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News2022November21

Quick-closing valve allows fish to rapidly regulate the water in their cells
Regulating the fluid balance in cells is vital in all living things. When insufficient water is being transported via the cell membrane, cells can use their aquaporins—also known as water channels—that open and close to remedy this. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg recently identified a water channel in a fish with what appears to be a unique quick-closing valve. Ultimately, this discov
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Bill Gates Reflects on Drinking Product of Fecal Sludge
Silly Billy Happy Holidays to all, especially Microsoft founder Bill Gates. The billionaire philanthropist took to LinkedIn on Saturday to celebrate a more niche holiday: World Toilet Day. And as proof of his zest for the holiday, the tech mogul shared — or, as some might argue, overshared — some tales of his fecal fortitude. "I've done some weird crap over the years: I drank water from fecal slu
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Genetic 'hitchhikers' can be directed using CRISPR
In a new study, North Carolina State University researchers characterize a range of molecular tools to rewrite—not just edit—large chunks of an organism's DNA, based on CRISPR-Cas systems associated with selfish genetic "hitchhikers" called transposons.
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The Theater World Has Never Understood Lorraine Hansberry
If you remember A Raisin in the Sun as a play about a family that decides to buy a house, you might be surprised that the author thought its crucial line was about African decolonization. Lorraine Hansberry's favorite character wasn't Lena Younger, the stalwart widow who wants to use her husband's life-insurance payment to move her family out of a cramped apartment on Chicago's South Side. Nor wa
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Why Maus Was Banned
In the 1970s, the cartoonist Art Spiegelman jotted down a thought in a notebook. "Maybe Western civilization has forfeited any right to literature with a big 'L,'" he wrote. "Maybe vulgar, semiliterate, unsubtle comic books are an appropriate form for speaking of the unspeakable." It came to him around the time he started making comics about the Holocaust, which would eventually lead to his two-v
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Study analyzes dust transport in the upper levels of the atmosphere over the last two glacial cycles
Dust from the dry Puna Plateau in northwestern Argentina was an important source of iron for the nutrient-deficient South Pacific in the last two glacial cycles—especially at the beginning of these cycles. This was the key finding of a study presented in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal by a team of researchers led by geochemist Dr. Torben Struve from the University of O
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Building green energy facilities may produce substantial carbon emissions, says study
First, the bad news: Nothing is free. Moving the world energy system away from fossil fuels and into renewable sources will generate carbon emissions by itself, as construction of wind turbines, solar panels and other new infrastructure consumes energy—some of it necessarily coming from the fossil fuels we are trying to get rid of. The good news: If this infrastructure can be put on line quickly,
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How deep learning empowers cell image analysis
The cell is the basic structural and functional unit of life, with varying sizes, shapes, and densities. There are many different physiological and pathological factors that influence these parameters. It is therefore extremely important for biomedical and pharmaceutical research to study the characteristics of cells.
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Watch: Person uses thoughts to operate a wheelchair
In one of the first studies of its kind, several people with motor disabilities were able to operate a wheelchair that translates their thoughts into movement. The study is an important step forward for brain-machine interfaces—computer systems that turn mind activity into action. Researchers have studied the concept of a thought-powered wheelchair for years, but most projects have used non-disab
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Can touchy feely robots help you with laundry?
New research can help robots feel layers of cloth rather than relying on computer vision tools to only see it. The work could allow robots to assist people with household tasks like folding laundry. Humans use their senses of sight and touch to grab a glass or pick up a piece of cloth. It is so routine that little thought goes into it. For robots, however, these tasks are extremely difficult. The
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The Man Whose Magazine Covers Changed America
As an art director for Esquire in the 1960s, George Lois assailed Muhammad Ali with arrows, drowned Andy Warhol in a can of soup, and prepped Richard Nixon's profile for a close-up. He stunned minds to attention, making magazine covers that spoke so urgently, they muted an entire newsstand's worth of bold headlines. Through Lois's work, history was reified. I wasn't alive in the '60s, but I can t
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American Soccer Comes of Age
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. On June 10, 2002 in Daegu, South Korea, Claudio Reyna led the United States men's national team onto the pitch to face the World Cup's host nation. Daegu stadium was a sea of red bandanas, T-shirts, and scarves emblazoned with the nation's name in Korean— Daehanminguk . Two
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Study finds you should keep your cats inside for the sake of their health and the surrounding environment
The next time you crack your backdoor to let your cat outside for its daily adventure, you may want to think again. For a cat, the outdoors is filled with undesirable potential. Like the risks of catching and transmitting diseases, and the uncontrollable drive to hunt and kill wildlife, which has been shown to reduce native animal populations and degrade biodiversity.
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Retired NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly Dishes on Ukraine, Russia, and Moon Mission
Scott Kelly is someone you might call an outspoken guy. The retired NASA astronaut and US Navy captain, who once held the American record for the longest time spent in a single off-world orbit, takes a no-holds-barred approach to Twitter, where he's spent the last several months not only expressing his support for the people of the embattled Ukraine, but even sparring directly with the markedly u
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NASA Launch Pad Sustained Significant Damage During Artemis Takeoff
Damages It appears that NASA's Artemis 1 rocket launch pad caught way more damage than expected when it finally took off from Kennedy Space Center last week. As Reuters space reporter Joey Roulette tweeted , a source within the agency said that damage to the launchpad "exceeded mission management's expectations," and per his description, it sounds fairly severe. "Elevator blast doors were blown r
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Timelapse shows Earth visible on Nasa's Orion lunar flyby – video
Nasa checked off another crucial milestone on its first crew-capable moon mission for 50 years early on Monday, with the Orion capsule of Artemis 1 "buzzing" the moon as it made its closest approach to the lunar surface of the 25-day space flight. The pass, 81 miles above the far side of the moon, was followed by a critical engine burn to place the spacecraft on a pathway to a wide lunar orbit 40
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Obstacles need not impede cooperation in active matter
Nature, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03769-3 A theory shows that active agents can cooperate in the presence of disorder — a result that could inform the design of robots that organize on rough surfaces, or show how cells migrate en masse.
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These Engineered Cells Are Super Soldiers That Hunt Down Cancers
A new cancer therapy is a match made in heaven. On one side is CRISPR, the gene-editing technology that's taken genetic engineering by storm. The other is a therapy called CAR-T, which transforms normal immune cells into super soldiers that hunt down specific cancers. Scientists have long sought to combine these two big advances into a "danger zone" for cancers—a cellular fighter jet that hunts d
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Less burping, more meat and milk—how livestock farmers can help tackle the climate crisis
Africa's livestock farmers are at the forefront of climate change. Images of parched landscapes littered with the carcasses of starved cattle are becoming all too familiar as droughts increase in frequency and severity. But cattle farming globally is also one of the causes of climate change. The world's three billion or more ruminants—cattle, sheep and goats—produce methane, one of the most potent
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Mapping Lyme disease out west
Tick bites can transmit Lyme disease. But even knowing where these ticks live doesn't necessarily mean you can predict the disease in humans. It's only one part of a broader picture which includes human behavior and the habits of the parasite's carriers.
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Recreating the adrenal gland in a petri dish
A team coaxed stem cells to take on the characteristics and functions of a human adrenal gland, progress that could lead to new therapies for adrenal insufficiencies and a deeper understanding of the genetics of such disorders.
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'SharkGuard' reduces bycatch of endangered sharks, sea trials show
For sharks living in the open ocean, longline fishing is the number-one threat, with an estimated 20 million pelagic sharks caught annually by fishers looking for tuna and other desired species. Now, a new studyshows that a new technology, known as 'SharkGuard,' could allow longline fishing to continue while reversing the dramatic decline of endangered sharks around the world.
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Arctic carbon conveyor belt discovered
Every year, the cross-shelf transport of carbon-rich particles from the Barents and Kara Seas could bind up to 3.6 million metric tons of CO2 in the Arctic deep sea for millennia. In this region alone, a previously unknown transport route uses the biological carbon pump and ocean currents to absorb atmospheric CO2 on the scale of Iceland's total annual emissions, as researchers report.
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Measuring organ development
Organs in the human body have complex networks of fluid-filled tubes and loops. They come in different shapes and their three-dimensional structures are differently connected to each other, depending on the organ. During the development of an embryo, organs develop their shape and tissue architecture out of a simple group of cells. Due to a lack of concepts and tools, it is challenging to understa
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Verified after two decades: The fourth anaconda species
Two decades after having described a new Anaconda species based on morphological characteristics, a team guided by David Tarknishvili succeeded in extracting DNA from some old, pre-existing tissue samples. They used these to substantiate and verify the specific status of the new species.
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Less burping, more meat and milk—how livestock farmers can help tackle the climate crisis
Africa's livestock farmers are at the forefront of climate change. Images of parched landscapes littered with the carcasses of starved cattle are becoming all too familiar as droughts increase in frequency and severity. But cattle farming globally is also one of the causes of climate change. The world's three billion or more ruminants—cattle, sheep and goats—produce methane, one of the most potent
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Temps spike after tropical cyclone 'heat pumps'
Above-average temperatures almost always follow tropical cyclones and may soar to nearly 10 degrees Fahrenheit higher than average, according to a new study. The researchers stress their results are likely conservative estimates of just how high temperatures can climb following tropical cyclones, which by definition include tropical storms and hurricanes. Three days after Hurricane Fiona struck P
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Antony Blinken on the Diplomatic Niceties of the Beautiful Game
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. Secretary of State Antony Blinken is perhaps the highest-ranking soccer fan in the United States government since Henry Kissinger. Last night, I spoke with him as he was flying to Qatar. Of course, he had many important meetings on his agenda. But he was also planning on at
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Cut the Baloney Realism
In recent weeks, General Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, created alarm among Ukraine's friends by suggesting in several forums that Ukraine has fought Russian forces to a "standstill," and that given the emerging stalemate on the ground and the onset of winter, the time may be ripe for negotiations between Kyiv and Moscow. Other news reports indicated that the United State
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Short gamma-ray bursts traced farther into distant universe
Astronomers have developed the most extensive inventory to date of the galaxies where short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) originate. Using several highly sensitive instruments and sophisticated galaxy modeling, the researchers pinpointed the galactic homes of 84 SGRBs and probed the characteristics of 69 of the identified host galaxies.
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Corals found to be beneficial in saving other corals
Under the right living arrangement, disease-resistant corals can help "rescue" corals that are more vulnerable to disease, found a study from the University of California, Davis, that monitored a disease outbreak at a coral nursery in Little Cayman, Cayman Islands.
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'Butterfly bot' swims 4X faster than past robots
The biomechanics of the manta ray inspired researchers to develop an energy-efficient soft robot that can swim more than four times faster than previous swimming soft robots. The robots are called "butterfly bots," because their swimming motion resembles the way a person's arms move when they are swimming the butterfly stroke. "To date, swimming soft robots have not been able to swim faster than
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Why businesses, banks and society still need more women in executive roles
Only nine in the U.K.'s top 100 companies have a woman CEO, a recent report has revealed—part of an "appalling" picture of British business which even in 2022 remains remarkably male dominated. The report, from accountancy giant EY and Cranfield University, goes on to reveal that only around 17% of executives in the FTSE 100 are female.
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Cooling nanoparticles simultaneously independently of their electric charge
Over the past forty years, physicists have learned to cool increasingly large objects down to temperatures close to the absolute zero: atoms, molecules and, more recently, also nanoparticles consisting of billions of atoms. Whereas one can cool atoms with laser light alone, up to now nanoparticles needed to have an electric charge and had to be manipulated using electric fields for optimal cooling
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Exploring the deep: Drones offer new ways to monitor sea floor
Researchers have developed a novel method for measuring the earth's crust on the seafloor. A lightweight geodetic measurement device was mounted on a sea-surface landing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The mobility of this new system will enable rapid, efficient collection of real-time deep seafloor information, which is critical for understanding earthquake risk, as well as various other oceanogra
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Two new species of slender gecko reported in Yunnan karsts
As the largest family of geckos, Gekkonidae shows high levels of endemism in karst systems. Hemiphyllodactylus (commonly known as half leaf-fingered geckos, dwarf geckos, or slender geckos), belongs to the family Gekkonidae. However, like other small organisms (e.g., snails, millipedes, and other invertebrates), this genus is often overlooked, and given the highly endemic nature of the group, more
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Nitrogen deposition promotes tree growth and drives photosynthate allocation into wood in temperate and boreal forests
Human activities have greatly increased reactive nitrogen (N) emissions to the atmosphere, resulting in an increasing global atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Existing stimulated nitrogen deposition experiments are carried out mostly in forests with low background nitrogen deposition, whose treatment durations are often short. In China, nitrogen deposition levels have remained steady in the last te
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UN climate boss settles for no cuts on emissions
Given an energy crisis in Europe and progress made in helping climate victims, the new climate chief for the United Nations said he'll settle for a lack of new emissions-cutting action coming out of the now-concluded climate talks in Egypt.
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Researchers propose design theory for high-homogeneity multilayer Halbach magnet
Portable magnetic resonance (MR) systems have become a hot research topic for low-field MR systems in recent years thanks to the research and development of high homogeneity multilayer Halbach magnets. However, due to the imperfect design theory, current magnet design methods mostly adopt approximate calculation or finite element simulation, which have problems such as low calculation accuracy and
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Two new species of slender gecko reported in Yunnan karsts
As the largest family of geckos, Gekkonidae shows high levels of endemism in karst systems. Hemiphyllodactylus (commonly known as half leaf-fingered geckos, dwarf geckos, or slender geckos), belongs to the family Gekkonidae. However, like other small organisms (e.g., snails, millipedes, and other invertebrates), this genus is often overlooked, and given the highly endemic nature of the group, more
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Hubble views a billowing cosmic cloud
A small, dense cloud of gas and dust called CB 130-3 blots out the center of this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. CB 130-3 is an object known as a dense core, a compact agglomeration of gas and dust. This particular dense core is in the constellation Serpens and seems to billow across a field of background stars.
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Nitrogen deposition promotes tree growth and drives photosynthate allocation into wood in temperate and boreal forests
Human activities have greatly increased reactive nitrogen (N) emissions to the atmosphere, resulting in an increasing global atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Existing stimulated nitrogen deposition experiments are carried out mostly in forests with low background nitrogen deposition, whose treatment durations are often short. In China, nitrogen deposition levels have remained steady in the last te
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A path to faster and more cost-effective drug development
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) have published research in Molecular Pharmaceutics predicting how proteins interact in drug development. The research is a collaboration between Amgen and the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor. In the paper, researchers use a mathematical model to predict the viscosity of solutions of proteins to be used as drugs. This is critical in drug develo
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Early disinterest in school snowballs into academic, social problems
The first years of school are pivotal because academic habits are unformed and peer relationships are fluid. A national assessment has shown troubling setbacks in both math and reading. A Florida Atlantic University study last year suggests that students who are not interested in academics when they begin school, struggle to find their footing, academically and socially.
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EU Mulls Putting Data Centers in Space
(Image: Thales Alenia) The world's ever-increasing reliance on the internet comes at a physical cost. Data centers, which fulfill the vital role of housing and maintaining core computer services and data, are a central element of any operation that relies on digital resources. They're also physically large; as an organization grows, it does, too. Eventually, organizations are forced to consider n
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AI-generated creatures that stretch the boundaries of imagination | Sofia Crespo
Can AI help us see beyond our human capabilities? Through a kaleidoscopic blend of technology, nature and art, neural artist Sofia Crespo brings to life animals that push the boundaries of creativity and imagination. Her artistic renditions of chimeras combine images of real-world endangered species to create something totally new — with the intention of inspiring real-world conservation. Witness
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A path to faster and more cost-effective drug development
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) have published research in Molecular Pharmaceutics predicting how proteins interact in drug development. The research is a collaboration between Amgen and the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor. In the paper, researchers use a mathematical model to predict the viscosity of solutions of proteins to be used as drugs. This is critical in drug develo
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Monitoring 'frothy' magma gases could help evade disaster
Volcanic eruptions are dangerous and difficult to predict. A team has found that the ratio of atoms in specific gases released from volcanic fumaroles (gaps in the Earth's surface) can provide an indicator of what is happening to the magma deep below — similar to taking a blood test to check your health. This can indicate when things might be 'heating up.' Specifically, changes in the ratio of ar
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Sam Bankman-Fried's Lawyers Quit Because of His "Incessant and Disruptive Tweeting"
Posting Through It Even as it's engulfed in chaos by new owner Elon Musk , Twitter is still causing major problems for people — just ask Sam Bankman-Fried, the now-infamous founder of the FTX crypto exchange whose lawyers just fired him as a client because he refused to stop tweeting. As Bloomberg reports , the Paul Weiss law firm announced that it's dropped SBF because his "incessant and disrupt
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The phenotypic costs of animal captivity
Animals bred in captivity can experience significant changes to their bodies, behavior and health, which affects their chances of survival when they're released into the wild, a new review from The Australian National University (ANU) has shown.
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New hope for novel therapies has emerged from computational models
In the war between good and evil, I was there seeking to design powerful selfish strategies for investigating the defense mechanisms of cooperators. Surprisingly, the results serve a different domain of science. It gave me the hope to develop novel therapies using selfish strains as traitors betray their original species in favor of us. They commit treason inside cancer and microbial pathogen popu
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It's time-out for leap seconds
Meeting in Versailles, France, on Friday, the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has called time-out on "leap seconds"—the little jumps occasionally added to clocks running on Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), to keep them in sync with Earth's rotation.
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New hope for novel therapies has emerged from computational models
In the war between good and evil, I was there seeking to design powerful selfish strategies for investigating the defense mechanisms of cooperators. Surprisingly, the results serve a different domain of science. It gave me the hope to develop novel therapies using selfish strains as traitors betray their original species in favor of us. They commit treason inside cancer and microbial pathogen popu
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Exploring the deep: Drones offer new ways to monitor sea floor
Measuring the position and topography of the Earth's crust is critical for understanding earthquake risk. Now, researchers led by the Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo have developed a novel method for monitoring the position of the seafloor with a drone-based observation device that could revolutionize oceanographic observation.
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Charged porphyrins: The key to investigating the properties of stacked ion pairs
Ions are created when an atom or molecule either loses or gains electrons, thus gaining a charge. When two oppositely charged ions are combined, it can lead to the creation of an ion pair. The influence of different ion pairs on the physical properties of the material they are present in has been widely studied as it can lead to the creation of new functional electronic materials.
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Another Flop From GOP Productions
Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET on November 21, 2022 In 2006 and 2018, Democrats won control of the U.S. House of Representatives on the way to winning the presidency two years later. In 1994 and 2010, Republicans won control of the U.S. House of Representatives. They then lost the presidency two years later. The difference? Discipline. The leader of the Democratic majority elected in 2006 and 2018 was
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The Science Writer Every Science Nerd Wants You to Read
O n a gray Montana morning , I sat with the science writer David Quammen in the office of his Bozeman home, each of us in opposite corners and wearing masks. Quammen's rescue python, Boots, who was staring at us from inside his enclosure, arched up and flicked his tongue in my direction. An air filter whirred in the background: Quammen had only just recovered from COVID a couple of days before, a
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Watch this robot dog scramble over tricky terrain just by using its camera
When Ananye Agarwal took his dog out for a walk up and down the steps in the local park near Carnegie Mellon University, other dogs stopped in their tracks. That's because Agarwal's dog was a robot—and a special one at that. Unlike other robots, which tend to rely heavily on an internal map to get around, his robot uses a built-in camera. Agarwal, a PhD student at Carnegie Mellon, is one of a gro
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New study on school pedagogy: Announcements of performance tests promote learning success
To this day, there is a debate about whether performance tests in schools ought to be announced. A new study conducted under the direction of Prof. em. Dr. Ludwig Haag (University of Bayreuth) and Prof. Dr. Thomas Götz (University of Vienna) has come to the conclusion that the practice of not announcing performance assessments increases students' anxiety, reduces their enjoyment of learning, and t
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Ice Age temperatures and precipitation reconstructed from earthworm granules
Scientists from an international research project led by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have applied a new method to reconstruct past climate. As they report in the current issue of Communications Earth & Environment, they have determined temperatures and precipitation during the last Ice Age, which peaked about 25,000 years ago, by analyzing earthworm granules.
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'SharkGuard' reduces bycatch of endangered sharks, sea trials show
For sharks living in the open ocean, longline fishing is the number-one threat, with an estimated 20 million pelagic sharks caught annually by fishers looking for tuna and other desired species. Now, a new study reported in Current Biology on November 21 shows that a new technology, known as SharkGuard, could allow longline fishing to continue while reversing the dramatic decline of endangered sha
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Connectivity of 3D structures in tissues provides metrics for organ development
Organs in the human body have complex networks of fluid-filled tubes and loops. They come in different shapes, and their three-dimensional structures are differently connected to each other, depending on the organ. During the development of an embryo, organs develop their shape and tissue architecture out of a simple group of cells. It has been challenging to understand how shape and the complex t
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Arctic carbon conveyor belt discovered
Every year, the cross-shelf transport of carbon-rich particles from the Barents and Kara Seas could bind up to 3.6 million metric tons of CO2 in the Arctic deep sea for millennia. In this region alone, a previously unknown transport route uses the biological carbon pump and ocean currents to absorb atmospheric CO2 on the scale of Iceland's total annual emissions, as researchers from the Alfred Weg
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Equipping kids to defend against science misinformation
At a time when climate models churn out increasingly precise and dire predictions, about 30% of Americans don't believe climate change will occur in their lifetimes. While the James Webb space telescope peers toward the beginning of the universe, 2 in 10 Americans remain unconvinced that the Earth is round. And while pharmaceutical companies continue to tweak vaccines to combat COVID-19 variants,
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'SharkGuard' reduces bycatch of endangered sharks, sea trials show
For sharks living in the open ocean, longline fishing is the number-one threat, with an estimated 20 million pelagic sharks caught annually by fishers looking for tuna and other desired species. Now, a new study reported in Current Biology on November 21 shows that a new technology, known as SharkGuard, could allow longline fishing to continue while reversing the dramatic decline of endangered sha
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Gene signature quickly predicts who'll develop vaccine immunity
A gene signature seen in antibody-producing cells in the blood of vaccinated study participants could expedite vaccine development, a new study shows. Scientists developing the COVID-19 vaccines accelerated clinical trials, but a major holdup was waiting to see whether the vaccine protected the study participants. What if there was a way to predict a person's vaccine-induced immunity? By studying
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The Simple Geometry Behind Brownie Bake Offs and Equal Areas
Gina the geometry student stayed up too late last night doing her homework while watching The Great British Bake Off, so when she finally went to bed her sleepy mind was still full of cupcakes and compasses. This led to a most unusual dream. Gina found herself the judge of the Great Brownie Bake Off at Imaginary University, a school where students learn lots of geometry but very little arithmetic
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Molecular motion of proteins reveals previously unseen binding sites that could be targets for new drug molecules
Some of the toughest challenges in treating disease are presented by "undruggable" proteins whose structures and roles in disease are known but are seemingly unable to be targeted by drugs that will bind to them. Researchers at KAUST have now shown that the molecular motion of many "undruggable" proteins can in fact expose sites at which drugs could bind.
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Get the rich, not the poor, to live sustainably
Ensuring that everyone has access to minimum resources and services while also safeguarding the stability of the Earth's environment requires drastic societal transformation, a study shows. The new study in the journal Nature Sustainability investigates the environmental impacts of eliminating poverty. The study authors conclude that drastic societal change is key to ensuring people's universal a
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Fiskar jämnar ut tryck i cellerna med snabba ventiler
Forskare har hittat en unik typ av ventil för vattenkanaler i celler, som stängs mycket snabbt. I framtiden kan den här upptäckten hjälpa till att ta fram mediciner mot bland annat cancer och alzheimers. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Kasseret behandling mod delir øger overlevelsen blandt intensivpatienter
Haloperidol har været på markedet som behandling til patienter med delir i flere årtier, men i de seneste år har mange intensivafdelinger erstattet lægemidlet med nyere anden generations antipsykotika. Nu viser ny dansk forskning, at Haloperidol bør beholde sin plads i behandlingen af delir på intensivafdelinger verden over, for lægemidlet er forbundet med øget overlevelse blandt patienter.
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Tony Beets Goes on the Attack against Flooding on His Claim! | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #Discovery #discoveryplus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discover
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New Cerebras Wafer-Scale 'Andromeda' Supercomputer Has 13.5 Million Cores
Cerebras unveiled its new AI supercomputer Andromeda at SC22. With 13.5 million cores across 16 Cerebras CS-2 systems, Andromeda boasts an exaflop of AI compute and 120 petaflops of dense compute. Its computing workhorse is Cerebras' wafer-scale, manycore processor, WSE-2. Each WSE-2 wafer has three physical planes, which handle arithmetic, memory, and communications. By itself, the memory plane'
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Nasa's Orion capsule reaches moon on way to record-breaking lunar orbit
Milestone in $4.1bn test flight that began last Wednesday after Orion launched into space atop massive Artemis rocket Nasa checked off another crucial milestone on its first crew-capable moon mission for 50 years early on Monday with the Orion capsule of Artemis 1 "buzzing" the moon as it made its closest approach to the lunar surface of the 25-day space flight. The pass, 81 miles above the far s
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The 'watch doctor' turns back time on old devices
Nature, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03799-x The only independent female watchmaker in the United Kingdom, Rebecca Struthers restores and repairs vintage watches using traditional techniques.
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Extinct monkey teeth help zero in on age of human fossils
Teeth from an extinct monkey species are a clue to the ages of fossils of human ancestors throughout South Africa, new research shows. The study updates the proposed ages of key fossil sites in South Africa, sites that hold important clues to human evolution. The findings suggest that the oldest hominin fossils in South Africa are no more than 2.8 million years old. That number contradicts other
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Researchers detect illegal intercountry trade of mercury using discrepancies in mirrored trade data
The Minamata Convention on Mercury is an international treaty designed to protect humans and the environment from the harmful effects of mercury pollution. With these treaty restrictions on the use of mercury, an increase in the illegal trade of mercury has been expected. A team of researchers undertook a study of the illegal intercountry trade of mercury by examining different countries' export a
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Fluxonium qubits bring the creation of a quantum computer closer
Russian scientists from University of Science and Technology MISIS and Bauman Moscow State Technical University were one of the first in the world to implement a two-qubit operation using superconducting fluxonium qubits. Fluxoniums have a longer life cycle and a greater precision of operations, so they are used to make longer algorithms. An article on research that brings the creation of a quantu
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Quick-closing valve allows fish to rapidly regulate the water in their cells
Regulating the fluid balance in cells is vital in all living things. When insufficient water is being transported via the cell membrane, cells can use their aquaporins—also known as water channels—that open and close to remedy this. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg recently identified a water channel in a fish with what appears to be a unique quick-closing valve. Ultimately, this discov
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Engineers bring MRI contrast agents into better view
Engineers are starting to understand exactly what goes on when doctors pump contrast agents into your body for an MRI scan. In a new study that could lead to better scans, the research team digs deeper via molecular simulations that, unlike earlier models, make absolutely no assumptions about the basic mechanisms at play when gadolinium agents are used to highlight soft tissues. The study led by
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Studying the impacts of glacial flour on ecosystems
The meltwater from glaciers carries thousands of tiny rock fragments into the sea. Using a special camera, researchers at the University of Oldenburg can make these mineral particles visible in all their diversity—and investigate their impact on ecosystems.
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New eclipsing binary discovered with TESS
Using NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), astronomers have detected a new low-mass, pre-main-sequence binary system. The newfound binary, designated 2M1222−57, contains two stars the size of the sun but less massive than it. The finding is reported in a paper published November 15 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Researchers control individual light quanta at very high speed
A team of German and Spanish researchers from Valencia, Münster, Augsburg, Berlin and Munich have succeeded in controlling individual light quanta to an extremely high degree of precision. In Nature Communications, the researchers report how, by means of a soundwave, they switch individual photons on a chip back and forth between two outputs at gigahertz frequencies. This method, demonstrated here
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Monitoring 'frothy' magma gases could help evade disaster
Volcanic eruptions are dangerous and difficult to predict. A team at the University of Tokyo has found that the ratio of atoms in specific gases released from volcanic fumaroles (gaps in the Earth's surface) can provide an indicator of what is happening to the magma deep below—similar to taking a blood test to check your health. This can indicate when things might be "heating up."
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New quantum tool: Experimental realization of neutron helical waves
For the first time in experimental history, researchers at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) have created a device that generates twisted neutrons with well-defined orbital angular momentum. Previously considered an impossibility, this groundbreaking scientific accomplishment provides a brand new avenue for researchers to study the development of next-generation quantum materials with appl
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Epic Claims Google Paid Activision, Others Huge Sums to Not Compete With Play Store
Google has been paying publishers not to compete with the Play Store, according to a new filing in Epic's ongoing legal offensive. In an unredacted copy of Epic's lawsuit against Google , the Fortnite maker claims that Google has paid off other companies that are exploring the possibility of launching an alternative app store. Epic calls this behavior anti-competitive, but naturally, Google disag
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The Download: resurrecting mammoths, and the climate bill's big flaw
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. How much would you pay to see a woolly mammoth? Sara Ord has one of the most futuristic job titles around—director of species restoration at Colossal Biosciences, the world's first "de-extinction" company. Her team is figuring out how to turn Asian elephants i
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Methodology to develop a stakeholder map and stakeholder engagement exercise
This is the fourth and final video in the Ethics & Society training module on Knowledge Transfer and Commercialization in the HBP. In this final video, Dr Achim Rosemann introduces a methodology that enables innovators and researchers, as well as social scientists, staff of government bodies, companies, NGOs and interested members of the public, to develop a comprehensive stakeholder map and mult
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Artificial Muscles
There are some situations in which biology is still vastly superior to any artificial technology. Think about muscles. They are actually quite amazing. They can rapdily contract with significant force and then immediately relax. They can also vary their contraction strength smoothly along a wide continuum. Further, they are soft and silent. No machine can come close to their functionality. In eng
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Responsible innovation and stakeholder engagement
This is the third of four videos in the Ethics & Society training module on Knowledge Transfer and Commercialization in the HBP. In this lecture, Dr. Achim Rosemann from the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility at De Montfort University discusses key ethical and responsible aspects of knowledge transfer and commercialization. In particular, the video explores the role of public and stak
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Innovation management and exploitation of research results
In this video, Dr. Guillermo Velasco from the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid introduces key aspects of the management of innovation processes from research to innovation, and the development of new technologies, products, and services. This includes information on the maturity assessment of different types of research results, and a discussion of the protection, ownership, and exploitation of
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Introduction to the practical, ethical and responsible innovation dimensions of knowledge transfer
This is the first of four videos in the Ethics & Society training module on Knowledge Transfer and Commercialization in the HBP. In this video Dr. Achim Rosemann, senior Research Fellow at De Montfort University, gives an introduction to the topic of knowledge transfer and commercialization in the Human Brain Project. The video presents the training module's core contents, intended learning outco
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Trump's Veepstakes Begin
You're not going to get a lot of suspense from a third Donald Trump presidential campaign. The American people know who this guy is, in sometimes excruciating detail; they know what he stands for politically; they know what kind of campaign he runs; and they know that he's going to say some shocking things, even if they don't know what. One of the few outstanding questions is whom Trump might pic
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Remembering Roger Angell
I t's the 1986 World Series , Game 6, at Shea Stadium in New York, bottom of the tenth inning. The Boston Red Sox, who haven't won the championship since 1918, establishing a reputation for dramatic unsuccess, have just taken a 5–3 lead over the New York Mets. Three more Mets outs and the elusive Series at last will be Boston's. In the press box, high above the field, I'm a rookie magazine report
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Where U.S.-China Competition Leaves Climate Change
The latest round of international negotiations on climate change, which concluded on Sunday, achieved a significant breakthrough by creating a fund to compensate poor countries for damage caused by global warming. But the two weeks of intense haggling at COP27, this year's United Nations climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, may focus the attention of the climate-activist community on the Uni
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What Does It Mean to Care About COVID Anymore?
After nearly three years of constantly thinking about COVID, it's alarming how easily I can stop. The truth is, as a healthy, vaxxed-to-the-brim young person who has already had COVID , the pandemic now often feels more like an abstraction than a crisis. My perception of personal risk has dropped in recent months, as has my stamina for precautions. I still care about COVID, but I also eat in crow
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The U.S. Needs More Housing Than Almost Anyone Can Imagine
How many homes must the United States' expensive coastal cities build to become affordable for middle-class and working-poor families again? Over the past few weeks, I asked a number of housing experts that question. I expected a straightforward response: If you build X units, you reduce rents by Y percent—which means that Washington, D.C., needs to build Z units to become broadly affordable agai
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A New Theory of American Power
A national mood disorder afflicts America, causing wild swings between mania and despair, superhuman exertion and bruised withdrawal. We overdo our foreign crusades, and then we overdo our retrenchments, never pausing in between, where an ordinary country would try to reach a fine balance. American exceptionalism has two faces, equally transfixed with a sense of specialness—one radiant with the n
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The US climate bill has made emission reductions dependent on economic success
In August, President Joe Biden signed the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) into law, the largest US climate bill in more than a decade. The legislation puts the country back on track to meet its commitments under the 2015 Paris Agreement. Beyond enacting specific measures to reduce US carbon emissions by more than 40 percent by 2030, the IRA also fundamentally reframes how the government approaches
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Techtopia #261: Det er bare bryster
Digital etik er ugens emne. Ada Hyldahl Fogh står bag kunstprojektet 'in transitu', der er kønspolitisk protest mod Instagrams censur af kvinders brystvorter. Det har til formål at få hendes profil lukket.
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Neuroethics and AI Ethics
In the video, Michele Farisco and Arleen Salles introduce AI ethics, a field that has literally exploded in the last 10 years. They will try to provide an original contribution through the reflection on two specific topics: the connection between neuroethics and AI ethics, and the analysis of brain-inspired AI with explicit reference to the work done within the HBP. More specifically, the course
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Human Data in EBRAINS
In this video, Dr Damian Eke, Dr Simisola Akintoye and Dr William Knight discuss the Data Governance, Data Protection and Ethics Compliance structure for EBRAINS. They discuss the People, Processes and Technologies (PPT) structure for data governance, the various measures in place to manage data protection such as data protection impact assessments and the role of the data protection officer, and
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Bruno Latour (1947–2022)
Nature, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03796-0 Philosopher and anthropologist who revolutionized ideas about science in practice.
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Will the World Cup boost Qatar's science ambitions?
Nature, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03788-0 The soccer tournament might put the nation on more scientists' radars, but many will have concerns over continuing human-rights issues.
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Conversational AI in school psychology.
Hi! Sorry, if it's not the right place for my question. I'm writing an article about the usage of conventional artificial intelligence in school psychology. Would appreciate any input. Are there any apps/tools that are used in schools that help pupils to talk anonymously about their problems? A kind of chat or a voice conversation? How can psychologists engage with young people that don't want to
8h
Surfplatta gör förskolebarns lek mindre kreativ
Förskolebarns lek med datorplattor är mindre kreativ och fantasifull jämfört med deras lek med fysiska leksaker. Det visar en ny studie från Uppsala universitet. Skillnaden är markant, enligt forskarna. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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How much would you pay to see a woolly mammoth?
Sara Ord spent her week talking to scientists about skin cells from a mouse-size marsupial called the dunnart. The cells were sent to the "de-extinction" company where she works, Colossal Biosciences, from collaborators in Australia. Ord's job is to lead a team that's figuring out how to use gene editing to gradually change the DNA of those cells so that it begins to resemble that of a distantly
9h
A theory-driven synthesis of symmetric and unsymmetric 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane analogues via radical difunctionalization of ethylene
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34546-5 DPPEs are fundamental bidentate ligands with a C2-alkyl-linker chain for many transition-metal-catalyzed reactions. Here, authors utilize the AFIR method to develop a practical synthetic method for both symmetric and unsymmetric DPPEs with ethylene.
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Multi-omics signatures of the human early life exposome
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34422-2 Environmental exposures in early life can have lasting health effects, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, the authors discover >1000 associations between exposure factors and child multi-omics profiles, revealing signatures for diet, toxic chemical compounds, essential trace elements
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Depletion of CD206+ M2-like macrophages induces fibro-adipogenic progenitors activation and muscle regeneration
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34191-y Muscle regeneration requires the contribution and communication of various different cell types. Here, Nawaz et al. show that CD206+ macrophages inhibit the secretion of the promyogenic factor follistatin by fibro-adipogenic progenitor cells, impeding myogenesis and muscle regeneration.
9h
Äldreboendets ägarform kan påverka hur personalen mår
Pris eller kvalitet? Svenska kommuner upphandlar äldrevård på väldigt olika vis. Och de som jobbar på icke vinstdrivande äldreboenden tenderar att känna sig tryggare på jobbet jämfört med andra. Det framgår av forskning från Högskolan i Gävle. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
'We're in a trauma together': Americans need therapy – but psychologists are booked
A study finds that six in 10 have no space for new patients. Therapists address the surge and how to tackle it At a time when it feels like the world's perpetually on fire, we all need a therapist – but trying to land one these days can be a nightmare. A study from the American Psychological Association (APA) published this week found that six in 10 psychologists "no longer have openings for new
10h
How Wild Turkeys Find Love
A photographer in Wisconsin set out to learn how wild turkeys attract their mates — and found that the answer involves wingmen and sexy snoods.
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Christie's cancels T rex skeleton auction after doubts raised
Sale of 1,400kg skeleton withdrawn after New York Times reported claims of similarities to T rex sold in 2020 The British auction house Christie's has been forced to call off the £20m auction of a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton just days before it was due to go under the hammer after a well-known paleontologist raised concerns that parts of it looked similar to another dinosaur. Christie's said on Mo
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Dubbelinfekterade med hiv får långsammare sjukdom
Den vanliga formen av hiv kallas hiv-1. Men det finns även en mildare variant, hiv-2. Och de som har infekterats av båda tycks få en långsammare sjukdomsutveckling. Kanske kan detta fynd bidra till bättre vaccin framöver, hoppas forskare. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
11h
ASCO endorses "integrative oncology" quackery for cancer pain
Last week, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Society for Integrative Oncology published guidelines for treating cancer pain. These guidelines endorsed quackery like reflexology and acupuncture. The infiltration of quackademic medicine continues apace in oncology. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
12h
Scientists Debate the Role of a Virus in Multiple Sclerosis
If Epstein-Barr virus causes multiple sclerosis, it does so in concert with other factors that scientists don't yet understand. A recent Science paper strengthened the link, but some experts believe it falls short of proving causation. The uncertainty is raising questions about how research should proceed.
12h
Bagdadbatteriet
Bagdad­batteriets tre delar En galvanisk cell från det antika Persien? Det så kallade Bagdad­batteriet är ett arkeologiskt fynd från en utgrävning 1936 vid Khujut Rabu utanför Bagdad, Irak. Fyndet består av tre delar: en 15 cm hög terrakotta­urna, en 9 cm hög och 2,5 cm bred koppar­cylinder samt en sönderrostad järnstav. Rester av tjära vid … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Fol
13h
Starwatch: Jupiter and Saturn form a guard of honour for ancient Aquarius
The venerable constellation, first recorded by the Babylonians, will be framed by the two planets in the southern sky Aquarius, the water bearer, is one of the fainter zodiacal constellations – the constellations bisected by the plane of our solar system, and as such the ones through which the planets, the moon and the sun all move. Aquarius sits between Capricornus and Pisces and is best seen fr
14h
Regulome analysis in B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia exposes Core Binding Factor addiction as a therapeutic vulnerability
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34653-3 The ETV6-RUNX1 chimeric- and native RUNX1-responsive regulomes in paediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) remain to be characterized. Here, the authors reveal functional antagonism between the two transcription factors predominantly for the regulation of cell cycle-associated pathways and dependenc
14h
Rethinking 'Run, Hide, Fight'
Last night, at least five people were killed and 25 were injured in a shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colorado . The venue, Club Q, has been described as a " second home full of chosen family ," a safe space for people to be who they are. No more. The motive of the attacker remains unclear, but officials are investigating whether the attack should be classed as a hate crime. I
20h
Evidence Grows That Soggy Meteorites Gave Earth Its Oceans
Rock of Ages Where Earth's water comes from remains a contentious topic amongst scientists, but a meteorite that landed in England last year may contain a key chunk of evidence. Dubbed the Winchcombe meteorite, the space rock was examined by researchers from the National History Museum in London, who found that it contained water similar to Earth's water. Their accompanying study , published in t
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Facebook Takes Down AI That Churns Out Fake Academic Papers After Widespread Criticism
Fabulating After just a few days online — and tons of Twitter criticism — Meta-formerly-Facebook has taken down an AI it created that writes vaguely-plausible-sounding-but-ultimately-nonsensical academic papers. Released on November 15, Meta pulled the plug on its Galactica AI after three days of experts and random social media users dunking on the scientific paper-trained Large Language Model (L
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NASA Adjusting James Webb Orbit to Get Damaged by Meteorites Less
Avoidance Zone NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is adjusting its orbit to — hopefully — avoid getting pelted with so many micrometeorites. "We have experienced 14 measurable micrometeoroid hits on our primary mirror, and are averaging one to two per month, as anticipated," Webb lead mission systems engineer Mike Menzel said in an update . "The resulting optical errors from all but one of these w
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New Vaccine Blocks Fentanyl in Brains of Rats
Researchers have come up with a vaccine that appears to block fentanyl from getting rats high. They're hailing the research as a "breakthrough discovery," potentially paving the way for a new treatment for people trying to kick an opioid addiction. Fentanyl addiction remains an enormously serious problem in America and worldwide. It can be up to 50 times stronger as the already-formidable heroin,
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Scientists Build Circuit Boards Based on Mushrooms
MycelioTronics Electronic waste, also known as "e-waste," is a major polluter , not to mention an increasingly difficult issue to combat. Excitingly, however, a team of Austrian scientists are working on a creative new solution to solve at least part of the e-waste puzzle: they're making biodegradable substrates for electronics out of mushroom skins. Yes, really. And per the scientists' proof-of-
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Cornelia Schroeder obituary
My mother, Cornelia Schroeder, who has died aged 73, was a virologist specialising in influenza and also the editor of her mother's memoir. Cornelia spent the early years of her career in her native East Germany, but after its collapse, she went to work at the National Institute for Medical Research in Mill Hill, London. From 1990 to 1993, she was Wellcome research fellow at the institute's divis
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