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News2022November18

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JAXA's ambitious mission to Phobos will even have European-built rover
Japan and Germany have a history of collaboration in scientific and technological endeavors. The countries have a Joint Committee on Cooperation in Science Technology that has met many times over the decades. Both countries have advanced, powerful economies and sophisticated technological know-how, so it makes sense they'd collaborate on scientific activities.
17min
NASA Webb micrometeoroid mitigation update
Micrometeoroid strikes are an unavoidable aspect of operating any spacecraft. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope was engineered to withstand continual bombardment from these dust-sized particles moving at extreme velocities, to continue to generate groundbreaking science far into the future.
17min
Editorial examines challenges of automated facial-expression analysis
As automated facial-expression analysis, or AFEA, becomes increasingly able to recognize facial behavior in everyday life, it will become increasingly important to understand what causes the technology to work incorrectly, as well as anticipate problems that could arise when it does work correctly.
17min
As New South Wales reels, many are asking why it's flooding in places where it's never flooded before
On Monday, residents of Eugowra in New South Wales had to flee for their lives. They had only minutes to get to higher ground—or their rooftops—to escape what's been dubbed an "inland tsunami" of water. This week, many other towns across western NSW faced renewed floods. For many people affected, the real shock is how unexpected it was—and how fast the water came. Their houses and land had never f
17min
What Do Children Owe Their Parents?
Our first relationship in life is usually with a parent. This early experience sets the blueprint for how we approach people for the rest of our lives —the traits we value, our tolerance for vulnerability, and the walls we build up. But parent-child dynamics are more complicated than people are willing to admit, especially parents. And when they're a burden, they're often one that a child shoulde
27min
Prioritizing autoimmunity risk variants for functional analyses by fine-mapping mutations under natural selection
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34461-9 Immune genes under selection can shed light on phenotypes contributing to survival and modern inflammatory conditions. Here, the authors prioritize adaptive disease variants in 535 risk loci for 21 inflammatory conditions and report promising SNPs for functional studies with predictions of cell context and f
59min
'I don't watch television': how two Brian Coxes stumped one hotel receptionist
Scottish actor and physics professor describe their difficulty in checking in to same hotel using matching names It adds a whole new meaning to double booking. Or perhaps it's more of a mathematical problem: solve Brian Cox squared? But when the question was raised by a hotel receptionist, it was left to an actor and a physicist to find an answer. Brian Cox, the former musician turned physics pro
1h
Experts Baffled by Why NASA's "Red Crew" Wear Blue Shirts
Red Crew, Blue Crew Had it not been for the heroics of three members of NASA's specialized " Red Crew ," NASA's absolutely massive — and incredibly expensive — Space Launch System (SLS) likely wouldn't have made it off the ground this week. During the launch, the painfully delayed Mega Moon Rocket sprang a hydrogen leak . The Red Crew ventured into the dangerous, half-loaded launch zone to fix it
1h
Can a universal basic income help address homelessness?
Homelessness is an increasing problem across the developed world, and existing policy responses are failing to make an impact. In Australia, for instance, homelessness has increased despite growing investment in (predominantly crisis-oriented) specialist homelessness services.
1h
NOAA adopts Finland's CubeSat-proven space weather monitor
An advanced X-ray monitoring instrument tested for space aboard an ESA CubeSat will serve as an operational space weather payload on the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Next Lagrange 1 Series satellite, currently planned for launch in 2028, which will operate 1.5 million km from Earth, keeping watch for eruptions from our sun.
1h
Study: Zebrafish are smarter than we thought
A new study from MIT and Harvard University suggests that the brains of the seemingly simple zebrafish are more sophisticated than previously thought. The researchers found that larval zebrafish can use visual information to create three-dimensional maps of their physical surroundings—a feat that scientists didn't think was possible.
1h
Silver nanoparticles inhibit four pathogens causing kiwifruit post-harvest rot
Kiwifruit is popular with consumers due to its unique flavor and high concentration of vitamin C, minerals, and other nutrients. As demand grows and the kiwifruit producing area in China expands, post-harvest rot diseases become more severe, with the average infected rate reaching 30%–50%, causing more than 100,000 tons of fruit losses per year, which seriously limits the industry's healthy develo
1h
Silver nanoparticles inhibit four pathogens causing kiwifruit post-harvest rot
Kiwifruit is popular with consumers due to its unique flavor and high concentration of vitamin C, minerals, and other nutrients. As demand grows and the kiwifruit producing area in China expands, post-harvest rot diseases become more severe, with the average infected rate reaching 30%–50%, causing more than 100,000 tons of fruit losses per year, which seriously limits the industry's healthy develo
1h
This Week in Space: Artemis 1 Takes Flight, While X-37B Lands
Artemis 1 launches from pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Image: NASA/Joel Kowsky Hello, lovelies, and welcome back to the best Friday space news roundup this side of LEO. This week, we've got updates aplenty from NASA. The agency's CAPSTONE cubesat has entered lunar orbit. Faulty calibration on the James Webb Space Telescope is forcing astronomers to revise their reports. We've also got re
1h
You are 'what you eat,' but you are not 'where you live'
Genetic studies of the past 20 years have extensively shown how, across human populations worldwide, the majority of genetic differences are encountered at the individual rather than at the population level. Two random humans from a single group tend indeed to be more genetically different from each other than two different human populations on average.
1h
A study of stormy Houston switches gears
In weather terms, convection is the process of conveying heat and moisture upward through a turbulent atmosphere. From there, convection forms clouds—mostly puffy, rain-free shallow cumuli. But others evolve into towering cumulonimbus, or anvil clouds, which form thunderstorms.
1h
A Myb enhancer-guided analysis of basophil and mast cell differentiation
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34906-1 The transcription factor MYB has been shown to regulate haematopoietic stem cells but there could be lineage specific enhancers. Here, using lineage tracing and single cell sequencing the authors characterise a Myb −68 enhancer that regulates the differentiation of mast cells and basophils.
1h
Cesium-mediated electron redistribution and electron-electron interaction in high-pressure metallic CsPbI3
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34786-5 Halide perovskites display physical properties that are of both practical and fundamental interest. At high pressure, the low-temperature electrical transport in one such compound, CsPbI3, is now shown to be due to Cs-mediated electron-electron interactions resulting in Fermi-liquid-like behaviour.
1h
Guy Linked to Huge Crypto Meltdown Says It's Just a Coincidence That He's Hanging Out in a Country With No Extradition to United States
As crypto exchange FTX continues its demise, a few certain ghosts of crypto collapses past have unexpectedly crawled out of the rubble. Take Zhu Su and Kyle Davies, the now-maybe-not-missing cofounders of the notorious Three Arrows Capital (3AC) hedge fund. After months of radio silence, the disgraced hedge honchos have made a sudden re-emergence into public — or at least, digitally visible — lif
2h
Former Facebook Exec Says Zuckerberg Has Surrounded Himself With Sycophants
In just about a year, Facebook-turned-Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg's metaverse vision has cost his company upwards of $15 billion , cratering value and — at least in part — triggering mass company layoffs. That's a high price tag, especially when the Facebook creator has shockingly little to show for it, both in actual technology and public interest . Indeed, it seems that every time Zuckerberg excit
2h
Celebrities' Bored Apes Are Hilariously Worthless Now
Floored Apes The value of Bored Ape Yacht Club NFTs have absolutely plummeted, leaving celebrities with six figure losses, in a perhaps predictable conclusion to a bewildering trend. Earlier this year, for instance, pop star Justin Bieber bought an Ape for a whopping $1.3 million . Now that the NFT economy has essentially collapsed in on itself, as Decrypt points out , it's worth a measly $69,000
2h
Weak tropical cyclones are intensifying due to global warming, study of surface drifter data finds
A pair of researchers at Fudan University's Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and CMA-FDU Joint Laboratory of Marine Meteorology, working with one colleague from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and another from the University of California San Diego, has found that weak tropical cyclones, also known as tropical storms, are growing stronger due to climate change.
2h
Exploring the activity of adenylate cyclase in the receptor of auxins
When humans get hurt, they feel pain. Between these occurrences there is a series of indirect relay reactions. An analogical set called transduction of signals exists in all living organisms, including plants. When a stimulus appears, for instance a draft factor as an attack of a pathogen, a plant receives this information through a receptor, analyzes it, sometimes amplifies it and forms a corresp
2h
Webb Telescope Spots Two of the Most Ancient Galaxies in the Universe
In the short time it has been operating, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has unlocked a new realm of astronomy. It can peer farther into the cosmos, detecting objects too faint to appear in less powerful telescopes. A pair of new studies explore two such objects, which are believed to be among the oldest galaxies in the universe. These objects could add greatly to our understanding of th
2h
Report: Millennials, Boomers split on issue-driven investing
Younger investors are more willing to put money behind environmental and social goals, even if that's costlier, a survey of investors indicates. The world's largest asset management companies have come out swinging on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) investing, with heavy hitters like BlackRock, Vanguard, and State Street declaring their intention to use their proxy-voting power to pre
2h
Virtual green space boosts pregnant women's well-being
Pregnant women exposed to a green space environment in virtual reality experienced decreases in blood pressure and improvements in mental health and well-being, according to a new study. For the study in Environmental Research , the researchers examined the short-term responses of urban pregnant women exposed to a virtual reality green space. "Even short exposure to a virtual green space environm
2h
Exploring the activity of adenylate cyclase in the receptor of auxins
When humans get hurt, they feel pain. Between these occurrences there is a series of indirect relay reactions. An analogical set called transduction of signals exists in all living organisms, including plants. When a stimulus appears, for instance a draft factor as an attack of a pathogen, a plant receives this information through a receptor, analyzes it, sometimes amplifies it and forms a corresp
2h
Black holes in eccentric orbit
A research team has reconstructed the origin of an unusual gravitational wave signal. The signal GW190521 may result from the merger of two massive black holes that captured each other in their gravitational field and then collided while spinning around each other in a rapid, eccentric motion.
2h
What Will Writers Do Without Twitter?
Twitter might be at death's door. Elon Musk seems to be running it into the ground at comical speed. New reporting every day tracks mass layoffs within the company, discontinued micro-features, glitching systems. Predictions range from a partial to a full collapse. If Twitter survives, the consensus seems to be, it may not be recognizable —and for writers, this is particularly alarming. The site
2h
My Friend, Mike Gerson
In the mid-1990s, I was the policy director of Empower America, a think tank whose co-directors were Jack Kemp, William Bennett, and Jeane Kirkpatrick. A colleague told me that there was a person writing speeches for Jack he thought I might like to meet. He introduced me to Michael J. Gerson. Mike and I bonded immediately. Ours was an acquaintance that quickly grew into a friendship that soon bec
2h
A Short History of Brazilian Soccer
The World Cup in Qatar gets under way in days, and as teams from nations around the globe take to the pitch, one team has a fabled history that stands out among the rest: Brazil. Over the years, the Brazilian national team has reached incredible heights and suffered devastating losses . They have also produced some of the game's most extraordinary and dramatic players . The historical significanc
2h
Researchers Grew Bigger Vegetables Using Exhaled CO2 as Fertilizer
(Photo: Francesco Gallarotti/Unsplash) We all know that talking to our plants technically supports their growth—albeit not super noticeably—but what if we turned that concept up a notch? Scientists recently tested the effect of funneling carbon dioxide-rich exhaust toward a vegetable garden, and the results were (literally) huge. A team of agricultural researchers at Boston University came up wit
2h
Simulations suggest GW190521 merger was the result of non-spinning black holes randomly finding each other
A team of researchers from Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Università di Torino and INFN sezione di Torino, has found evidence that the black hole collision that led to an odd gravitational wave detection in 2019 was due to a unique set of circumstances. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the group describes modeling and simulating the conditions that could possibly lea
2h
CHARA Array detects elusive, dusty inner region of distant galaxy
An international team of scientists has achieved the milestone of directly observing the long-sought, innermost dusty ring around a supermassive black hole, at a right angle to its emerging jet. Such a structure was thought to exist in the nucleus of galaxies but had been difficult to observe directly because intervening material obscured our line of sight.
2h
Study shows how moral behavior pays off in the end
Selfless behavior and cooperation cannot be taken for granted. Mohammad Salahshour of the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences (now at Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior), has used a game theory-based approach to show why it can be worthwhile for individuals to set self-interests aside.
3h
Revealing biochemical 'rings of power'
Benzobactins are bacterial natural products that have special biological activity due to a compound consisting of two ring structures. The bacterial genes responsible for the formation of the compound were previously unclear. Now, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology have been able to decipher its biosynthesis through extensive genomic research. Their research facili
3h
NASA's Artemis Launch Just Kicked Off a New Age in Space Exploration
Human spaceflight has suffered a significant lull since the groundbreaking Apollo missions of the 19 60s and 70s. But that looks set to change following the successful launch of NASA's Artemis I mission, a crucial first step towards taking astronauts back to the moon. Since the s pace s huttle made its final outing in 2011, NASA has relied on Russian Soyuz capsules, and more recently SpaceX's Cre
3h
Revealing biochemical 'rings of power'
Benzobactins are bacterial natural products that have special biological activity due to a compound consisting of two ring structures. The bacterial genes responsible for the formation of the compound were previously unclear. Now, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology have been able to decipher its biosynthesis through extensive genomic research. Their research facili
3h
A low-carbon energy transition may result in substantial emissions
A new ICTA-UAB study shows that the process of transitioning to a low-carbon energy system could lead to significant global emissions, consuming much of the remaining carbon budget, and thus leaving less emissions for socio-economic processes and activities than widely thought. The average emissions associated with a low-carbon energy transition amount to 195 gigatons of CO2, which equals approxim
3h
Why some feces float and others sink
A team of researchers at the Mayo Clinic has solved the mystery of why some people find their bowel movements floating while others find theirs sinking to the bottom of the toilet bowl. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes their accidental discovery of the answer.
3h
UN climate talks go into overtime
UN climate talks that were supposed to end Friday were extended by a day in an effort to break a deadlock over creating a fund for developing countries devastated by the fallout from global warming.
3h
Activity tracker data can shed light on heart health
Data gathered from wearable activity trackers can be used to obtain several metrics associated with the user's general physical health and cardiovascular health status, a new study shows. While these sensors are generally marketed as daily step counters, the researchers believe they could potentially serve a greater purpose: supporting clinical care for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertensi
3h
Avoid food poisoning over the holidays
Here are expert tips for avoiding food poisoning during the holiday season. Each year, an estimated 48 million Americans get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of food poisoning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "…it is not a good idea to eat stuffing cooked inside the turkey." "Forgetting about food safety is a recipe for disaster," says Diane Calello, exec
4h
Self-assembled nanoscale architectures could feature improved electronic, optical, and mechanical properties
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new way to guide the self-assembly of a wide range of novel nanoscale structures using simple polymers as starting materials. Under the electron microscope, these nanometer-scale structures look like tiny Lego building blocks, including parapets for miniature medieval castles and Roman aqueducts. Bu
4h
Climate change 'main threat' for world heritage sites
One of the world's first cities came close to being wiped off the map during tragic floods this summer in Pakistan. Though Mohenjo Daro survived, it has become a symbol of the threat global warming poses to humanity's cultural heritage.
4h
Parents Need Their Own AARP
Compared with other wealthy nations, the United States is a uniquely difficult place to raise children. One in four mothers returns to work within two weeks of giving birth, and we're the only rich country that doesn't have federally mandated paid leave for new parents. While other wealthy countries invest an average of $14,000 a year for every toddler's care, America spends $500 . The pandemic s
4h
Do You Really Want a New Kitchen Counter?
In the new Netflix horror series The Watcher , which follows a family as a stalker turns their new suburban dream home into a nightmare, the first boogeyman the viewer meets is the home's Carrara-marble countertops. The house is, by all indicators, an impeccable domestic fantasy at the time of purchase, and its new owners had to empty their savings and investment accounts to fend off rival bidder
4h
How to Cheer for America
Updated at 12:36 p.m. ET on November 18, 2022 When I was 6, my mother missed the deadline to register me for the Pop Warner football league. She needed something that would get me to do a lot of running outside the house, so that I didn't do as much running inside of the house. A colleague suggested soccer. It wasn't a sport my mom had considered: Not many Black kids in Louisiana played soccer in
4h
Tumblr Gets the Last Laugh
After haggling with the author Stephen King (don't worry about it), Elon Musk, the new owner of Twitter, decided that Twitter users would have to pay $8 a month to keep their blue verification check marks. Previously, these check marks were free and indicated an account was authentic—that's the real New York Times , the real President Joe Biden, the real Slim Jim, and so on. They're sort of a sta
4h
Why Elon Musk Is Blowing Up Twitter's Business
Hours before Elon Musk closed his deal to buy Twitter, he published an open letter to advertisers. Musk knew that big companies in particular were anxious about his plans to dramatically reduce the amount of content moderation on the site. They saw this as a potential threat to what advertisers call "brand safety," because it would make it more likely that their ads would end up next to deceptive
4h
An Ode to Pull-Ups
W ho do I think I am, dangling off this bar? I think I'm an ape. I think I'm an aerialist. I think I'm Jason Momoa. I think I'm a 54-year-old man with a dodgy shoulder, experiencing—to the pound, to the ounce—the precise terms of my contract with gravity. That's one thing you can always say for the pull-up: You're lifting your own weight. Its first cousin is of course the push-up. But the push-up
4h
The Download: Twitter may only last weeks, and Meta's unforced AI error
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Former Twitter employees fear the platform might only last weeks Recently-departed Twitter staff have told MIT Technology Review they worry that the platform has weeks to live based on current staffing levels, mass resignations overnight, and the morale of the
4h
Fixing the rift
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03733-1 A hole lot of trouble.
4h
The Potential of Geothermal Energy
As we discuss the optimal path forward for the next 30 years to get to net-zero carbon emissions for the energy sector, one big variable is the real-world potential of geothermal energy. Right now in the US geothermal produces 0.4% of our electricity. That is almost negligible, and is not going to help get us to our goal without an order of magnitude or more increase. What is the probability that
5h
Should stores crack down on 'serial returners'?
A policy change that targets customers who are "serial returners" rather than the entire customer base may prevent backlash and protect a retailer's bottom line, research finds. This holiday season is expected to set another record for online sales, according to the National Retail Federation. But if consumer habits mirror previous years, they'll return 20% to 30% of the merchandise. It's a big f
5h
Why Meta's latest large language model survived only three days online
On November 15 Meta unveiled a new large language model called Galactica , designed to assist scientists. But instead of landing with the big bang Meta hoped for, Galactica has died with a whimper after three days of intense criticism. Yesterday the company took down the public demo that it had encouraged everyone to try out. Meta's misstep—and its hubris—show once again that Big Tech has a blind
5h
Lab-Grown Meat Moves One Step Closer to Reality With FDA Green Light
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has moved one step closer to allowing sales of laboratory cultured meat products, announcing it has completed a pre-market consultation with Upside Foods. The company says its lab-grown chicken is safe to eat, and now the FDA has agreed. Upside Foods can now begin the process of getting products certified for sale to consumers, but instead of perusing a slau
5h
PODCAST Lastbiler med kørestrøm er spild af energi
Skal vi have køreledninger mellem Øresundsbroen og Femern, så lastbiler kan køre på strøm? I ugens Transformator runder vi også den vellykkede opsendelse af Nasas SLS-raket og Volvo EX90, der tilbyder to-vejs-opladning. Og så har vi et tilbud til halv pris.
5h
Why women aren't from Venus, and men aren't from Mars
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03782-6 Neuroscientist Gina Rippon describes how and why she tackled the nature–nurture debate in her book The Gendered Brain, and the media furore it caused.
5h
The Year Virginia Rewrote the Rules of Popular Culture
A t the peak of his powers, Michael Vick could make a broken play look like it was planned. In 2002, as quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons, he was a newly minted NFL star, known for his ability to confound defenses with his deep passes and exhilarating runs. In my Virginia Beach high school, this was the year of the Michael Vick jersey; we were about a Vick-length scramble from his hometown of N
5h
New Archer Midnight eVTOL Air Taxi Promises Quick Trips to the Airport
Traffic snarls in some cities can make the trip to or from the airport longer than your flight, but Archer Aviation aims to change that by adding an additional flight. The company's newly revealed Midnight sky taxi is 100 percent electric and capable of ferrying up to four passengers and a minimal amount of baggage from urban centers to airports, and you could book a flight as soon as 2025. Arche
6h
These three charts show who is most to blame for climate change
Leaders at the annual UN climate conference are still in the thick of negotiations, working to plan a path forward to cut emissions, as well as to address climate impacts that are already occurring. Part of this second goal includes discussions about establishing funding for " loss and damage " caused by climate change, which richer countries would pay to help poorer and more vulnerable nations.
6h
Mathematician requests two retractions for "subtle inaccuracies"
A mathematician has requested the retraction of two recently published articles "claiming proofs of big results in number theory," as one observer put it. After publication, the author said he "found some subtle inaccuracies" in the work. The editor-in-chief of the mathematics journal Studia Logica, where the papers were published, posted a notice to the … Continue reading Mathematician requests t
7h
I found out my biological age—and was annoyed by the result
This article is from The Checkup, MIT Technology Review's weekly biotech newsletter. To receive it in your inbox every Thursday, sign up here . You're only as old as you feel, so they say. Now biological clocks attempt to put a number on it. These tools analyze proteins in your blood, chemical markers on your DNA, or even the makeup of your gut bacteria to essentially predict how close you are to
7h
Carbon dioxide is shrinking uppermost atmosphere, prolonging life of space debris
Near Earth's surface, increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are causing temperatures to rise. But starting around 60 kilometers (37 miles) up, in the outermost layers of atmosphere called the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) carbon dioxide actually cools the atmosphere, causing it to shrink and contract. That cooling and contracting process has been hypothesized for
7h
Så smittas kvinnor av apkoppor
Var fjärde ciskvinna som smittas av apkoppor har inte fått viruset via sexuell kontakt, en annars vanlig smittväg. Det framgår av en internationell studie om apkoppor. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
7h
Former Twitter employees fear the platform might only last weeks
Recently departed Twitter staff have told MIT Technology Review they worry that the platform has weeks to live judging from current staffing levels, mass resignations overnight, and the morale of those few who remain. With some within Twitter estimating that 75% of those remaining plan to quit after Elon Musk sent an email informing them that they "will need to be extremely hardcore" and must cli
8h
Tvang i psykiatrien bør ophøre
DEBAT: Danmarks tvangsbehandlinger i psykiatrien, har fået FN til at løfte pegefingeren. Det mener professor Peter Gøtszche er fuldstændig på sin plads. Ifølge ham må og skal tvang i psykiatrien stoppes.
8h
Alzheimers kan diagnostiseras innan symtom
En ny stor internationell studie ledd från Lunds universitet, visar att man nu kan identifiera personer med Alzheimers sjukdom innan de har några symtom. Det går även att förutsäga vem som kommer försämras inom de närmaste åren.
8h
Decarboxylative oxidation-enabled consecutive C-C bond cleavage
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34829-x The selective cleavage of inert C(sp3)-C(sp3) bonds and their subsequent functionalization is an important goal in synthetic organic chemistry. Here, the authors developed consecutive C–C bond cleavage from stable trisubstituted acids via photocatalysis and copper catalysis.
8h
Developing medical imaging AI for emerging infectious diseases
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34234-4 Very few of the COVID-19 ML models were fit for deployment in real-world settings. In this Comment, Huang et al. discuss the main steps required to develop clinically useful models in the context of an emerging infectious disease.
8h
Book Review: The Magic and Mystery of Human Cells
In "The Song of the Cell," Siddhartha Mukherjee is both lyrical and clinical in his exploration of the body's fundamental building blocks, and the therapies and treatments that arise from our evolving understanding of them. "The human body functions as a citizenship of cooperating cells," Mukherjee writes.
10h
Photos of the Week: Camel Race, Sea Horse, Illusion Room
Artwork by Banksy in the ruins of Ukraine, an American Indian Heritage celebration in San Francisco, a gaggle of geese in Prague, damage from Hurricane Nicole in Florida, liberation in Ukraine's Kherson region, early Christmas decorations in Paris, a volcanic eruption in Chile, and much more
12h
Schneider Shorts 18.11.2022 – Race to the bottom
Schneider Shorts 18.11.2022 – a Spanish university hunts "Nazis", Indian elites flock to a scamference, publishers embracing fraud, WHO embracing papermills, the fall of COPE, with a Dutch sexual harasser, Saudi and Egyptian data forgers, other science elites in a race to the bottom, and a diet advice to eat sand.
12h
Primes in arithmetic progressions to large moduli, and shifted primes without large prime factors
We prove the infinitude of shifted primes $p-1$ without prime factors above $p^{0.2844}$. This refines $p^{0.2961}$ from Baker and Harman in 1998. Consequently, we obtain an improved lower bound on the the distribution of Carmichael numbers. Our main technical result is a new mean value theorem for primes in arithmetic progressions to large moduli. Namely, we estimate primes of size $x$ with quadr
13h
James Webb telescope finds two of the oldest and most distant galaxies ever seen
Nasa says space telescope is finding previously hidden early galaxies, including one that may have formed 350m years after the big bang Nasa's James Webb space telescope is finding bright, early galaxies that until now have been hidden from view, including one that may have formed just 350m years after the big bang. Astronomers said Thursday that if the results were verified, this newly discovere
16h
Grid of quantum islands could reveal secrets for powerful technologies
Researchers have created grids of tiny clumps of atoms known as quantum dots and studied what happens when electrons dive into these archipelagos of atomic islands. Measuring the behavior of electrons in these relatively simple setups promises deep insights into how electrons behave in complex real-world materials and could help researchers engineer devices that make possible powerful quantum comp
17h
Elusive, dusty inner region of distant galaxy
An international team of scientists has achieved the milestone of directly observing the long-sought, innermost dusty ring around a supermassive black hole, at a right angle to its emerging jet. Such a structure was thought to exist in the nucleus of galaxies but had been difficult to observe directly because intervening material obscured our line of sight.
17h
Down syndrome, like Alzheimer's, is a double-prion disorder, study shows
The brains of people with Down syndrome develop the same neurodegenerative tangles and plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease and frequently demonstrate signs of the neurodegenerative disorder in their forties or fifties. A new study shows that these tangles and plaques are driven by the same amyloid beta and tau prions that researchers showed are behind Alzheimer's disease in 2019.
17h
New oral drug for lowering cholesterol
After statins, the next leading class of medications for managing cholesterol are PCSK9 inhibitors. These highly effective agents help the body pull excess cholesterol from the blood, but unlike statins, which are available as oral agents, PCSK9 inhibitors can only be administered as shots, creating barriers to their use. Now, a new study describes an orally administered small-molecule drug that r
17h
How to deal with the trauma of the Medibank cyber breach | Andrea Szasz
The weaponisation of private health information can feel like a violation of personal safety, but there are steps you can take to regain control Millions of Australians have been left feeling violated in the wake of the Medibank cyber breach. The weaponisation of private health information can be deeply traumatic – particularly for those who have had sensitive health information released publicly
17h
Development of an easy-to-synthesize self-healing gel composed of entangled ultrahigh molecular weight polymers
A research team has developed a method for easily synthesizing a self-healing polymer gel made of ultrahigh molecular weight polymers (polymers with a molecular weight greater than 106 g/mol) and non-volatile ionic liquids. This recyclable and self-healable polymer gel is compatible with circular economy principles. In addition, it may potentially be used as a durable, ionically conductive materia
17h
Development of an easy-to-synthesize self-healing gel composed of entangled ultrahigh molecular weight polymers
A research team has developed a method for easily synthesizing a self-healing polymer gel made of ultrahigh molecular weight polymers (polymers with a molecular weight greater than 106 g/mol) and non-volatile ionic liquids. This recyclable and self-healable polymer gel is compatible with circular economy principles. In addition, it may potentially be used as a durable, ionically conductive materia
18h
Plant roots change shape and branch out for water
Researchers have discovered how plant roots adapt their shape to maximize their uptake of water, pausing branching when they lose contact with water and only resuming once they reconnect with moisture, ensuring they can survive even in the driest conditions.
18h
Enjoying Soccer in Its Dark Age
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Franklin Foer, a staff writer who is contributing to The Atlantic 's new World Cup pop-up newsletter, The Great Game , has been a soccer fan since he was a kid in the 1980s. I talked with Frank about
18h
Panicked Elon Musk Reportedly Begging Engineers Not to Leave
Elon Musk's Twitter operations are still in free fall. Earlier this week, the billionaire CEO sent an email to staff telling them that they "need to be extremely hardcore" and work long hours at the office, or quit and get three months severance, as The Washington Post reports . Employees had until 5 pm on Thursday to click "yes" and be part of Twitter moving forward or take the money and part wa
19h
Researchers uncover insights into the evolution of color patterns in frogs and toads
A team of researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) has discovered new insights into the evolution of color patterns in frogs and toads—collectively known as anurans. Animal color patterns can help them camouflage with their surroundings and avoid detection from preys or predators. Many anurans have a light stripe along their back, which, when observed from above, creates the optical illusion that th
19h
Researchers uncover insights into the evolution of color patterns in frogs and toads
A team of researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) has discovered new insights into the evolution of color patterns in frogs and toads—collectively known as anurans. Animal color patterns can help them camouflage with their surroundings and avoid detection from preys or predators. Many anurans have a light stripe along their back, which, when observed from above, creates the optical illusion that th
19h
Molecular magneto-ionic proton sensor in solid-state proton battery
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34874-6 Ionic control of magnetism promises ultralow-field sensor, but current physical realizations of proton-based magneto-ionic sensor are limited due to the lack of effective solid-state sensing methods. Here, authors report magneto-ionics-based proton sensing under low working radiofrequency and magnetic fields
20h
Transplantable human thyroid organoids generated from embryonic stem cells to rescue hypothyroidism
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34776-7 Hypothyroidism is a common condition that cannot always be satisfactorily treated through continued hormone replacement. Here the authors report the generation of transplantable thyroid organoids derived from human embryonic stem cells that can restore plasma thyroid hormone in athyreotic mice.
20h
Development of an easy-to-synthesize self-healing gel composed of entangled ultrahigh molecular weight polymers
A research team consisting of the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Hokkaido University and Yamaguchi University has developed a method for easily synthesizing a self-healing polymer gel made of ultrahigh molecular weight (UHMW) polymers (polymers with a molecular weight greater than 106 g/mol) and non-volatile ionic liquids. This recyclable and self-healable polymer gel is compatib
20h
Science misinformation on GMOs reaches quarter of a billion people, study finds
Over a two-year period, science misinformation about genetically modified crops and foods reached a potential global readership of over a quarter of a billion people, according to a new study published in GM Crops & Food by the Alliance for Science, which combats anti-science misinformation on topics like climate, vaccines and GMOs.
20h
How to fight misinformation in the post-truth era
An article published in the Journal of Social Epistemology entitled "Institutions of Epistemic Vigilance: The Case of the Newspaper Press" authored by Central European University researchers Akos Szegofi and Christophe Heintz describe how we can and should fight against misinformation: through collective action. The fight can only be won through updating existing institutions of epistemic vigilanc
20h
Made by women: Why women buy from women and men buy from women and men
Researchers from Technical University of Munich and Copenhagen Business School published a new paper in the Journal of Consumer Psychology that provides fresh insights into how individual purchase decisions are influenced by the gender of the person producing the goods. The research has implications for online platforms marketing handmade products and policymakers seeking to promote socially respo
20h
Remote-controlled microscopes bring complex biology education to students worldwide
In many communities around the world, students' ability and enthusiasm to pursue STEM fields in their high school and college careers is limited by a lack of resources that prevent them from accessing complex, project-based curriculum like their peers. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these existing educational inequalities, requiring new solutions to democratize access to this field.
20h
NASA's Perseverance Rover investigates intriguing Martian bedrock
NASA's Perseverance Mars rover has begun exploring an area the science team calls "Yori Pass" near the base of Jezero Crater's ancient river delta. They've been eager to explore the region for several months after spotting a rock similar to one Perseverance collected samples from in July.
20h
Stress protection and drought recovery in cool-season turfgrass
Drought stress can interrupt the metabolic and physiological processes of plants, including nitrogen and amino acid metabolism. Researchers in the Department of Plant Biology at Rutgers University took a closer look at the role of amino acids and nitrogen on cool-season turfgrass regrowth or recovery from drought stress.
20h
Legacy of a molecular dynamics trailblazer: Computer simulations meet biochemistry
Life is motion. And so, to understand how living organisms function, one must understand the movement and reorganization of the atoms and molecules that compose them. The approach called "molecular dynamics simulation" enables scientists to use computer programs to simulate the dynamic motion of all the atoms in a molecular system as a function of time.
20h
A grid of quantum islands could reveal secrets for powerful technologies
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have created grids of tiny clumps of atoms known as quantum dots and studied what happens when electrons dive into these archipelagos of atomic islands. Measuring the behavior of electrons in these relatively simple setups promises deep insights into how electrons behave in complex real-world materials and could help research
20h
Chemical defenses may not protect Antarctic seafloor animals, jeopardizing their value for drug discovery
Long-lived sponges, intestine-like worms, colonies of sea squirts and many other cold-loving animals populate the seafloor around Antarctica. But the arrival of outsiders—borne in ships' ballast water, on plastic refuse or on floating kelp, or encouraged by warming temperature—threaten this menagerie.
20h
Webb draws back curtain on universe's early galaxies
A few days after officially starting science operations, the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope propelled astronomers into a realm of early galaxies, previously hidden beyond the grasp of all other telescopes. Webb is now unveiling a very rich Universe where the first forming galaxies look remarkably different from the mature galaxies seen around us today.
20h
A new experiment pushes the boundaries of our understanding of topological quantum matter
New research conducted by Princeton University physicists is delving with high resolution into the complex and fascinating world of topological quantum matter—a branch of physics that studies the inherent quantum properties of materials that can be deformed but not intrinsically changed. By repeating an experiment first conducted by researchers at Kyoto University, the Princeton team has clarified
20h
The Menu Skewers Class Politics
Let's get this out of the way quickly: The Menu is not—I repeat, not —a movie about cannibalism. I say this not to spoil potential viewers but to reassure, since it's the first question almost anyone who's aware of the film has asked me. Just what is going on in Mark Mylod's pitch-black comedy about a celebrity chef presiding over a very special meal for the wealthy and famous? Something sinister
20h

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