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Quantum bath engineering of a high impedance microwave mode through quasiparticle tunneling
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34762-z Quantum bath engineering in the context of circuit quantum electrodynamics typically relies on single-photon losses. Aiello et al. demonstrate an approach for engineering higher-order photon losses in a microwave resonator coupled to a tunnel junction, which may be utilized in quantum information application
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Giving Thanks for What We've Averted
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . It's time for us to look around and realize, with gratitude, not only what we have, but how many terrible outcomes we've escaped. But first, here are three new stories from The Atlantic . Inside the m
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The Madness of Twitter
We are living through the most Twittery moment of all time. Since Elon Musk took over Twitter, whose users sometimes call it a "hellsite," tweeters have been tweeting in panic mode, as if from an aircraft about to careen into a mountainside. Woe, Musk is ruining Twitter! The service will collapse! It's sure to grind to a halt any day now! Where will we go next? Some are even calling the exfiltrat
4h
What Has Technology Done to Soccer?
Well, that didn't take long. Less than two minutes into Sunday's World Cup opening match, between Ecuador and the host country, Qatar, the Ecuadorians won a free kick just beyond half field. Their left back lofted a dangerous ball toward goal, Qatar's keeper came sprinting off his line to punch the ball away, and one of Ecuador's center backs leaped to challenge for it with his head. From there,
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Ron DeSantis's Speech Policing Could Hurt the Right Too
If free speech and fighting racism come into conflict, which is more important? If you think you know how American conservatives and progressives would answer that question, I've got a story to confound you. It starts with a win for the free-speech rights of professors at public universities. On Thursday, a federal district-court judge in Tallahassee temporarily halted enforcement of a Florida la
4h
Cheapskate Elon Musk Refusing to Pay Bills at Twitter
Bills to the Bin After demanding verified Twitter users pay a monthly fee to keep their checkmarks , the social media platform's new CEO Elon Musk is reportedly refusing to pay up on some of his company's own bills, according to The New York Times . Hundreds of thousands of dollars in travel expenses and even office space have gone unpaid, according to the newspaper. Musk's loyal staff have been
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A Kid's-Eye View of the U.S. vs. 'Whales'
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. Typically, when the opening games of the World Cup commence, it is the beginning of summer—a time when I find myself relishing the long hours of sunlight, enjoying enormous platters of barbecue, and wondering how many Popsicles is too many Popsicles for a grown man to eat i
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The Tiny and Nightmarishly Efficient Future of Drone Warfare
On Saturday, October 29, a Russian fleet on the Black Sea near Sevastopol was attacked by 16 drones—nine in the air and seven in the water. Purportedly launched by Ukraine, no one knows how much damage was done, but video shot by the attacking drones showed that the vessels were unable to avoid being hit. In response to that and other successful attacks, Russia has retaliated with scores of missi
5h
Scientists say chemicals could undercut global plastics treaty
Next week the United Nations intergovernmental negotiating committee will meet in Uruguay to develop an international legally binding instrument on plastic pollution. There is concern brewing among scientists that the negotiations will overlook the diversity and complexity of chemicals present in plastics. This would severely undermine the treaty's effectiveness, according to a new article publish
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Green stormwater control measures clean up urban streams
Catching urban runoff in raingardens and rainwater capture tanks improves the water quality of nearby streams and rivers and lowers water temperatures that have risen in the region due to climate change and the urban heat island effect, according to a new report spanning two decades in the greater Melbourne metropolitan area of Australia.
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Researchers introduce a Persian language tool for evaluating aesthetic responsiveness
Some people have strong reactions to art and music, others hardly any. In 2020, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics (MPIEA) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, developed a method that scientists can use to predict the general receptivity of potential study participants to aesthetic stimuli. Initially, the Aesthetic Responsiveness Assessment (AReA) was available only in Germ
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Researchers working to improve and simplify models for how PFAS flow through ground
As a growing number of communities are forced to confront PFAS contamination in their groundwater, a key hurdle in addressing this harmful group of chemicals lies in unraveling how they move through a region of the environment called the unsaturated zone—a jumble of soil, rock and water sandwiched between the ground's surface and the water table below.
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Elon Musk Has Reportedly Been Hiding That SBF Secretly Owns Part of Twitter
In the days since FTX's collapse into bankruptcy, few — if any — public figures seem to have taken greater joy in the public shaming of Sam Bankman-Fried, the crypto exchange's disgraced ex-CEO, than freshly minted Twitter owner Elon Musk. Musk has used his newly purchased social site to post bizarre FTX memes , applaud himself for recognizing SBF's apparent " bullshit " from day one, and even ac
5h
HIV infection leaves a 'memory' in cells
Though antiretroviral therapy has made HIV a manageable disease, people living with HIV often suffer from chronic inflammation. This can put them at an increased risk of developing comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive dysfunction, impacting the longevity and quality of their lives. Now, a new study explains why chronic inflammation may be happening and how suppression or
5h
Limiting global warming now can preserve valuable freshwater resource
A research team has found that the Andean region of Chile could face noticeable snow loss and roughly 10% less mountain water runoff with a global warming of approximately 2.5 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels over the next three decades. The study also shows that what happens in the Andes could be a harbinger of what is to come for the California Sierra Nevada mountain range, and
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Opinion: COP27 will be remembered as a failure—here's what went wrong
Billed as "Africa's COP", the 27th UN climate change summit (otherwise known as COP27) in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, was expected to promote climate justice, as this is the continent most affected but least responsible for the climate crisis. Negotiations for a fund that would compensate developing countries for the loss and damage that climate change has wrought dominated the negotiations. In the ea
5h
New insights into how long-banned PCBs unleash their toxicity inside the body
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been widely used in industrial and commercial products including plastics, paints, electronic equipment and insulating fluids. Their manufacture was extensively banned from the late 1970s onwards due to their toxicity, but large amounts still remain in our environment and accumulate inside animals' bodies.
6h
New way to synthesize mRNAs could enhance effectiveness of mRNA drugs and vaccines
A team of synthetic biologists at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has recently discovered a way that could increase synthetic mRNA's protein production efficiency by up to 10 times, which means the effectiveness of mRNA vaccines and drugs—such as those used against cancer, COVID-19 or other genetic diseases, will be greatly boosted with even less dosage of the mRNAs.
6h
New way to synthesize mRNAs could enhance effectiveness of mRNA drugs and vaccines
A team of synthetic biologists at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has recently discovered a way that could increase synthetic mRNA's protein production efficiency by up to 10 times, which means the effectiveness of mRNA vaccines and drugs—such as those used against cancer, COVID-19 or other genetic diseases, will be greatly boosted with even less dosage of the mRNAs.
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It is still too early to use artificial intelligence for criminal justice, claims new paper
Artificial intelligence is poised to reshape our world in countless ways and in almost every field. This includes the criminal justice system. Algorithm-based, data-driven decision-making is being increasingly used in pre-trial risk assessments in the United States as a tool to calculate a defendant's risk of reoffending. Proponents argue that this removes inherent bias present in criminal justice
6h
NOAA's GOES-U completes thermal vacuum testing
NOAA's GOES-U, the final satellite in the GOES-R Series of advanced geostationary environmental satellites, recently completed thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing as part of a rigorous assessment program to ensure the satellite can withstand the harsh conditions of launch and orbiting 22,236 miles above Earth's equator. The testing is taking place at Lockheed Martin Space's Littleton, Colorado, facility
6h
NASA, ESA reveal tale of death, dust in Orion constellation
A new image combining previously released data from three telescopes shows a region that includes the Orion Nebula, named after the mighty hunter from Greek mythology who was felled by a scorpion's sting. But the story of how this dusty region came to be is just as dramatic.
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Limiting global warming now can preserve valuable freshwater
Snowcapped mountains not only look majestic, they're also vital to a delicate ecosystem that has existed for tens of thousands of years. Mountain water runoff and snowmelt flows down to streams, rivers, lakes, and oceans—and today, around a quarter of the world depends on these natural "water towers" to replenish downstream reservoirs and groundwater aquifers for urban water supplies, agricultural
6h
Chinese Military Forcefully Seizes Debris That Philippines Recovered After It Fell From Space
Keepaway China's in hot water after being accused of yoinking Chinese rocket debris from a Philippine vessel that had recovered them from disputed waters. As the BBC reports , the Philippine Navy says China of not only blocking its vessels as its boats attempted to retrieve the metallic floating object found near the country's Thitu Island — which are part of the disputed Spralty Island region wh
6h
A History of Violence
T he constitutional right whose protections lie nearest to the skin, flesh, and blood of each American citizen is the Eighth Amendment—the constraint on the government's ability to punish us in cruel and unusual ways. As with any civil right, if it isn't enforced, it effectively ceases to exist. Because its enforcement ultimately rests with the nation's highest court, it is practically, if not id
6h
This AI Supercomputer Has 13.5 Million Cores—and Was Built in Just Three Days
Artificial intelligence is on a tear. Machines can speak, write, play games, and generate original images, video, and music. But as AI's capabilities have grown, so too have its algorithms. A decade ago, machine learning algorithms relied on tens of millions of internal connections , or parameters. Today's algorithms regularly reach into the hundreds of billions and even trillions of parameters .
7h
A Scientist Is Crowdfunding an Experiment to Check if We Live in a Simulation
Simulating By now, most people have heard of the "simulation theory" that we live in an advanced virtual world — but one theoretical physicist now says he not only has a way to test the concept, but is crowdfunding to make it happen. In an essay for The Conversation , physicist Melvin Vopson of the University of Portsmouth in England laid out the theory behind his simulation test, which builds on
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Elon Musk's Wealth Has Plummeted by Over $100 Billion This Year
Wealth Wipeout Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has had a whirlwind of a year. While SpaceX has made significant progress in developing its Starship rocket capable of returning humans to the Moon, Tesla has had a rough time, with shares plummeting around 52 percent . That means Musk's net worth has been along for the ride as well, as a big chunk of his wealth is tied up in Tesla. According to the B
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How cells use nutrients when viruses attack may affect disease severity
Researchers suspect that the way cells use nutrients in the presence of a virus can determine disease outcome and severity. The immune system has long been touted as the body's primary defense against invading viruses, with the understanding that a strong immune response swiftly knocks out an infection while a weak one allows it to linger, leading to prolonged disease or even death. Now, research
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How to test whether we're living in a computer simulation
Physicists have long struggled to explain why the universe started out with conditions suitable for life to evolve. Why do the physical laws and constants take the very specific values that allow stars, planets and ultimately life to develop? The expansive force of the universe, dark energy, for example, is much weaker than theory suggests it should be—allowing matter to clump together rather than
7h
No need for six-month wait to try for baby after pregnancy loss, study finds
Analysis challenges WHO health guidance on amount of time women should delay after miscarriage or abortion Women don't need to wait for at least six months before trying for another baby after a miscarriage or abortion, an analysis of data suggests, challenging World Health Organization guidance. The research was also at odds with WHO advice that women should delay at least 24 months after a live
8h
Structural basis for activation of DNMT1
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34779-4 DNMT1 is an essential for maintaining genomic DNA methylation. Here, we report the cryo-EM structure of DNMT1 bound to ubiquitinated H3 and hemimethylated DNA, revealing structural insight into the activation mechanism of DNMT1.
8h
Donald Perkins obituary
Physicist who played a key role from the birth of particle physics in the 1940s to the discovery of the Higgs boson The particle physicist Donald Perkins, who has died aged 97, made seminal discoveries about the structure of the proton, and nuclear interactions at extreme energies, and first proposed the use of beams of pion particles in cancer therapy. His career spanned the birth of particle phy
8h
Microplankton study: Active lipids enable intelligent swimming under nutrient limitation
Biophysicists from the University of Luxembourg have uncovered how microplankton—key photosynthetic organisms which produce nearly 50% of the oxygen we breathe—adopt a thrifty lifestyle when nutrients turn limiting. They strategically harness internal lipids to regulate swimming properties to maximize their fitness.
8h
More Republicans died than Democrats after COVID vaccines came out
A new study looks at excess deaths by partisan affiliation in two states during the pandemic. Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, public health officials have warned that some of us are at higher risk of severe outcomes from the virus, due to factors such as age or preexisting medical conditions. The new research points to another factor that puts people at greater risk of dying from C
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Autumn Colors and Autumn Chill
As the season progresses toward colder days and nights, I wanted to take one last look at the colorful beauty of this autumn, seen in cities and countryside vistas across the Northern Hemisphere. Get cozy in a warm sweater and enjoy this batch of recent fall photos. For even more autumnal goodness, see "Fall Is in the Air: Images of the Season" from earlier this year.
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The Streaming Death Spiral Must End
Last week, Disney released a long-awaited sequel featuring a six-time Oscar-nominated star, lavish sets, CGI creatures, and full-blown musical numbers—though you might've missed it. That's because Disenchanted , the follow-up to 2007's hit Enchanted , dropped exclusively on Disney+. Since the pandemic began, it's the latest in a long line of major family titles to largely skip theaters and go dir
8h
Secrets of sunspots and solar magnetic fields investigated in NASA supercomputing simulations
The Sun is much more than just a source of light for Earth—it's a dynamic and complex star, with storms, flares, and movement causing it to change constantly. Magnetic fields govern most of the solar activity we can observe but how they do this is still poorly understood. New results based on simulations out of NASA's Advanced Supercomputing facility at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's
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Sweet corn sweltering in summer heat spells uncertainty for corn lovers
Few things say summer in America more than buttery corn on the cob, but as summer temperatures climb to unprecedented levels, the future of sweet corn may not be so sweet. New University of Illinois research shows sweet corn yields drop significantly with extreme heat during flowering, especially in rainfed fields in the Midwest.
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International Voices 2022 Share Your Research Series
http://www.iBiology.org As part of the 2022 Share Your Research Talk series, #scientists describe their experience in the global research community. The 2022 Share Your Research series features Ph.D. students and postdocs giving talks about their research and discoveries. Six scientists were selected from a large pool of talented individuals from around the globe. Except where otherwise noted, th
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Lunar Lander Released by NASA's Artemis 1 Mission Dies
OMOTENASHI Out Tragic news from space! A Japan-made CubeSat called OMOTENASHI (Outstanding MOon exploration TEchnologies demonstrated by NAno Semi-Hard Impactor) has died after being released by NASA's Artemis mission. "Though we tried to recover OMOTENASHI and start the landing sequences today, the communication didn't come back, and we gave up our [Ultra-High Frequency] operation on the landing
9h
Paralyzed People Successfully Test Brain-Controlled Electric Wheelchairs
Several people with a severe form of paralysis that prevents them from moving any of their limbs have successfully operated a brain-controlled-wheelchair and accurately navigated it through an obstacle-filled room, according to a new study published in the journal iScience last week. The patients suffered from quadriplegia — also known as tetraplegia — a form of paralysis that affects all four li
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What planting tomatoes shows us about climate change
There's a piece of gardening lore in my hometown which has been passed down for generations: never plant your tomatoes before Show Day, which, in Tasmania, is the fourth Saturday in October. If you're foolhardy enough to plant them earlier, your tomato seedlings will suffer during the cold nights and won't grow.
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Europas uppvärmning snabbast i världen
Uppvärmningen i Europa under sommarhalvåret går betydligt snabbare än temperaturökningen för jorden som helhet. Utsläpp av växthusgaser innebär att klimatet också blivit torrare, framför allt i södra Europa. Utvecklingen innebär en ökad risk för fler värmeböljor och bränder. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Ancient oral microbiomes support gradual Neolithic dietary shifts towards agriculture
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34416-0 Here, the authors compare 76 dental calculus oral microbiomes from Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers with Neolithic and Copper Age farmers living in the same region of Italy. Integrating these data with archaeological data and dietary information, they find evidence of a gradual transition to agriculture.
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Mapping the effects of pregnancy on resting state brain activity, white matter microstructure, neural metabolite concentrations and grey matter architecture
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33884-8 Animal studies have shown that pregnancy is associated with unique changes in the mammalian brain and behaviour, although pregnancy-associated changes in the human brain are less well studied. Here the authors show that pregnancy is associated with changes in resting state brain activity and brain anatomy wh
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3 steps to build peace and create meaningful change | Georgette Bennett
As the child of Holocaust survivors and a World War II refugee herself, peace builder Georgette Bennett was stunned by the human toll and tragedy of the Syrian civil war. She got to work, bringing together historical enemies to build an aid pipeline from Israel to Syria — a feat many considered impossible, but has since helped millions. Through this inspiring story of unlikely partnership, Bennet
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New research reveals invisible meteors
In a new thesis from the Swedish Institute of Space Physics and Umeå University, unique methods for the analysis of radar data and simulations of meteoroids in the solar system are presented. The methods have been applied to confirm the existence of rare high-altitude meteors as well as to measure space debris from the Kosmos-1408 satellite. On November 25, Daniel Kastinen defends his doctoral the
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Chris Hemsworth Reveals Grim Genetic Test Results, Will Take Break From Acting
Chris Hemsworth of Marvel fame — and one of the biggest movie stars on the planet — will be taking an unexpected break from acting after learning that he carries two copies of a gene that spikes his chances of developing Alzheimer's disease. The sobering revelation came to the "Thor" star while filming his latest TV show, "Limitless," in which he fights against aging and human mortality. Hemswort
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Rebelling Against Trump Is Not the Same as Rebelling Against Trumpism
Republican elites are done with Donald Trump, and this time, they mean it . Since the conservative "red wave" splashed on shore like gentle foam at low tide, some Republican Party bigs have begun reconsidering the GOP's relationship with Donald Trump. Republicans took back the House with a slim margin, but Democrats kept the Senate, a dismal result given President Joe Biden's low approval ratings
10h
Neutrons expose crystal structure of elusive carbonic acid for the first time
The existence of carbonic acid has long been the subject of debate: theoretically real, but practically impossible to detect. That is because the compound decomposes at the Earth's surface. A German-Chinese team of researchers working at the FRM II Research Neutron Source at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now made the crystalline structure of carbonic acid molecules visible for the f
11h
Is the digital dollar the future of money?
An expert explains how a central bank digital currency works and why it's under consideration around the world. The United States is considering issuing a digital dollar, which would be backed by the nation's central bank and could help reinforce the US role as a leader in the world financial system. Several financial institutions, including Citibank and Mastercard, have announced that they're te
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Australia's First Homegrown Rocket Could Head to Space in April 2023
Australia is a bit of an outlier among developed nations in that it has never launched a rocket of its own into space. That could change in April 2023 when Gilmour Space sends its Eris rocket to the launchpad. The company, which is headquartered in Helensvale, Queensland, has successfully tested its hybrid rocket engine, and construction of the first two Eris vehicles is now wrapping up. The thre
11h
Plastic in foraminifera and possible consequences for the environment
Single-celled organisms with calcareous shells, called foraminifera, contribute significantly to the formation of sand deposited on beaches, islands and coastal areas. Researchers at the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research (ZMT) have now found for the first time that foraminifera can take up tiny plastic particles and incorporate them into their calcareous shells. The results were publishe
11h
The interplay between epidemics, prevention information, and mass media
When an epidemic strikes, more than just infections spread. As cases mount, information about the disease, how to spot it, and how to prevent it propagates rapidly among people in affected areas as well. Relatively little is known, however, about the interplay between the course of epidemics and this diffusion of information to the public.
11h
Plastic in foraminifera and possible consequences for the environment
Single-celled organisms with calcareous shells, called foraminifera, contribute significantly to the formation of sand deposited on beaches, islands and coastal areas. Researchers at the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research (ZMT) have now found for the first time that foraminifera can take up tiny plastic particles and incorporate them into their calcareous shells. The results were publishe
11h
The real paleo diet: researchers find traces of world's oldest meal in 550m-year-old fossil
Remains of slug-like Ediacaran animal Kimberella contain compounds suggesting it had a gut and ate bacteria and algae from the ocean floor Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our morning and afternoon news emails , free app or daily news podcast The ancient dietary habits of Earth's oldest animals, which lived more than 550m years ago, have been uncovered by an internat
11h
Tom Meade obituary
Epidemiologist whose research into the role of blood in heart disease paved the way for new targeted treatments Tom Meade, who has died aged 86, pioneered the field of cardiovascular epidemiology. His research, spanning five decades, gave medical science a vastly improved understanding of the biology of blood and the circulatory system, opening the door for targeted new heart disease treatments. B
11h
Expert: Musk's engineer ideas can't fix Twitter
Elon Musk's purchase and overhaul of Twitter since October has raised big questions about the platform's future. "Twitter hasn't made a profit in the last 9 out of 10 years. His arguments about driving toward profitability read a little hollow." Cliff Lampe , professor and associate dean for academic affairs at the University of Michigan's School of Information, says the company has struggled fin
11h
Researchers develop algorithm to identify microbial contaminants in low microbial biomass microbiomes
One of the major challenges in microbiome science has been distinguishing what is a potential environmental contaminant from a true, bona fide microbiome signal. Challenges associated with metagenomic sequencing with low biomass environments include the distinction between a true signal versus contamination, a remnant DNA from a sampling kit or extraction kit or the environment.
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Researchers develop algorithm to identify microbial contaminants in low microbial biomass microbiomes
One of the major challenges in microbiome science has been distinguishing what is a potential environmental contaminant from a true, bona fide microbiome signal. Challenges associated with metagenomic sequencing with low biomass environments include the distinction between a true signal versus contamination, a remnant DNA from a sampling kit or extraction kit or the environment.
11h
Bacteria can travel thousands of kilometers on airborne dust
When winds lift dust off the ground, attached bacteria go along for the ride. These airborne bacteria make up aerobiomes, which, when the dust settles again, can alter environmental chemistry and affect human and animal health, although scientists do not know exactly how.
11h
A Mathematician Dancing Between Algebra and Geometry
Like many people who would go on to become mathematicians, Wei Ho grew up competing in math contests. In eighth grade, she won the Mathcounts state competition in Wisconsin, and her team took third place at nationals. Unlike many future mathematicians, she wasn't sure she ever wanted to become one. "I wanted to do everything, all the time," Ho said. "I took ballet very seriously until early high.
11h
Inside the Mind of an Anti-Paxxer
Paxlovid is a paradoxlovid. The game-changing antiviral swooped in during the pandemic's worst winter with the promise of slowing COVID deaths to a trickle. But since it became widely available this spring, death rates have hardly budged. According to the White House, the problem is not the drug but the fact that too few people are taking it. A recent CDC report found that from April to July, les
11h
Tesla Full Self-Driving Caught Ignoring Stop Signs on School Buses
Fully Self-Involved With Tesla's Full Self-Driving (FSD) still in its beta, the advanced driver assistance system is bound to run into a few problems. Take, for instance, school buses, which make frequent stops to allow children to board or disembark, and by law require drivers in all lanes not separated by a median to stop as well. You'd think recognizing that would be a massive priority for Tes
11h
Scary Crash for Lizzy Musi! | Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings #StreetOutlaws #Streetracing #discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
11h
International team observes innermost structure of quasar jet
An international team of scientists has observed the narrowing of a quasar jet for the first time by using a network of radio telescopes across the world. The results suggest that the narrowing of the jet is independent of the activity level of the galaxy which launched it.
12h
Puzzle piece clarifies mystery of melanoma survival
Researchers have discovered the missing puzzle piece in the mystery of how melanoma tumors control their mortality. In a paper in Science , Jonathan Alder, and his team describe how they discovered the perfect combination of genetic alterations that tumors use to promote explosive growth and prevent their own demise. It's a development that could change the way oncologists understand and treat me
12h
Science paper on sense of taste gets expression of concern as university investigates
Science has published an expression of concern for a recent article on a receptor for bitter taste while the authors' institution investigates "potential discrepancies" with a figure. The article, "Structural basis for strychnine activation of human bitter taste receptor TAS2R46," was published in September of this year. According to the abstract: Taste sensing is a … Continue reading
12h
A powerful new tool to advance genomics, disease research
UVA Health researchers have developed an important new tool to help scientists sort signal from noise as they probe the genetic causes of cancer and other diseases. In addition to advancing research and potentially accelerating new treatments, the new tool could help improve cancer diagnosis by making it easier for doctors to detect cancerous cells.
12h
Large parts of Europe are warming twice as fast as the planet on average
The warming during the summer months in Europe has been much faster than the global average, according to a new study by researchers at Stockholm University published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. As a consequence of human emissions of greenhouse gases, the climate across the continent has also become drier, particularly in southern Europe, leading to worse heat waves and an
12h
A powerful new tool to advance genomics, disease research
UVA Health researchers have developed an important new tool to help scientists sort signal from noise as they probe the genetic causes of cancer and other diseases. In addition to advancing research and potentially accelerating new treatments, the new tool could help improve cancer diagnosis by making it easier for doctors to detect cancerous cells.
12h
Not super creative? Try this approach
Looking at emotional situations in a different way can boost creativity among people who tend to think more conventionally, a study finds. In a set of experiments, researchers found that conventional thinkers, those who rank low on openness to new ideas and experiences, came up with more creative ideas than peers after they practiced "emotional reappraisal." This means viewing a situation through
13h
Managing Washington's gray wolf population—through fear
The high-profile reintroduction of gray wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995 is generally considered a conservation success: Gray wolf packs inside and outside the park gradually established new populations. In Washington, wolves were largely absent for decades until a pack was identified in the northeastern part of the state in 2008.
13h
Scientists unlock nature's secret to super-selective binding
EPFL researchers have discovered that it is not just molecular density, but also pattern and structural rigidity, that control super-selective binding interactions between nanomaterials and protein surfaces. The breakthrough could help optimize existing approaches to virus prevention and cancer detection.
13h
The Download: China's social credit law, and robot dog navigation
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Here's why China's new social credit law matters It's easier to talk about what China's social credit system isn't than what it is. Ever since 2014, when China announced plans to build it, it has been one of the most misunderstood things about China in Western
13h
Nvidia Finally Responds to RTX 4090 Cable-Melting Controversy
Nvidia has spent several weeks examining melted RTX 4090 adapter cables and has finally come to a conclusion. It turns out people weren't plugging them in properly, as was reported by several outlets previously. Though the solution to the mystery is rather simple, and we imagine quite embarrassing for those affected, it still raises questions about Nvidia's adapter design. Team Green posted the r
14h
NASA: Orion Successfully Completes Lunar Flyby
NASA finally got its first Space Launch System (SLS) rocket off the ground last week, beginning the Artemis Program in earnest. Artemis 1 is an uncrewed shakedown flight for the Orion spacecraft, which has just reappeared after successfully orbiting the moon. It's not heading back to Earth quite yet — Orion will get into a stable lunar orbit to perform some system tests first. The SLS moon rocket
14h
Zoomposium Interview with Prof. Dr. Wolf Singer "Can the brain understand the brain?"
#Zoomposium Interview with Prof. Dr. #Wolf #Singer "Can the brain understand the #brain?" Another Zoomposium interview ( https://philosophies.de/index.php/2022/03/22/kann-das-gehirn-das-gehirn-verstehen/ ) with the very well-known and renowned German neurophysiologist and brain researcher Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Wolf Singer on the topic "Constitution of Consciousness" from a neuroscientific and
14h
Relating to self and others (18+)
Hi everyone! I am conducting an academic study that aims to explore how people feel about relationships with others, both in terms of casual and intimate relationships, and how this links to mental well-being. We are hoping to get around 100 participants. It should take around 15-20 minutes to complete. If you have the time, we would really appreciate your assistance! Link: https://lsbupsychology
14h
New 'hitchhiker' tool rewrites chunks of DNA
A new study characterizes a range of molecular tools to not just edit, but rewrite large chunks of an organism's DNA, based on CRISPR-Cas systems associated with selfish genetic "hitchhikers" called transposons. The researchers investigate diverse Type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems and engineer them to add genetic cargo—up to 10,000 additional genetic code letters—to the transposon's cargo to make desir
14h
Tandlossning kopplas till tarmsjukdom
Patienter med inflammatoriska tarmsjukdomar som Crohns och ulcerös kolit har en ökad risk för tandlossning – som i sin tur kan förvärra tarmproblemen. Det visar ett forskningsprojekt. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Genes and Language
There are now approximately 8 billion people on the planet. In addition, there are over 7,100 languages spoken on Earth. One question for anthropologists and linguistic experts is – how closely do genetic relationships match language relationships. Both language and genes are generally inherited from our parents – well, genes absolutely, but language generally. It makes sense that a map of geneti
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Microlaser chip adds new dimensions to quantum communication
With only two levels of superposition, the qubits used in today's quantum communication technologies have limited storage space and low tolerance for interference. Engineering's hyperdimensional microlaser generates 'qudits,' photons with four simultaneous levels of information. The increase in dimension makes for robust quantum communication technology better suited for real-world applications.
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What shapes the composition of microbes in a warbler's gut?
Differences among the collection of bacteria and other microorganisms that live within birds' digestive tracts — their gut microbiomes — are not primarily driven by diet diversity, contrary to a recently proposed hypothesis. Instead, a team of researchers found that evolution may play a larger role in explaining these differences, which could potentially have implications for how these species a
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Building green energy facilities may produce substantial carbon emissions, says study
A new study says that moving the world energy system away from fossil fuels and into renewable sources will generate carbon emissions by itself, as construction of wind turbines, solar panels and other new infrastructure consumes energy — some of it necessarily coming from the fossil fuels we are trying to get rid of. But if this infrastructure can be put on line quickly, the study asserts, those
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1,700-year-old spider monkey remains discovered in Teotihuacán, Mexico
The complete skeletal remains of a spider monkey — seen as an exotic curiosity in pre-Hispanic Mexico — grants researchers new evidence regarding social-political ties between two ancient powerhouses: Teotihuacán and Maya Indigenous rulers. The remains of other animals were also discovered, as well as thousands of Maya-style mural fragments and over 14,000 ceramic sherds from a grand feast. Thes
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Corals saving corals
Corals resistant to disease can rescue more vulnerable corals, UC Davis found. Raising corals with diverse genotypes builds resilience amid disease and climate changes in reefs.
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Uncoordinated protein coordinates cell migration
Nature, Published online: 22 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03732-2 Mounting evidence suggests that developing neurons and metastatic cancer cells migrate through similar mechanisms. Characterization of a previously unknown complex involved in cell migration confirms this idea.
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'Moms in Proteomics' pushes for change
Nature, Published online: 22 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03817-y A need for community drove Jennifer Geddes-McAlister to found a network for mothers in science. Here's what she learnt.
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How Much Alone Time Do Kids Need?
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. What if my kid doesn't have friends? That thought probably occurs to most parents at some point. People tend to worry about toddlers developing social skills, tweens getting included at school, and teens finding a supp
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Favourite lyrics reveal your attachment style – psychologists would have a field day with mine | Lauren O'Neill
Are you secure, anxious, or avoidant: songs we play repeatedly can be revealing. So what is it with me and Pulp's Babies? When I discover or am reminded of a song I particularly like, I am one of those people who will listen to it over and over and over again. The song will be on when I am exercising, when I am running errands, when I am putting things in my online shopping basket to replicate th
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Is Moore's Law Really Dead?
A postmortem on "Cramming More Components Onto Integrated Circuits"—the most influential article of the 20th century.
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Who's Afraid of Masih Alinejad?
When Masih Alinejad, Public Enemy No. 1 of the Islamic Republic of Iran, met me at a hotel in Lower Manhattan, she sat with her back to a ground-floor window. Her frizzy hair was framed in the glass and visible to tourists and office workers walking by—and, it occurred to me but seemingly not to her, to any assassin who might want to take her out. The threat is not theoretical. In July, police ar
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How J. Edgar Hoover Went From Hero to Villain
F ive decades after his death, J. Edgar Hoover still haunts the FBI. His nearly 48-year reign as its director, from 1924 to 1972, has come to symbolize the dangers of a stealth domestic police-and-intelligence agency in an open society. Hoover is widely seen today as an autocrat who used secret surveillance and other illegal means to control politicians and infiltrate and disrupt domestic politic
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Why Shouldn't Girls Outdo Boys in School?
Redshirt the Boys Boys should start school a year later than girls, Richard V. Reeves wrote in the October issue. Speaking as a 75-year-old man, I completely agree with Richard Reeves's "Redshirt the Boys." To avoid one more year of child care, my parents started me in first grade at age 5. I turned 6 in late October, making me one of the youngest boys in every class through high school. I was at
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The Sumptuous Minimalism of Lionel Messi
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. Politically, socially, and competitively, there is much to be said about the 2022 FIFA World Cup. There are the manifold human-rights violations of the host nation. There is the question of how an authoritarian state twice the size of Delaware with no soccer history to spea
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Bakterien dödar sig själv när den angrips – kan ge ny behandling
Ett virus attackerar en bakterie. Och hur försvarar sig bakterien? Jo, genom att ta kål på sig själv, för att rädda andra bakterier. Nu hoppas forskare kunna utnyttja denna försvarsmekanism i kampen mot infektioner – kanske går det att lura farliga bakterier och förmå dem att förinta sig själva. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Trust large language models at your own peril
This story originally appeared in The Algorithm, our weekly newsletter on AI. To get stories like this in your inbox first, sign up here . When Meta launched Galactica, an open-source large language model designed to help scientists, the company—reeling from criticism of its expensive metaverse investments and its recent massive layoffs—was hoping for a big PR win. Instead, all it got was flak on
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Validation of Food Compass with a healthy diet, cardiometabolic health, and mortality among U.S. adults, 1999–2018
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34195-8 The Food Compass is a nutrient profiling system to characterize the healthfulness of diverse foods, beverages and meals. In a nationally representative cohort of 47,999 U.S. adults, the authors validate a person's individual Food Compass Score against health outcomes.
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Varmare tvätt av hjärnan minskar behov av ny operation
Vid lättare slag mot huvudet kan en blödning uppstå som ibland kräver en operation. En studie visar att varmare temperatur på den spolvätska som används under ingreppet är effektivare och minskar risken för återfall. Inlägget Varmare tvätt av hjärnan minskar behov av ny operation dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Read Me
@everyone Be All U can Be. 😶 Graphene- "The field of bio-nano interfaces paves the way for a better understanding, development, and implementation of the advanced biotechnological process. Interfacing biomolecules with the nanomaterials will result in the development of new tools and techniques that, in turn, will enable to explore the fundamental cost-effective portable devices. Fascinating bio
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China just announced a new social credit law. Here's what it means.
It's easier to talk about what China's social credit system isn't than what it is . Ever since 2014, when China announced a six-year plan to build a system to reward actions that build trust in society and penalize the opposite, it has been one of the most misunderstood things about China in Western discourse. Now, with new documents released in mid-November, there's an opportunity to correct the
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Hopklumpade celler kan ge fel forskningsresultat
När man odlar mänskliga nervceller händer att dessa klumpar ihop sig med varandra. Och detta hopklumpande kan påverka forskningsresultaten på ett sätt som tidigare förbisetts, enligt en studie från Lunds universitet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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What happens when humans meddle with nature?
Seven ways in which our destruction of the natural world has led to deadly outcomes In the early 1990s, vultures across India started dying inexplicably. Long-billed, slender-billed and oriental white-backed vultures declined to the brink of extinction, with the number of India's most common three vulture species falling by more than 97% between 1992 and 2007 . Six other species were in sharp dec
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'This looks like the real deal': are we inching closer to a treatment for Alzheimer's?
After years of setbacks, dementia researchers are getting excited about a new antibody drug called lecanemab. No one expects it to stop cognitive decline, but even slowing it would be a breakthrough At the end of November, thousands of researchers from around the world will descend on San Francisco for the annual Clinical Trials on Alzheimer's Disease meeting. The conference is a mainstay of the
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Renewed Climate Disinformation Campaigns Threaten COP27 Progress
A recent report found that a significant portion of people in six large countries still believe that climate change isn't human caused, and that such false beliefs are more likely among viewers of right-wing news. The pandemic and Russia's war, experts say, have "turbocharged the disinformation ecosystem."
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Scientists reveal new lines of attack to raise cancer survival rate
Targeting non-cancerous cells in tumours could open up new frontiers in fight against the disease Scientists hope to double the survival rate of people with advanced cancer within a decade by using new lines of attack to fight the disease. Speaking at the launch of a joint five-year research strategy by the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and the Royal Marsden NHS foundation trust in London, e
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Will the Qatar World Cup really be carbon neutral?
It's supposed to be the first ever carbon neutral World Cup. Organisers Fifa and host Qatar say they have implemented sustainability initiatives, taken measures to limit carbon output and will offset greenhouse gas emissions by purchasing credits. Fifa has admitted, however, that the tournament's carbon footprint will bigger than any of its predecessors, and experts believe emissions have been un
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Will the Qatar World Cup really be carbon neutral?
It's supposed to be the first ever carbon neutral World Cup. Organisers Fifa and host Qatar say they have implemented sustainability initiatives, taken measures to limit carbon output and will offset greenhouse gas emissions by purchasing credits. Fifa has admitted, however, that the tournament's carbon footprint will bigger than any of its predecessors, and experts believe emissions have been und
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Russia's Vindictive Rage
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Russia's war on Ukraine is going badly: The Russian army is in retreat, and the Kremlin is looking for help from Iran and North Korea. But we must not forget that the Russian military is murdering Ukr
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The Era of 'Stay and Fight' Twitter Is Here
Over the weekend, Elon Musk welcomed Donald Trump back to Twitter. Or rather, he tried to lure him back after lifting a 22-month suspension . Trump, who was banned for encouraging insurrectionists at the U.S. Capitol and violating a content policy against inciting violence, has not actually tweeted anything yet. Musk would like him to, and so began posting some you know you want to memes, one usi
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Acupuncture relieves back and pelvic pain during pregnancy, study suggests
Analysis shows significant benefits with no major side-effects for mother or baby but more trials needed 'to confirm results' Acupuncture can significantly relieve the lower back or pelvic pain frequently experienced by pregnant women, according to a new global data analysis of the available evidence. There were no observable major side effects for babies whose mothers opted for the procedure, th
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Bad Guy in New "Indiana Jones" Movie Is Nazi Who Works at NASA
NASA Nazis? Like it or not, the fifth installation of the iconic "Indiana Jones" series is on its way, with the now octogenarian Harrison Ford himself reprising his role as the series' fedora-wearing, whip-wielding protagonist. Though the movie's full title is still under wraps, its creators revealed a few details about the plot in a new Empire exclusive — and let's just say that NASA might face
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Satellites cast critical eye on coastal dead zones
A dead zone in the ocean is as bad as it sounds, and having no information about dead zones' scope and path is worse. However, scientists at Michigan State University (MSU) have discovered a birds-eye method to predict where, when, and how long dead zones could persist across large coastal regions.
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What shapes the composition of microbes in a warbler's gut?
Differences among the collection of bacteria and other microorganisms that live within birds' digestive tracts—their gut microbiomes—are not primarily driven by diet diversity, contrary to a recently proposed hypothesis. Instead, a team of researchers from Penn State has found that evolution may play a larger role in explaining these differences, which could potentially have implications for how t
1d
What shapes the composition of microbes in a warbler's gut?
Differences among the collection of bacteria and other microorganisms that live within birds' digestive tracts—their gut microbiomes—are not primarily driven by diet diversity, contrary to a recently proposed hypothesis. Instead, a team of researchers from Penn State has found that evolution may play a larger role in explaining these differences, which could potentially have implications for how t
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Astrophysicists chronicle the history of mathematical cosmology
RUDN University astrophysicists have gathered the most important discoveries of modern cosmology from 1917 to our time. The collected data became an introduction to Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A in two parts: from 1917 to 1980 and from 1980 to our time.
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Children in child protection need more say about their care, says study
New Australian Catholic University (ACU) research shows that more must be done to support children's participation in child protection to ensure they have a voice when making decisions about their protection. ACU social work lecturer and study lead Dr. Elise Woodman said the new research revealed gaps between policy and practice.
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Shining a new light on the importance of a critical photosynthesis pathway in plants
Photosynthesis is one of the most important chemical reactions, not just for plants but also for the entire world. The impact and thus the importance of photosynthesis can scarcely be underestimated. Thus, it makes sense that science has long been fascinated by the reactions and physical phenomena that make photosynthesis occur. One of these phenomena is the ferredoxin/thioredoxin (Fd/Trx) pathway
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Shining a new light on the importance of a critical photosynthesis pathway in plants
Photosynthesis is one of the most important chemical reactions, not just for plants but also for the entire world. The impact and thus the importance of photosynthesis can scarcely be underestimated. Thus, it makes sense that science has long been fascinated by the reactions and physical phenomena that make photosynthesis occur. One of these phenomena is the ferredoxin/thioredoxin (Fd/Trx) pathway
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15 Readers on How They're Cutting Costs
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week I asked readers for their best tips on cutting costs in times of economic strain—and, looking back on their lives, what they
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Rejoice! NASA's Artemis I Is Now Orbiting the Moon
Changing the Game NASA's Artemis I mission has, after months of delay and tens of billions of dollars , finally reached the Moon, which it will orbit for the next two weeks before returning home. Just days after its launch, the Orion spacecraft has reached its lunar destination and is now engaging in the orbit pattern it will remain in until early December, as Universe Today notes , before travel
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A combination of ultrasound and nanobubbles allows cancerous tumors to be destroyed without invasive treatments
A new technology developed at Tel Aviv University makes it possible to destroy cancerous tumors in a targeted manner, via a combination of ultrasound and the injection of nanobubbles into the bloodstream. According to the research team, unlike invasive treatment methods or the injection of microbubbles into the tumor itself, this latest technology enables the destruction of the tumor in a non-inva
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Research to mend broken bones, test implantable devices, and inspire future explorers on way to ISS
While millions of Americans plan for the upcoming holidays, a variety of critical research and supplies will head to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of SpaceX's 26th Commercial Resupply Services mission (SpaceX CRS-26). The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft is scheduled for launch onboard a Falcon 9 rocket to the space station no earlier than November 22, 2022, from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's K
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Mapping Lyme disease across western North America
Tick bites transmit Lyme disease. But even knowing where these ticks live doesn't necessarily mean you can predict the disease in humans. It's only one part of a broader picture which includes human behavior and the habits of the parasite's carriers.
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How a rare plant species could hinder a needed lithium mine
Skyrocketing demand for domestically sourced lithium to meet federal goals for zero-emission technologies has developers planning for the next great mining boon in the Silver State, but a rare wildflower may stymie one proposed project.
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Researchers identify last remaining steps in the biosynthesis of tropane alkaloids from coca
Tropane alkaloids are a particular class of plant-derived compounds that have been exploited by mankind since the domestication of medicinal plants. The distribution of these alkaloids is scattered amongst the flowering plants and the two most studied families include those from the Solanaceae (tomato, tobacco, potato relatives) and the Erythroxylaceae (coca). The WHO lists several tropane alkaloi
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Repeated stress speeds up eye aging
New research with mice suggests aging is an important component of retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma. The researchers also report that novel pathways can be targeted when designing new treatments for glaucoma patients. The study appears in Aging Cell . The research describes the transcriptional and epigenetic changes happening in aging retina. The team shows how stress, such as intraocular
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Researchers identify last remaining steps in the biosynthesis of tropane alkaloids from coca
Tropane alkaloids are a particular class of plant-derived compounds that have been exploited by mankind since the domestication of medicinal plants. The distribution of these alkaloids is scattered amongst the flowering plants and the two most studied families include those from the Solanaceae (tomato, tobacco, potato relatives) and the Erythroxylaceae (coca). The WHO lists several tropane alkaloi
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How the Great Depression shaped people's DNA
Nature, Published online: 21 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03789-z Epigenetics study finds that children born during the historic recession have markers of accelerated ageing later in life.
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The Eocene rise of eastern Tibet drove an ancient monsoon that modernized Asian biodiversity
Today East Asia, and in particular the Hengduan Mountains and other parts of southwestern China, hosts several of Earth's great biodiversity "hotspots." A biodiversity hotspot is where very large numbers of unique species are under threat of extinction, and so are conservation priority areas. However, to understand how best to look after this diversity we need to understand what created it and how
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Genes and languages aren't always found together, says new study
More than 7,000 languages are spoken in the world. This linguistic diversity is passed on from one generation to the next, similarly to biological traits. But have language and genes evolved in parallel over the past few thousand years, as Charles Darwin originally thought?
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