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News2022November02

UK parents told to look out for signs of strep A in their children after six deaths
Health Security Agency issues rare alert over rise in cases, urging people to seek immediate medical help if they see symptoms Q&A: what are the symptoms and how can strep A be treated? Parents across the UK are being urged to look out for symptoms of strep A infection in their children after health officials revealed a rise in cases had led to the death of six youngsters. The UK Health Security
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Scientists Say They've Figured Out the Ideal Urinal for Not Splashing Back
Pants Protection Urinals are convenient, but they're not known for their cleanliness. Splashback is both annoying and unsanitary, not to mention a gross problem for those that keep our bathrooms clean. So scientists at the University of Waterloo in Canada took it upon themselves to design the perfect splash free urinal. "I think most of us have been a little inattentive at our post and looked dow
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Health benefits of using wind energy instead of fossil fuels
A new study finds that the health benefits associated with wind power could more than quadruple if operators turned down output from the most polluting fossil-fuel-based power plants when energy from wind is available. However, compared to wealthier communities, disadvantaged communities would reap a smaller share of these benefits.
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So Many People Die at Motorcycle Rallies That Organ Donations Spike
Huge motorcycle rallies may indeed be as dangerous as they look — but according to a new study, one biker's loss could be someone else's gain. The joint analysis undertaken by Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital found that between the years 2005 and 2021, organ donations jumped 21 percent per day on average during these rallies — and even more surprisingly, as a Harvard pres
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Optimal blood tests for development of new therapies of Alzheimer's disease
A new study have identified which blood tests are best at detecting Alzheimer's disease during the earliest stages, and also other another blood test that are is optimal for detecting relevant treatment effects. These findings will speed up the development of new therapies that can slow down the disease progression.
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'Virtual pillars' separate and sort blood-based nanoparticles
Engineers at Duke University have developed a device that uses sound waves to separate and sort the tiniest particles found in blood in a matter of minutes. The technology is based on a concept called "virtual pillars" and could be a boon to both scientific research and medical applications.
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Basho in the machine
AI shows potential in creating literary art rivaling that of humans without human help. AI-generated haiku without human intervention was compared with a contrasting method. The evaluators found it challenging to distinguish between the haiku penned by humans and those generated by AI. Evaluators showed algorithm aversion when unconsciously giving lower scores to those they felt were AI-generated.
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The Far Right Is Getting What It Asked For
If you're looking for a way to understand the right wing's internet-poisoned, extremist trajectory, one great document is an infamous October 6 tweet from the House Judiciary GOP that read, " Kanye. Elon. Trump. " This tweet was likely intended to own the libs by adding Kanye to an informal, Avengers-style list of supposed free-speech warriors and truth tellers—a variation, perhaps, on the sort o
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The Cursed Goal
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. Yesterday, the FIFA-ranked No. 2 team in the world, Belgium exited the World Cup after a narrow victory over Canada, a loss to group winner Morocco, and a scoreless draw with the 2018 finalists Croatia. But it was not just that it went out, but the way it went out that is t
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New AI Tells Children That Santa Isn't Real
Kringled OpenAI's powerful new chatbot is so deft at tone that it was able to pretend to be Santa Claus while explaining to someone's kid that Santa isn't, in fact, real. Heartwrenching! As she kicked the tires on the new ChatGPT 's capabilities, Shopify exec Cynthia Savard posted the generated text that she said made her "slightly emotional." "I am writing to let you know that I am not a real pe
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Discovery of BODIPY J-aggregates with absorption maxima beyond 1200 nm for biophotonics | Science Advances
Abstract Organic dyes with absorption maxima in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II; 1000 to 1700 nm) are of great interest in biophotonics. However, because of the lack of appropriate molecular scaffolds, current research in this field is limited to cyanine dyes, and developing NIR-II–absorbing organic dyes for biophotonics remains an immense challenge. Here, we rationally designed an etheny
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Limpet teeth microstructure unites auxeticity with extreme strength and high stiffness | Science Advances
Abstract Materials displaying negative Poisson's ratio, referred to as auxeticity, have been found in nature and created in engineering through various structural mechanisms. However, uniting auxeticity with high strength and high stiffness has been challenging. Here, combining in situ nanomechanical testing with microstructure-based modeling, we show that the leading part of limpet teeth success
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Super-resolution image display using diffractive decoders | Science Advances
Abstract High-resolution image projection over a large field of view (FOV) is hindered by the restricted space-bandwidth product (SBP) of wavefront modulators. We report a deep learning–enabled diffractive display based on a jointly trained pair of an electronic encoder and a diffractive decoder to synthesize/project super-resolved images using low-resolution wavefront modulators. The digital enc
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Treatment of epilepsy using a targeted p38γ kinase gene therapy | Science Advances
Abstract Hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau has been implicated in dementia, epilepsy, and other neurological disorders. In contrast, site-specific phosphorylation of tau at threonine 205 (T205) by the kinase p38γ was shown to disengage tau from toxic pathways, serving a neuroprotective function in Alzheimer's disease. Using a viral-mediated gene delivery approach in different
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DNA origami–based artificial antigen-presenting cells for adoptive T cell therapy | Science Advances
Abstract Nanosized artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) with efficient signal presentation hold great promise for in vivo adoptive cell therapy. Here, we used DNA origami nanostructures as two-dimensional scaffolds to regulate the spatial presentation of activating ligands at nanoscale to construct high-effective aAPCs. The DNA origami–based aAPC comprises costimulatory ligands anti-CD28 a
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Deep brain stimulation of the subgenual cingulum and uncinate fasciculus for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder | Science Advances
Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been investigated for neuropsychiatric disorders. In this phase 1 trial, we treated four posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients with DBS delivered to the subgenual cingulum and the uncinate fasciculus. In addition to validated clinical scales, patients underwent neuroimaging studies and psychophysiological assessments of fear conditioning, extincti
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A Triassic crown squamate | Science Advances
Abstract Mammals, birds, and squamates (lizards, snakes, and relatives) are key living vertebrates, and thus understanding their evolution underpins important questions in biodiversity science. Whereas the origins of mammals and birds are relatively well understood, the roots of squamates have been obscure. Here, we report a modern-type lizard from the Late Triassic of England [202 million years
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Widespread formation of toxic nitrated bisphenols indoors by heterogeneous reactions with HONO | Science Advances
Abstract With numerous structurally diverse indoor contaminants, indoor transformation chemistry has been largely unexplored. Here, by integrating protein affinity purification and nontargeted mass spectrometry analysis (PUCA), we identified a substantial class of previously unrecognized indoor transformation products formed through gas-surface reactions with nitrous acid (HONO). Through the PUCA
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Biomolecular condensates can both accelerate and suppress aggregation of α-synuclein | Science Advances
Abstract Biomolecular condensates present in cells can fundamentally affect the aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins and play a role in the regulation of this process. While liquid-liquid phase separation of amyloidogenic proteins by themselves can act as an alternative nucleation pathway, interaction of partly disordered aggregation-prone proteins with preexisting condensates that act as locali
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Perovskite grain wrapping by converting interfaces and grain boundaries into robust and water-insoluble low-dimensional perovskites | Science Advances
Abstract Stabilizing perovskite solar cells requires consideration of all defective sites in the devices. Substantial efforts have been devoted to interfaces, while stabilization of grain boundaries received less attention. Here, we report on a molecule tributyl(methyl)phosphonium iodide (TPI), which can convert perovskite into a wide bandgap one-dimensional (1D) perovskite that is mechanically r
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Transcranial photobiomodulation enhances visual working memory capacity in humans | Science Advances
Abstract Transcranial photobiomodulation (tPBM) is a safe and noninvasive intervention that has shown promise for improving cognitive performance. Whether tPBM can modulate brain activity and thereby enhance working memory (WM) capacity in humans remains unclear. In this study, we found that 1064-nm tPBM applied to the right prefrontal cortex (PFC) improves visual working memory capacity and incr
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Angiogenic adipokine C1q-TNF–related protein 9 ameliorates myocardial infarction via histone deacetylase 7–mediated MEF2 activation | Science Advances
Abstract C1q/tumor necrosis factor–related protein 9 (CTRP9) is an adipokine and has high potential as a therapeutic target. However, the role of CTRP9 in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis remains unclear. We found CTRP9 to induce HDAC7 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation via tight regulation of AMPK in vascular endothelial cells, leading to angiogenesis through increased MEF2 activity. The expression
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Lifetime risk of imprisonment in the United States remains high and starkly unequal | Science Advances
Abstract How likely are U.S. males and females of different ethnoracial groups to be imprisoned over the course of their lives, and how have these risks changed in recent decades? Using survey and administrative data, we update 20th-century estimates of the cumulative risk of imprisonment for the 21st century. In 2016, non-Hispanic Black males' lifetime risk of imprisonment remained very high—mor
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MacroH2A impedes metastatic growth by enforcing a discrete dormancy program in disseminated cancer cells | Science Advances
Abstract MacroH2A variants have been linked to inhibition of metastasis through incompletely understood mechanisms. Here, we reveal that solitary dormant disseminated cancer cells (DCCs) display increased levels of macroH2A variants in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma PDX in vivo models and patient samples compared to proliferating primary or metastatic lesions. We demonstrate that dormancy-
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Impacts of wind power on air quality, premature mortality, and exposure disparities in the United States | Science Advances
Abstract Understanding impacts of renewable energy on air quality and associated human exposures is essential for informing future policy. We estimate the impacts of U.S. wind power on air quality and pollution exposure disparities using hourly data from 2011 to 2017 and detailed atmospheric chemistry modeling. Wind power associated with renewable portfolio standards in 2014 resulted in $2.0 bill
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Long noncoding RNA Gm2694 drives depressive-like behaviors in male mice by interacting with GRP78 to disrupt endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis | Science Advances
Abstract Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in various biological processes and implicated in the regulation of neuronal activity, but the potential role of lncRNAs in depression remains largely unknown. Here, we identified that lncRNA Gm2694 was increased in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of male mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS). The down-regulation of Gm2694 in
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Active DNA demethylation of developmental cis-regulatory regions predates vertebrate origins | Science Advances
Abstract DNA methylation [5-methylcytosine (5mC)] is a repressive gene-regulatory mark required for vertebrate embryogenesis. Genomic 5mC is tightly regulated through the action of DNA methyltransferases, which deposit 5mC, and ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes, which participate in its active removal through the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). TET enzymes are essential for mamm
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Cheetah marking trees are hotspots for communication also for other species
Marking trees are important hotspots of communication for cheetahs: Here they exchange information with and about other cheetahs via scent marks, urine and scats. A team has now shown that several mammalian species on farmland in Namibia maintain a network for intra- and interspecific communication at cheetah trees. Black-backed jackals, African wildcats and warthogs visited and sniffed the cheeta
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Do women age differently from men?
The effect of medicines on women and men can differ significantly. This also applies to the currently most promising anti-ageing drug rapamycin, as researchers have now shown. They report that the drug only prolongs the lifespan of female fruit flies, but not that of males. In addition, rapamycin only slowed the development of age-related pathological changes in the gut in female flies. The resear
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New genetic mutation behind childhood glaucoma identified
An international team of researchers has discovered a new genetic mutation that leads to childhood glaucoma, and in the process, uncovered a new mechanism for causing the disease. They hope their findings can lead to better screening for families affected by this devastating condition and one day new treatments.
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Deteriorating neurons are source of human brain inflammation in Alzheimer's disease
Scientists have found that neurons from people with Alzheimer's disease show deterioration and undergo a late-life stress process called senescence. These neurons have a loss of functional activity, impaired metabolism, and increased brain inflammation. The researchers also discovered that targeting the deteriorating neurons with therapeutics could be an effective strategy for preventing or treati
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Free Speech Absolutist Elon Musk Discovers That Some Speech Is Unacceptable After All
After his gallingly anti-Semitic rant on InfoWars yesterday, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West got suspended by Twitter. That would be perfectly normal on a regular social network, but Twitter has been anything but since it was acquired by self-proclaimed "free speech absolutist" Elon Musk this year. In announcing the suspension, Musk posted a four -letter tweet that appears to stand for "f
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The End of Companion Television
Media Winter is here once more, and it is getting ugly. It seems as though every news giant is shrinking toward 2023 through end-of-year layoffs, hiring freezes, or otherwise Dickensian austerity. Text chains and Slack channels are bursting with farewells and expressions of uncertainty about the future. Industry veterans will tell you they've come to expect these Christmas-time cutbacks. The Gann
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Fossil found in drawer is found to be oldest known modern lizard ancestor
Specimen collected in 1950s pushes back origins of squamates by at least 34m years The fossilised remains of a small, sharp-toothed lizard, left in a cupboard for more than half a century, have pushed back the origins of the group that encompasses modern snakes and lizards by tens of millions of years. The specimen was collected in the 1950s from a quarry near Tortworth in Gloucestershire by the
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FCC: SpaceX Can Only Launch 7,500 Second-Gen Starlink Satellites
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has finally granted SpaceX the license it needed to begin deploying a new generation of Starlink satellites. While SpaceX initially wanted authorization to launch almost 30,000 v2 satellites, the FCC has only given the go-ahead for 7,500 (at altitudes over 500 kilometers) instead of the 29,988 it wanted. However, that's still more than double the number
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Study indicates SARS-CoV-2 variants are still transmissible between species
Scientists believe bats first transmitted SARS-CoV-2 to humans in December 2019, and while the virus has since evolved into several variants such as delta and omicron, a new study indicates the virus is still highly transmissible between mammals. Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) developed computer simulations that show the coronaviruses use their spike proteins to attach them
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Is that turtle legal? Fighting wildlife trafficking with stable isotopes
Wildlife trafficking is a well-known threat to biodiversity, with many species imperiled by poachers working in the illegal pet trade. Worse still, when traffickers are caught in the act, they often evade prosecution through animal "laundering"—erroneously claiming that the confiscated wildlife was bred in captivity.
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Study indicates SARS-CoV-2 variants are still transmissible between species
Scientists believe bats first transmitted SARS-CoV-2 to humans in December 2019, and while the virus has since evolved into several variants such as delta and omicron, a new study indicates the virus is still highly transmissible between mammals. Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) developed computer simulations that show the coronaviruses use their spike proteins to attach them
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Airbus to Strap Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engine to Massive Superjumbo Jet
Hydrogen Hype Airbus has announced that it's strapping an experimental hydrogen fuel cell engine to a modified A380 superjumbo jet, an exciting new foray into the concept of powering commercial passenger aircraft with hydrogen alone. The company says it's planning to start test flights in 2026 and launch a fully operational first zero-emissions aircraft by 2035 — an ambitious timeline, considerin
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Scientists Hopeful About Promising Results From HIV Vaccine
An experimental two-dose HIV vaccine developed by an international team of researchers has the scientific community hopeful after it was found to generate antibodies against the deadly virus in 35 out of 36 patients, as detailed in a new paper published in the journal Science — and without any serious side effect. As is common in medical research, there are caveats here. We still don't know if th
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How gravity may cause irritable bowel syndrome
A new theory suggests irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most common gastrointestinal disorder, may be caused by gravity. An expert explains that IBS — and many other conditions — could result from the body's inability to manage gravity.
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Ranches of the future could be home to cows wearing smart-watch-style sensors powered by their movements
Using smart technology to monitor the health, reproductivity, location, and environmental conditions of cattle can help with food safety and supply chain efficiency, but this monitoring adds energy cost to an already highly emissive industry. To combat this, researchers have designed a wearable smart device for cows that captures the kinetic energy created by even their smallest movements and uses
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New and more detailed world map of antimicrobial resistance
There are large geographical differences in both how frequently resistant genes occur and in which types of bacteria the genes are found. This is shown by analyses of sewage from throughout the globe, thus underlining the importance of combating antimicrobial resistance based on data on local conditions.
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Ranches of the future could be home to cows wearing smart-watch-style sensors powered by their movements
Using smart technology to monitor the health, reproductivity, location, and environmental conditions of cattle can help with food safety and supply chain efficiency, but this monitoring adds energy cost to an already highly emissive industry. To combat this, researchers have designed a wearable smart device for cows that captures the kinetic energy created by even their smallest movements and uses
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Researchers boost accuracy of home-based continuous glucose monitoring
Home-based continuous glucose monitoring for diabetics up to now has had to trade ease of use, low cost, and portability for a somewhat lower sensitivity—and thus accuracy—compared to similar systems in clinics or hospitals. A team of researchers has now developed a biosensor for such monitors that involves "zero-dimensional" quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanospheres (AuNSs), and no longer has to co
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Smarter 'transport' robots could speed up online deliveries
Researchers are working to speed up the online delivery process with a software model designed to make "transport" robots smarter. Imagine a team of humans and robots working together to process online orders—real-life workers strategically positioned among their automated coworkers who are moving intelligently back and forth in a warehouse space, picking items for shipping to the customer. This
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Broken symmetries provide opportunities for thermal emission management
Radiative heat transfer is a ubiquitous physical process in our universe. Any object with a temperature above absolute zero exchanges thermal energy with the environment. In physics, thermal emission originates from electromagnetic radiation induced by the thermal motion of charged particles inside materials.
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Zapped, infrared-heated lentils are more nutritious and 'greener' to process
By combining heat from microwaves and infrared energy, University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers have uncovered a new, more energy efficient way to process lentils, making them more nutritious and digestible. The findings may result in more value for consumers, food processors, ingredient manufacturers, and producers.
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How language impacts political opinions
Words have power, but so does the language in which they're spoken, according to Margit Tavits, the Dr. William Taussig Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.
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Pandemic widened gaps in postpartum care
Attendance at postpartum health care visits declined by almost six percentage points during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers report. Uninsured women, Black women, and women under age 19 faced the sharpest decreases in visits, according to the study. The findings show the pandemic exacerbated existing disparities in postpartum care. "Our study found that groups who already faced disproportionate
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New potential mechanism for vision loss discovered
Thanks to laboratory produced human mini-retinas, researchers were able to observe complex changes in the retina as they occur in macular degeneration. This enabled them to discover the so-called cell extrusion as a potential mechanism for neurodegenerative diseases.
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Multiple sclerosis therapy improves gut flora
A medication used to treat MS also has a beneficial effect on the composition of the intestinal flora, according to researchers. Conversely, the gut flora also plays a role in which side effects occur during treatment with the medication.
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Researchers generate lab-grown human tissue model for food tube cancer
Researchers say they have created a laboratory-grown three-dimensional 'organoid' model that is derived from human tissue and designed to advance understanding about how early stages of cancer develop at the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) — the point where the digestive system's food tube meets the stomach.
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Metallurgist explains the surprising properties of aluminum
Despite being the most abundant metal on Earth, constituting over 8% of the Earth's core mass, aluminum was only discovered in the 1820s, by Danish physicist Hans Christian Ørsted. This is partly explained because pure aluminum doesn't exist in nature as it binds easily with other elements like oxygen.
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Mosquito alert app: How to track invasive mosquitoes
Have you ever been bitten by a tiger? A tiger mosquito, that is. This invasive species and other close Asian species have found their way to Europe. But thanks to an ingenious smartphone app developed by the COST Action Aedes Invasive Mosquitoes (AIM), you can do more to bring this insect under control than simply swinging your flyswatter.
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Wildlife study: Cheetah marking trees are hotspots for communication among other species as well
Marking trees are important hotspots of communication for cheetahs: Here they exchange information with and about other cheetahs via scent marks, urine and scats. A team from the Cheetah Research Project of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) now showed that several mammalian species on farmland in Namibia maintain a network for intra- and interspecific communication
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A Novel That Will Make You Laugh and Then Punch You in the Gut
For Kevin Wilson fans, the opening of his fourth novel, Now Is Not the Time to Panic , will feel familiar: A woman named Frankie Budge receives a call from a reporter asking about her role in a moral panic that spread from a tiny Tennessee town to the rest of America in the summer of 1996. The call sends Frankie reeling—" Oh shit, oh shit, oh shit, fuck, no in my head, a kind of spiraling madness
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Wildlife study: Cheetah marking trees are hotspots for communication among other species as well
Marking trees are important hotspots of communication for cheetahs: Here they exchange information with and about other cheetahs via scent marks, urine and scats. A team from the Cheetah Research Project of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) now showed that several mammalian species on farmland in Namibia maintain a network for intra- and interspecific communication
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Call to protect Australian tenants with pets
With the national squeeze in rental accommodation, Flinders University researchers say it's more important than ever that the South Australian Parliament legislate to uphold the rights of tenants with pets.
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MSN Fired Its Human Journalists and Replaced Them With AI That Started Publishing Fake News About Mermaids and Bigfoot
Earlier this month, we reported that the Microsoft-operated news site MSN had run a clearly bogus story claiming that Claire "Grimes" Boucher had publicly called out ex-boyfriend Elon Musk on Twitter for not paying child support. The tweet the story based its claims off was an obvious fabrication, but that didn't stop the Inquisitr from publishing it, or MSN from distributing it to a much wider a
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If there is phosphine on Venus, there isn't much
In the absence of direct observations of extraterrestrial life, scientists often focus on searching for biosignatures, chemical by-products of life, that can be detected with remote sensing. Although Mars has received the most attention in this regard, other solar system worlds with atmospheres also have been investigated.
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Experts present strategies to mitigate methane emissions in dairy cattle
Methane mitigation has been identified as essential for addressing climate change. Intensive research in the past decade has resulted in a better understanding of factors driving enteric methane emissions in dairy cattle. Researchers recently found that dietary changes could decrease emissions with no negative effect on milk production.
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Parents talk more to toddlers who talk back
Hummus. Chewbacca. Belly button. These are just a few of the thousands of words scientists painstakingly decoded from over 2,100 hours of recorded conversations to determine if the amount of language kids hear explains why girls have bigger vocabularies early in life. It doesn't. Instead, the scientists found that caregivers just talk more to toddlers after they say their first word, which suggest
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Strep A: what are the symptoms and how can infection be treated?
Highly contagious bacteria behind the infection can in rare cases cause serious illnesses Six children in the UK have died after contracting strep A infection and health officials are warning parents and school staff to look out for its signs and symptoms. While most people who get it will not become extremely sick, the highly contagious bacteria that cause the infection can, in some cases, cause
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Should companies tell customers how long they'll be queuing for this holiday season?
Companies should partially hide information on how long the queue is if their products are highly popular and valuable, according to research by ESMT Berlin. By partially hiding this information, the researchers say they are likely to generate more customers in the queue. However, if a product is of low-demand and of low-value, the researchers suggest that companies should avoid partially hiding t
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Mars shines high in UK skies
In the first part of December, Northern Hemisphere observers will enjoy their best view of Mars until the 2030s. The red planet will be high in U.K. skies and will appear brighter than any star.
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Differences in adoption of digital payments by Generation Y versus Generation Z
Research in the International Journal of Electronic Marketing and Retailing looks at the difference of opinion between Generation Y and Generation Z in the adoption of digital payments. They found that people in the older group were less tolerant of risks associated with digital payment and were more prone to social environmental influences whereas those in the younger group were more concerned wi
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Monitoring maritime emissions at land and sea using drones and handheld particle sensors
Cambridge engineers have used drones, handheld particle sensors and a new modeling framework to measure, map and characterize harmful shipping emission particles at both land and sea. It is the first time that multi-characteristic particle measurements—including lung deposited surface area (LDSA), black carbon, and particle number—have been performed in this way, and it is hoped that this research
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This Week in Space: You Wouldn't Hack an Exoplanet…
Mauna Kea erupts, November 30, 2022. Image: USGS Welcome back, everyone. This week, scientists announced two never-before-seen minerals found inside a 17-ton meteorite. We also found out that astronomers used the James Webb space telescope to watch clouds moving — on Titan. Meanwhile, Mauna Loa is erupting, and you can see it from space. We've also got updates from Tiangong, the International Spa
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Single-cell 'atlas' reveals origin of an aggressive brain tumor
Data from a new fetal brain atlas has helped a science team discover a collection of progenitor cells that give rise to aggressive 'group 3' medulloblastomas. Findings include identifying two genes that may serve as treatment targets. Mice with these tumors lived longer when bred to express reduced activity of these genes.
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Automating the data analysis of X-ray diffraction studies on crystalline materials
Researchers at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) in Japan have automated a complex and labor-intensive process for analyzing the results of X-ray diffraction studies, which are used to determine the structure of crystalline materials. The team described the development and application of their technique in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials: Methods.
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Four-day week trial confirms working less increases wellbeing and productivity
A group of companies that have been trialing a four-day working week have recently reported increased revenue, with fewer employees taking time off or resigning. While it's easy to understand the effects of a shorter week on worker well-being, the positive effects on company earnings and productivity may be more of a surprise—but research backs this up.
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Interactive map reveals hotels used for immigration detention in Australia
Australia first introduced Alternative Places of Detention (APODs) 20 years ago. Since then, hotels—including both major chains and independent operators—have been used as places of detention, including for people who have sought asylum. Yet, there is no publicly available list of APODs in current or previous use.
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James Webb telescope produces an unparalleled view of the ghostly light in galaxy clusters
In clusters of galaxies there is a fraction of stars which wander off into intergalactic space because they are pulled out by huge tidal forces generated between the galaxies in the cluster. The light emitted by these stars is called the intracluster light (ICL) and is extremely faint. Its brightness is less than 1% of the brightness of the darkest sky we can observe from Earth. This is one reason
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Clonal integration research enlightens bamboo forest management for giant panda habitats
Bashania fargesii bamboo is an important dominant understory species influencing community structure and regeneration of overstory trees, and it serves as an important food source for giant panda in the Qinling Mountains. B. fargesii invades old fields via clonal rhizome growth. However, the pattern of bamboo invasion into old fields and the role of physiological integration during bamboo expansio
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Is it possible that nuclear defense technologies will surpass the abilities of nuclear weapons in the future, rendering them near useless?
Some of my friends at Northrop Grumman say that "nuke-stopping" technologies are getting pretty advanced. I'm just wondering if you believe there will be a point where we can easily stop multiple nukes at once. For example, space lasers that can shoot down 100 nukes per minute or something ridiculous of that nature. submitted by /u/Wide-Escape-5618 [link] [comments]
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Europe's Central Bank Warns That Bitcoin Is on Its "Last Gasp"
Rebound, Schmebound The European Central Bank is throwing some major shade at bitcoin even as it bounces back following the FTX collapse. In a blog post titled "Bitcoin's last stand ," published on its official European Union website, the ECB lobs a devastating takedown at the digital currency — and warns that its demise could just be getting started. As the ECB notes, bitcoin's peak value of nea
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New attack could've threatened spaceflight
Researchers have exposed a major vulnerability in a networking technology widely used in critical infrastructures such as spacecraft, aircraft, energy generation systems, and industrial control systems. The attack goes after a network protocol and hardware system called time-triggered ethernet, or TTE, which greatly reduces costs in high-risk settings by allowing mission-critical devices (like fl
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Clonal integration research enlightens bamboo forest management for giant panda habitats
Bashania fargesii bamboo is an important dominant understory species influencing community structure and regeneration of overstory trees, and it serves as an important food source for giant panda in the Qinling Mountains. B. fargesii invades old fields via clonal rhizome growth. However, the pattern of bamboo invasion into old fields and the role of physiological integration during bamboo expansio
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A disability-inclusive future of work | Ryan Gersava
One billion people worldwide are living with a disability, and too many of them are left unemployed or feeling like they need to hide their conditions due to discriminatory hiring practices, says social innovator and TED Fellow Ryan Gersava. With a focus on healing and disclosure, he created an online school to provide people like him with the technical skills and employment aid they need to thriv
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New chip-scale laser isolator opens new research avenues in photonics
Lasers are transformational devices, but one technical challenge prevents them from being even more so. The light they emit can reflect back into the laser itself and destabilize or even disable it. At real-world scales, this challenge is solved by bulky devices that use magnetism to block the harmful reflections. At chip scale, however, where engineers hope lasers will one day transform computer
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The Wrong Way to Look at the Past
Americans are used to learning history through the stories of great men. Think of Thomas Jefferson: He drafted the Declaration of Independence; he was the first secretary of state and our third president; he even died, poetically, on the Fourth of July. Though he's frequently discussed alongside other Founding Fathers, in the public consciousness, Jefferson stands on his own, like a titan. But th
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New potential target proteins for novel antibiotics discovered
Bacteria are small but tough organisms, partly because their cells are enclosed by a protective cell wall skeleton. Professor Felipe Cava and his team at Umeå University in Sweden and collaborators at Harvard Medical School in the U.S., have discovered long-sought proteins needed to maintain the bacterial cell wall structure. These proteins represent a very promising vulnerability for many bacteri
7h
New potential target proteins for novel antibiotics discovered
Bacteria are small but tough organisms, partly because their cells are enclosed by a protective cell wall skeleton. Professor Felipe Cava and his team at Umeå University in Sweden and collaborators at Harvard Medical School in the U.S., have discovered long-sought proteins needed to maintain the bacterial cell wall structure. These proteins represent a very promising vulnerability for many bacteri
7h
Researchers observe directly turbulent magnetic reconnection in solar wind
Researchers from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, under the direction of Prof. Wang Rongsheng and Prof. Lu Quanming, used data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission to directly observe bursty and turbulent magnetic reconnection in the solar wind. Their findings were published in Nature Astronomy.
7h
Examining the limits of nonlocal wide-field-of-view metalenses
Metalenses, compact lenses made with metasurfaces, have the potential to enable thinner, lighter, cheaper, and better imaging systems for a wide range of applications where miniaturization is critical (e.g., for mobile devices, medical imaging, and augmented reality).
7h
What do 2022's midterm elections mean for Trump's 2024 run?
What do the 2022 midterm election results say about former president Donald Trump's 2024 election chances? The former president announced his campaign to return to the White House on November 15. The declaration came one week after a midterm election with underwhelming results for Republicans, particularly candidates with endorsements from Trump and close ties to the former president. Zachary Alb
7h
Tesla Semi Truck Drives 500 Miles Fully Loaded
Mother Trucker Tesla released a timelapse video of one of its all-electric Semi trucks driving a 500-mile journey while carrying 82,000 pounds, the equivalent of a full load, on a single charge. It's a seriously impressive feat, suggesting the Elon Musk-led company could have a big win on its hands when the trucks hit the market. We still don't know how many trucks the company will be able to pro
7h
An Interviewer Asked Sam Bankman-Fried If He'd Been Honest and His Answer Was Bizarre
Against the wisdom of pretty much any lawyer anywhere, former FTX CEO Sam Bankman-Fried has been speaking out about the spectacular demise of the crypto exchange he founded, and he's been speaking out a lot . Since the crash, in fact, he's been so active on Twitter that the first law firm that dared take his case on quit, noting his " incessant and disruptive tweeting " as their reason to jump sh
7h
Decades of racial disparities revealed in National Science Foundation funding patterns
An investigation into National Science Foundation (NSF) data on funding rates, award types, and proposal ratings from 1996 to 2019 found pervasive racial disparities. The study, recently published in eLife by a team of researchers including University of Hawai'i at Mānoa Associate Professor Rosie Alegado, revealed that white principal investigators (PIs) are consistently funded at higher rates tha
7h
Researchers develop a safer carrier for cancer vaccines
Lipid nanoparticle (LNP)-based messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines have recently emerged as a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of cancers, as well as infectious diseases. LNPs are carriers that safely and effectively deliver nucleic acid vaccines, eliciting a strong immune response.
7h
'Dialogue' with environment fuels cancer stem cells
New research digs into what drives tumor growth. Researchers found that a single mutated gene in an otherwise healthy stem cell can kick off an increasingly deviant feedback loop of miscommunication between the cancerous stem cell and its surrounding tissue, fueling the development of a malignant tumor. The findings suggest that many of the mutations in cancer may simply be setting in stone a pat
7h
Photoinduced β-fragmentation of aliphatic alcohol derivatives for forging C–C bonds
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35249-7 Transformations of alcohols, which are ubiquitous in chemistry and are native functionalities in many natural products and bioactive molecules, are cornerstones of organic synthesis. Here the authors describe photocatalyzed cross-couplings of activated alcohols with α-amino acids, providing a direct approach
7h
Mongolian fossil is first known species of streamlined non-avian theropod dinosaur to walk on two legs
A team of researchers from Seoul National University, the University of Alberta and the Mongolian Academy of Sciences has identified the first known example of a streamlined, non-avian theropod dinosaur to walk on two legs. In their paper published in Communications Biology, the group describes where the fossil was found, its condition, and its features that were used to help identify it as a new
7h
Dog Flu Is Back, Too
Canine influenza can spread quickly through shelters, kennels and day care facilities, although most dogs will recover on their own, experts said.
8h
Mongolian fossil is first known species of streamlined non-avian theropod dinosaur to walk on two legs
A team of researchers from Seoul National University, the University of Alberta and the Mongolian Academy of Sciences has identified the first known example of a streamlined, non-avian theropod dinosaur to walk on two legs. In their paper published in Communications Biology, the group describes where the fossil was found, its condition, and its features that were used to help identify it as a new
8h
Physicists Simulate a Simplified Wormhole on Google's Quantum Computer
Wormholes might sound like something that belongs in a Star Trek episode rather than a research paper, but scientists just simulated one on Google's Sycamore quantum computer . The result suggests these devices could be used to test out fundamental physical theories. The possibility of wormholes was first outlined in a 1935 paper by Albert Einste i n and Nathan Rosen. In broad terms, they describ
8h
Microplastics could make other pollutants more harmful
Microplastics—small plastic pieces less than five millimeters in length—are becoming a ubiquitous ecological contaminant. Studies suggest that on their own, these tiny bits are potentially harmful, and it's unclear what effect they could have on pollutants that latch onto them. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology Letters show that, when attached to microplastics, UV fi
8h
The Internet, but for Hot People
The holiday season is here, and with it the age-old question: What is the best way to invite people to my party? Facebook invitations are no longer tenable. People don't use Facebook anymore, which means they might not see your event unless you expressly tell them to go look for it there—horrible. For a big party, I like to send an email. For a small party, why not just make a calendar event and
8h
The Blindness of 'Color-Blindness'
I needed to be in the room. I wanted to witness the next chapter in a story that mattered to me, one that I had even been a part of. And as a historian, I wanted to be there as it happened—I had to see and hear firsthand what I once thought was unimaginable. Affirmative action has been implemented in its various forms for well over half a century, for 75 percent of my existence, for nearly 40 per
8h
The Math Behind Wordle Guesses
In the simple game of Wordle, players have to guess a secret five-letter word in six or fewer turns based on clues about the presence and location of letters revealed by their previous guesses. While somewhat similar games have appeared in the past, everyone who plays Wordle on a particular day has to discover the same secret word, making it easy to share your attempts and discuss the game among.
8h
Plastic pledges from top companies don't mean much
Although 72% of the top 300 companies on the Fortune Global 500 list have made some form of voluntary commitment to reduce plastic pollution, few have prioritized reducing their use of virgin plastic, research finds. That virgin plastic is the real root of the problem, according to Zoie Diana, a PhD candidate at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment. Earth is awash in plastic. It l
8h
Viral surface-inspired nanocarriers for improved oral insulin therapy
Clinically, type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and advanced type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients require multiple daily insulin injections to maintain blood glucose levels, which may cause great pain and is an inconvenience to patients and can lead to hyperinsulinemia. In comparison, oral insulin therapy has high patient compliance.
8h
How CO2 leads to changes in bumble bee reproduction
A new study reveals clues about how carbon dioxide affects bumble bee physiology, including reproduction. While a beekeeper puffing clouds of carbon dioxide into a hive to calm the insects is a familiar image to many, less is known about its other effects on bees. The researchers set out to disentangle how carbon dioxide seems to bypass diapause , a phase similar to hibernation during which bees
8h
More efficient hybrid rice breeding achieved with female sterility technique
Research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) involving the use of a pioneering female sterility technique has led to a breakthrough in the production of hybrid rice seeds. Compared to the commonly used "three-line" male sterility technique in hybrid rice seeds production, the novel approach enhances the efficiency of hybrid rice production by eliminating rice seeds that have been produced d
8h
More efficient hybrid rice breeding achieved with female sterility technique
Research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) involving the use of a pioneering female sterility technique has led to a breakthrough in the production of hybrid rice seeds. Compared to the commonly used "three-line" male sterility technique in hybrid rice seeds production, the novel approach enhances the efficiency of hybrid rice production by eliminating rice seeds that have been produced d
8h
It's the End of Trending
Spotify Wrapped memes, Twitter hashtags, YouTube's best-of list. Do social media trends still have anything vital to say?
9h
Pandemic appears to have aged teen brains
Pandemic-related stressors have physically altered adolescents' brains, making their brain structures appear several years older than the brains of comparable peers before the pandemic, research suggests. The study appears in the journal Biological Psychiatry: Global Open Science . In 2020 alone, reports of anxiety and depression in adults rose by more than 25% compared to previous years. The new
9h
Near-critical spreading of droplets
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35047-1 Tanner's law describes the spreading dynamics of droplets made of Newtonian viscous fluids. Here, the authors demonstrate that this law remains valid for phase-separated binary liquids close to their critical point, and thus for all the associated universality class.
9h
Astronomers Spot Black Hole Devouring Star on the Other Side of the Universe
Astronomers scanning the farthest reaches of space earlier this year spotted something unusual: a powerful signal that lit up in X-ray, optical, and radio bands. The team, from MIT and the University of Birmingham, dubbed the phenomenon AT 2022cmc. They've since published a paper showing that AT 2022cmc is a supermassive black hole that has just started a "hyper-feeding frenzy" as it tears apart
9h
Daily briefing: In praise of fundamental research in biology
Nature, Published online: 01 December 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04326-8 Resist the temptation to push for quick returns on basic biology research, implores a Nature editorial. Plus, ants make milk to feed their young and a beak fossil upends the bird evolutionary tree.
9h
What the Respect for Marriage Act does and doesn't do
The United States Senate passed landmark legislation this week enshrining protections for same-sex and interracial marriages in federal law in a bipartisan vote. The Senate action marks a major hurdle for the legislation , which President Biden has said he will sign into law pending a vote in the House of Representatives. Leonore F. Carpenter , a Rutgers Law School professor who has served as an
9h
The Download: circumventing China's firewall, and using AI to invent new drugs
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. How Twitter's "Teacher Li" became the central hub of China protest information As protests against rigid covid control measures in China engulfed social media in the past week, one Twitter account has emerged as the central source of information: @李老师不是你老师 ("T
9h
Evolution Is Not a Straight Line
Yesterday I wrote about the fact that technological development is not a straight line, with superior technology replacing older technology. That sometimes happens, but so do many other patterns of change. Often competing technologies have a suite of relative strengths and weaknesses, and its hard to predict which one will prevail. Also, competing technologies may exist side-by-side for long peri
10h
Photo-induced stress relaxation in reconfigurable disulfide-crosslinked supramolecular films visualized by dynamic wrinkling
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35271-9 The mechanics of reconfigurable supramolecular polymer networks are governed by their dynamic crosslinking chemistry and the resulting stress relaxations. Here, the authors use reversible wrinkling patterns to visualize localized stress relaxations, due to molecular network rearrangements.
10h
Nvidia-Powered 'Smart Tractors' Enable Autonomous Farming
(Photo: Monarch Tractor) Farming is heading in an entirely new direction if Nvidia and a new California startup have anything to say about it. Monarch Tractor, a company based just east of Silicon Valley, has built autonomous electric tractors using Nvidia's artificial intelligence platform. The first of its shipments are rolling out to California farms and vineyards this week. MK-V, Monarch's fl
10h
Is Web 3 legit? Please read below. What are the use cases of a blockchain and can we be truly "decentralized?"
I am 19 years old, currently just thinking alone at night, and I had the question if blockchain is the future of "Web 3?" I am currently reading Edward Snowden's' book, "Permanent Record," and he describes how Google, Amazon, Facebook (Meta), etc are all selling our personal information to government agencies such as the CIA and NSA. My question is, if the government has this kind of control, and
10h
PODCAST Vi jagter mørklagte skibe i Østersøen
Ugens Transformator står til søs. DTU er i gang med at opbygge et 'forbryderalbum' over skibe, der er kendt for at slukke deres AIS-transponder ligesom de to mørklagte skibe, der blev observeret i Østersøen, kort før Nord Stream 2 blev sprængt.
10h
Give People a Right to Claim Their Innocence
Adnan Syed spent more than two decades in prison before a judge, in September, vacated his murder conviction. The next month, the state's attorney for Baltimore City told journalists that Syed had been "wrongly convicted" and dropped charges against him. Justice moved slowly in his case: Only recently did an investigation uncover that prosecutors in his trial might have failed to hand over releva
10h
China's Blank-Paper Protests Are Only a Beginning
The A4 Revolution that erupted in China in the past week is not really a revolution at all, not yet at least. The term revolution implies a sustained movement aimed at overthrowing the Chinese Communist Party. At this stage, the A4 Revolution—named after the size of the printer paper held up at vigils throughout the country—is a series of scattered, spontaneous protests against the brutality and
10h
The Most Consequential First Amendment Case This Term
On Monday the Supreme Court is going to hear oral arguments in what may well be the most consequential First Amendment case of the term. It will be cast as a culture-war case, as a fight between LGBTQ rights and free speech, but it's not truly that. It's something else, something far more significant. The case is called 303 Creative v. Elenis , and the precise issue in the case is simple: "whethe
10h
The Prospect of Prison Time Spoils Far-Right Fantasies
Stewart Rhodes, the leader of the far-right Oath Keepers, faces a prison sentence for doing something on January 6, 2021, that he didn't specifically plan on doing. Along with a co-defendant, Kelly Meggs, Rhodes was found guilty this week of seditious conspiracy for the Oath Keepers' efforts to stop the peaceful transfer of power and keep President Donald Trump in the White House. Rhodes, who fou
10h
Definition of the estrogen negative feedback pathway controlling the GnRH pulse generator in female mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35243-z Estrogen secreted by the ovary controls how the brain drives pulsatile reproductive hormone secretion. The authors show that in mice, estrogen receptor alpha within a specific population of hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons is the principal pathway through which estrogen brings about this classic negative feed
11h
Att förstatliga den svenska sjukvården kan ta många år
Regeringen och Sverigedemokraterna vill utreda om det går att förstatliga vården. Men en sådan förändring kan ta många år. Och att politiker vill omdana vården åt något håll är inget nytt. Det finns flera exempel bara från de senaste årtiondena. Det är som en historiskt svängande pendel, säger en forskare. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
11h
The GOP Can't Hide From Extremism
The role of extremist white nationalists in the GOP may be approaching an inflection point. The backlash against former President Donald Trump's meeting with Nick Fuentes, an avowed racist, anti-Semite, and Christian nationalist, has compelled more Republican officeholders than at any point since the Charlottesville riot in 2017 to publicly condemn those extremist views. Yet few GOP officials hav
11h
Paper about "sexual intent" of women wearing red retracted seven years after sleuths raised concerns
A psychologist whose controversial publications on human behavior have attracted scrutiny for their implausible workload and impossible statistics has lost a third paper – seven years after sleuths first began questioning it. The 2012 article, "Color and Women Attractiveness: When Red Clothed Women Are Perceived to Have More Intense Sexual Intent," was published in the … Continue reading
12h
Reconfigurable neuromorphic memristor network for ultralow-power smart textile electronics
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35160-1 Neuromorphic computing memristors are attractive to construct low-power- consumption electronic textiles. Here, authors report an ultralow-power textile memristor network of Ag/MoS2/HfAlOx/carbon nanotube with reconfigurable characteristics and firing energy consumption of 1.9 fJ/spike.
12h
Nuclear localization of mitochondrial TCA cycle enzymes modulates pluripotency via histone acetylation
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35199-0 Cellular metabolism is important in pluripotency and cell fate regulation. Here, authors observe chromatin remodeling followed by TCA enzyme translocation from the mitochondria to the nucleus, demonstrating pluripotency regulation by mitochondria to nucleus retrograde signaling.
12h
Cheflæge: Sårede ukrainske soldater er langt dårligere end forventet
Alvorligt tilskadekomne ukrainske soldater fra krigen i Ukraine trækker lige nu store veksler på både ressourcer og personale på Aarhus Universitetshospital. Svære skader og multiresistente bakterier vanskeliggør behandlingen, lyder det fra cheflæge Sten Larsen. Og det betyder aflyste operationer for afdelingens øvrige patienter.
12h
Your microbiome ages as you do—and that's a problem
This article is from The Checkup, MIT Technology Review's weekly biotech newsletter. To receive it in your inbox every Thursday, sign up here . We're all crawling with bugs. Our bodies are home to plenty of distinct ecosystems that are home to microbes, fungi, and other organisms. They are crucial to our well-being. Shifts in the microbiome have been linked to a whole host of diseases. Look after
12h
Prior exposure to B. pertussis shapes the mucosal antibody response to acellular pertussis booster vaccination
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35165-w Bordetella pertussis (Bp), the causative agent of pertussis, continues to circulate and it's not well understood how (sub)clinical infections shape immune memory to Bp and vaccination. Here, using a mutant Bp strain lacking antigens of the acellular pertussis vaccine, the authors show how prior exposure to B
12h
How Twitter's "Teacher Li" became the central hub of China protest information
As protests against rigid covid control measures in China engulfed social media in the past week, one Twitter account has emerged as the central source of information: @李老师不是你老师 ("Teacher Li Is Not Your Teacher"). People everywhere in China have sent protest footage and real-time updates to the account through private messages, and it has posted them on their behalf—taking care to keep the source
13h
Lost and found: twitchers delight at sweet song of the black-browed babbler
Since the bird was 'rediscovered' by accident in Borneo in 2020, ornithologists have returned to study the melodious species last documented more than 170 years ago For more than 170 years, and despite its name, scientists and birdwatchers heard no babbling, chirping, tweeting or any other sounds from the black-browed babbler. The bird was long assumed to be extinct, until an accidental discovery
14h
'Citizen rewilders' invited to buy shares in Scottish Highlands projects
Firm restoring nature on two estates hopes to give ordinary investors 5% annual return over 10 years Ordinary people are being invited to invest in projects to rewild the Scottish Highlands by a company that is restoring nature on two estates and seeking to expand its rewilding portfolio. "Citizen rewilders" can invest a minimum of £50 and up to £200,000 in £10 shares in Highlands Rewilding, whic
14h
New analysis approach could help boost sensitivity of large telescopes
Some of the largest and most sophisticated telescopes ever made are under construction at the Simons Observatory in Northern Chile. They are designed to measure cosmic microwave background—electromagnetic radiation left over from the formation of the universe—with unprecedented sensitivity. In a new study, researchers detail an analysis method that could improve these telescopes by evaluating thei
14h
US-European differences on climate law persist
President Joe Biden on Thursday tried to allay concerns raised by French President Emmanuel Macron about a clean energy law that benefits electric vehicles and other products made in North America. But the U.S. and Europe remain divided over the landmark law.
14h
Lagoon dries up as drought grips Peru's southern Andes
From her home under the baking sun of Peru's southern Andes, Vilma Huamaní can see the small Cconchaccota lagoon, the axis of her community's life. It has been a source of trout, fun for children eager to swim, beauty as flamingos flew from over the mountains and water for thirsty sheep.
14h
Dynamic spatiotemporal determinants modulate GPCR:G protein coupling selectivity and promiscuity
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34055-5 G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) can couple to different Gα protein subfamilies either selectively or promiscuously. Here, the authors use computational approach to show that selectivity determinants are at the periphery of the GPCR—G protein interface and that promiscuous GPCRs more frequently sample the
15h
#ClimateScam: denialism claims flooding Twitter have scientists worried
Many researchers are fleeing the platform, unnerved by the surge in climate misinformation since Musk's chaotic takeover Twitter has proved a cherished forum for climate scientists to share research, as well as for activists seeking to rally action to halt oil pipelines or decry politicians' failure to cut pollution. But many are now fleeing Twitter due to a surge in climate misinformation, spam
15h
Reference panel guided topological structure annotation of Hi-C data
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35231-3 Predicting topological structures from Hi-C data provides insight into comprehending gene expression and regulation. Here, the authors present RefHiC, an attention-based deep learning framework that leverages a reference panel of Hi-C datasets to assist topological structure annotation from a given study sam
16h
Schneider Shorts 2.12.2022 – Public Apologies
Schneider Shorts 2.12.2022 – Stanford president's fake science suddenly in the news, curcumin cheater in Michigan makes lab members apologise, Indian lab's science proven reliable despite fake data, with lazy russian papermillers, a Japanese astronaut caught on research fraud, musical genes discovered, and the real papermill heroes established by The BMJ.
17h
Photos of the Week: Camel Mill, Monkey Festival, Krampus Run
A velociraptor model in Malta, flood damage in Saudi Arabia, a Christmas-tree lighting in Denmark, a new volcanic eruption in Hawaii, protests against Chinese authorities in Hong Kong, scenes from the World Cup in Qatar, ongoing power outages in Ukraine, ski jumping in Finland, and much more
17h
RM of BTS Is Embracing the Silence
O ne year ago today , the leader of the world's biggest pop group stood beneath bright lights and told more than 50,000 fans about his fears. Kim Namjoon, better known by his stage name RM, had guided his fellow BTS members through the vagaries of early-pandemic life —a canceled world tour, delayed music releases and life plans, illness. In an emotional speech during a Los Angeles concert last De
17h
Synergistic passivation and stepped-dimensional perovskite analogs enable high-efficiency near-infrared light-emitting diodes
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35218-0 Defect-assisted nonradiative recombination and carrier aggregation at the interface hinder the potential of perovskites as emitter for light-emitting diodes. Here, Fang et al. achieve an external quantum efficiency of 24.1% by combining multidimensional perovskite with cascade conduction bands.
17h
New paper: A toolkit for understanding and addressing climate scepticism
This is a quick summary about the newly published paper " A toolkit for understanding and addressing climate scepticism " by Matthew J. Hornsey and Stephan Lewandowsky. It leverages a thread tweeted by Stephan Lewandowsky shortly after publication as well as a mention in Doug Bostrom's and Marc Kodack's New Research Week #47 The Abstract Despite over 50 years of messaging about the reality of hum
17h
Structural insights into mechanism and specificity of the plant protein O-fucosyltransferase SPINDLY
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35234-0 Arabidopsis SPINDLY (SPY) is a nucleocytoplasmic protein O-fucosyltransferase. Here, the authors present a crystal structure of Arabidopsis SPY/GDP complex, reveal SPY's substrate recognition and enzyme mechanism, and provide insights into the glycan donor substrate selection in GT41 proteins.
18h
A dish-like molecular architecture for dynamic ultralong room-temperature phosphorescence through reversible guest accommodation
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35155-y Developing dynamic organic ultralong roomtemperature phosphorescence (URTP) remains challenging due to the difficulty in manipulating aggregate structures. Herein, the authors report a dish-like molecular architecture featuring guest responsive dynamic URTP.
18h
Podd: Hjälp jag gnisslar tänder!
Nästan alla gnisslar tänder i perioder av sitt liv, och oftast finns sömnproblem och stress i bakgrunden. I den här podden berättar Birgitta Häggman Henrikson, professor i odontologi, vid Malmö universitet om hur bruxism fungerar, både när man sover och är vaken hårt, både under dag- och nattid.
18h
Total enzymatic synthesis of cis-α-irone from a simple carbon source
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35232-2 Retrosynthetic pathway design using promiscuous enzymes can provide a solution to the biosynthetic production of natural products. Here, the authors design a pathway for the production of cis-α-irone with a promiscuous methyltransferase using structure-guided enzyme engineering strategies.
19h
Turing patterns with high-resolution formed without chemical reaction in thin-film solution of organic semiconductors
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35162-z Regular patterns can form spontaneously in chemical reaction-diffusion systems under non-equilibrium conditions as proposed by Alan Turing. Here, the authors generate regular patterns in uphill-diffusion solution systems without a chemical reaction process through in-situ and ex-situ observations.
19h
To save nature, focus on populations, not species
Human-released greenhouse gasses are causing the world to warm, and with that warming comes increasing stress for many of the planet's plants and animals. That stress is so great that many scientists believe we are currently in the midst of the 'sixth extinction,' when entire species are disappearing up to 10,000 times faster than before the industrial era. However, scientists have been uncertain
20h
Researchers solve 20-year-old optical light mystery
It was believed that it was impossible to differentiate the enantiomers of a chiral molecule using helical light beams — until now that is. Researchers have now developed a new chiroptical technique to differentiate the two non-superimposable mirror images of a chiral molecule. Its efficiency can even be scaled and controlled by using linear polarized helical light beams.
20h
Two novel hydrogen production catalysts based on mineral gel and 'crystalline-amorphous' dual-phase nano-aluminium alloy
Clean hydrogen energy is a good alternative to fossil fuels and is critical for achieving carbon neutrality. Researchers around the world are looking for ways to enhance the efficiency and lower the cost of hydrogen production, particularly by improving the catalysts involved. Recently, a research team developed a new, ultra-stable hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalyst, which is based
20h
Researchers solve 20-year-old optical light mystery
It was believed that it was impossible to differentiate the enantiomers of a chiral molecule using helical light beams — until now that is. Researchers have now developed a new chiroptical technique to differentiate the two non-superimposable mirror images of a chiral molecule. Its efficiency can even be scaled and controlled by using linear polarized helical light beams.
20h
When FMD hits a family, abdominal aortic aneurysms may too
A new study finds a shared complex genetic architecture that explains why when one family member develops fibromuscular dysplasia, the risk of a male member of that family developing an abdominal aortic aneurysm is significantly higher. Researchers say the findings also support that screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in male relatives of patients with FMD may be useful, along with currently e
20h
Down syndrome research should look at the whole cell not just the extra chromosome, scientists say
Research on understanding the effect of extra chromosomes for conditions like Down syndrome typically involves examining what genes play a role in the symptoms of these conditions. However, researchers propose a new way of looking at these conditions, suggesting that when an extra chromosome is present, the impact on the cell depends less on which chromosome is duplicated and more on the presence
20h
The Neuroethics of Consciousness and Cognition in Clinical Contexts
This is an introduction to neuroethics of consciousness with specific focus on disorders of consciousness, considering both fundamental and practical issues. Neuroethical reflections on consciousness and cognition in clinical contexts is followed by a presentation on how to diagnose patients with disorders of consciousness. About the presenters Michele Farisco is a neuroethics researcher at the C
20h
Introduction to RRI in the Human Brain Project and EBRAINS
What type of world do you want to live in and how can science better enable this? Starting off with the Rome Declaration definition of RRI, Professor of Critical Research in Technology and Ethics Director of the Human Brian Project Bernd Stahl presents the concept of Responsible Research and Innovation and how it can enable better science and innovation. This video describes RRI and explains why
20h
Human Brain Project's Capacity Development Plan & Other RRI Resources
In this video George Ogoh, Research Fellow at De Montfort University and task lead for Ethics coordination and communication in Work Package 9 of the Human Brain Project, presents the Responsible Research and Innovation capacity development programme developed for the Human Brain Project and EBRAINS by members of the Ethics and Society team. The training programme has been developed for all EBRAI
20h
Neuroethics in the Human Brain Project and EBRAINS
This video provides an introduction to neuroethics, combining reflection on its history and conceptual development, with particular focus on how the discipline has been defined and practiced within the Human Brain Project. The presentation offers an essential introduction to the discipline, as well as analysis and justification of its relevance to EBRAINS. The presentation aims to increase EBRAIN
20h
Ghana's Grudge Match
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. When Ghana meets Uruguay on Friday, the Black Stars will be out for redemption—or vengeance, depending on how you look at it. Twelve years ago in South Africa, Ghana were on the verge of becoming the first African team to make it to the semifinals of a World Cup, the first
21h
Nature in Focus | Great Bird Migrations
The days are getting colder and shorter, but if you look up, you can catch a glimpse of 4 billion birds migrating south for the winter. Nature photographer Ian Shive takes us to his favorite spots in New Mexico and Texas to witness these incredible bird migrations. #discovery #discoveryplus #greatbirdmigrations Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://
21h
Why Did the Oath Keepers Do It?
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . What did the Oath Keepers and other militia groups really think they would achieve by attacking American democracy and losing everything? I suspect they wanted only one thing: to escape the boredom of
22h
Long COVID patients and those with other illnesses experience similar, negative lingering effects during the pandemic
Long COVID patients can experience many of the same lingering negative effects on their physical, mental, and social well-being as those experienced by people who become ill with other, non-COVID illnesses. Researchers found that 40 percent of the COVID-positive and 54 percent of the COVID-negative group reported moderate-to-severe residual symptoms three months after enrolling in the study.
23h
A Brain Parasite Is Making Wolves Into Pack Leaders, Scientists Say
Parasitic Relationship It seems that grey wolves are yet more victims of the strange and poorly-understood toxoplasma gondii parasite — but in their case, the effects of this brain worm seem to be driving the wolves toward leadership roles. A new study in the journal Communications Biology details how an analysis of 27 years of data found that grey wolves in Yellowstone National Park that were in
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Scientists say land is being created at one of two sites on Louisiana's coast
Supporters of the large-scale Mississippi River sediment diversions currently being planned by the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority got a boost to their case recently when Louisiana State University (LSU) College of the Coast & Environment scientists published an analysis of two existing freshwater diversions on the state's coastline, one of which shows a significant amount o
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This COVID Winter Will Be Different
December is here and with it comes the third winter of the pandemic. With holiday travel and indoor family gatherings, the season has brought tragic spikes in COVID cases the past two years. Are we in for more of the same, or will this winter be different? The Atlantic deputy editor Paul Bisceglio talks with the staff writer Katherine Wu about what to expect. Will a new variant accelerate infecti
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How can sex education training videos be more inclusive?
Sexuality education often fails LGBTQIA2S+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, Two-Spirit with the + indicating other identities not listed) students, few of whom report ever receiving inclusive education at school. Yet sexuality education classrooms have the potential to be safe, affirming, and inclusive spaces if educators receive training to develop inclusion skills.
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Changing the color of quantum light on an integrated chip
Optical photons are ideal carriers of quantum information. But to work together in a quantum computer or network, they need to have the same color—or frequency—and bandwidth. Changing a photon's frequency requires altering its energy, which is particularly challenging on integrated photonic chips.
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Growing startups should worry about rising 'diversity debt,' say researchers
Startups should pay attention to gender diversity from the get-go. UvA Economics and Business researchers Dr. Yuval Engel and Dr. Tanja Hentschel, together with colleagues in the US, conducted research about why women are underrepresented among startup employees. They discovered a self-reinforcing pattern of what they refer to as 'diversity debt."
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Study discovers microbial communities shift while a coral 'sleeps' through the winter
As winter approaches, many species of animals—from bears and squirrels to parasitic wasps and a few lucky humans—hunker down for some needed rest. The northern star coral (Astrangia poculata) also enters a hibernating state of dormancy, or quiescence, during this time. But what happens to its microbiome while it's sleeping?
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Another Crypto Exchange Is Laying Off 1,100 Employees
Powell Problems The so-called "crypto winter" has claimed even more victims. Kraken, one the the cryptosphere's largest exchanges, just announced a major round of layoffs. "Today we're announcing one of the hardest decisions at Kraken to date," Kraken CEO Jesse Powell, a noted scumbag who's still the organization's CEO despite using racial slurs with employees and writing in a company Slack chann
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Twitter Competitor Shuts Down App When It Turns Out Hackers Can Read Users' Private Messages
As users are desperate to find a new alternative to Twitter, which has been sucked into a morass of endless chaos by its new owner Elon Musk, developers working on Twitter competitors are starting to buckle under the pressure. As TechCrunch reports , Twitter alternative Hive Social has had to pull all of its servers offline in light of serious security vulnerabilities, after an estimated two mill
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Flowers show their true colors
A plant common to Japan, Causonis japonica, is the first to show a newly discovered trait. Its flowers can change color depending on the stage of its maturation cycle, and then change back to its original color. Although many flowers have been shown to change color depending on their maturation phase, Causonis japonica is the only known example of bidirectional color change. The pigments involved
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Finding the answers hidden in our antibodies
An innovative protocol called PepSeq is changing the way researchers test for contagious diseases — and this knowledge should change the way humanity responds to future pandemics. Researchers just published a comprehensive study about PepSeq that lays out the process, the tool and how to interpret the results, with the goal of more, better and faster information for the next outbreak.
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Biology students expose exotic amphibians in the dunes
During the spring of 2021, a group of eight biology students from Leiden set out into the dunes in search of amphibians. Using DNA, they determined the geographic origin of the animals. And guess what? In many cases they discovered exotic populations of animals that do not naturally belong in The Netherlands. Today they publish their striking results as four scientific articles in the journal Amph
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Study: To save nature, focus on populations, not species
Human-released greenhouse gases are causing the world to warm, and with that warming comes increasing stress for many of the planet's plants and animals. That stress is so great that many scientists believe we are currently in the midst of the "sixth extinction," as entire species are disappearing up to 10,000 times faster than before the industrial era. However, scientists have been uncertain whi
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Integrated platform promises to accelerate drug discovery process
Many successful drugs have their origins in natural sources such as plants, fungi, and bacteria, but screening natural products to identify potential drugs remains a difficult undertaking. A new approach using molecular biology, analytical chemistry, and bioinformatics to integrate information from different screening platforms addresses some of the biggest challenges in natural products drug disc
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Webb and Keck telescopes team up to track clouds on Saturn's moon Titan
On the morning of Saturday, Nov. 5, an international team of planetary scientists woke up with great delight to the first Webb images of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Here, Principal Investigator Conor Nixon and others on the Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) program 1251 team using Webb to investigate Titan's atmosphere and climate describe their initial reactions to seeing the data.
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Biology students expose exotic amphibians in the dunes
During the spring of 2021, a group of eight biology students from Leiden set out into the dunes in search of amphibians. Using DNA, they determined the geographic origin of the animals. And guess what? In many cases they discovered exotic populations of animals that do not naturally belong in The Netherlands. Today they publish their striking results as four scientific articles in the journal Amph
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Study: To save nature, focus on populations, not species
Human-released greenhouse gases are causing the world to warm, and with that warming comes increasing stress for many of the planet's plants and animals. That stress is so great that many scientists believe we are currently in the midst of the "sixth extinction," as entire species are disappearing up to 10,000 times faster than before the industrial era. However, scientists have been uncertain whi
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Those Headlines About Scientists Building a Wormhole Are Total Nonsense, People
Some fun but esoteric physics news broke this week: that researchers had simulated two black holes using a quantum computer, and managed to send a message between them, as if the virtual system was a tiny wormhole . The research, as detailed in a new paper published in the journal Nature on Wednesday, was picked up by major new outlets — but in a serious failing of science literacy, they jumped t
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Where did Omicron come from?
First discovered a year ago in South Africa, the SARS-CoV-2 variant later dubbed 'Omicron' spread across the globe at incredible speed. It is still unclear exactly how, when and where this virus originated. A new study shows that Omicron's predecessors existed on the African continent long before cases were first identified, suggesting that Omicron emerged gradually over several months in differen
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Old-growth trees more drought tolerant than younger ones, providing a buffer against climate change
A new analysis of more than 20,000 trees on five continents shows that old-growth trees are more drought tolerant than younger trees in the forest canopy and may be better able to withstand future climate extremes. The findings highlight the importance of preserving the world's remaining old-growth forests, which are biodiversity strongholds that store vast amounts of planet-warming carbon, accord
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Integrated platform promises to accelerate drug discovery process
Many successful drugs have their origins in natural sources such as plants, fungi, and bacteria, but screening natural products to identify potential drugs remains a difficult undertaking. A new approach using molecular biology, analytical chemistry, and bioinformatics to integrate information from different screening platforms addresses some of the biggest challenges in natural products drug disc
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Simulated driving program reduces crash risk for teens with ADHD in small study
A program that combines computer-based and driving simulator training may reduce the proportion of crashes and near crashes among teens with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a small study. Teens who took the training, which aims to reduce the number of long glances away from the roadway, had a nearly 40% lower risk for crash or near crash, compared to a similar group w
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Elon Musk's Neuralink Expects to Install Brain Chip in Humans in 6 Months
(Credit: Neuralink) Elon Musk took a short break from tweeting yesterday to host another Neuralink "Show and Tell" event. At the last one in 2021, Neuralink revealed it had implanted its brain-computer interface chip in the brains of monkeys, giving them the ability to control a game of pong just by thinking . In the latest update, Neuralink discussed improvements to the design, and Musk claimed
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Death Valley's Ubehebe Crater reveals volcanic hazard areas are underestimated
When magma bubbles up toward Earth's surface and meets groundwater, steam pressure builds, sometimes bursting into eruptions that spew currents of hot ash, potentially burning and asphyxiating people and burying nearby cities. Take, for example, similar ash currents that formed during the eruptions at Mount Vesuvius, which were responsible for many of the fatalities in the city of Pompeii around 7
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Black Hole In "Hyper-Feeding Frenzy" Chews Through Stars and Shoots Its Leftovers Towards Earth
Cosmic Combine Using the Very Large Telescope (VLT), scientists have witnessed a black hole more than 8.5 billion light years away gorging on a star — the farthest distance at which astronomers have ever observed such an event. In fact, they were only able to spot the grisly feeding in visible light because leftovers of the kill were ejected via a jet that happened to be pointed right at Earth, l
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The World Cup of Microsoft Excel
A few weeks ago, you very likely missed what were very likely the most thrilling moments in the history of Microsoft Excel. Allow me to set the scene: The semifinal of the Excel World Championship was streaming live on YouTube and ESPN3. Defending champion Andrew Ngai had steamrolled his previous three opponents, but he now trailed the unseeded newcomer Brittany Deaton 316–390—not an insignifican
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News at a glance | Science
HomeScienceVol. 378, No. 6623News at a glanceBack To Vol. 378, No. 6623 Full accessIn BriefSCI COMMUN Share on News at a glanceScience1 Dec 2022Vol 378, Issue 6623pp. 932-933DOI: 10.1126/science.adg0517 PREVIOUS ARTICLEScience urgencies for BrazilPreviousNEXT ARTICLEIndictment of monkey importers could disrupt U.S. researchNext ContentsCountries vote for sustainable shark fishingIn a first for…
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Plants can adapt their lignin using 'chemically encoding' enzymes to face climate change, study finds
A new study shows how plants "encode" specific chemistries of their lignin to grow tall amid climate changes: Each plant cell uses different combinations of the enzymes LACCASEs to create specific lignin chemistries. These results can be used both in agriculture and in forestry for selecting plants with the best chemistry to resist climate challenges.
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Shame or hope? How should we feel about climate change?
Is it OK to enjoy warmer summers, given they are caused by climate change? Should we feel shame when we fly? Is anxiety an overreaction, or a rational response to the current climate crisis? There is widespread disagreement about how we should feel regarding climate change. In a new award-winning article, two researchers at the Institute for Futures Studies (IFFS), Stockholm help us sort out our c
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Biological invasions in China's coastal zone | Science
Over the past few decades, China's coastal zone has been subject to extensive land reclamation. As of 2014, approximately 65% of all coastlines in China were affected by the expansion of farmlands, salt pans, aquaculture ponds, roads, and buildings (1), resulting in disrupted ecosystem services, ecological security, and sustainability (2–4). About a decade ago, the Chinese government began address
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Combatting national research restrictions | Science
In her Science Insider piece "Indonesia bans five foreign scientists, shelves conservation data" (7 October, https://scim.ag/up), D. Rochmyaningsih describes how the Indonesian government is suppressing conservation scientists, research, and data in pursuit of economic development. Other governments have also restricted domestic and international research on politically sensitive topics, sometimes
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Guizhou snub-nosed monkey in peril | Science
HomeScienceVol. 378, No. 6623Guizhou snub-nosed monkey in perilBack To Vol. 378, No. 6623 Full accessLetter Share on Guizhou snub-nosed monkey in perilTao Ju and Xianghong Dong [email protected]Authors Info & AffiliationsScience1 Dec 2022Vol 378, Issue 6623p. 956DOI: 10.1126/science.adf3707 PREVIOUS ARTICLEMeet the HuxleysPreviousNEXT ARTICLECombatting national research restrictionsNext Conten…
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Science urgencies for Brazil | Science
Last month in Egypt at the United Nations Climate Change Conference, Brazil's president-elect Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva reaffirmed his pledge to make Brazil a global leader in addressing climate change and deforestation. However, when Lula takes the reins …
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Beneficial green tea extract may cause liver damage
Long-term use of a high-dose green tea extract may protect against cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, but may also create liver damage in some people. A new study points to two genetic variants that predict who may be at risk. "Learning to predict who will suffer liver damage is potentially important because there's growing evidence that high-dose green tea extract may
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New research prompts urgent call to protect Madagascar's unique biodiversity before it's too late
In two new papers published today, December 1, in Science, researchers from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and partners from 50 global organizations have undertaken a major review of Madagascar's extraordinary biodiversity. Bringing together the most up to date resources and using cutting-edge techniques to predict conservation status, the team evaluated the threats facing terrestrial and freshwat
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Should we build a nature reserve on Mars?
There are 8 billion of us now. The UN says when the population peaks around the year 2100, there'll be 11 billion human souls. Our population growth is colliding with the natural world on a greater scale than ever, and we're losing between 200 and 2,000 species each year, according to the World Wildlife Federation.
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New research prompts urgent call to protect Madagascar's unique biodiversity before it's too late
In two new papers published today, December 1, in Science, researchers from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and partners from 50 global organizations have undertaken a major review of Madagascar's extraordinary biodiversity. Bringing together the most up to date resources and using cutting-edge techniques to predict conservation status, the team evaluated the threats facing terrestrial and freshwat
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The Most Overhyped Space Movie
As the outer-space correspondent at The Atlantic , I spend a lot of time looking beyond Earth's atmosphere. I've watched footage of a helicopter flying on Mars. I've watched a livestream of NASA smashing a spacecraft into an asteroid on purpose. I've seen people blast off on rockets with my own eyes. But I have never seen 2001: A Space Odyssey . This is an enormous oversight , apparently. The 196
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Christine McVie's Most Miraculous Song
The popular image of Fleetwood Mac is of the band as an unstable molecule, its parts best understood by their place in an ever-changing swirl of connections. The group's long saga includes marriages and divorces and affairs, departures and firings and returns. Bustling with rumbling blues, painterly folk, and hippie pop, its songs are pleasant blurs from afar, and cathedral-ceiling complex up clo
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Gift-Giving Is About the Buyer, Not the Receiver
Growing up, Stephanie Michael's brother longed for a six-foot-tall K'nex Ferris-wheel set. At the time, however, the 8,550-piece toy exceeded their family's budget. For his 30th birthday a few years ago, Michael, a geriatric social worker in Philadelphia, rallied her relatives to pool their funds and purchase the gift. The gesture moved her brother to tears. "It was that one big special present f
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Biotech labs are using AI inspired by DALL-E to invent new drugs
The explosion in text-to-image AI models like OpenAI's DALL-E 2 —programs trained to generate pictures of almost anything you ask for—has sent ripples through the creative industries, from fashion to filmmaking, by providing weird and wonderful images on demand. The same technology behind these programs is also making a splash in biotech labs, which are increasingly using this type of generative
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Image: Pillars of Creation (NIRCam and MIRI composite image)
By combining images of the iconic Pillars of Creation from two cameras aboard the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope, the Universe has been framed in its infrared glory. Webb's near-infrared image was fused with its mid-infrared image, setting this star-forming region ablaze with new details.
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The Guardian view on Alzheimer's drugs: a working therapy would be a breakthrough | Editorial
The search for a cure for dementia continues, but scientific advance in treatment is a landmark moment Finding a cure for Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, is the holy grail of medical research. The incurable malady is – along with other dementias – the leading cause of death in the UK. Until now, no therapy had emerged that could even slow its lethal brain shrinkage, let alo
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Defective LED Streetlights Are Turning the Night Purple
Mood Lights As cities around the world ditch old school sodium-vapor streetlights, they're quickly replacing them with modern LEDs . They're supposed to be cheaper and longer-lasting than their predecessors, but at least one of those claims isn't exactly panning out as intended. A new story from Insider details how many of these LED lights used in cities across the world , though mostly in North
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Elon Musk Reportedly Slashed the Team That Fights Child Sexual Abuse on Twitter
Last week, Twitter CEO Elon Musk took to his recently purchased social media platform to declare that "removing child exploitation" from Twitter was the restructuring site's "priority #1." That's a great goal to have — but unfortunately, Musk's actions reportedly aren't aligning with his words. Bloomberg reports that Twitter's formerly 20 person team responsible for preventing child sexual exploi
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A new method for detecting indirect corporate emissions
As part of its climate change mitigation strategy, the EU is preparing a new directive to regulate corporate sustainability reporting. Meanwhile, the Norwegian government has determined that all companies in the state portfolio now have a duty to report annually on their direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions.
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With a small network of satellites around Mars, rovers could navigate autonomously
When it comes to "on the ground" exploration of Mars, rovers make pretty good advance scouts. From Pathfinder to Perseverance, we've watched as these semi-autonomous robots do what human explorers want to do in the future. Now, engineers are studying ways to expand rover exploration on Mars. One thing they're thinking about: communication satellite constellations for Mars surface navigation.
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Pit bull attacks in South Africa—a historian sheds light on the issues
Pit bulls have been in the news in South Africa after a series of deadly attacks on humans by the dogs. There have been revenge attacks on the dogs and politicians have called for their ban—tapping into a history of dogs being used by their white owners to intimidate and attack black South Africans. A racist incident then made the news when a dog lover responded with fury to the call for a ban.
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Sci-fi books for young readers often omit children of color from the future
While visiting an elementary school library in 2016 to count the fantasy books for a graduate class on fantasy literature, I noticed there were hardly any science fiction books for readers under 12. This discovery prompted me to spend the next five years researching the shortage of science fiction books for children in this age group.
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Pit bull attacks in South Africa—a historian sheds light on the issues
Pit bulls have been in the news in South Africa after a series of deadly attacks on humans by the dogs. There have been revenge attacks on the dogs and politicians have called for their ban—tapping into a history of dogs being used by their white owners to intimidate and attack black South Africans. A racist incident then made the news when a dog lover responded with fury to the call for a ban.
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2022 Space Telescope Advent Calendar
It's time once more for one of my favorite holiday traditions: the 15th annual Space Telescope Advent Calendar—this year featuring images from both NASA's Hubble telescope and its brand-new James Webb Space Telescope. Every day until Sunday, December 25, this page will present a new, incredible image of our universe from one of these two telescopes. Be sure to come back every day until Christmas,
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Mark Zuckerberg Tries to Explain Why the Metaverse Is Great, Gets Attack of the Hiccups Instead
Hic-What? While trying to explain the pros of the metaverse in an interview that took place within said metaverse, Meta-formerly-Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg ran into a few hiccups — literally. In an interview with the New York Times , both Zuckerberg's real self and his virtual avatar struggled against hiccups as he explained to Andrew Ross Sorkin, the founder of the paper's DealBook newsletter
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