond composites with B4C coating
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25431-8 Retraction Note: Enhanced tensile strength and thermal conductivity in copper diamond composites with B 4 C coating
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Author Correction: From January to June: Birth seasonality across two centuries in a rural Polish community
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25709-x Author Correction: From January to June: Birth seasonality across two centuries in a rural Polish community
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Author Correction: Data-driven model discovery of ideal four-wave mixing in nonlinear fibre optics
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25523-5
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Genetic barriers, a warming ocean, and the uncertain future for an important forage fish
In the vast oceans, one would assume their inhabitants can travel far and wide and, as a result, populations of a species would mix freely. But this doesn't appear to be the case for a vital forage fish called the sand lance.
3h
17 Best Apple Deals: iPads, MacBooks, Apple Watches and AirPods
Don't worry if you skipped the Cyber Monday madness. Some of the company's best gear is on sale right now.
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How metastatic cancer causes leaky blood vessels
Researchers examine the local communication between endothelial cells and tumors cells and its effects on endothelial cell orientation. The approach uses co-cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and breast epithelial tumor cell lines to simulate the tumor-endothelial interaction. The group found the clockwise chirality of the hUVECs was less affected by local hormone signaling and more s
3h
Tiny underwater sand dunes may shed light on larger terrestrial and Martian formations
Researchers have been studying the dynamics of how crescent-shaped sand dunes are formed. Known as barchans, these formations are commonly found in various sizes and circumstances, on Earth and on Mars. Using a computational fluid dynamics approach, the team carried out simulations by applying the equations of motion to each grain in a pile being deformed by a fluid flow, showing the ranges of val
3h
Genetic barriers, a warming ocean, and the uncertain future for an important forage fish
In the vast oceans, one would assume their inhabitants can travel far and wide and, as a result, populations of a species would mix freely. But this doesn't appear to be the case for a vital forage fish called the sand lance.
3h
Hurricane's effects killed sturgeon in Apalachicola River
As hurricane Michael churned through the Gulf of Mexico to make landfall near Florida's Apalachicola River in 2018, it left a sea of destruction in its wake.
3h
The Companies That Are Killing Creativity
In 2012, Jeff Bezos claimed in a letter to Amazon shareholders that the company was serving humanity by eliminating old-fashioned "gatekeepers," like book publishers, that stood between creators and their audiences. Today, nearly three decades since its founding, the company has indeed replaced these businesses with an even bigger and more centralized gatekeeper: Amazon itself. Think about the ar
3h
China's COVID Wave Is Coming
In China, a dam seems on the verge of breaking. Following a wave of protests , the government has begun to relax some of its most stringent zero-COVID protocols , and regional authorities have trimmed back a slew of requirements for mass testing, quarantine, and isolation. The rollbacks are coming as a relief for the many Chinese residents who have been clamoring for change. But they're also swif
3h
2022 in Photos: How the First Months Unfolded
As the end of the year approaches, here is a look back at some of the major news moments of 2022. Events covered in this essay (the first of a three-part photo summary of the year) include Russia's invasion of Ukraine, the ongoing challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Beijing Winter Olympics and Paralympics, the infamous slap at the Oscars, a protest against vaccine mandates in Canada, and muc
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Turning video on and seeing others may boost remote class experience
Turning the camera on during a remote class—and seeing more students with their own cameras on—may improve factors critical to a better class experience, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
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Long-lived lakes reveal a history of water on Mars
The northern hemisphere of Mars is divided into two broadly distinctive areas: the smooth northern lowlands and the pockmarked southern highlands. The region of Arabia Terra sits along the transition between these two regions and is thought to contain some of the planet's oldest rocks, at more than 3.7 billion years old.
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Sr-Nd isotope baseline in Silk Road regions enables archaeological plant-ash glass provenance
Recently, Associate Professor LV Qinqin from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), constructed the first largescale, semi-quantitative Sr-Nd isotope baseline for the vast Silk Road regions, and validated its application in plant-ash glass provenance. The study was published in Journal of Archaeological Science.
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Following insect 'footprints' to improve crop resilience and monitor pollinator biodiversity
Bees and other insects leave behind tiny "footprints" of environmental DNA on plants each time they visit, giving researchers a way of tracking where insects have been, and offering clues on how to help them flourish.
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Ground telescopes can adapt to satellite megaconstellations if they get accurate telemetry data
The growing population of communication satellites such as Starlink and OneWeb is posing challenges for Earth-based astronomy facilities. Since such constellations will not be going away soon, astronomers want to find ways to work around the issue.
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Refugees need accessible information on their rights upon arrival in Ireland, report shows
As the Irish Government continues to grapple with accommodation shortages for individuals and families fleeing conflict and persecution and protests fueled by far-right fearmongering grab media attention, a new study into the Irish Community Sponsorship program provides insights into the work of community groups around Ireland in welcoming and supporting refugees.
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Ancient mummy portraits and rare Isis-Aphrodite idol discovered in Egypt
For the first time in 50 years, archaeologists have discovered Fayum mummy portraits at an ancient Egyptian site.
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Adobe Will Accept Stock Art Generated by AI
Until recently, you needed some degree of artistic skill to create a piece of digital art, but artificial intelligence is changing that. Now, all you have to do is click a few buttons to generate new art, and that has put stock image providers in a tight spot. Fearing abuse and copyright issues, some image repositories have banned AI-generated art , but Adobe is willing to take a risk. It will al
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Elon Musk Reportedly Building "Sad Hotel Rooms" at Twitter HQ for Exhausted Employees
After buying Twitter for $44 billion, Elon Musk is making some deep structural changes to the social media company's operations. Now, physical changes may be afoot as well. In his quest to realize his " extremely hardcore " vision, the billionaire CEO has reportedly transformed conference spaces at Twitter's headquarters in San Francisco into "sad hotel rooms," Forbes reports , so exhausted emplo
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How dementia caregivers can cope with the holidays
An expert on elder care has tips for how families can make the most of the season when caring for someone experiencing memory loss. Although the holiday season brings joy to many, it may mean added stress for families supporting a loved one with memory loss. Mary Catherine Lundquist is the program director of Care2Caregivers, a peer counseling helpline (800-424-2494) for caregivers of people with
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Astronomers have identified six massive stars before they exploded as core-collapse supernovae
The venerable Hubble Space Telescope has given us so much during the history of its service (32 years, seven months, six days, and counting). Even after all these years, the versatile and sophisticated observatory is still pulling its weight alongside more recent addition, like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and other members of NASA's Great Observatories family. In addition to how it is st
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Forest Service to Explore a New Frontier–Electric Trucks
As part of the push to electrify government fleets, employees at three national forests will test out Ford F-150 Lightnings for field operations in rugged and remote areas
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Researchers welcome $3.5-million haemophilia gene therapy — but questions remain
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04327-7 The world's most expensive drug has the potential to save lives. But it cannot treat the most common form of the disease.
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Report: Towards conservation and recovery of Victoria's biodiversity
While the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework is under negotiation at Montreal's COP15 meeting this week, the Royal Society of Victoria has released its own Report for Changemakers to guide ecological recovery closer to home.
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Maybe we don't see aliens because they're waiting to hear a signal from us first
We've had a long-running series here at UT on potential solutions Fermi paradox—why aren't we able to detect any alien life out there in the Universe? But more possible solutions are being developed all the time. Now, another paper adds some additional theory to one of the more popular solutions—that aliens are just too busy to care about us.
4h
LY6D marks pre-existing resistant basosquamous tumor subpopulations
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35020-y The identification of distinct cell populations with cellular plasticity in skin basal cell carcinoma is important for understanding treatment resistance mechanisms. Here, the authors identify the resistant LY6D+ basosquamous population that correlates with poor clinical outcomes.
4h
Developmental genetics: How germ cells cut the cord from their parents
For the first cell to develop into an entire organism, genes, RNA molecules and proteins have to work together in a complex way. At first, this process is indirectly controlled by the mother. At a certain point in time, the protein GRIF-1 ensures that the offspring cut themselves off from this influence and start their own course of development. A research team now details how this process works.
4h
CRISPR insight: How to fine-tune the Cas protein's grip on DNA
At the heart of every CRISPR reaction, whether naturally occurring in bacteria or harnessed by CRIPSR-Cas gene editing technology, is a strong molecular bond of a Cas protein via a guide RNA to its target site on DNA. It's like a nanoscale ski binding.
4h
As a sacred minnow nears extinction, Native Americans of Clear Lake call for bold plan
Spring runs of a large minnow numbering in the millions have nourished Pomo Indians since they first made their home alongside Northern California's Clear Lake more than 400 generations ago.
4h
Renewables Will Overtake Coal by Early 2025, Energy Agency Says
In a new report, the international group said that solar, wind and other renewable sources will expand much more swiftly than forecast last year.
4h
Inquest to examine treatment of first child to die of Covid in UK
Coroner to look at whether misplaced medical tube contributed to death of Ismail Mohamed Abdulwahab, 13 A misplaced medical tube may have contributed to the death of the first child in the UK to die after contracting Covid, a review of the case heard on Tuesday. Thirteen-year-old Ismail Mohamed Abdulwahab's death on 30 March 2020 at King's College hospital in London prompted widespread shock, whi
4h
Deforestation: EU law bans goods linked to destruction of trees
Household goods such as coffee and chocolate will have to pass strict checks before they are sold in the EU.
4h
Controversial internal control audits improve operational efficiency for small firms, study finds
The November collapse of cryptocurrency exchange FTX serves as a lesson of what happens when a corporation avoids internal audits of its own financial operations.
4h
Novel two-dimensional homogeneous bias device induced under moderate pressure
In a study published in Advanced Materials, researchers from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in cooperation with researchers from University of Science and Technology of China have developed a new type of two-dimensional homogeneous bias device with moderate pressure.
4h
Chess study shows masks can put cognitive performance in check
Wearing a face mask can temporarily disrupt decision-making in some situations according to University of Queensland research.
4h
Why OpenAI's New ChatGPT Has People Panicking | New Humanoid AI Robots Technology
submitted by /u/kenickh [link] [comments]
4h
Telescope-inspired microscope sees molecules in 6D
A new technology, inspired in part by the design of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), uses mirror segments to sort and collect light on the microscopic scale, and capture images of molecules with a new level of resolution: position and orientation, each in three dimensions.
4h
Antiferromagnets are suitable for transporting spin waves over long distances, study finds
Smaller, faster, more powerful: The demands on microelectronic devices are high and are constantly increasing. However, if chips, processors and the like are based on electricity, there are limits to miniaturization. Physicists are therefore working on alternative ways of transporting information, such as quantized spin waves, also called magnons, for example.
4h
'Any means necessary': The police who adopt the skull symbol of an ultra-violent comic book vigilante
In Travis Linnemann's book The Horror Of Police, he quotes David Grossman, founder of the "bulletproof warrior" seminar series, notorious for teaching police that killing is "just not that big of a deal."
4h
Sea urchins have invaded Tasmania and Victoria, but people can't work out what to do with them
While crown-of-thorns starfish on the Great Barrier Reef have long been ecological villains in the popular imagination, sea urchins have mostly crawled under the national radar—until now.
4h
Why we need open-source science innovation—not patents and paywalls
As we prepare to invest money to prevent the next global pandemic and find solutions to many other problems, science funders have a large opportunity to move towards open science and more research collaboration by offering open-source endowed chairs.
5h
Supporting feminine leadership could help create a just and kinder future
Women are still struggling to reach leadership positions. Though there are more women earning college degrees and a comparable number entering the workplace, women are still not reaching mid-level and top-level leadership positions at the same rate as men.
5h
Can 'voluntourism' outgrow the white savior stereotype and make a positive change post-pandemic?
As the tourism industry emerges from pandemic shutdowns and border closures, so too is "voluntourism," the sometimes controversial combination of overseas volunteer work and more traditional tourist experiences.
5h
Clashing laws need to be fixed if Australians want to live in bushfire-prone areas, says researcher
It's almost bushfire season. Yes, even though floods are still racing through parts of eastern Australia. Fire conditions are above average including in inland New South Wales and Queensland.
5h
A Question of Sex
Watch this documentary series about how gender and sex biases skew science
5h
How neurons regulate their excitability autonomously
Nerve cells can regulate their sensitivity to incoming signals autonomously. A new study has now discovered a mechanism that does just that.
5h
'Unwinding' chromosomes: A unique perspective on determinants of chromosomal width
Mitotic chromosomes are pivotal for the inheritance of genetic material. Now, it is already known that chromosomes vary in dimensions among organisms. But what governs mitotic chromosomal size and degree of DNA compaction? Scientists investigated mitotic chromosome formation to find answers and have revealed that within a species, the chromosomal arm length determines its width. These new insights
5h
Peekaboo! Tiny, hidden galaxy provides a peek into the past
Peeking out from behind the glare of a bright foreground star, astronomers have uncovered the most extraordinary example yet of a nearby galaxy with characteristics that are more like galaxies in the distant, early universe. Only 1,200 light-years across, the tiny galaxy HIPASS J1131-31 has been nicknamed "Peekaboo" because of its emergence in the past 50-100 years from behind the fast-moving star
5h
AI Has Finally Gone Too Far With This Horrifying Sex Scene Between Yoda and Chewbacca
Yobacca Slash It may not be able to tell truth from fiction , but OpenAI's ChatGPT conversational text-generating AI is seriously good at coming up with believable prose , poetry , and even source code . Ever since it was opened to the public six days ago, more than a million users have used the algorithm to spit out anything from prompts for AI image generators to made up "Seinfeld" scenes . Now
5h
That Viral Video of Stephen Curry Sinking Impossible Shots Is Fake
Full Court Press Credit where credit is due: NBA superstar Stephen Curry is an absolute beast, sinking more 3-pointer shots in consecutive games than anybody else. But a new viral video is overselling his godly abilities. The clip, shared by Sports Illustrated this week, shows Curry sinking five consecutive full-court shots, a seemingly superhuman feat. As it turns out, the video was put together
5h
Graduate students report racism, and more — this week's best science graphics
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04365-1 Three charts from the world of research, selected by Nature editors.
5h
Nattehimlen i dybden og detaljen: Fuld af farver
PLUS. Prisvindende fotograf viser i ny bog nattehimlen i imponerende farver og detaljer.
5h
'Zombie' viruses have been revived from Siberian permafrost. Could they infect people?
Researchers have isolated viable microbes from melting permafrost after tens of thousands of years. But don't worry; they infect only amoebas.
5h
The College Essay Is Dead
Suppose you are a professor of pedagogy, and you assign an essay on learning styles. A student hands in an essay with the following opening paragraph: The construct of "learning styles" is problematic because it fails to account for the processes through which learning styles are shaped. Some students might develop a particular learning style because they have had particular experiences. Others m
5h
Weasels, not pandas, should be the poster animal for biodiversity loss, says ecologist
At the United Nations biodiversity conference that opens in Montreal on Dec. 7, 2022, nations aim to create a new global framework for transforming humanity's relationship with nature. The conference logo features a human reaching to embrace a panda—but from an ecological perspective, a weasel or badger would be a more appropriate choice.
5h
After the deluge — cascading effects of extreme weather on human health
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Emily Jack-Scott and Sarah Spengeman News coverage of this summer's devastating flood in Pakistan has peaked, but the deluge left behind hasn't subsided: Experts predict the floodwaters could take six months to fully recede. An aerial view of Shahdadkot, Khairpur Nathan Shah, Mado, Faridabad, Mehar and other cities of Sindh, Pakistan covered with
5h
Why married mothers end up doing more housework when they start out-earning their husbands
The idea of a male "breadwinner" in married heterosexual couples might seem old fashioned. But as a social construct, the view that a husband's primary role is to earn money has proved to be exceptionally durable.
5h
Should sports cheats be prosecuted? When violence in the ring or on the field becomes criminal
Professional boxing is no stranger to controversy. The British Medical Association, the trade union for doctors in the UK, has called for years for the sport to be banned due to its damaging effects. It has a higher potential for injury than any other contact sport.
5h
Orthodox Judaism can still be a difficult world for LGBTQ Jews—but in some groups, the tide is slowly turning
Yeshiva University, the storied modern Orthodox Jewish university in New York City, is in the midst of a legal battle over its refusal to recognize the YU Pride Alliance, an undergraduate club.
5h
The four biggest gift-giving mistakes, according to a consumer psychologist
A good gift can elicit a surge of happiness and gratitude in the recipient. It also feels great to give, with psychologists finding that the joy of giving a gift is more pronounced than the pleasure of receiving one.
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GPR174 knockdown enhances blood flow recovery in hindlimb ischemia mice model by upregulating AREG expression
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35159-8 Gpr174 is a regulator of regulatory T cells, which play an important role in angiogenesis after hindlimb ischemia. Here, the authors show GPR174-deficient Tregs promote AREG expression by inhibiting Gαs/cAMP/PKA signal pathway and increasing EGR1 nuclear accumulation to improve angiogenesis and vascular remo
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Multiple drivers and lineage-specific insect extinctions during the Permo–Triassic
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35284-4 The impact of three extinction events during the Permo–Triassic interval on terrestrial invertebrates is unclear. Here, the authors find that key abiotic and biotic factors, including changes in floral assemblages, were correlated with changes in insect diversity through this interval.
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Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby: The Impact of Prenatal Depression on Maternal and Infant Immunity
http://www.iBiology.org Have you wondered why certain people develop allergies? In this 2022 Share Your Research Talk, Justine Noel describes these prenatal exposures may be coming from the mom's psychological stress. Her thesis research aims to identify immune signatures related to maternal prenatal psychological stress and infant allergy eczema risk. She studied maternal and infant cohorts and
5h
What Constitutes a Mind? Lars Chittka Challenges Our Perception of Sentience With the Smallest of Creatures
At the beginning of my research career around 15 years ago, any suggestion that a bee, or any invertebrate, had a mind of its own or that it could experience the world in an intricate and multifaceted way would be met with ridicule. As Lars Chittka points out in the opening chapters of The Mind of a Bee , the attribution of human emotions and experiences was seen as naivety and ignorance; anthrop
5h
Thousands of Mysterious 'Owl' Stones May Be The Work of Ancient Children
A glimpse of childhood from 5,000 years ago.
5h
What you should know about the new Alzheimer's drug
An experimental Alzheimer's drug is effective in slowing cognitive decline for some patients, according to the findings of a new clinical trial. The drug, published in the New England Journal of Medicine , may be the first significant treatment advance in decades. The drug, called lecanemab, is a humanized monoclonal antibody manufactured by Biogen and Eisai and administered intravenously every t
5h
Weasels, not pandas, should be the poster animal for biodiversity loss, says ecologist
At the United Nations biodiversity conference that opens in Montreal on Dec. 7, 2022, nations aim to create a new global framework for transforming humanity's relationship with nature. The conference logo features a human reaching to embrace a panda—but from an ecological perspective, a weasel or badger would be a more appropriate choice.
5h
How to spot 'fake news' online
Before the November midterm elections, Russia activated an army of misinformation-laden social media bots aimed at convincing voters in closely contested House of Representatives and Senate races that the U.S. should not support efforts by Ukraine to resist the Russian invasion.
5h
Ex-Twitter Employees Plan to 'Bombard' Company With Legal Claims
Disgruntled former staff allege they were not given the severance packages they were promised. The mountain of litigation could cost Twitter millions.
5h
Heat pump uses a loudspeaker and wet strips of paper to cool air
A prototype heat pump that uses water and sound to cool is three times as efficient as previous comparable designs
5h
Big egos, lack of staff training and policy enforcement are major barriers to island conservation
A new study led by the University of Oxford is the first to quantify the day-to-day barriers that conservation workers face as they try to conserve and manage island ecosystems around the world. The results have been published today in the journal People and Nature.
6h
Men are slowly losing their Y chromosome, but a discovery in spiny rats brings hope for humanity
The sex of human and other mammal babies is decided by a male-determining gene on the Y chromosome. But the human Y chromosome is degenerating and may disappear in a few million years, leading to our extinction unless we evolve a new sex gene.
6h
To avoid the health effects of stress, get proactive
Two new studies find that younger adults who take preemptive steps to respond to stress are better able to avoid negative health outcomes. "The fact that we have two studies with the same results highlights the importance of proactive coping for younger adults when it comes to handling stress," says Shevaun Neupert, corresponding author of a paper on the two studies and a professor of psychology
6h
Ekonomiska svårigheter ökar risken för psykisk ohälsa
Personer som har svårt att betala sina räkningar och saknar besparingar löper betydligt större risk att drabbas av psykisk ohälsa, enligt forskning vid Lunds universitet. De ekonomiska problemen är vanligast bland kvinnor, utlandsfödda och personer med osäkra anställningsförhållanden. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Big egos, lack of staff training and policy enforcement are major barriers to island conservation
A new study led by the University of Oxford is the first to quantify the day-to-day barriers that conservation workers face as they try to conserve and manage island ecosystems around the world. The results have been published today in the journal People and Nature.
6h
Men are slowly losing their Y chromosome, but a discovery in spiny rats brings hope for humanity
The sex of human and other mammal babies is decided by a male-determining gene on the Y chromosome. But the human Y chromosome is degenerating and may disappear in a few million years, leading to our extinction unless we evolve a new sex gene.
6h
MSN Deletes Fake News About Mermaids and Bigfoot, Runs New Story About Haunted Ventriloquist Dummy
Last week, we reported that the Microsoft-owned MSN — which, back in 2020, fired most of its human journalists and replaced them with AI — has been circulating a staggering number of obviously fake stories from the likes of conspiracy rags like Inquisitr and Exemplore. Fortunately, we have some good news to report: despite the fact that they have yet to actually respond to our repeated requests f
6h
Study shows promise of new anti-KRAS drug for pancreatic cancer
A small molecule inhibitor that attacks the difficult to target, cancer-causing gene mutation KRAS, found in nearly 30 percent of all human tumors, successfully shrunk tumors or stopped cancer growth in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer, researchers showed.
6h
Energy-efficient computing with tiny magnetic vortices
A large percentage of energy used today is consumed in the form of electrical power for processing and storing data and for running the relevant terminal equipment and devices. Innovative concepts, such as neuromorphic computing, employ energy-saving approaches to solve this problem.
6h
New antimalarial drug requires higher doses to cure infection
A new antimalarial drug is being introduced at a dose that is too low to be effective for all patients who need it, according to a new report.
6h
Redesigning diabetes technology to detect low blood sugar in older adults with diabetes and Alzheimer's disease
A human factors engineer and health services researcher is developing and testing user-friendly health information tools and technology designed to enhance accessibility and value to older adults with both diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, and their caregivers. Without numerous finger sticks, these tools and technology will be designed to provide patients, caregivers, and clinicians with glucose m
6h
Hurricane's effects killed sturgeon in Apalachicola River
As hurricane Michael churned through the Gulf of Mexico to make landfall near Florida's Apalachicola River in 2018, it left a sea of destruction in its wake. The path was easy to follow on land, but debris and infrastructure failures also diminished the river's water quality and led to the death of roughly half the gulf sturgeon population there. A study reveals new details in how a decrease in ox
6h
Researchers use ultrasound waves to move objects hands-free
Researchers have discovered a new method to move objects using ultrasound waves, opening the door for using contactless manipulation in industries such as robotics and manufacturing.
6h
Exploring a warm water inflow below an Antarctic ice shelf
The cold, dense water circulating under Antarctica's Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (FRIS) keeps under-ice melting there to a minimum, helping the ice shelf act as a regulating force against the Antarctic Ice Sheet's contribution to global sea level rise.
6h
Researchers compile ethnopharmacology of genus Veronicastrum
The genus Veronicastrum (Plantaginaceae) has about 20 species in the world with a distribution in eastern Asia and North America. Species in the genus Veronicastrum are beautiful perennial herbs with mostly alternate leaves, five sepals, and a tubular corolla with four lobes. It is tubular straight or slightly curved, usually with a ring of villous hairs inside.
6h
How to tap into your awareness — and why meditation is easier than you think | Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche
Meditation asks you to slip into a state of serene presence. But why does something that sounds effortless often feel so difficult? In this lighthearted invitation, spiritual leader Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche shares three steps to help you accept the ebb and flow of your emotions and learn to meditate anytime, anywhere.
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Researchers compile ethnopharmacology of genus Veronicastrum
The genus Veronicastrum (Plantaginaceae) has about 20 species in the world with a distribution in eastern Asia and North America. Species in the genus Veronicastrum are beautiful perennial herbs with mostly alternate leaves, five sepals, and a tubular corolla with four lobes. It is tubular straight or slightly curved, usually with a ring of villous hairs inside.
6h
A surprising number of African animals eat beeswax
Honeyguide birds lead humans to bees' nests and get beeswax as a reward, but camera traps reveal that honey badgers, baboons and mongooses all feed on the leftovers
6h
Electrophotocatalytic Oxygenation of Multiple Adjacent C–H Bonds
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05608-x
6h
On-demand storage of photonic qubits at telecom wavelengths
In a recent study published in Physical Review Letters, a research team led by Prof. Guo Guangcan from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) achieved on-demand storage of photonic qubits at telecom wavelengths using a laser-written waveguide fabricated in an erbium-doped crystal.
6h
NASA's Roman mission completes key optical components
Engineers at Ball Aerospace, one of the industrial partners for NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope, have installed and aligned the element wheel assembly (pictured above) into the telescope's Wide Field Instrument. The assembly contains eight science filters, two dispersive elements (a grism and prism) and a "blank" element (used for internal calibration) that will help scientists solve some
6h
Hubble observes an outstanding open cluster
A twinkling group of stars dominates the center of this image. NGC 2002 is an open star cluster that resides roughly 160,000 light-years away from Earth in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way containing numerous star-forming regions. NGC 2002 is about 30 light-years in diameter and is a relatively young cluster at 18 million years old.
6h
CRISPR insight: How to fine-tune Cas protein's grip on DNA
At the heart of every CRISPR reaction, whether naturally occurring in bacteria or harnessed by CRIPSR-Cas gene editing technology, is a strong molecular bond of a Cas protein via a guide RNA to its target site on DNA. It's like a nanoscale ski binding.
6h
'Unwinding' chromosomes: A unique perspective on determinants of chromosomal width
Chromosomes are a highly condensed form of DNA and are crucial for cell division. During mitosis, chromosomes ensure that genetic material is equally divided among the daughter cells. Interestingly, the dimensions and degree of DNA condensation in mitotic chromosomes vary from organism to organism. How this is regulated—i.e., what factor governs mitotic chromosomal formation and dimensions—remains
6h
Tiny underwater sand dunes may shed light on larger terrestrial and Martian formations
The English poet William Blake famously implored readers to "see the world in a grain of sand." In the journal Physics of Fluids, scientists from the University of Campinas, in Brazil, and the University of California, Los Angeles, have been doing just that—studying the "granular" dynamics of how crescent-shaped sand dunes are formed.
6h
'Unwinding' chromosomes: A unique perspective on determinants of chromosomal width
Chromosomes are a highly condensed form of DNA and are crucial for cell division. During mitosis, chromosomes ensure that genetic material is equally divided among the daughter cells. Interestingly, the dimensions and degree of DNA condensation in mitotic chromosomes vary from organism to organism. How this is regulated—i.e., what factor governs mitotic chromosomal formation and dimensions—remains
6h
New globally distributed bacterial phyla within the FCB superphylum
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34388-1 Our understanding of microbial diversity and physiology in marine sediments is limited. Here, Gong et al. analyze thousands of metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) from coastal and deep-sea sediments, and identify MAGs belonging to new bacterial phyla that seem able to mediate key steps in sedimentary biogeoc
6h
Negotiation and honesty in artificial intelligence methods for the board game of Diplomacy
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34473-5 Artificial Intelligence has achieved success in a variety of single-player or competitive two-player games with no communication between players. Here, the authors propose an approach where Artificial Intelligence agents have ability to negotiate and form agreements, playing the board game Diplomacy.
6h
The gut microbiota and depressive symptoms across ethnic groups
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34504-1 Here, by studying a multi-ethnic cross-sectional urban cohort (N = 3211, 6 ethnic groups), the authors show that depressive symptom levels are related to the gut microbiota taxonomic characteristics but that these are largely invariant across ethnic groups.
6h
Subduction-related oxidation of the sublithospheric mantle evidenced by ferropericlase and magnesiowüstite diamond inclusions
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35110-x This article reports finding of a highly oxidised mineral in diamond inclusion derived from mantle transition zone or lower mantle, very reduced areas on our planet. Such oxidised material is likely linked to subduction of carbonates into this region.
6h
Multiplex Testing: A Solution to Manage Surge in Respiratory Illnesses as Concerns over "Multi-demic" Rise
Eunsin Bae, M.D discusses multiplex testing and the benefits of Seegene's Allplex™ SARS-CoV-2/FluA/FluB/ RSV Assay
6h
Construction starts in Australia on the world's largest radio telescope | The Square Kilometer Array will help study dark energy and the early universe.
submitted by /u/chrisdh79 [link] [comments]
6h
Self-driving truck startup Kodiak Robotics wins $50 million deal to help develop driverless Army vehicles
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Rafael and Lockheed Martin partner to offer IRON BEAM laser system in the U.S.
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
6h
Bell's V-280 Valor Tiltrotor Picked As Army's Black Hawk Replacement
submitted by /u/Test19s [link] [comments]
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Renewable power's growth is being turbocharged as countries seek to strengthen energy security – News – IEA
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South Korea Sees Space Exploration as Shaping Global Economy
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South Korea Sees Space Exploration as Shaping Global Economy
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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A "forest bubble" on Mars. Scientist proposes ambitious plan for sending wildlife to Mars | The ambitious proposal could help realize Elon Musk's vision of SpaceX's Starship as a "futuristic Noah's Ark".
submitted by /u/chrisdh79 [link] [comments]
6h
Emperor king's top secret assassination letter finally decrypted after 500 years
Researchers in France have finally cracked a complex code of mysterious symbols and "nonsense" decoys written by Charles V, the former Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain.
6h
Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid): Causes, symptoms & treatment
Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the body's thyroid gland doesn't produce enough hormones, leading to a range of symptoms.
6h
Developmental genetics: How germ cells cut the cord from their parents
For the first cell to develop into an entire organism, genes, RNA molecules and proteins have to work together in a complex way. At first, this process is indirectly controlled by the mother. At a certain point in time, the protein GRIF-1 ensures that the offspring cut themselves off from this influence and start their own course of development. A research team from Martin Luther University Halle-
6h
Breaking down the shield preventing drugs and immune cells from entering intractable cancers
A group lead by Prof. Horacio Cabral (Visiting Scientist of iCONM/Associate Professor of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo) has discovered a new approach for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer.
6h
Researchers' study predicted location of Mauna Loa eruption
Research conducted by a University of Miami scientist and his graduate assistant accurately predicted which of the two rift zones of Hawaii's Mauna Loa volcano would erupt.
6h
X-ray analysis without doubt: Four-decade enigma of cosmic X-rays solved
An international team led by the Heidelberg MPl for Nuclear Physics has solved a decades-long problem in astrophysics with a high-precision experiment.
6h
Developmental genetics: How germ cells cut the cord from their parents
For the first cell to develop into an entire organism, genes, RNA molecules and proteins have to work together in a complex way. At first, this process is indirectly controlled by the mother. At a certain point in time, the protein GRIF-1 ensures that the offspring cut themselves off from this influence and start their own course of development. A research team from Martin Luther University Halle-
7h
Curse Words Around the World Have Something in Common (We Swear)
These four sounds are missing from some of the seven words you can never say on television, and the pattern prevails in other languages too, researchers say.
7h
AI listens to toilet sounds to guess whether people have diarrhoea
An artificial intelligence that can detect diarrhoea with 98 per cent accuracy from recordings of toilet sounds could help track outbreaks of diseases, such as cholera
7h
World leaders must step up to put biodiversity deal on path to success
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04329-5 Ahead of the COP15 biodiversity meeting, few disagree that we must do more to protect nature — but money, underwritten by top-level support, is needed to make it happen.
7h
How nuclear waste will help spacecraft explore the Moon — and beyond
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04247-6 European researchers are developing batteries that use a radioactive isotope to power long missions in the Solar System.
7h
Twitter Cofounder Says Elon Musk Is "Not a Serious Person"
One of Twitter's founders appears to have some serious beef with new owner Elon Musk. Twitter cofounder — Biz Stone, who helped build the site alongside Jack Dorsey, Noah Glass, and Evan Williams — didn't expressly name Musk in an excoriating tweet . But given the context in the message and a later reply, there's nobody else he could conceivably be talking about. "He's not a serious person," Ston
7h
Tesla Is Having Extreme Trouble Hiring, for Some Reason
Operations at Tesla's massive new factory in Berlin are reportedly in "total chaos," Wired reports , with the Elon Musk-led company falling far short of its hiring goals. Worldwide, the number of vacancies at the company has doubled since the summer, suggesting that it's facing serious headwind in not only attracting new workers, but also keeping them motivated enough to stick around. In Germany,
7h
So far, Elon Musk's Twitter Files amount to 'a tempest in a teapot,' expert says
There was a lot of buzz over the weekend about the so-called "Twitter Files," a collection of communications released on Friday that revealed how the social media company, among other things, suppressed a story about Hunter Biden, President Joe Biden's son, ahead of the 2020 presidential election.
7h
Justin Swanstrom Has a Problem with the Right Lane | Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings #StreetOutlaws #Streetracing #discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
7h
Aging worms show DNA repair decline limits fertility
A new study suggests one possible reason why reproduction slows with age. The researchers report that older worms are less efficient at repairing broken DNA strands while making egg cells—part of a process that's essential for fertility. The findings appear in PLOS Genetics . Each sperm or egg cell has only half the number of chromosomes found in a regular cell. During meiosis, the cell division
7h
From Systems in Motion, Infinite Patterns Appear
In December 1977, a revolutionary paper quietly appeared in the Journal d'Analyse Mathématique, a specialty mathematics journal. The author, Hillel Furstenberg, did not claim any thrilling — or even new — results. He'd simply offered a proof of a theorem that another mathematician, Endre Szemerédi, had already proved two years before. Despite that, Furstenberg's paper left a lasting imprint on…
7h
Influencing factors and prediction methods of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer based on logistic regression analysis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25592-6
7h
Ny årsrapport: Kun halvdelen af hjertepatienter med behov deltager i rehabiliterings­forløb
Omkring halvdelen af patienter med behov for hjerterehabilitering deltager ikke i et forløb, viser årsrapport for Dansk Hjerterehabiliteringsdatabase. Rapporten viser også problemer med at følge op efter indlæggelse og med at få patienterne til at droppe smøgerne.
7h
Construction of World's Largest Radio Observatory Is Finally Under Way
Two giant telescopes—one in Australia, the other in South Africa—will comprise the supersensitive Square Kilometer Array
7h
An embedded interfacial network stabilizes inorganic CsPbI3 perovskite thin films
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35255-9 Lattice anchoring, in its varied forms, has proven effective at regulating the energetics of metastable phases of polymorphic crystals. Here, the authors utilize top-down photolithography to embed a tessellating 3D interfacial network into otherwise-unstable CsPbI3 perovskite thin films and devices, stabiliz
7h
DAP5 enables main ORF translation on mRNAs with structured and uORF-containing 5′ leaders
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35019-5 RNA structure and upstream ORFs can modulate the translation of human transcripts. Here, the authors show that structured mRNAs with pervasive uORF translation require DAP5, an eIF4G-like protein, for translation of the main ORF.
7h
In 30 years, the US saw 1.1 million gun deaths
A new study is the first analysis to show both the sheer magnitude of firearm fatalities in the United States over the past 32 years and the growing disparities by race/ethnicity, age, and geographic location. "In 2021, we have reached the highest number of gun fatalities that have ever occurred in the US." Using multiple data sets from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the research
7h
Why lab-grown meat may never be on the menu
High production costs together with increasingly vegetarian appetites may prevent this industry taking off
7h
Parkinson's medication improved blood pressure in teens with Type 1 diabetes
Teens with Type 1 diabetes who took bromocriptine, a medication usually prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease, had lower blood pressure after one month of treatment compared to those who did not take the medicine. Participants taking the medication for one month also experienced significant improvements in aortic stiffness, a measure of vascular health. Larger, longer-term studies are needed to
7h
Directly visualizing the cooperative adsorption of a string-like molecule onto a solid with double-stranded DNA
Macromolecules in diverse phases can adsorb onto natural systems, composite materials, and thin-film devices. In a new report now published in Science Advances, Yuma Morimitsu and a research team in applied chemistry and polymer interfaces and molecular adhesion used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize well-defined double-stranded DNAs and conducted molecular dynamics simulations to identif
8h
Directly visualizing the cooperative adsorption of a string-like molecule onto a solid with double-stranded DNA
Macromolecules in diverse phases can adsorb onto natural systems, composite materials, and thin-film devices. In a new report now published in Science Advances, Yuma Morimitsu and a research team in applied chemistry and polymer interfaces and molecular adhesion used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize well-defined double-stranded DNAs and conducted molecular dynamics simulations to identif
8h
Kilometer-scale modeling better reflects the relationship between land and precipitation
The technique referred to as "dynamical downscaling," which involves the use of regional climate models to dynamically infer the effects of large-scale climate processes at local scales, has proved to be an effective way to simulate precipitation at high resolution. Moreover, with advancements in supercomputing capabilities, dynamical downscaling is now progressing to the kilometer scale.
8h
Multifunctional terahertz transparency of thermally oxidized vanadium metasurface over insulator metal transition
A research team, led by the Nano Optics Group within the Department of Physics at UNIST has reported achieving all-vanadium dioxide (VO2) multifunctional metasurfaces, which perform as a transparent window in the broadband THz regime with variable DC conductivity of dynamic range over three decades and selective switchability of near-infrared (NIR) diffraction.
8h
Using the nexus approach to identify systematic solutions for sustainable development
The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, adopted in 2015, tackle a wide array of contemporary issues such as food, water, and energy insecurity, biodiversity loss, climate change, and rapid and spontaneous urbanization. Achieving these goals requires a strategy aimed towards overall progress, rather than improvement in isolated areas.
8h
Methods for building lunar landing pads may involve microwaving moon soil
Establishing a moon base will be critical for the U.S. in the new space race and building safe and cost-effective landing pads for spacecraft to touch down there will be key.
8h
Key proteins keep DNA regions close for longer
New work by Friedrich Miescher Institute researchers shows that key proteins help to stabilize the interaction between otherwise highly dynamic DNA structures. The findings shed light onto how the complex folds that help to fit nearly two meters of DNA into the cell's nucleus influence important biological processes.
8h
How chemical modifications on DNA keep genes silent
Several diseases, including certain types of cancer and some neurodevelopmental conditions, have aberrant patterns of DNA methylation, a chemical modification that regulates gene expression in ways that keep genes in the "off" position.
8h
Chance find results in a fresh understanding of ice age frequency
A chance find of an unstudied Antarctic sediment core has led University of Otago researchers to flip our understanding of how often ice ages occurred in Antarctica.
8h
New study sheds light on how neurons respond to aged-related iron accumulation
Iron (Fe) accumulates in the brain cortex with aging. A plethora of studies indicate that progressive iron accumulation in the substantia nigra (SN) in the aged human brain is a major risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases, but not for everyone. This is because our body has different ways for responding specifically to iron overloading.
8h
Hjerteafdeling hårdt presset af personaleflugt
Ti af 28 sengepladser på hjerteafdelingen på Esbjerg Sygehus er lukket efter en længere periode med et stort antal opsigelser blandt afdelingens sygeplejersker, skriver JydskeVestkysten.
8h
Queensland graziers unearth 100m-year-old plesiosaur remains likened to Rosetta Stone
Amateur fossil hunters find skull connected to body of marine giant elasmosaur for the first time in Australia Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our morning and afternoon news emails , free app or daily news podcast A group of female graziers from outback Queensland who hunt fossils in their downtime have uncovered the remains of a 100m-year-old creature that palaeont
8h
Hvem ender med Sorteper: Strømkabler smelter på nye grafikkort
50 gange er Nvidias nye flagskib, RTX 4090-grafikkort, brudt i brand eller smeltet.
8h
Key proteins keep DNA regions close for longer
New work by Friedrich Miescher Institute researchers shows that key proteins help to stabilize the interaction between otherwise highly dynamic DNA structures. The findings shed light onto how the complex folds that help to fit nearly two meters of DNA into the cell's nucleus influence important biological processes.
8h
New study sheds light on how neurons respond to aged-related iron accumulation
Iron (Fe) accumulates in the brain cortex with aging. A plethora of studies indicate that progressive iron accumulation in the substantia nigra (SN) in the aged human brain is a major risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases, but not for everyone. This is because our body has different ways for responding specifically to iron overloading.
8h
From the archive: statistical marvels, and the quest for insulin
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04166-6 Snippets from Nature's past.
8h
Tony Fadell Is Trying to Build the iPod of Crypto
The product guru made Ledger's new hardware wallet—a tiny vault for digital cash—flashy and fun. Plus, with this gadget you'll never get FTX'd.
8h
Robo Truckers and the AI-Fueled Future of Transport
Concerns about artificial intelligence replacing long-haul drivers are not new, but the real story is more nuanced.
8h
Tado Wireless Smart Thermostat V3+ Review: Save on Gas
With gas prices soaring in Europe, I tried a new thermostat system that promises savings and lets you control temperature for individual rooms.
8h
What we know so far about strep A child deaths in the UK
Nobody knows for sure why more children than usual have died due to the group A streptococcus bacterium this year, but increased mixing and viral infections may be factors
8h
Backbone amides are determinants of Cl− selectivity in CLC ion channels
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35279-1 CLC-type channels selectively transport Cl− across biological membranes, but it is unclear how discrimination between anions is maintained. Here, authors use a combination of non-natural amino acid substitutions, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations to determine Cl− specificity within this f
8h
Food abundance in men before puberty predicts a range of cancers in grandsons
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35217-1 Nutritional conditions experienced early in life may influence the disease risk of future children and grandchildren. Here the authors report that food abundance among boys before puberty associates with the relative risk of a range of cancers in grandsons, but not in granddaughters.
8h
What is carb loading?
"Carb loading" is a nutrition strategy often used by athletes to prepare for events lasting several hours.
8h
RabbitAir MinusA2 spa-780N review
The RabbitAir MinusA2 spa-780N is a powerful air purifier, offering customizable filtration, six layers of filters and a smart app.
8h
Best VR experiences 2022: Explore, learn, and be entertained in virtual reality
Toy with planets, explore the ocean, or step into the past with the best VR experiences.
8h
Researchers propose new structures to harvest untapped source of freshwater
An almost limitless supply of fresh water exists in the form of water vapor above Earth's oceans, yet remains untapped, researchers said. A new study suggests an investment in new infrastructure capable of harvesting oceanic water vapor as a solution to limited supplies of fresh water in various locations around the world.
8h
It's not them, it's you: Why potatoes don't deserve their bad reputation
Research has shown while potatoes may not have all the same benefits as some other vegetables — such as lowering risk of Type 2 diabetes — health issues associated with potatoes may actually be due to how people are preparing them and what they're eating them with. More than 54,000 people reported their dietary intake for the long-term Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study.
8h
Author Correction: Intra-specific variation in sensitivity of Bombus terrestris and Osmia bicornis to three pesticides
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25623-2
8h
Author Correction: The effects of point defect type, location, and density on the Schottky barrier height of Au/MoS2 heterojunction: a first-principles study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25621-4 Author Correction: The effects of point defect type, location, and density on the Schottky barrier height of Au/MoS 2 heterojunction: a first-principles study
8h
Author Correction: Enriched environment causes epigenetic changes in hippocampus and improves long-term cognitive function in sepsis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25622-3
8h
Verdens produktion af vedvarende energi er fordoblet om fem år
PLUS. Inden 2027 er der installeret lige så meget ny vedvarende elproduktion, som de sidste 20 år. Men VE vil stadig kun stå for 20 procent af verdens elproduktion.
8h
Researchers adapt a Nobel Prize-winning method to design new, ultra-powerful X-ray systems
If scientists want to push the boundaries of, say, an X-ray laser, they may need to create some new technology. But occasionally there's no need to reinvent the wheel. Instead, scientists simply come up with a new way to use it.
8h
'Black widow' PSR J1544+4937 investigated in detail
Indian astronomers have performed long-term radio observations of a "black widow" millisecond pulsar known as PSR J1544+4937. Results of the observational campaign, published November 25 on the arXiv pre-print server, shed more light on the properties of this pulsar.
8h
The oldest-known members of an evolutionary group that includes all living lizards and their closest extinct relatives
Yale researchers have identified the oldest-known, definitive members of the lizard crown group that includes all living lizards and their closest extinct relatives.
8h
Plasma instability may be a solution for magnetic nozzle plasma thrusters
A research group has demonstrated that spontaneously excited plasma waves may be the solution to a long-associated problem with magnetic nozzle plasma thrusters, turning conventional thinking on its head.
8h
Discovery Channel's 'Shark Week' Is Packed With Misinformation and Junk Science
Scientists watched 202 episodes and found them filled with unreliable information and white male experts named 'Mike'
8h
Vanliga immunceller kan förhindra läkning av tarmen
B-celler är viktiga för vårt immunförsvar, men nu visar forskning att immuncellerna ibland gör mer skada än nytta. Vid kronisk inflammation i tjocktarmen ökar nämligen B-cellerna kraftigt, något som förhindrar läkning av vävnaden. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
9h
Characterization of an RNA binding protein interactome reveals a context-specific post-transcriptional landscape of MYC-amplified medulloblastoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35118-3 MYC amplification is an independent prognostic factor for the most aggressive subgroup (Group 3) of pediatric medulloblastoma (G3 MB). Here, the authors highlight the role of the RNA-binding protein, Musashi-1 (MSI1) in G3 MB and identify MSI1-bound targets sharing MYC associated pathways.
9h
Early initiation of breastfeeding is inversely associated with public and private c-sections in 73 lower- and middle-income countries
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25564-w
9h
The Invasive Reach of 'Digital-by-Default' Immigration
The UK's use of technology to enforce its hard-line immigration policy brings the border into every facet of migrants' lives.
9h
The Download: Uber's flawed facial recognition, and police drones
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Uber's facial recognition is locking Indian drivers out of their accounts One evening in February last year, a 23-year-old Uber driver named Niradi Srikanth was getting ready to start another shift, ferrying passengers around the south Indian city of Hyderabad
9h
A Good Fountain Pen—Like the Lamy 2000—Lets You Enjoy the Finer Things in Life
For everything from journaling to writing my wedding vows, the iconic Lamy 2000 has become my favorite literary accessory.
9h
This Low-Cost Test for Hearing Loss Lives on a Smartphone
Audiology screening can be inaccessible for kids in low-resource areas. By utilizing off-the-shelf products, these scientists are trying to change that.
9h
What's going on with the potential rail strike?
The federal government is trying to prevent more than 100,000 freight railroad workers from going on strike at the height of the holiday season. At the urging of President Biden, the US Senate passed legislation on Thursday, December 1 that would force a tentative contract agreement between the rail unions and their employers. The deal, approved by the House Wednesday, calls for a 24% raise over
9h
AI Helps Biotech Labs Generate the Building Blocks for New Drugs
(Image: Generate Biomedicines) Myotis daubentonii. (Credit: Generate Biomedicines) Proteins are an essential part of life. Not only do they function as the "building blocks" for living organisms, but they also perform nearly every cellular task, from waste management to tissue repair. It tracks, then, that pharmaceuticals often contain or "target" proteins in an attempt to change or eliminate sym
9h
Astronomers Grapple with JWST's Discovery of Early Galaxies
Researchers are convinced the James Webb Space Telescope has glimpsed an unexpected population of galaxies in the early universe. Now they're trying to decide what this means for our understanding of the cosmos
10h
Fågelungar har det tufft i städerna
För en liten nykläckt fågel kan livet i en stad vara svårt. Forskning visar att de tydligt påverkas av en viss typ av luftförorening och vilka träd som finns i närheten av boet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Mars More Volcanically Active Than We Thought
Mars is perhaps the best candidate world in our solar system for a settlement off Earth. Venus is too inhospitable. The Moon is a lot closer, but the extremely low gravity (.166 g) is a problem for long-term habitation. Mars gravity is 0.38 g, still low by Earth standards but better than the Moon. But there are some other differences between Earth and Mars. Mars has only a very thin atmosphere, l
10h
World's largest communication satellite is a photobombing menace, astronomers warn
The International Astronomical Union has issued a warning over the newly launched BlueWalker 3 satellite, which is causing interference for both optical and radio telescopes.
10h
Sam Bankman-Fried, Crypto-Republican?
Sam Bankman-Fried tried to warn us. "Everyone should always be skeptical of things like this. Right?" the then–cryptocurrency star told NBC News's Chuck Todd in a September interview about his generous political donations, which he framed as not self-interested. Unlike much of his advice about money, this suggestion was wise. [ Derek Thompson: My crypto confession ] Bankman-Fried became prominent
10h
Take Yourself on a Date
R ecently, I started a weekly ritual. I walk from my office to the movie theater, where I slip into a back row and slouch down in the darkness. Afterward, I walk the hour and a half home, mulling over the film and daydreaming on my way across the Brooklyn Bridge. I don't need to formulate a coherent take—or tell anyone my thoughts at all. It's just me and the occasional passerby and the skyline m
10h
How to Decarbonize Crypto
Maintaining bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies causes about 0.3 percent of global CO 2 emissions. That may not sound like a lot, but it's more than the emissions of Switzerland, Croatia, and Norway combined . As many cryptocurrencies crash and the FTX bankruptcy moves into the litigation stage, regulators are likely to scrutinize the crypto world more than ever before. This presents a perfect opp
10h
Astronomers Grapple with JWST's Discovery of Early Galaxies
Researchers are convinced the James Webb Space Telescope has glimpsed an unexpected population of galaxies in the early universe. Now they're trying to decide what this means for our understanding of the cosmos
10h
Park Rangers Are Using Silent Ebikes to Catch Poachers
A Swedish electric bike is helping Mozambique's park rangers protect game and reducing the need for fossil fuel infrastructure in Africa's remotest areas.
10h
Stormzy Has Built a Last-of-Its-Kind Social Media Empire
The UK grime rapper transformed #Merky into a music label, a book imprint, and advocacy campaigns—something that may be impossible in the new Twitter era.
10h
Pandemin påverkade beslut om abort
Covid-19-pandemin tycks ha påverkat beslutet att göra abort, enligt en ny studie där abortsökande från sju kliniker i Sverige fick svara på frågor. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Europe's fastest supercomputer is now connected to a quantum computer
A small quantum computer has been connected to Europe's fastest supercomputer. This connection could help researchers work out how to best pair quantum computers together with powerful supercomputers to solve complex problems faster
10h
To fix LGBTQ+ disparities in science, we need the data
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04331-x How many LGBTQ+ researchers are there in the United States? The National Science Foundation should find out.
10h
Daily briefing: Publishers put paper-mill detectors to the test
Nature, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04367-z Journals trial paper mill-detecting tools, how smallpox inoculation shaped America's concept of freedom and the James Webb Space Telescope's best images so far
10h
The Conventional Wisdom About War Crimes Is Wrong
Could anyone , once thrust into a war zone, kill innocents and commit atrocities? For decades, experts have debated why combatants—including seemingly normal people who once worked standard jobs and love their family back home—are capable of war crimes. The question is one of profound importance; scholars estimate that 80 million to 200 million people have been victims of mass killings since the
10h
Good Sex in the Time of War
Not many novels mix juicy romance and wartime violence. War-induced longing is a common fictional occurrence—consider Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient , Sebastian Faulks's Birdsong , or, to a lesser degree, Ian McEwan's Atonement —but a vivid, sexy, not-doomed-feeling love story that also takes a war zone as a central subject rather than simply a setting is rarer. Of course, this rarity is
10h
Første tilladelse til CO2-lagring på dansk jord er givet: Det bliver langt fra kysten
PLUS. Project Greensand kan fra årsskiftet pumpe 15.000 tons CO2 ned i Nini-feltet under Nordsøen.
10h
Slingrekurs i letbanebyggeri: Risiko for overpris på mere end en milliard kroner
PLUS. Hovedstadens Letbane har undervurderet kompleksiteten i projektet, erkender selskabet.
10h
Author Correction: Deciphering diversity at er loci for diversification of powdery mildew resistance in pea
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25312-0
10h
Intravenous thrombolysis before thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: a dual centre retrospective cohort study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25696-z
10h
Palliative care reduces emergency room visits and total hospital days among patients with metastatic HPB and GI cancers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-23928-w
10h
Hollow and porous TiO2 in PVA matrix nanocomposite green synthesis using ionic liquid micelle for Congo red removal from contaminated water
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-24068-x Hollow and porous TiO 2 in PVA matrix nanocomposite green synthesis using ionic liquid micelle for Congo red removal from contaminated water
10h
EU agrees ban on imports driving deforestation
The European Union reached an agreement Tuesday to ban the import of products including coffee, cocoa and soy in cases where they are deemed to contribute to deforestation.
11h
How a dangerous stew of air pollution is choking the United States
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04333-9 Fires and droughts in the western states are getting worse — and they're combining with industrial sources to threaten air quality and people's health.
11h
Watch the 'Cold Moon' eclipse Mars during the final full moon of 2022
The 'Cold Moon,' the final full moon of 2022, will soon rise in a winter sky crowded by Saturn, Jupiter and Mars.
11h
How Vaccines Saved Money and Lives, and China's Zero-COVID Protests: COVID, Quickly Podcast, Episode 44
Vaccines saved New York City billions of dollars, and China faces public fury over its strict virus-control policies.
11h
Vismænd anbefaler CO2-skat på dansk landbrug snarest muligt: Sådan kan den se ud
Danmark bør gøre som i New Zealand, der er på vej med verdens første klimaafgift på landbruget.
11h
I met a police drone in VR—and hated it
This story originally appeared in The Algorithm, our weekly newsletter on AI. To get stories like this in your inbox first, sign up here . I'm standing in the parking lot of an apartment building in East London, near where I live. It's a cloudy day, and nothing seems out of the ordinary. A small drone descends from the skies and hovers in front of my face. A voice echoes from the drone's speakers
11h
How Vaccines Saved Money and Lives, and China's Zero-COVID Protests: COVID, Quickly Podcast, Episode 44
Vaccines saved New York City billions of dollars, and China faces public fury over its strict virus-control policies.
11h
Non-contact diagnosis of sleep breathing disorders using infrared optical gas imaging: a prospective observational study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25637-w
12h
Seasonal variations in presenting symptoms and signs of dry eye disease in Norway
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25557-9
12h
Effect of benznidazole on cerebral microcirculation during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25056-x
12h
The potential effect of BMSCs with miR‐27a in improving steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25407-8
12h
Hand function following accidental automatic animal syringe injector injuries
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25641-0
12h
The sex-specific metabolic signature of C57BL/6NRj mice during aging
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25396-8
12h
Increasing freshwater supply to sustainably address global water security at scale
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-24314-2
12h
Role of cardiac mitofusins in cardiac conduction following simulated ischemia–reperfusion
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25625-0
12h
The Elgin Marbles may finally return to Greece, 200 years after being removed by British nobility
The British Museum and the Greek government are reportedly in talks about returning the Parthenon Marbles, also called the Elgin Marbles, to Greece.
12h
Antibody feedback regulates immune memory after SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05609-w
12h
Musk's Twitter takeover jeopardizes culturomics
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04361-5
12h
Twitter's totter must prompt research rethink
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04362-4
12h
Foster neuroinclusivity at scientific meetings
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04360-6
12h
Prioritize gender equality to meet global biodiversity goals
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04363-3
12h
Biotech labs are using AI inspired by DALL-E to invent new drugs
submitted by /u/Magic-Fabric [link] [comments]
12h
Why You Need an iPhone Case with Electroplating ?
https://iphonecase.ml/ ​ Electroplating cases protect your iPhone against scratches, dents, and dings. These days, that's not enough! You want your phone case to do more than just protect your iPhone—you want it to add some style and flair to it as well! The best way to accomplish this is with an electroplated iPhone case, which allows you to customize the color of your iPhone case in a wide vari
12h
NASA Awards $57M Contract to Build Roads on the Moon
submitted by /u/wart365 [link] [comments]
12h
The overlapping burden of the three leading causes of disability and death in sub-Saharan African children
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34240-6 In this disease mapping study, the authors estimate disability-adjusted life year rates for three of the major causes of mortality for children under five 43 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. They identify significant heterogeneity at the subnational level, highlighting the need for a targeted intervention ap
12h
A metabolic associated fatty liver disease risk variant in MBOAT7 regulates toll like receptor induced outcomes
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35158-9 Hyperactivation of the toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been implicated as risk factors for more severe forms of disease in COVID-19 and metabolic (dysfunction) associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD). Here the authors report that MBOAT7 is reduced in macrophages of patients with MAFLD and COVID-19, and acts a
12h
Homo naledi may have used fire to cook and navigate 230,000 years ago
Archaeologists say they have found evidence that Homo naledi, an extinct human species with a tiny brain, used fire to cook and light up dark tunnels – though this claim remains controversial
12h
Uber's facial recognition is locking Indian drivers out of their accounts
One early evening in February last year, a 23-year-old Uber driver named Niradi Srikanth was getting ready to start another shift, ferrying passengers around the south Indian city of Hyderabad in his midsize sedan. He pointed the phone at his face to take a selfie to verify his identity. The process usually worked seamlessly. But this time he was unable to log in. It didn't take long for Srikanth
12h
The long-lost remains of the last known Tasmanian tiger have been found in a cupboard
The skeleton and skin of what is believed to be the last Tasmanian tiger have been stashed away in a cupboard at a museum in Tasmania, where experts lost track of the bizarre looking creature. (Image credit: Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)
12h
Ingen sikre brandveje: Beboere skal ud af højhus to uger før jul
PLUS. Beboere troede, de kunne bo i nedrivningsdømt højhus på Amager indtil nytår.
12h
Children at risk of strep A in England could be given preventive antibiotics
'Rare' blanket measure may be used at primary schools after at least nine UK deaths from bacterial infection Primary school children at risk from a severe form of strep A could be given preventive antibiotics as a blanket measure, in a move described as "rare" by health officials. At least nine children have died due to complications from strep A bacterial infections since September, with one sen
13h
In the West, Will Pink Snow Make Droughts Worse?
This summer, researchers from around the country crisscrossed the mountains of Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, Utah, and Montana, looking for pink-stained snow, the hallmark of an algal bloom. These microorganisms can change how quickly snow melts, but aren't included in standard snowmelt models.
14h
Balm of Gilead
Balm of Gilead was mentioned in the Bible, but we don't know what was in it. It is supposed to relieve pain, but we don't know if it is effective; there are no controlled studies. The post Balm of Gilead first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
14h
Bananflugan har fått fem Nobelpris
När skänkte du senast en tacksamhetens tanke till ogräset backtrav, bananflugan, zebrafisken eller rundmasken C. elegans? De är megakändisar i forskningslabben och har gjort mänskligheten enorma tjänster – men utanför forskarvärlden är de doldisar eller rentav irritationsmoment. Möt forskningens osynliga hjältar: modellorganismerna. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
15h
Spin-defect qubits in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides operating at telecom wavelengths
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35048-0 Defect centers in two-dimensional materials has shown promise for applications in quantum information and sensing. Lee et al. computationally discover a class of substitutional defect centers in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides with promising qubit characteristics operating at telecom wavelengths.
15h
Extracellular traps from activated vascular smooth muscle cells drive the progression of atherosclerosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35330-1 Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are known for their fate plasticity in atherosclerosis plaque progression. Here, Zhai et al. show that extracellular traps generated from CD68 + VSMCs adversely contribute to plaque progression and highlight their unexpected role in plaque stability by regulating the dire
15h
The Brains of Teenagers Look Disturbingly Different After Lockdown
"What does it mean for a 16-year-old if their brains are aging prematurely?"
16h
The Last Known Tasmanian Tiger Was Just Found in a Museum Cupboard
We thought it was lost forever.
16h
BYD to use sodium ion batteries in some of it's smaller EVs
submitted by /u/mutherhrg [link] [comments]
16h
China braces for Covid outbreaks among medical staff and migrant workers
Authorities fear virus surge in unprotected rural areas during lunar new year holiday as Beijing eases restrictions
17h
'Dynamic Soaring' Trick Could Speed Spacecraft Across Interstellar Space
No solar sail required.
17h
Byggeri-quiz | December
Er du rigtig bygge-klog? Tag månedens quiz her!
17h
Hvor hurtigt kan en spyflue flyve? | Dagens låge er åben!
Deltag i Ingeniørens Julequiz om årets tech-historier og vind flotte præmier!
17h
Why are children in the UK at risk of serious strep A infections?
The UK Health Security Agency issued a rare alert on Friday, telling parents to look out for signs of strep A infection in their children. Since September, eight children in England and Wales have died after becoming unwell with Group A streptococci bacteria. Typically causing illnesses like skin infections, tonsillitis or scarlet fever, very occasionally strep A can become a life-threatening, inv
17h
Why are children in the UK at risk of serious strep A infections? – podcast
The UK Health Security Agency issued a rare alert on Friday, telling parents to look out for signs of strep A infection in their children. Since September, eight children in England and Wales have died after becoming unwell with Group A streptococci bacteria. Typically causing illnesses like skin infections, tonsillitis or scarlet fever, very occasionally strep A can become a life-threatening, in
17h
Trods overvågnings-frygt: Teleselskaber sender kinesiske 5G-routere til danske hjem
PLUS. Kinesiske routere fra Huawei og ZTE dominerer markedet for hjemmeroutere til mobilt bredbånd over 5G.
18h
Vild PFAS-teori blandt vindmøllemodstandere: Uden hold i virkeligheden
Et rygte spreder sig om, at Miljøstyrelsen er i gang med at undersøge, om vindmøller er skyld i PFAS-forurening i naturen.
18h
Chinese students protest as university locks down over one Covid case
Footage shows large protest at Nanjing Tech University, as rules persist despite steps to ease zero-Covid policy 'Now I see it's not just me who's angry': readers in China on wave of protests Students at a university in eastern China have staged a protest against a Covid lockdown as many in the country remain under some form of restrictions despite government steps to ease its zero-Covid policy.
18h
New study sheds light on how neurons respond to aged-related iron accumulation
A recent study details the neuronal response to excessive iron accumulation, which is associated with age-related neurodegenerative diseases.
20h
Study uncovers inflammatory markers that may predict a response in certain patients to COVID-19 immunotherapies
Researchers have uncovered inflammatory markers that may predict which COVID-19 patients are more likely to respond to therapies like the anti-cancer drug pacritinib, according to phase 2 trial results.
20h
Surprising Omicron origins study comes under scrutiny
Nature, Published online: 06 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04357-1 Sequences of early forms of the fast-spreading variant reported to have been circulating in West Africa could have resulted from contamination.
20h
The Y Chromosome Is Slowly Vanishing. A New Sex Gene Could Be The Future of Men
Big changes are happening.
20h
Immunotherapy eliminates disease-causing cells in mice with MS-like disease
Researchers have shown that the cancer therapy known as CAR-T can be applied to multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the nervous system. The findings extend the powerful tool of immunotherapy to autoimmune diseases, a class of diseases that are often debilitating and difficult to treat.
20h
The majority of California's coastal airports are vulnerable to increased flooding caused by climate change
A new study has found that 39 out of 43 coastal airports in California have assets exposed to projected flooding that could disrupt their operations in the next 20 to 40 years.
20h
Financial incentives boost weight-loss programs, study finds
Paying cash to people with obesity for losing a specific amount of weight or completing weight-reducing activities works better than offering stand-alone free tools, such as weight-loss programs, diet books, and wearable fitness trackers, a new study shows.
20h
Pedestrians choose healthy obstacles over boring pavements
Up to 78% of walkers would take a more challenging route featuring obstacles such as balancing beams, stepping stones and high steps, research has found. The findings suggest that providing 'Active Landscape' routes in urban areas could help tackle an 'inactivity pandemic' and improve health outcomes.
20h
AI enables large-scale brain tumor study, without sharing patient data
Researchers led a large-scale global machine learning effort to securely aggregate knowledge from brain scans of 6,314 glioblastoma (GBM) patients at 71 sites around the globe and develop a model that can enhance identification and prediction of boundaries in three tumor sub-compartments, without compromising patient privacy.
20h
Small glowing protein allows researchers to peer deeper into living tissues
Biomedical and genetic engineers have designed a small fluorescent protein that emits and absorbs light that penetrates deep into biological tissue. Tailored to wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum, this protein can help researchers capture deeper, cleaner, more precise biomedical images.
20h
Small glowing protein allows researchers to peer deeper into living tissues
Biomedical and genetic engineers have designed a small fluorescent protein that emits and absorbs light that penetrates deep into biological tissue. Tailored to wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum, this protein can help researchers capture deeper, cleaner, more precise biomedical images.
21h
Researchers advance insights into cause of ripples on icicles
Experimental physicists growing icicles are closer to understanding why some form with ripples up and down their outsides, while others form with smooth, slick, even surfaces. By growing icicles from water samples with different contaminants like sodium chloride (salt), dextrose (sugar) and fluorescent dye, they discovered that water impurities become entrapped within icicles as they form and subs
21h
New quantum dots study uncovers implications for biological imaging
Researchers report the synthesis of semiconductor 'giant' core-shell quantum dots with record-breaking emissive lifetimes. In addition, the lifetimes can be tuned by making a simple alteration to the material's internal structure.
21h
New tool twice as accurate at predicting antibody resistance among US children with Kawasaki disease
A new tool could one day help clinicians better predict resistance to immunoglobulin therapy among children with Kawasaki disease in the United States. Compared to the Kobayashi score — the most widely used method in Japan for predicting resistance to the antibody, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), in Kawasaki disease — the newly developed tool is twice as accurate for Western New York children
21h
Women with elevated breast cancer risk could see mortality benefit from estrogen-blocking drugs
While it has long been recognized that drugs that block the cancer-promoting activity of estrogen reduce risk of developing new breast cancers, a new computer modeling study has shown that these treatments could also reduce the risk of dying from the disease in women who are at high risk.
21h
Forest resilience linked with higher mortality risk in western US
A forest's resilience, or ability to absorb environmental disturbances, has long been thought to be a boost for its odds of survival against the looming threat of climate change. But a new study suggests that for some Western U.S. forests, it's quite the opposite. The results of one of the first large-scale studies of its kind show that while high ecosystem resilience correlates with low mortality
21h
Bee study: Both habitat quality and biodiversity can impact bee health
Efforts to promote the future health of both wild bees and managed honeybee colonies need to consider specific habitat needs, such as the density of wildflowers. At the same time, improving other habitat measures — such as the amount of natural habitat surrounding croplands — may increase bee diversity while having mixed effects on overall bee health. Those are the key findings from a new analys
21h
New instrument measures supercurrent flow, data has applications in quantum computing
An extreme-scale nanoscope is beginning to collect data about how pulses of light at trillions of cycles per second can control supercurrents in materials. The instrument could one day help optimize superconducting quantum bits, which are at the heart of quantum computing, a new and developing technology.
21h
Off-patent liver disease drug could prevent COVID-19 infection and protect against future variants, researchers find
Scientists have identified an off-patent drug that can be repurposed to prevent COVID-19 — and may be capable of protecting against future variants of the virus — in research involving a unique mix of 'mini-organs', donor organs, animal studies and patients. The research showed that an existing drug used to treat a type of liver disease is able to 'lock' the doorway by which SARS-CoV-2 enters ou
21h
AI-designed structured material creates super-resolution images using a low-resolution display
submitted by /u/Dr_Singularity [link] [comments]
21h
Musk's Neuralink faces federal probe, employee backlash over animal tests
submitted by /u/frequenttimetraveler [link] [comments]
21h
A humorous set of cybersecurity predictions for 2023
submitted by /u/jeffweet [link] [comments]
21h
In this post I introduce the notion of the phantom cognit, a future-proof term for a cognitive unit a mind tries to access, but is absent.
submitted by /u/Gmroo [link] [comments]
21h
Neuralink Employees Admit Company Has Killed 1,500 Animals So Far
We already knew that there were problems at Elon Musk's brain-computer interface startup, Neuralink. Internally, employees have warned of chaos as they say Musk pushes for overly ambitious goals. Externally, subject matter experts say that Musk's glib promises gloss over profound challenges standing in the way of a commercial brain implant for humans — and downplays deep ethical questions that wi
21h
"李老师"口述:如何成为推特上中国抗议信息的聚集地
Editor's note: This is a translation of a story about a Chinese painter based in Italy who became a critical source of information for many in China during recent protests against the country's zero-covid policy. Find the English language version here . 过去一周,随着针对中国新冠防疫政策的抗议 席卷了社交媒体 ,一个推特账号 @李老师不是你老师 变成了各种相关信息来源的"集散地"。中国各地民众纷纷通过私信发来抗议视频和实时消息,而该账号帮投稿人隐去身份,匿名将这些消息发布出来。 这个账户背后只有一个人:李(大家称他为李老师),出于安全考虑
21h
Is there a common sound of swearing across languages?
Swear words across different languages may tend to lack certain sounds such as l, r, and w, suggests research published in Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. This common pattern in profanity indicates that these sounds, called approximants, may appear less offensive to listeners.
21h
Finding better ways to measure cognitive change in people with intellectual disability
A new study finds the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery is a promising option for measuring cognitive change in people with intellectual disability.
21h
Guiding conservation with local touch
New science can benefit conservation, but a group of biologists emphasizes how species have adapted to local habitats is crucial to success.
21h
Neuronal activities in the sensorimotor cortex
An interdisciplinary research team has found important clues about the functioning of the sensorimotor cortex. The new findings on neuronal activities in this brain area could be helpful for the further development and use of so-called neuroprostheses. These have an interface with the nervous system and are intended to help compensate for neuronal dysfunctions.
21h
Not all micronutrients created equal: Study identifies some supplements that benefit cardiovascular health
Healthy diets are rich in antioxidants like amino acids, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin C, but exactly how beneficial these micronutrients are for cardiovascular health has long been controversial. Now a new meta-analysis provides some clarity.
21h
X-rays reveal elusive chemistry for better EV batteries
Scientists used high energy x-rays to investigate the solid-electrolyte interphase, a chemical layer in batteries that's key to stabilizing lithium metal anodes. Chemists unraveled this complex chemical mechanisms that is crucial for boosting energy density.
21h
X-rays reveal elusive chemistry for better EV batteries
Scientists used high energy x-rays to investigate the solid-electrolyte interphase, a chemical layer in batteries that's key to stabilizing lithium metal anodes. Chemists unraveled this complex chemical mechanisms that is crucial for boosting energy density.
21h
Spicing Up Your Meals Could Be One Simple Way to Build a Healthier Gut
The spice of life.
22h
China's elderly vaccine refuseniks pose obstacle for Xi Jinping
Nearly 90mn Chinese are insufficiently protected against Covid as Beijing begins to unwind pandemic controls
22h
The Southern Hemisphere is stormier than the Northern, and we finally know why
The Southern Hemisphere is stormier than the Northern — but no one knew why. A new study lays out the first concrete explanation for this phenomenon. Researchers found two major culprits: ocean circulation and the large mountain ranges in the Northern Hemisphere.
22h
Climate change in the forests of northern Germany
More and more trees are suffering the consequences of decades of human-made climate change. The growth of the European beech has so far suffered decline mainly in southern Europe. European beech is Germany's most important native forest tree species and it is most commonly found in Central Europe. A research team has now been able to show that the European beech is suffering from increasing drough
22h
New clue discovered for how and why cancer cells spread
An international team of researchers has uncovered a new mechanism that enables cancer cells to move throughout the body, providing a potential new target to stop metastasis, which is responsible for 90 per cent of cancer deaths. The team identifies that cancer cells move faster when they are surrounded by thicker fluids, a change that occurs when lymph drainage is compromised by a primary tumor.
22h
Greenland ice sheet: Short-lived ice streams
Major ice streams can shut down, shifting rapid ice transport to other parts of the ice sheet, within a few thousand years. This was determined in reconstructions of two ice streams, based on ice-penetrating radar scans of the Greenland ice sheet.
22h
These Depressing Images Show What We're Not Seeing in The Night Sky
Here's where you can go.
22h
Why synonymous mutations are not always silent
New modeling shows how synonymous mutations — those that change the DNA sequence of a gene but not the sequence of the encoded protein — can still impact protein production and function.
22h
Snot Comes in Many Colors, And It Can Tell You About Your Health
Go ahead and look.
23h
How We Could Discover Alien Life
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Fifty years ago this week, NASA launched the Apollo 17 mission. When that crew returned, President Richard Nixon said "this may be the last time in this century that men will walk on the moon"—and he
23h
Cocaine Bear: Why?
Two questions immediately occur to anyone watching the trailer for Cocaine Bear : Is this real? and Why? The first is easy enough to answer. The film, about a black bear that gobbles bricks of cocaine and then butchers a series of humans in rapid succession, is loosely based on a real-life black bear that, in 1985, gobbled at least part of a single brick of cocaine and then died. The true story h
23h
Cognitive biases similar to choice-supportive bias
Hey. I'm sorry if this is considered a low quality post, feel free to remove in that case. Anyway, I'm studying analytical sociology and have come across a pretty funny pattern in a data set i'm playing around with. The data is a survey from polling locations on an election day. It contains questions on "how important (policy area) was for your decision for how to vote today?" – and in virtually
23h
Skkrt! NASA's Orion Heads Back to Earth, Leaves Moon in the Dust
Artemis-ty Eyed NASA's Orion lunar capsule is headed back to terra firma — and it captured a breathtaking image of the Moon with the Earth rising in the background on its way home. "For Orion, this is not a 'goodbye,' but a 'see you later' to the Moon," a NASA TV spokesperson said in the stunning footage captured by one of the Artemis I mission's many cameras, which captured an Earthrise in the d
1d
SBF Not Happy to Be Asked About Ex-Girlfriend Caroline Ellison
Drama Bomb Yes, there is still more FTX drama unfolding — and this time, it's personal. A quick catchup before we dig into the good stuff: among the many major fallouts from the FTX collapse last month, one of the more salacious revelations centered the exchange's disgraced ex-CEO Sam Bankman-Fried and Caroline Ellison , the CEO of FTX's sister arm, Alameda Research. Along with her murky role in
1d
New manufacturing process produces better, cheaper cathodes for lithium-ion batteries
Researchers have developed a new method for producing a key component of lithium-ion batteries. The result is a more affordable battery from a faster, less wasteful process that uses less toxic material.
1d
A journey across generations: Inheritance of the plant microbiome via seed
What defines us and other living organisms more strongly, genes or the environment? Only recently, researchers were able to prove experimentally that even microorganisms can be inherited from one plant generation to the next via the seed.
1d
Religious violence increases anxiety among Muslims and Jews, even if they have never been personally targeted
Fear of hate crime looms especially large in the minds of Jews and Muslims, even if they have never been personally targeted, according to a new study from Rice University and West Virginia University.
1d
December serving up baked Alaska and warming most of Arctic
Much of the Arctic is in a burst of freak December warming.
1d
Shhhh … speaking more quietly in restaurants means everyone can be heard
In a crowded restaurant, diners usually talk with their companions at their own table. But the sound of their conversations bounces off walls and reflects to other patrons, creating background noise. Each individual speaker wants to be heard over that noise, so they end up talking a little bit louder, which again increases the overall din. Eventually—barring an interruption—the system gets loud en
1d
Understanding the cryptic role fungi play in ecosystems
When you say "fungi," most people think of mushrooms, showy fruiting bodies, but most fungi do not produce mushrooms. It is estimated that there are approximately 3 to 13 million fungal species on Earth, many of which are microscopic in size.
1d
Improving precision of pressure determination in nanosecond X-ray diffraction experiments
X-ray diffraction measurements under laser-driven dynamic compression allow researchers to investigate the atomic structure of matter at hundreds of thousands of atmospheres of pressure and temperatures of thousands of degrees, with broad implications for condensed matter physics, planetary science and astronomy.
1d
The Psychological Test of Japan's Finale
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. Japan beat two World Cup champions, Germany and Spain, on its way to the knockout stage. But the Samurai Blue will go no further, defeated on penalties by the 2018 finalists Croatia after more than 120 minutes of play, including the first shootout of this year's tournament.
1d
10 Readers on Opposing Anti-Semitism
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week I asked readers, "What is the best response to anti-Semitism in America?" Yosef responded with acid observations about the t
1d
Donald Trump Is No Lover of the Constitution
Donald Trump's call over the weekend for terminating the Constitution was, though appalling, also a long time coming. Trump, the once and aspirationally future Republican president, has long praised the Constitution and touted his own defense of it in heroic terms. But for just as long, he has shown a shallow understanding of the document—seldom extending much beyond a maximalist reading of the S
1d
Top 25 News Photos of 2022
As the end of the year approaches, here is a look back at some of the major news events and moments of 2022. Russian troops invaded Ukraine and were met with stronger resistance than they had expected, leaving thousands dead or injured, and sparking an ongoing brutal conflict. Countries around the world grappled with the continuing coronavirus pandemic. Dramatic droughts, floods, and wildfires of
1d
A journey across generations: Inheritance of the plant microbiome via seed
What defines us and other living organisms more strongly, genes or the environment? Only recently, researchers were able to prove experimentally that even microorganisms can be inherited from one plant generation to the next via the seed.
1d
More flexible than we thought: Worms provide new insights into the evolution and diversification of TGF-beta signaling
The TGF-ß cellular signaling network, essential to various functions in all metazoans and involved in many severe human pathologies like autoimmune diseases and cancer, is more flexible than previously thought.
1d
Giant mantle plume reveals Mars is more active than previously thought
Orbital observations unveil the presence of an enormous mantle plume pushing the surface of Mars upward and driving intense volcanic and seismic activity. The discovery reveals that Mars, like Earth and Venus, possesses an active interior, which challenges current views on the evolution of the red planet.
1d
Milestone for laser technology
Extremely intense light pulses generated by free-electron lasers (FELs) are versatile tools in research. Particularly in the X-ray range, they can be deployed to analyze the details of atomic structures of a wide variety of materials and to follow fundamental ultrafast processes with great precision. Until now, FELs such as the European XFEL in Germany are based on conventional electron accelerato
1d
Finding the right AI for you
AI is a powerful tool for studying the human genome. But its recent popularity has inundated the field with innovation. With so many options, it's hard to know which AI algorithms work best. Computational scientists have now come up with a solution called GOPHER, which systematically compares AI algorithms and evaluates their reliability, accuracy, and performance.
1d
Immune system irregularities found in women with postpartum mood disorders
Women with prolonged mental health problems up to three years after childbirth may be suffering from irregular immune system responses, according to new research.
1d
New manufacturing process produces better, cheaper cathodes for lithium-ion batteries
Researchers have developed a new method for producing a key component of lithium-ion batteries. The result is a more affordable battery from a faster, less wasteful process that uses less toxic material.
1d
Household air cleaners improve heart health among individuals with COPD, researchers find
A six-month study oncludes that the use of portable home air purifiers can improve some markers of cardiovascular health in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD
1d
How to edit the genes of nature's master manipulators
CRISPR, the Nobel Prize-winning gene editing technology, is poised to have a profound impact on the fields of microbiology and medicine yet again. A team has developed a tool to edit the genomes of bacteria-infecting viruses called bacteriophages using a rare form of CRISPR. The ability to easily engineer custom-designed phages will help researchers treat dangerous drug-resistant infections and co
1d
New research explains how our body clock influences vaccine responses
Research has provided new insights into the mechanism behind how our circadian 24-hour body clock influences our immune response to vaccines, depending on the time of day.
1d
Checking blood pressure in a heartbeat, using artificial intelligence and a camera
Engineers have designed a system to remotely measure blood pressure by filming a person's forehead and extracting cardiac signals using artificial intelligence algorithms.
1d
More flexible than we thought: Worms provide new insights into the evolution and diversification of TGF-beta signaling
The TGF-ß cellular signaling network, essential to various functions in all metazoans and involved in many severe human pathologies like autoimmune diseases and cancer, is more flexible than previously thought.
1d
Adélie penguins show signs of self-awareness on the mirror test
When shown their reflection, wild Adélie penguins can tell it isn't another penguin – but they may not fully connect their mirror image to themselves
1d
New research develops a model that optimizes political fairness for political redistricting
Political redistricting is a problem of national interest with consequences to electoral representation. It is a decennial process of redrawing the boundaries of congressional and state legislative districts, and can affect a wide range of stakeholders, including the voters, candidates and political parties. New research in the journal Operations Research introduces a model that can be adopted for
1d
New study finds that 70% of Florida's coral reefs are eroding
A new study has found that 70% of Florida's reefs are eroding and experiencing net loss of reef habitat. The research, conducted by an interdisciplinary group of scientists through the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Science, provides new information on the state of Florida's world-famous co
1d
Study finds DNA repair declines with age, limiting fertility
Even worms have a ticking fertility clock. Older worms are less efficient at repairing broken DNA strands while making egg cells—part of a process that's essential for fertility. A new study from University of Oregon (UO) biologists suggests one possible reason that reproduction slows with age.
1d
Study shows the majority of California's coastal airports are vulnerable to increased flooding caused by climate change
Most of California's population and its largest airports are located along the Pacific coastline, which is increasingly impacted by storm surges, sea level rise, and erosion due to climate change. In the next 30 years, sea level along the coast is expected to rise as much as 8 inches. All of this means more frequent and far-reaching flooding that will impact critical infrastructure like roads, pow
1d
New study finds that 70% of Florida's coral reefs are eroding
A new study has found that 70% of Florida's reefs are eroding and experiencing net loss of reef habitat. The research, conducted by an interdisciplinary group of scientists through the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Science, provides new information on the state of Florida's world-famous co
1d
Study finds DNA repair declines with age, limiting fertility
Even worms have a ticking fertility clock. Older worms are less efficient at repairing broken DNA strands while making egg cells—part of a process that's essential for fertility. A new study from University of Oregon (UO) biologists suggests one possible reason that reproduction slows with age.
1d
Climate change in the forests of northern Germany: Team finds widespread drought stress in European beech
More and more trees are suffering the consequences of decades of manmade climate change. The growth of the European beech has so far suffered decline mainly in southern Europe. European beech is Germany's most important native forest tree species, and it is most commonly found in central Europe.
1d
New instrument measures supercurrent flow; data has applications in quantum computing
Jigang Wang offered a quick walk-around of a new sort of microscope that can help researchers understand—and ultimately develop—the inner workings of quantum computing.
1d
Climate change in the forests of northern Germany: Team finds widespread drought stress in European beech
More and more trees are suffering the consequences of decades of manmade climate change. The growth of the European beech has so far suffered decline mainly in southern Europe. European beech is Germany's most important native forest tree species, and it is most commonly found in central Europe.
1d
Boosted by government programs, cover cropping is increasing across the US Midwest
Cover crops, with their ability to reduce erosion and promote soil health, are being planted across more U.S. Midwestern land than ever. That's according to new University of Illinois research showing that cover crop adoption reached 7.2% in 2021, up from just 1.8% a decade prior. The finding is the result of sophisticated satellite-based remote sensing efforts that accurately detected cover crops
1d
Mysterious Object Emerges From Beach in Florida
Unidentified Beach Object Beach erosion caused by Hurricane Nicole and Ian has caused a massive mysterious object to poke out of the sand at Daytona Beach Shores in Volusia County, Florida — a tantalizing enigma that's naturally fascinating folks online. The lengthy object appears to be mostly made out of wood and metal and measures roughly 80 feet from end to end, The New York Times reports . Of
1d
Astronomers Spot Volcano Erupting on a Distant Comet
Erupting Comet An unusual volcanic comet has unexpectedly erupted in a massive cloud of gas and ice, Live Science reports , an offworldly spectacle that stunned astronomers. Scientists believe the dirty snowball, dubbed 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann or 29P for short, is the most volcanically active comet in our solar system. It was first discovered in 1927 by German astronomers Arnold Schwassmann and
1d
Boosted by government programs, cover cropping is increasing across the US Midwest
Cover crops, with their ability to reduce erosion and promote soil health, are being planted across more U.S. Midwestern land than ever. That's according to new University of Illinois research showing that cover crop adoption reached 7.2% in 2021, up from just 1.8% a decade prior. The finding is the result of sophisticated satellite-based remote sensing efforts that accurately detected cover crops
1d
For biodiversity to thrive, conservation efforts must be 'nature and people positive,' experts say
In a new expert study published in the journal One Earth, an international team of scientists from the Earth Commission, convened by Future Earth, say that efforts to meet new biodiversity targets and goals for the next three decades risk repeating past failures unless three factors are addressed in campaigning efforts and practice: focused attention to direct and indirect drivers of decline; unre
1d
Biopunk: Or, what can we reasonably expect out of rock, wood, flesh and bone?
submitted by /u/schizoscience [link] [comments]
1d
Man and Machine: A new Era
submitted by /u/levijohnson1 [link] [comments]
1d
For biodiversity to thrive, conservation efforts must be 'nature and people positive,' experts say
In a new expert study published in the journal One Earth, an international team of scientists from the Earth Commission, convened by Future Earth, say that efforts to meet new biodiversity targets and goals for the next three decades risk repeating past failures unless three factors are addressed in campaigning efforts and practice: focused attention to direct and indirect drivers of decline; unre
1d
Biologists make case for guiding conservation with a local touch to fight climate change effects
As nature reels towards a hotter, drier, harsher future, new conservation tools—seed banks and frozen zoos, gene editing and assisted gene flow—hold promise to help struggling animal and plant populations. The catch: New approaches must incorporate the strengths the species have evolved for their local environments.
1d
Forest resilience linked with higher mortality risk in western U.S., study finds
A forest's resilience, or ability to absorb environmental disturbances, has long been thought to be a boost for its odds of survival against the looming threat of climate change.
1d
Biologists make case for guiding conservation with a local touch to fight climate change effects
As nature reels towards a hotter, drier, harsher future, new conservation tools—seed banks and frozen zoos, gene editing and assisted gene flow—hold promise to help struggling animal and plant populations. The catch: New approaches must incorporate the strengths the species have evolved for their local environments.
1d
NASA is testing a new robotic arm that really knows how to chill out
Future planetary missions could explore in extremely cold temperatures that stymie existing spacecraft, thanks to a project under development at JPL.
1d
Teachers entering the profession from other fields often less satisfied
There is a shortage of teachers not only in Germany, but in many countries around the world. For this reason, people without formal teaching degrees are often brought in from other fields to teach in schools. Yet according to a new study, they are often less satisfied in their new jobs than their colleagues who trained to become teachers.
1d
Measuring times in billionths of a billionth of a second
Scientists have developed a novel interferometric technique capable of measuring time delays with zeptosecond (a trillionth of a billionth of a second) resolution. They have used this technique to measure the time delay between extreme ultraviolet light pulses emitted by two different isotopes of hydrogen molecules — H2 and D2 — interacting with intense infrared laser pulses. This delay was foun
1d
NASA capsule flies over Apollo landing sites, heads home
NASA's Orion capsule and its test dummies swooped one last time around the moon Monday, flying over a couple Apollo landing sites before heading home.
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3D printing can help produce valuable radiopharmaceuticals
Without accurate diagnostics, it is difficult to talk about effective treatment of patients, especially in the case of cancer. Today, as much as 80% of diagnostic procedures using radiopharmaceuticals require the use of molybdenum-99. In the future, the production efficiency of this valuable radioisotope can be increased using uranium targets prepared by spatial printing.
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NASA delivers first flight hardware to ESA for Lunar Pathfinder
NASA delivered the first flight hardware for the Lunar Pathfinder mission to ESA (European Space Agency), which formally accepted the instrument on Nov. 4. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, developed the instrument, a laser retroreflector array, which will test new navigation techniques for lunar missions.
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Image: Hubble spies emission nebula-star cluster duo
Against a backdrop littered with tiny pinpricks of light glint a few, brighter stars. This whole collection is NGC 1858, an open star cluster in the northwest region of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way that boasts an abundance of star-forming regions. NGC 1858 is estimated to be around 10 million years old.
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Study finds both habitat quality and biodiversity can impact bee health
Efforts to promote the future health of both wild bees and managed honeybee colonies need to consider specific habitat needs, such as the density of wildflowers.
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Feline genetics help pinpoint first-ever domestication of cats
Nearly 10,000 years ago, humans settling in the Fertile Crescent, the areas of the Middle East surrounding the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, made the first switch from hunter-gatherers to farmers. They developed close bonds with the rodent-eating cats that conveniently served as ancient pest-control in society's first civilizations.
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Feline genetics help pinpoint first-ever domestication of cats
Nearly 10,000 years ago, humans settling in the Fertile Crescent, the areas of the Middle East surrounding the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, made the first switch from hunter-gatherers to farmers. They developed close bonds with the rodent-eating cats that conveniently served as ancient pest-control in society's first civilizations.
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Team develops photon-efficient volumetric imaging method with light-sheet scanning fluorescence microscopy
In biological imaging, researchers aim to achieve 3D, high-speed, and high-resolution, with low photobleaching and phototoxicity. The light-sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM) helps meet that aim. Based on a unique excitation and detection scheme, the LSFM can image live specimens with high spatiotemporal resolution and low photobleaching. It has shown great potential for 3D imaging of biological
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Wine forecast: Britain could be Chardonnay champions by 2050
The impact of climate change by 2050 may mean that UK-grown Chardonnay grapes will be ripe enough to produce high quality still wines, in most years.
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The Southern Hemisphere is stormier than the Northern, and we finally know why
For centuries, sailors who had been all over the world knew where the most fearsome storms of all lay in wait: the Southern Hemisphere. "The waves ran mountain-high and threatened to overwhelm [the ship] at every roll," wrote one passenger on an 1849 voyage rounding the tip of South America.
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A paper used capital T's instead of error bars. But wait, there's more!
Mere days after tweets went viral pointing out that the purported error bars in one figure of a paper were really just the capital letter T, the publisher has marked it with an expression of concern. And that's not all that's strange about the paper. The July 2022 article, "Monitoring of Sports Health Indicators Based … Continue reading
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Save over $300 on powerful student laptops with this Black Friday HP laptop deal
HP's student-focused laptops are reduced by as much as $320 in Best Buy's Black Friday HP deals.
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Woman's name and tiny sketches hidden in 1,200-year-old manuscript
Researchers have discovered secret scribbles and sketches that were likely scratched by an elite woman into a medieval manuscript more than 1,200 years ago.
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Ny chatrobot kan klare din eksamen, rette din software og skrive dit essay
Nye fremskridt inden for kunstig intelligens vil ændre arbejdet for masser af vidensarbejdere, mener podcast-vært.
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New research shows people, wildlife, and marine environment benefit when island-ocean connections are restored
Restoring and rewilding islands that have been decimated by damaging invasive species provides benefits to not only the terrestrial ecosystem but to coastal and marine environments as well. Linking land and sea through coordinated conservation efforts may offer unrealized and amplified benefits for biodiversity, human well-being, climate resilience and ocean health, and provides a microcosm for th
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SpaceX Unveils Starshield, an Encrypted Starlink Service for Governments
SpaceX has been providing satellite internet to regular folks under the Starlink brand for several years, but governments have specific needs that aren't addressed by consumer solutions. So, SpaceX is announcing Starshield, a service based on the same technology as Starlink, with added encryption and features for national security applications. SpaceX says Starshield will offer communication, hos
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New research shows people, wildlife, and marine environment benefit when island-ocean connections are restored
Restoring and rewilding islands that have been decimated by damaging invasive species provides benefits to not only the terrestrial ecosystem but to coastal and marine environments as well. Linking land and sea through coordinated conservation efforts may offer unrealized and amplified benefits for biodiversity, human well-being, climate resilience and ocean health, and provides a microcosm for th
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Study finds climate change exacerbates the food gap between North and South Mediterranean countries
The Mediterranean region is widely acknowledged as one of the most exposed in the world to the effects of climate change, water scarcity, biodiversity loss and land degradation, coupled with a nutrition transition of its populations.
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Los Angeles Bans New Oil Wells, Plans to Close Existing Ones
The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously on Friday to ban new oil and gas wells in the city and eventually close existing ones
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Local air regulators say it's impossible to meet smog standards without federal help
Southern California air regulators have approved a sweeping plan to reduce pollution in the nation's smoggiest region within the next two decades, but say they cannot meet national air quality standards without federal action.
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What factors influence Chinese university students' food waste behavior?
Food waste is a major social problem that contributes to the overutilization of natural resources, affecting economic progress and environment protection. Food waste occurs at all stages of the food supply chain, including production, transportation processing and consumption. Reducing food waste in the consumption stage has been an important goal attracting global concerns.
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Seaweed molecules used to improve outcomes for bypass surgery
Researchers are using a natural material derived from seaweed to promote vascular cell growth, prevent blood clots and improve the performance of synthetic vascular grafts used in heart bypass surgery.
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Fearlessness can be learned
The neurotransmitter serotonin plays a key role in both the onset and in the unlearning of fear and anxiety. A research team has been investigating the underlying mechanisms. The researchers showed that mice lacking a specific serotonin receptor unlearn fear much faster than the wild type. The results of the study provide a viable explanation how drugs that are typically used for the treatment of
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A new, unique covalent organic framework for use in drug delivery and clean energy
The energy and health challenges of the human population require the development of advanced materials. In this regard, 3D COFs with their net-like structures and unprecedented porosity show promise. But their synthesis from pre-designed building units is extremely challenging. To this end, researchers have now developed TUS-84, the first 3D COF with a unique scu-c network structure, with enormous
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Author Correction: Multilayer network analysis of FMD transmission and containment among beef cattle farms
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25505-7
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Europe is looking for ways to counter the new US climate law
The European Union should improve its state aid rules and consider more green transition funding to offset possible distortions from the new U.S. climate and tax law, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said.
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Do you want to be a good member of society? Voting, climate change efforts are a start, survey says
You go to work. You pay your taxes. You vote, and you may even go to a place of worship regularly. But which of these actions, if any, make you a good citizen?
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Elon Musk Thinks It's Likely that "Something Bad" Will Happen to Him
Over the weekend, newly-minted Twitter owner and CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter Spaces to discuss — among other things — the "Twitter Files," a dubiously-received investigation into Twitter's suppression of the alleged content of Hunter Biden's laptop during the runup to the 2020 presidential election. The first installment of the series — of which Musk says there will be several, although episode
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SpaceX Rocket Engine Explodes In a Green Blast
Xxxplosive A SpaceX Raptor rocket engine exploded during a recent test, joining a long series of epic blasts at Elon Musk's space travel company. As NASASpaceFlight explains in video of the explosion, the green flash of light that occurred in this specific blaze generally happens when "the engine has started to eat into its copper sections." Known in the spaceflight world as a " rapid unscheduled
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Proteogenomic characterization of MiT family translocation renal cell carcinoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34460-w The molecular landscape of microphthalmia transcription factor family translocation renal cell carcinoma tumours remain to be characterised. Here, the authors perform proteogenomic analysis and reveal dysregulation of DNA repair, mTOR signalling and metabolic processes.
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Political orientation—not party—predicts political tolerance: Study
In an age of high political polarization in the United States, the popular narrative often focuses on an "us versus them" battle between the two major political parties, each accusing the other of intolerance.
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Organic aerosols in remote regions are forming clouds and may have an underestimated effect on climate change
A research group from Nagoya University in Japan has developed a model to clarify the importance of analyzing the formation of clouds from human and natural particles. Since many climate models simplify the formation of atmospheric particles from organic vapors, these findings could lead to more accurate predictions of climate change and global warming.
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Study finds low salinity can work to culture popular Florida pompano fish
The Florida pompano, Trachinotus carolinus, a fish species that can live in waters of a wide range of salinity, is a prime candidate for aquaculture commercial fish production in the United States. Identified by its compressed silvery body with yellow dorsal and ventral surfaces, this species is found in warm water habitats along the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Florida pompano also is a popular target
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What do scientists gain from engaging in public communications?
Psychologists Dr. Friederike Hendriks and Prof Rainer Bromme surveyed scientists at the University of Münster about their involvement in the public outreach activities of two interdisciplinary research networks. The study demonstrates how communication with groups beyond the scientific community can have positive retroactive effects on the scientific collaboration of researchers from different dis
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The Next Great Overdose-Reversing Drug Might Already Exist
Fentanyl-related substances have a bad reputation, but they could also save lives. In the US, a legislative battle to expedite research is heating up.
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Study finds low salinity can work to culture popular Florida pompano fish
The Florida pompano, Trachinotus carolinus, a fish species that can live in waters of a wide range of salinity, is a prime candidate for aquaculture commercial fish production in the United States. Identified by its compressed silvery body with yellow dorsal and ventral surfaces, this species is found in warm water habitats along the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Florida pompano also is a popular target
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Feline genetics help pinpoint first-ever domestication of cats
Nearly 10,000 years ago, humans settling in the Fertile Crescent, the areas of the Middle East surrounding the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, made the first switch from hunter-gatherers to farmers. They developed close bonds with the rodent-eating cats that conveniently served as ancient pest-control in society's first civilizations. A new study found this lifestyle transition for humans was the cat
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Researchers say space atomic clocks could help uncover the nature of dark matter
Studying an atomic clock on-board a spacecraft inside the orbit of Mercury and very near to the Sun could be the trick to uncovering the nature of dark matter.
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The future of replacement organs is (quite possibly) here: Robust human intestinal organoids created in a lab
Researchers have found that growing human intestine-like spheroids in suspension and transferring them to a bioreactor for maturation results in the generation of differentiated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) suitable for subsequent transplantation into experimental mice. This technique is simpler than existing approaches and reliably produces healthy HIOs of predictable size, which could make
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Complete picture of Arctic sea ice freeze-thaw cycle highlights sea ice response to climate change
Years of research show that climate change signals are amplified in the Arctic, and that sea ice in this region is sensitive to increases in Arctic warming. Sea ice greatly modifies the exchanges of heat, momentum and mass between the atmosphere and the ocean. So, the timings of the sea ice melt and freeze onsets, as well as the length of the melt and freeze seasons, play a key role in the 'heat b
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Study examines medication hesitancy to treat childhood anxiety disorders
Researchers have published a new study examining factors behind the decision to begin or decline medication treatment for childhood anxiety disorders after cognitive behavioral therapy did not lead to improvement.
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New cancer testing method that makes regular monitoring affordable
Scientists have discovered a novel low-cost method of testing for cancers. Called the Heatrich-BS assay, this new test sequences clinical samples that have been heated in order to isolate cancer-specific signatures found in a patient's blood. The new method provides a promising non-invasive alternative to tissue biopsies. It costs around US$35 from start to finish, compared to other sequencing met
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Low salinity can work to culture popular Florida pompano fish
Less than 10 aquaculture farms in the U.S. have been successful in commercially raising and distributing the popular Florida pompano fish. A new study has determined the optimal salinity required to culture fingerlings (juvenile fish) from hatch to weaning under on-farm conditions. Researchers have shown it's possible to grow this warm water marine species in salinities a low as 10 parts per thous
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Studies ID ways to help young adults avoid health impacts of stress
It's well established that experiencing stress can hurt our physical health. Now two new studies find that younger adults who take preemptive steps to respond to stress are better able to avoid those negative health outcomes.
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Why you're less likely to get rich these days if your parents aren't already wealthy
Improvements in living standards over generations have been taken for granted in recent history, but these days young people are looking worse off than their parents in one major area: wealth.
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Fashion brand's controversial new campaign and the long history of 'shockvertising'
Kim Kardashian is refining her personal brand. Right-wing news outlet Fox TV is gaining viewers through attention-grabbing headlines. Photographer Gabriele Galimberti is gaining notoriety. All this is due to a recent advertising campaign from leading global fashion brand Balenciaga that has caused widespread controversy.
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Pandoravirus: The melting Arctic is releasing ancient germs—how worried should we be?
Scientists have recently revived several large viruses that had been buried in the frozen Siberian ground (permafrost) for tens of thousands of years.
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Cosmic ray counts hidden in spacecraft data highlight influence of solar cycle at Mars and Venus
Measurements by ESA's long-serving twin missions, Mars Express and Venus Express, have captured the dance between the intensity of high-energy cosmic rays and the influence of the sun's activity across our inner solar system.
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Switch to farming led to the first domestication of cats
Cat genes reveal how invention of agriculture bonded cats with people in ancient Mesopotamia, leading to worldwide feline migration with humans, researchers report. Nearly 10,000 years ago, humans settling in the Fertile Crescent, the areas of the Middle East surrounding the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, made the first switch from hunter-gatherers to farmers. They developed close bonds with the ro
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Emotions: The What, Where, and How
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Nasa's Orion spacecraft is homeward-bound
The ship fires its main engine near the Moon, committing itself to a return to Earth on Sunday.
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New cancer testing method that makes regular monitoring affordable
Scientists have discovered a novel low-cost method of testing for cancers. Called the Heatrich-BS assay, this new test sequences clinical samples that have been heated in order to isolate cancer-specific signatures found in a patient's blood. The new method provides a promising non-invasive alternative to tissue biopsies. It costs around US$35 from start to finish, compared to other sequencing met
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Study sheds light on phylogenomics and tree of life of flowering plants
Flowering plants (angiosperms) are the largest, most diversified, and most successful major lineage of green plants, with ~330,000 known species. In the past decade, the accelerated development of high-throughput sequencing technology has provided a great impetus for phylogenetic studies of angiosperms, and a large number of phylogenetic studies adopting hundreds to thousands of genes across a wea
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The impact of COVID-19 on young, unaccompanied asylum seekers in the UK
New research findings from the Lives on Hold, Our Stories Told (LOHST) project highlights failures in the U.K.'s legal and welfare systems and their impacts on unaccompanied young people seeking asylum.
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Report: Climate change for food projects
Many people working in local or community food projects already know that they need to review how they operate in order to ensure they are doing as much as possible to reduce future negative impacts on the climate.
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Opinion: Jobs are up! Wages are up! So why am I as an economist so gloomy?
In any other time, the jobs news that came down on Dec. 2, 2022, would be reason for cheer.
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Author Correction: Multilayer redox-based HfOx/Al2O3/TiO2 memristive structures for neuromorphic computing
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25502-w Author Correction: Multilayer redox-based HfO x /Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 memristive structures for neuromorphic computing
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Author Correction: A blockchain based lightweight peer-to-peer energy trading framework for secured high throughput micro-transactions
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-25504-8
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Parasite may create risk-taking wolves in Yellowstone
New research suggests that a common parasite associated with cats turns Yellowstone National Park wolves into risk takers, who when infected are much more likely to disperse across the landscape and become pack leaders.
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Study sheds light on phylogenomics and tree of life of flowering plants
Flowering plants (angiosperms) are the largest, most diversified, and most successful major lineage of green plants, with ~330,000 known species. In the past decade, the accelerated development of high-throughput sequencing technology has provided a great impetus for phylogenetic studies of angiosperms, and a large number of phylogenetic studies adopting hundreds to thousands of genes across a wea
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Black hole 'carnivals' may produce the signals seen by gravitational-wave detectors
Since 2015, the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA Collaboration have detected about 85 pairs of black holes crashing into each other. We now know that Einstein was right: gravitational waves are generated by these systems as they inspiral around each other, distorting space-time with their colossal masses as they go. We also know that these cosmic crashes happen frequently: as detector sensitivity improves, we are
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Team reveals extraordinary plasticity of the glucocorticoid receptor
Glucocorticoids—such as cortisone—are among the most widely used anti-inflammatory drugs, and are used to treat asthma, psoriasis, organ transplantation and even COVID-19. Regarding their pharmacological action, the activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is crucial.
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Indigenous spiritual teaching in schools can foster reconciliation and inclusion
Indigenous education has become an area of growing concern for public schools across Canada. We are living in an era of reconciliation where Indigenous populations are growing and interest in confronting our shared histories continues to develop. Part of that involves focusing on how primary and secondary schools are addressing the Indigenous experience in Canada.
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DeepMind's Latest AI Trounces Human Players at the Game 'Stratego'
AI hates uncertainty. Yet to navigate our unpredictable world, it needs to learn to make choices with imperfect information—as we do every single day. DeepMind just took a stab at solving this conundrum. The trick was to interweave game theory into an algorithmic strategy loosely based on the human brain called deep reinforcement learning. The result, DeepNash, toppled human experts in a highly s
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Team reveals extraordinary plasticity of the glucocorticoid receptor
Glucocorticoids—such as cortisone—are among the most widely used anti-inflammatory drugs, and are used to treat asthma, psoriasis, organ transplantation and even COVID-19. Regarding their pharmacological action, the activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is crucial.
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Pro-choice crowdfunding has surged in the U.S. But donating that way has risks
The Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization decision by the United States Supreme Court earlier this year overturned constitutional protections of reproductive choice for Americans.
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Measuring times in billionths of a billionth of a second
How fast do electrons inside a molecule move? Well, it is so fast that it takes them just a few attoseconds (a billionth of billionth of a second) to jump from one atom to another. Blink and you missed it—millions of billions of times. So measuring such ultrafast processes is a daunting task.
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Coinbase CEO Says Only a "Gullible Person" Wouldn't Think FTX Stole User Funds
Messy Accounting As the dust starts to settle following crypto exchange FTX's dramatic implosion last month — an event that wiped out a $32 billion valuation in a matter of days and even took down other exchanges with it — competing exchanges are starting to actively distance themselves from disgraced former FTX CEO Sam Bankman-Fried. "I don't care how messy your accounting is (or how rich you ar
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Scientists call for better controls of Australia's groundwater
After Australia's floods subside, a study led by Flinders University has called for action on 18 challenges facing more sustainable use of vital groundwater, a natural resource valued at more than $34 billion to the economy.
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How pastoral farming can help to avoid a biodiversity crisis
The world is losing its biodiversity. An estimated 41,000 animal species are now threatened with extinction. World leaders will convene at the UN COP15 biodiversity conference in Montreal this month to discuss ways of reversing this decline.
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Researchers say space atomic clocks could help uncover the nature of dark matter
Studying an atomic clock on-board a spacecraft inside the orbit of Mercury and very near to the sun might be the trick to uncovering the nature of dark matter, suggests a new study published in Nature Astronomy.
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Paying people money for losing weight works
Paying cash to people with obesity for losing a specific amount of weight or completing weight-reducing activities works better than many other methods, a new study shows. Cash beats offering stand-alone free tools, such as weight-loss programs, diet books, and wearable fitness trackers, the researchers report. The researchers tracked the weight-loss efforts for up to a year of 668 low-income, mo
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Amazing image of crescent Earth rising over the moon captured by Orion
The Orion capsule has made its closest pass above the surface of the moon and begun its journey back to Earth, capturing astonishing views of our planet on the way
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COP15 target to reverse biodiversity loss by 2030 is 'unrealistic'
Goal to "halt and reverse" biodiversity loss by 2030 – a headline aim of the COP15 biodiversity summit – could take 80 rather than eight years to achieve, say conservationists
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HILDA Survey finds working from home boosts women's job satisfaction more than men's, and that has a downside
The shift to working from home is unlikely to reverse.
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In Australia and South Africa, construction has started on the biggest radio observatory in Earth's history
Construction of the world's biggest radio astronomy facility, the SKA Observatory, begins today. The observatory is a global project 30 years in the making.
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A dangerous pesticide isn't being monitored in key bird of prey populations. We're shedding light on that gap
It was once regarded as a miracle chemical to protect against disease and improve global food production. The man who discovered its properties even won a Nobel Prize for medicine. But today, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is best known for its devastating effects on the environment, as well as on animal and human health.
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Protecting 30% of Earth's surface for nature means thinking about connections near and far
A biodiversity crisis is reducing the variety of life on Earth. Under pressure from land and water pollution, development, overhunting, poaching, climate change and species invasions, approximately 1 million plant and animal species are at risk of extinction.
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1 in 10 women may develop high blood pressure after childbirth
One in 10 women who did not have hypertension before or during pregnancy may develop it up to a year after they give birth, according to a new study. People with no history of high blood pressure can develop hypertension for the first time in the weeks and months after childbirth, but until now, there has been very little data on first-time hypertension that develops more than six weeks after del
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A dangerous pesticide isn't being monitored in key bird of prey populations. We're shedding light on that gap
It was once regarded as a miracle chemical to protect against disease and improve global food production. The man who discovered its properties even won a Nobel Prize for medicine. But today, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is best known for its devastating effects on the environment, as well as on animal and human health.
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Protecting 30% of Earth's surface for nature means thinking about connections near and far
A biodiversity crisis is reducing the variety of life on Earth. Under pressure from land and water pollution, development, overhunting, poaching, climate change and species invasions, approximately 1 million plant and animal species are at risk of extinction.
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The Year Without Germs Changed Kids
In the spring of 2021, Brett Finlay, a microbiologist at the University of British Columbia, offered the world a bold and worrying prediction. "My guess is that five years from now we are going to see a bolus of kids with asthma and obesity," he told Wired . Those children, he said, would be "the COVID kids": those born just before or during the height of the crisis , when the coronavirus was eve
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How to Stop the Next World War
Our efforts to help restore the technological prowess of the U.S. military started six years ago in a Pentagon conference room. One of us, a former executive and tech innovator in Silicon Valley, was then serving as the head of the Defense Innovation Board, created to match the needs of the Department of Defense with America's most advanced technologies. The other was the deputy secretary of defe
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The Transcendent Brain
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. Recently, I found myself in the office of the neuroscientist Robert Desimone, the director of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, discussing what it takes to know that two people are going to fall in love
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Exome variants associated with asthma and allergy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-24960-6
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Post-lockdown auto emissions can't hide in the grass
Scientists have a new way to demonstrate which neighborhoods are most affected by air pollution from vehicle emissions: analyzing wild grass for radiocarbon content, which is a proxy for fossil fuel emissions.
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Student 'slave auctions' illustrate the existence of a hidden culture of domination and subjugation in US schools
In an otherwise normal football season, two California high schools abruptly canceled the remainder of their games for the same reason. Players on both teams participated in troublesome acts of racism.
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New quantum dots study uncovers implications for biological imaging
A new study involving researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago achieved a milestone in the synthesis of multifunctional photonic nanomaterials.
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Three ways cryptocurrency is changing the way colleges do business with students and donors
Until about 2020, universities used cryptocurrencies only to pay ransoms to criminals attacking their networks. A fast payment to criminals helped victim universities restore their networks quickly.
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Ørkenens gåde er løst: Namibias mystiske cirkler har forvirret forskere i årevis
PLUS. Millioner af cirkler i Namibias ørken har ført til et hav af mærkværdige teorier. Ingen af dem passede, viser tysk forskning.
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Webb Telescope Pictures of Titan Help Start an Alien Storm Forecast
Saturn's largest moon came under the gaze of NASA's powerful Webb space observatory, allowing it and another telescope to capture clouds drifting through Titan's methane-rich atmosphere.
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The industrial metaverse: A game-changer for operational technology
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G-protein coupled receptor findings could accelerate research and development of new cancer treatments
Researchers from City of Hope, one of the largest cancer research and treatment organizations in the United States, have identified how a protein receptor targeted by about 33% of all federally approved medication works. The discovery could facilitate pharmaceutical research because how and why this protein chooses to link to other proteins is critical to how cells will respond to medicines.
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G-protein coupled receptor findings could accelerate research and development of new cancer treatments
Researchers from City of Hope, one of the largest cancer research and treatment organizations in the United States, have identified how a protein receptor targeted by about 33% of all federally approved medication works. The discovery could facilitate pharmaceutical research because how and why this protein chooses to link to other proteins is critical to how cells will respond to medicines.
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Research inspects a distant gamma-ray emitting blazar
An international team of astronomers has performed a long-term multiwavelength study of a distant gamma-ray emitting blazar known as 1ES 0647+250. Results of the research, published November 23 on arXiv.org, yield important insights into the long-term variability of this source.
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The satellite data mapping Australia's new climate extremes
For decades, satellites have been keeping a watchful eye on Earth, relaying increasingly precise, detailed and timelier information than ever before.
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Researchers discover a master regulator of plant immunity
The demonstration that a regulatory protein linked to stress responses in plants also serves as a master switch for anti-pathogen immunity could help breeders develop more pest-resistant and climate-resilient crops.
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Quantum light source could pave the way to a quantum internet
The ability to integrate fiber-based quantum information technology into existing optical networks would be a significant step toward applications in quantum communication. To achieve this, quantum light sources must be able to emit single photons with controllable positioning and polarization and at 1.35 and 1.55 micrometer ranges where light travels at minimum loss in existing optical fiber netw
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Glassy discovery offers computational windfall to researchers across disciplines
John Crocker had expected to see a flat line—a familiar horizontal track with some slight peaks and valleys—but the plot of energy in front of him dove sharply downward.
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Air pollution disparities and equality assessments of US national decarbonization strategies
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35098-4 Decarbonization is essential to achieving climate goals, but myopic decarbonization policies that ignore co-pollutants may leave Black and high-poverty communities with 26-34% higher PM2.5 exposure over the energy transition.
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SpaceX Pushes Back Starlink Data Caps to February 2023
The unparalleled success of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket has helped Elon Musk's aerospace firm deploy a megaconstellation of Starlink satellites in just a few years. The service has been available to consumers for several years, and speeds were impressive at launch, but it's slowing down as more users get on the network. SpaceX's solution was to implement a 1TB data cap . They were supposed to go int
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A clot too far: An embalmer dissects antivax misinformation about blood clots in Died Suddenly
Two weeks ago, COVID-19 conspiracy theorist Stew Peters released an antivax pseudodocumentary, Died Suddenly , whose main claim is that COVID-19 vaccines cause clots that have caused a massive wave of people to "die suddenly." Key to its narrative are embalmers claiming that they are seeing more clots in the bodies they are embalming than ever before. SBM has recruited Benjamin Schmidt, an experi
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The Future of Antibody Discovery for Biotherapeutics
Modern screening methods help usher in a new age of antibody therapeutics.
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Drug that targets ACE2 receptors may work against new covid variants
A drug that is approved for treating gallstones and liver conditions inhibits cells' ACE2 receptors, which the coronavirus' spike protein binds to
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Gen Zers are taking on more debt, roommates, and jobs as their economy gets worse and worse
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Fusion robots at work in the UK space industry
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ispace lunar lander: Japanese firm is racing to complete first private moon mission
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Airbus looks to run full-size airliners on liquid hydrogen by 2035
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The truth about hydrogen fuel and how it can still play a unique role in decarbonization
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Decoding the cell signals between young proteins and their 'chaperones'
Of the 25,000 different proteins in the human body, insulin, antibodies, and collagen are among the few that perform their biological jobs by literally folding into 3D shapes.
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Survey reveals how Australians were affected by the start of COVID-19
A new report reveals how the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic impacted Australians, as many of us received government income support, worked from home under lockdown, watched more TV and worried over an uncertain future.
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Homeless numbers have jumped since COVID housing efforts ended. And the problem is spreading beyond the big cities
The numbers of people who are homeless have risen sharply across Australia, with soaring housing costs emerging as the biggest driver of the increase. The Australian Homelessness Monitor 2022, released today, reports that the average monthly number of people using homelessness services increased by 8% in the four years to 2021–22. That's double the population growth rate over that period.
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Why sponges may be the 'canary in the coal mine' for impacts of marine heat waves
Marine sponges were thought to be more resilient to ocean warming than other organisms. But earlier this year, New Zealand recorded the largest-ever sponge bleaching event off its southern coastline.
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The future of replacement organs is (quite possibly) here: Robust human intestinal organoids created in a lab
Growing miniature organ-like tissues in the lab is already within our reach. Now, researchers from Japan have developed a new approach that enables intestinal mini-organs to be grown more easily and efficiently in the lab. This holds immense promise for regenerative medicine.
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Researchers solve pre-harvest sprouting in rice and wheat
Seed dormancy is an important survival tool for plants because it allows them to weather conditions not conducive to survival. At the same time, excessive dormancy may lessen cultivation time. In response, farmers often plant low dormancy cultivars of rice and wheat in order to achieve a higher, more uniform emergence rate after sowing.
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Demystifying the wild world of crypto | Laura Shin
Is crypto truly the next big thing, or is it just a money-sucking flash in the pan? In a wide-ranging interview, journalist Laura Shin explains what crypto is (and what it definitely isn't), taking us through the most recent turns in its constantly evolving story — including the recent meltdown caused by the bankruptcy of FTX. (This conversation, hosted by TED tech curator Simone Ross, was part o
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How can we escape soaring energy bills? Stop using fossil fuels | Tessa Khan
As oil and gas companies continue to make record profits off of the same forces driving climate chaos, war and soaring energy bills, it's become clear that boom times for the fossil fuel industry are bad times for the rest of us, says climate change lawyer Tessa Khan. She asks us to consider the true cost of our reliance on fossil fuels, outlining why the transition to safer, cleaner forms of ener
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The future of replacement organs is (quite possibly) here: Robust human intestinal organoids created in a lab
Growing miniature organ-like tissues in the lab is already within our reach. Now, researchers from Japan have developed a new approach that enables intestinal mini-organs to be grown more easily and efficiently in the lab. This holds immense promise for regenerative medicine.
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Researchers solve pre-harvest sprouting in rice and wheat
Seed dormancy is an important survival tool for plants because it allows them to weather conditions not conducive to survival. At the same time, excessive dormancy may lessen cultivation time. In response, farmers often plant low dormancy cultivars of rice and wheat in order to achieve a higher, more uniform emergence rate after sowing.
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A new milestone for laser technology: Seeded free-electron lasers
Extremely intense light pulses generated by free-electron lasers (FELs) are versatile tools in research. Particularly in the X-ray range, they can be deployed to analyze the details of atomic structures of a wide variety of materials and to follow fundamental ultrafast processes with great precision.
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Giant mantle plume reveals Mars is more active than previously thought
On Earth, shifting tectonic plates reshuffle the planet's surface and make for a dynamic interior, so the absence of such processes on Mars led many to think of it as a dead planet, where not much happened in the past 3 billion years.
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Girl with a Pearl Earring and Mona Lisa recreated with nanotechnology
A technique that uses nanoscale structures to reproduce colour has been employed to make copies of famous paintings, and could also help fight counterfeiting
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Dendritic cells direct circadian anti-tumor immune responses
Nature, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05605-0
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FXR inhibition may protect from SARS-CoV-2 infection by reducing ACE2
Nature, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05594-0
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Severe COVID could cause markers of old age in the brain
Nature, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04253-8 Key genes that are active in the brains of older people are also active in the brains of people who developed serious COVID-19.
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A liver drug reduces SARS-CoV-2 entry into cells
Nature, Published online: 05 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04149-7 A widely used drug called UDCA reduces SARS-CoV-2 infection in human organoid structures, animals and human organs maintained outside the body. Individuals using UDCA for liver conditions are less likely to develop severe COVID-19 than are people who did not use it. UDCA treatment could help to protect people with suppress
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How opioid withdrawal threatens social support
New research identifies a key molecular link between opioid withdrawal and social aversion in the brains of mice. The acute physical illness characterizing opioid withdrawal is tough enough to endure even with full family, community, and medical support—so it is a brutal and sometimes deadly irony that one of withdrawal's salient symptoms is extreme social aversion. "Self-isolation can cause addi
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The Missing Mammal That May Have Shaped California's Kelp Forests
Researchers claim that the behavior of a massive extinct herbivore, the Steller's sea cow, might inform conservation efforts of threatened ecosystems today.
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Simulations predict the existence of black hole radio-wave hot spots
Black holes, regions in spacetime where gravity is so strong that nothing can escape from them, are among the most fascinating and widely studied cosmic phenomena. While there are now countless theories about their formation and underlying physics, many questions remain unanswered.
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Scientists decrypt the 'mechanical code' of DNA
A new study has deciphered the mechanical code of DNA to reveal previously unknown ways in which nature encodes biological information in DNA sequence.
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Enhancing earthquake detection from orbit
When a major earthquake strikes, nearby seismometers can inform rapid alerts to residents and emergency services that potentially hazardous shaking or tsunamis may be headed their way. However, local seismometer measurements are not sufficient to determine in real time just how big the largest earthquakes are.
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More magma found below Yellowstone Caldera than expected
A team of researchers with members affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S. and one in Australia reports evidence that there is much more magma below the Yellowstone Caldera than previously thought.
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Professors Alarmed by New AI That Writes Essays About as Well as Dumb Undergrads
AI Student It's no secret that artificial intelligence algorithms have increasingly good at generating text that could almost pass as being written by an actual human being. OpenAI's latest release, ChatGPT, is the most impressive yet. The algorithm is an offshot of the company's groundbreaking GPT-3 AI, but makes it so that pretty much anybody can use it to generate text on virtually any topic.
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