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Parker's Crew Sets Up a Massive Radial Stacker | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #Discovery #discoveryplus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discover
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To stop new viruses jumping across to humans, we must protect and restore bat habitat
Bats have lived with coronaviruses for millennia. Details are still hazy about how one of these viruses evolved into SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID in humans. Did it go directly from bats to humans or via another animal species? When? And why? If we can't answer these questions for this now-infamous virus, we have little hope of preventing the next pandemic.
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To stop new viruses jumping across to humans, we must protect and restore bat habitat
Bats have lived with coronaviruses for millennia. Details are still hazy about how one of these viruses evolved into SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID in humans. Did it go directly from bats to humans or via another animal species? When? And why? If we can't answer these questions for this now-infamous virus, we have little hope of preventing the next pandemic.
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Cell engineering | Science
HomeScienceVol. 378, No. 6622Cell engineeringBack To Vol. 378, No. 6622 Full accessIntroduction to Special Issue Share on Cell engineeringL. Bryan Ray and Priscilla N. KellyAuthors Info & AffiliationsScience24 Nov 2022Vol 378, Issue 6622pp. 846-847 NEXT ARTICLEThe emerging era of cell engineering: Harnessing the modularity of cells to program complex biological functionNext Contents …
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Rethink farm animal production: The 3Rs | Science
Any scientist working with animals is familiar with the "3Rs"—replacement, reduction, and refinement (1). Replacement refers to using alternative methods instead of live animals. Reduction requires using the minimum number of animals. Refinement demands the optimization of experimental techniques, housing, and care to safeguard animal welfare. The 3Rs led to a paradigm shift in guiding the use of
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Assess and reduce toxic chemicals in bioplastics | Science
To promote a circular economy and mitigate pollution, the bioplastics industry has begun to phase out polymers derived from petrochemicals (1–3). This action is a positive step, but it doesn't affect the many bioplastics on the market, which also contain potentially harmful additives. Given that bioplastics will likely replace polymers, it is crucial to determine which bioplastics cause the least
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Global plastic treaty should address chemicals | Science
HomeScienceVol. 378, No. 6622Global plastic treaty should address chemicalsBack To Vol. 378, No. 6622 Full accessLetter Share on Global plastic treaty should address chemicalsTridibesh Dey [email protected], Leonardo Trasande, […] , Rebecca Altman, Zhanyun Wang, […] , Anja Krieger, Melanie Bergmann, Deonie Allen, Steve Allen, Tony R. Walker, […] , Martin Wagner, Kristian Syberg, Susanne M. …
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Rethinking premedical education | Science
The world needs more physicians. Increasing their numbers alone won't solve the many problems associated with improving health care. But it doesn't help to have a dearth of doctors, who were generally in short supply before COVID-19 struck. The pandemic …
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Eight glasses of water a day excessive for most people, study suggests
'One size fits all' guidance could lead to 20m litres of drinking water being wasted each day in UK, scientists say A recommendation to drink eight glasses of water a day is likely to be excessive for most people, according to scientists. The suggestion has become accepted wisdom and often appears in health guidance . The latest work, however, the most rigorous study to date on water turnover, re
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Increased grazing pressure threatens the most arid rangelands
A new study published in Science reports results from the first-ever global field assessment of the ecological impacts of grazing in drylands. An international research team has found that grazing can have positive effects on ecosystem services, particularly in species-rich rangelands, but these effects turn to negative under a warmer climate.
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A light-powered catalyst could be key for hydrogen economy
Rice University researchers have engineered a key light-activated nanomaterial for the hydrogen economy. Using only inexpensive raw materials, a team from Rice's Laboratory for Nanophotonics, Syzygy Plasmonics Inc. and Princeton University's Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment created a scalable catalyst that needs only the power of light to convert ammonia into clean-burning hydrogen
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Overfished lobster found to grow bigger in protected areas
A team of researchers at the University of Agder's, Center for Coastal Research, working with a colleague at the Institute of Marine Research, both in Norway, has found that when protected areas for lobsters are established in overfished parts of the sea, the lobsters tend to grow bigger. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of lobsters in
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Overfished lobster found to grow bigger in protected areas
A team of researchers at the University of Agder's, Center for Coastal Research, working with a colleague at the Institute of Marine Research, both in Norway, has found that when protected areas for lobsters are established in overfished parts of the sea, the lobsters tend to grow bigger. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of lobsters in
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Possible organic compounds found in Mars crater rocks
A study published in Science analyses multiple rocks found at the bottom of Jezero Crater on Mars, where the Perseverance rover landed in 2020, revealing significant interaction between the rocks and liquid water. Those rocks also contain evidence consistent with the presence of organic compounds.
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A study offers new insights into the record 2021 Western North America heat wave
The heat wave that hammered western North America in late June and early July 2021 was not just any midsummer event. Over nine days, from British Columbia through Washington and Oregon and beyond, it exceeded average regional temperatures for the period by 10 degrees C (18 F), and on single days in some locales, by an astounding 30 C, or 54 F. Among many new daily records, it set a new national be
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A single fiber actuator inspired by human muscles
To effectively replicate the movements of humans and animals, robots should integrate muscle-like structures. These artificial muscles should attain an optimal performance across all relevant actuation parameters, including energy density, strain, stress, and mechanical strength.
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Tracing changes to the human diet during the transition from hunting to agriculture
A large team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions across Italy has used DNA found in the dental calculus of ancient peoples to help trace changes to the human diet during the transition from hunting to agriculture in Italy over thousands of years. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their study of calcified plaque found on the teeth o
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Tracing changes to the human diet during the transition from hunting to agriculture
A large team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions across Italy has used DNA found in the dental calculus of ancient peoples to help trace changes to the human diet during the transition from hunting to agriculture in Italy over thousands of years. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their study of calcified plaque found on the teeth o
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AI skräddarsyr DNA för framtidens läkemedel
Med hjälp av artificiell intelligens har forskare på Chalmers lyckats designa konstgjort DNA som kontrollerar cellernas proteintillverkning. Tekniken kan bidra till att vaccin, läkemedel mot svåra sjukdomar och nya livsmedel kan utvecklas. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Garvet sundhedsøkonom får ny rolle
En af landets førende sundhedsøkonomer Kjeld Møller Pedersen fra Syddansk Universitet skifter fra december sin titel som professor i sundhedsøkonomi og -politik ud med titlen som professor emeritus.
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Mickael Bech rykker fra VIVE til SDU
Forsknings- og analysechefen forlader VIVE for anden gang. Denne gang er det til fordel for SDU, hvor han bliver professor indenfor sundhedsledelse og -politik på Institut for Statskundskab.
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När blir det grönt att flyga igen?
Om 25-30 år går det att flyga med gott samvete igen, menar forskare som utvecklar biobränslen för svensk luftfart. Vi kommer att flyga mer sällan, och med större hål i reskassan. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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I always knew powerful people had blind spots – now neuroscience has proved it | Suzanne Alleyne
Science shows us that many of those in authority are so used to wielding it that they are unaware of their privilege The thing that people with power don't know is what it's like to have little or no power. Minute by minute, you are reminded of your place in the world: how it's difficult to get out of bed if you have mental health conditions, impossible to laugh or charm if you are worried about
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An ultra-short-period exoplanet discovered with TESS
Using NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), an international team of astronomers has detected a new ultra-short-period exoplanet. The newfound alien world, designated HD 20329 b, orbits its host star in slightly less than one day. The finding was presented November 4 on arXiv.org.
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The Download: climate responsibility, and AI training data shortages
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. The US and China are pointing fingers at each other over climate change The UN climate conference wrapped up over the weekend after marathon negotiations that ran way over. The most notable outcome was the establishment of a fund to help poor countries pay for
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Glass Onion Understands the Absurdity of Extreme Wealth
Glass Onion begins with a puzzle—or rather, a series of puzzles. Each of the new characters in Rian Johnson's Knives Out sequel receives an intricate box packed with gears and motors that crank out riddles and codes. Once they're deciphered, the package unveils an invitation to a weekend getaway on a remote island owned by a wealthy acquaintance. It's a classic murder-mystery setup. But the true
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The House GOP's Investigation Conundrum
The list of investigative priorities for the House Judiciary Committee that the incoming chairperson, Jim Jordan, sent to the Justice Department earlier this month reads like an assignment sheet for Fox News. And that was before Jordan, with incoming House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chair James Comer , repeatedly insisted the FBI had colluded with "Big Tech" to undermine former pre
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Is Food Getting Better?
Congrats! You are probably about to eat the very best Thanksgiving meal of your life. Maybe your turkey is drier than a World Cup fan in Qatar , or maybe you overcommitted and nothing is ready by 8 p.m. Maybe you're making the same exact menu as last year. But if you round up every single Thanksgiving dinner in the United States—all the birds and pies and mac and cheeses and green-bean casseroles
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Why Saudi Arabia Is So Quiet About Iran's Protests
E xpressions of support for Iranian protesters have been pouring in from around the world—from leaders such as President Joe Biden , the former first lady Michelle Obama , French President Emmanuel Macron , and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern —as the protests, well into their second month, remain defiant and have even gained in intensity . But aside from some media coverage, those natio
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Does Overindulgence Make You Happy?
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . La Grande Bouffe is a 1973 French Italian dark comedy about a group of four friends who shut themselves up in a villa and eat themselves to death. Although mostly unknown to American audiences, the
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Spin cross-correlation experiments in an electron entangler
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05436-z Spin correlation experiments are demonstrated in an electron entangler device based on the 'splitting' of Cooper pairs from a superconductor, which can potentially be used to investigate many fundamental phases and processes related to the electron spin.
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Webb Telescope Collects First-Ever Atmospheric Data From an Exoplanet
The James Webb Space Telescope has been in space for less than a year, but it's already racked up an impressive list of firsts, from capturing the bones of another galaxy to the first-ever detection of what may be among the oldest galaxies in the universe . Now, Webb is making history again by collecting a full chemical profile from the atmosphere of a distant exoplanet. The new data, published b
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Wildlife summit to vote on shark protections
Delegates at a global summit on trade in endangered species will decide Thursday whether to approve a proposal to protect sharks, a move that could drastically reduce the lucrative and often cruel shark fin trade.
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Brain Matters #12 – "Rodent Brain Atlasing"
This episode featured the following HBP researchers: Heidi Kleven who is a PhD student at the University of Oslo with a research focus on developing and expanding rat and mouse brain atlases. She presented her ongoing work on brain atlases, focusing on the Waxholm Space atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain. Maja Puchades from the University of Oslo presented an overview of EBRAINS tools for anal
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The US and China are pointing fingers at each other over climate change
The UN climate conference just wrapped up over the weekend after a marathon negotiating session that stretched talks nearly 48 hours past their scheduled conclusion. (A question for my editor: the UN isn't hitting deadlines, so do I still have to?) The most notable outcome from the conference was establishment of a fund to help poor countries pay for climate damages. That piece is being hailed as
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Tusentals bins liv har spårats med sändare
Hur lever våra honungsproducenter och hur mår de? Forskare har utrustat 4000 bin med sändare för att få veta mer om beteende, flygtider, överlevnad och hälsohot från kvalster. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Physicists strike gold, solving 50-year lightning mystery
The chances of being struck by lightning are less than one in a million, but those odds shortened considerably this month when more than 4.2 million lightning strikes were recorded in every Australian state and territory over the weekend of 12-13 November.
12h
Call for harder line on how we judge conservation
James Cook University scientists say a more direct approach should be taken to conservation planning—with greater focus on the real impact of conservation actions and less attention paid to targets or actions that misrepresent progress.
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We could run out of data to train AI language programs
Large language models are one of the hottest areas of AI research right now, with companies racing to release programs like GPT-3 that can write impressively coherent articles and even computer code. But there's a problem looming on the horizon, according to a team of AI forecasters: we might run out of data to train them on. Language models are trained using texts from sources like Wikipedia, ne
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Cutting-edge experiments ride SpaceX's 26th CRS mission to space station
SpaceX's 26th commercial resupply mission (CRS) is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida in late November. The Dragon spacecraft carries scientific experiments and technology demonstrations that explore growing plants in space, creating nutrients on-demand, in-space construction, and more.
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What Public Health Messaging Gets Wrong About Prostate Cancer
Popular guidelines tell patients to watch out for signs of prostate cancer such as a frequent need to urinate. But by doing so, they contribute to a public misperception about the condition, which might lead people to avoid necessary routine screening. Lessening confusion around the symptoms could save lives.
14h
Underwater tsunamis created by glacier calving cause vigorous ocean mixing
Scientists on a research vessel in Antarctica watched the front of a glacier disintegrate and their measurements "went off the scale." As well as witnessing disruptions on the ocean surface, they recorded "internal" underwater tsunamis as tall as a house, a phenomenon that has been previously missed in the understanding of ocean mixing and in computer models.
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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #47 2022
Open access notables: Web bulb temperatures verging on unsurvivable are creeping into our world and heading toward familiar. That's the lesson we can infer from Dong-Quan & Sun's Effects of anthropogenic forcing and atmospheric circulation on the record-breaking welt bulb heat event over southern China in September 2021 . Analyzing an event including 32.8°C the authors find: "Results indicate tha
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Kinetics of mRNA nuclear export regulate innate immune response gene expression
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34635-5 The UCLA Ribonomics group reports that the nuclear export efficiency of innate immune mRNAs varies over a hundred-fold range such that for many genes only a small fraction of the newly synthesized premRNA reaches the cytoplasm. They show that nuclear export and cytoplasmic decay rates are correlated thereby
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How should we prepare for an ageing global population?
On 15 November the world's population reached 8 billion, according to the UN. Much of that growth is because we're living longer. As a species we will continue to age, but eventually stop growing. The UN predicts that in the next century humanity will begin to go into decline. So what happens when societies get older and smaller – a problem some countries are already encountering? Ian Sample spea
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How should we prepare for an ageing global population?
On 15 November the world's population reached 8 billion, according to the UN. Much of that growth is because we're living longer. As a species we will continue to age, but eventually stop growing. The UN predicts that in the next century humanity will begin to go into decline. So what happens when societies get older and smaller – a problem some countries are already encountering? Ian Sample speak
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Engineering superconducting qubits to reduce quasiparticles and charge noise
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34727-2 Quasiparticles, or broken Cooper pairs, are a major source of decoherence in superconducting qubits but their origin is debated. Pan et al. confirm the dominant mechanism due to photon absorption in the Josephson junction and demonstrate mitigation strategies based on tuning of the qubit geometry.
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Engineered disorder in CO2 photocatalysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34798-1 Developing an efficient photocatalyst for CO2 reduction is appealing. Here, the authors report a core-shell c-TiO2@a-TiO2-x(OH)y heterostructure with surface frustrated Lewis pairs on amorphous shells which enables a new genre of chemical reactivity.
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If a solar flare were to wipe most if not all technology, what plans/countermeasure could be taken to slow rebuild things like the internet?
I don't know if this is the right place to ask this, but I have seen many discussions about it and I am actually quite curious about this particular question. From some research and articles I have read recently, I became aware of types of solar flare that could completely wipe out all electrical powered technology if it were to hit earth (think it is a type X solar flare or a super geostorm).if
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Scientists convert waste paper into battery parts for smartphones and electric vehicles
Scientists have developed a technique to convert waste paper, from single-use packaging and bags, and cardboard boxes, into a crucial component of lithium-ion batteries. Through a process called carbonisation which converts paper into pure carbon, the researchers turned the paper's fibers into electrodes, which can be made into rechargeable batteries that power mobile phones, medical equipment, an
19h
A radical new approach in synthetic chemistry
Scientists have measured how unpaired electrons in atoms at one end of a molecule can drive chemical reactivity on the molecule's opposite side. This work shows how molecules containing these so-called free radicals could be used in a whole new class of reactions.
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Gene that guides earliest social behaviors could be key to understanding autism
A new animal study points to a gene that is important for the earliest development of basic social behaviors. The work also suggests that exposure to certain drugs and environmental risk factors during embryonic development can cause changes to this gene, leading to alterations in social behavior that are similar to those found in individuals who have autism.
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A simpler path to better computer vision
Research finds using a large collection of simple, un-curated synthetic image generation programs to pretrain a computer vision model for image classification yields greater accuracy than employing other pretraining methods that are more costly and time consuming, and less scalable.
20h
Gully erosion prediction tools can lead to better land management
Soil erosion is a significant problem for agricultural production, impacting soil quality and causing pollutants to enter waterways. Among all stages of soil erosion, gully erosion is the most severe phase, where large channels are carved through the field. Once gullies develop, they are challenging to manage through tiling; they require a more comprehensive approach along the impacted area. Resea
20h
Discovery could lead to new drugs to block protein that fuels bowel cancer
Scientists have revealed the inner workings of a key protein involved in a wide range of cellular processes — potentially paving the way for better and less toxic cancer drugs. Using Nobel Prize-winning microscopy techniques, the researchers revealed how the tankyrase protein switches itself on and off by self-assembling into 3D chain-like structures.
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Drug triggers immune cells to attack prostate cancer
A single drug compound simultaneously attacks hard-to-treat prostate cancer on several fronts, according to a new study in mice and human cells. It triggers immune cells to attack, helps the immune cells penetrate the tumor, and cuts off the tumor's ability to burn testosterone as fuel, according to new research.
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Structural basis of tankyrase activation by polymerization
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05449-8 Structural insights into the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferase tankyrase reveal its filamentous architecture and illustrate how assembly controls catalytic and non-catalytic functions.
20h
Quarter of former Olympians suffer from osteoarthritis
Competing at elite level in sport is linked with an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis and joint pain in later life, a study suggests. One in four retired Olympians reported a diagnosis of osteoarthritis, the form of arthritis that causes changes in the joint and can lead to discomfort, pain and disability, the research found.
20h
Quantum algorithms save time in the calculation of electron dynamics
Quantum computers promise significantly shorter computing times for complex problems. But there are still only a few quantum computers worldwide with a limited number of so-called qubits. However, quantum computer algorithms can already run on conventional servers that simulate a quantum computer. A team has succeeded in calculating the electron orbitals and their dynamic development using an exam
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Of mice and men: Treating acne with systemic antibiotics can have unintended consequences on the maturing skeleton during adolescence
Adolescence is a time of significant skeletal development. In a new report, researchers showed that long-term use of minocycline, an antibiotic used for the systemic treatment of adolescent acne, disrupts the normal gut microbiome, leading to poor bone maturation. Surprisingly, these effects were caused by a change in the gut microbiome, leading to an altered profile of bile acids — molecules tha
20h
Cultural differences affect how we support close friends and family
A new study found that differences in culture affect when Japanese and American university students feel comfortable providing social support. The researchers found that Japanese university students were less likely than American students to offer assistance to a close friend or family member unless they had been explicitly asked for help, even when they knew that the person needed assistance. The
20h
Achieving a quantum fiber
Researchers have successfully demonstrated the transport of two-photon quantum states of light through a phase-separated Anderson localization optical fiber.
21h
Pocket feature shared by deadly coronaviruses could lead to pan-coronavirus antiviral treatment
Scientists have discovered why some coronaviruses are more likely to cause severe disease, which has remained a mystery, until now. Researchers say their findings could lead to the development of a pan-coronavirus treatment to defeat all coronaviruses — from the 2002 SARS-CoV outbreak to Omicron, the current variant of SARS-CoV-2, as well as dangerous variants that may emerge in future.
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Genes and languages not always together
Does the history of our languages match the history of our genes? A team of scientists has revealed a large number of matches — but also widespread mismatches in around 20 percent of cases, including in Malta, Hungary and Namibia.
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Researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon
Researchers have recently developed a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V compound semiconductor devices and silicon components on silicon photonics (Si-photonics) platform by selective direct epitaxy1, unlocking the potential of integrating energy-efficient photonics with cost-effective electronics, as well as enabling the next generation telecommunications with low cost
21h
Electro-active metaobjective from metalenses-on-demand
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34494-0 Future optical devices, e.g., for AR and VR, will require sophisticated flat metaoptics with unique optical functionalities. The authors demonstrate a metaobjective based on electrically switchable metallic polymer metalenses, whose optical states and focal length is adjustable via CMOS compatible voltages.
21h
Structured cerebellar connectivity supports resilient pattern separation
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05471-w Mapping of the mouse cerebellar cortex using 3D reconstruction from electron microscopy, as well as numerical simulation of neuronal activity, shows non-random redundancy of connectivity that may favour resilient learning over encoding capacity.
22h
Thanksgiving After Fleeing the Taliban
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . In August of last year, the Afghan journalist Bushra Seddique, now a 23-year-old editorial fellow at The Atlantic , fled Kabul, smuggling her laptop past the Taliban and leaving members of her family
23h
A radical new approach in synthetic chemistry
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory helped measure how unpaired electrons in atoms at one end of a molecule can drive chemical reactivity on the molecule's opposite side. As described in a paper recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, this work, in collaboration with Princeton University, shows how molecules containing thes
23h
Tracking explosions with toughened-up tracers
What happens in an explosion? Where do the products of that explosion go following the blast? These questions are often difficult to solve. New rugged tracer particles, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers, can provide some answers.
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Gully erosion prediction tools can lead to better land management
Soil erosion is a significant problem for agricultural production, impacting soil quality and causing pollutants to enter waterways. Among all stages of soil erosion, gully erosion is the most severe phase, where large channels are carved through the field. Once gullies develop, they are challenging to manage through tiling; they require a more comprehensive approach along the impacted area.
1d
Low-cost sensor records the level of rivers
Researchers at the University of Bonn have developed a method that allows the water level of rivers to be monitored around the clock. The cost-effective sensor is for instance suitable for area-wide flood warning systems. The study has been published in the journal Water Resources Research.
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Gully erosion prediction tools can lead to better land management
Soil erosion is a significant problem for agricultural production, impacting soil quality and causing pollutants to enter waterways. Among all stages of soil erosion, gully erosion is the most severe phase, where large channels are carved through the field. Once gullies develop, they are challenging to manage through tiling; they require a more comprehensive approach along the impacted area.
1d
The Greatest Day in Arab Soccer?
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. I was in a gym in Beirut the summer of 2010, a few weeks before the World Cup was to start. As was usual for Lebanese gyms in those days, everyone sat on benches and workout machines chatting and catching up. All looked good in their coordinated sporting outfits, and they a
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The Case for Building More Housing
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week For whom or what are you thankful this year? Or, recount the best conversation you've ever had or the most intere
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Can we protect Earth from space weather?
In early September 1859, the Northern Lights could suddenly be seen as far south as the Caribbean. The cause was a geomagnetic solar storm—specifically a coronal mass ejection, now dubbed the Carrington Event, after the astronomer who recorded it.
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NET locus regulates both flavor quality and nutrient metabolite accumulation in rice
Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, providing much of the calorific needs for half of the global population. Economic development and rising living standards have led to the demand for rice gradually shifting from satisfying the need to "be full" to satisfying the need to "eat well," and combining flavor with nutrition is essential for the latter. Much research has
1d
Synthetic fibers discovered in Antarctic air, seawater, sediment and sea ice
As nations meet in Uruguay to negotiate a new Global Plastics Treaty, marine and forensic scientists publish new results this week that reveal the discovery of synthetic plastic fibers in air, seawater, sediment and sea ice sampled in the Antarctic Weddell Sea. The field research was undertaken during an expedition to discover Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship, the Endurance. The results are published
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Old World flycatchers' family tree mapped
The European robin's closest relatives are found in tropical Africa. The European robin is therefore not closely related to the Japanese robin, despite their close similarity in appearance. This is confirmed by a new study of the Old World flycatcher family, to which these birds belong. The study comprises 92 percent of the more than 300 species in this family.
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NET locus regulates both flavor quality and nutrient metabolite accumulation in rice
Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, providing much of the calorific needs for half of the global population. Economic development and rising living standards have led to the demand for rice gradually shifting from satisfying the need to "be full" to satisfying the need to "eat well," and combining flavor with nutrition is essential for the latter. Much research has
1d
The free fatty acid–binding pocket is a conserved hallmark in pathogenic β-coronavirus spike proteins from SARS-CoV to Omicron | Science Advances
Abstract As coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) persists, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern (VOCs) emerge, accumulating spike (S) glycoprotein mutations. S receptor binding domain (RBD) comprises a free fatty acid (FFA)–binding pocket. FFA binding stabilizes a locked S conformation, interfering with virus infectivity. We provide evidence that the poc
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Identification of the niche and mobilization mechanism for tissue-protective multipotential bone marrow ILC progenitors | Science Advances
Abstract Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) play crucial roles in maintenance and defense of peripheral tissues but would undergo natural and inflammation-induced attrition over time. A potential solution to counteract the peripheral ILC attrition would be regulated mobilization of bone marrow (BM) ILC progenitors. The major multipotential ILC progenitors (ILCPs) are divided into two subsets in distinc
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Multicatalysis protocol enables direct and versatile enantioselective reductive transformations of secondary amides | Science Advances
Abstract The catalytic asymmetric geminal bis-nucleophilic addition to nonreactive functional groups is a type of highly desirable yet challenging transformation in organic chemistry. Here, we report the first catalytic asymmetric reductive/deoxygenative alkynylation of secondary amides. The method is based on a multicatalysis strategy that merges iridium/copper relay catalysis with organocatalys
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Adaptive duplication and genetic diversification of protein kinase R contribute to the specificity of bat-virus interactions | Science Advances
Abstract Several bat species act as asymptomatic reservoirs for many viruses that are highly pathogenic in other mammals. Here, we have characterized the functional diversification of the protein kinase R (PKR), a major antiviral innate defense system. Our data indicate that PKR has evolved under positive selection and has undergone repeated genomic duplications in bats in contrast to all studied
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Expression of expanded GGC repeats within NOTCH2NLC causes behavioral deficits and neurodegeneration in a mouse model of neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease | Science Advances
Abstract GGC repeat expansions within NOTCH2NLC have been identified as the genetic cause of neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID). To understand the molecular pathogenesis of NIID, here, we established both a transgenic mouse model and a human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) model. Expression of the NOTCH2NLC with expanded GGC repeats produced widespread intranuclear and perinuclear pol
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Application of combined CRISPR screening for genetic and chemical-genetic interaction profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis | Science Advances
Abstract CRISPR screening, including CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) and CRISPR-knockout (CRISPR-KO) screening, has become a powerful technology in the genetic screening of eukaryotes. In contrast with eukaryotes, CRISPR-KO screening has not yet been applied to functional genomics studies in bacteria. Here, we constructed genome-scale CRISPR-KO and also CRISPRi libraries in Mycobacterium tuberculos
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Successful targeting of PD-1/PD-L1 with chimeric antigen receptor-natural killer cells and nivolumab in a humanized mouse cancer model | Science Advances
Abstract In recent decades, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)–engineered immune effector cells have demonstrated promising antileukemic activity. Nevertheless, their efficacy remains unsatisfactory on solid cancers, plausibly due to the influence of tumor microenvironments (TME). In a novel mouse cancer model with a humanized immune system, tumor-infiltrating immunosuppressive leukocytes and exhaus
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Internal tsunamigenesis and ocean mixing driven by glacier calving in Antarctica | Science Advances
Abstract Ocean mixing around Antarctica exerts key influences on glacier dynamics and ice shelf retreats, sea ice, and marine productivity, thus affecting global sea level and climate. The conventional paradigm is that this is dominated by winds, tides, and buoyancy forcing. Direct observations from the Antarctic Peninsula demonstrate that glacier calving triggers internal tsunamis, the breaking
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High-temperature adaptation of an OsNRT2.3 allele is thermoregulated by small RNAs | Science Advances
Abstract Climate change negatively affects crop yield, which hinders efforts to reach agricultural sustainability and food security. Here, we show that a previously unidentified allele of the nitrate transporter gene OsNRT2.3 is required to maintain high yield and high nitrogen use efficiency under high temperatures. We demonstrate that this tolerance to high temperatures in rice accessions harbo
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A universal way to enrich the nanoparticle lattices with polychrome DNA origami "homologs" | Science Advances
Abstract DNA origami technology has rapidly developed into an ideal means to programmably crystallize nanoparticles. However, most existing DNA origami three-dimensional platforms normally used a single type of DNA origami unit, which greatly limits the types of nanoparticle superlattices that can be synthesized. Here, we report a universal strategy to vastly enrich the library of nanoparticle su
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Intronic enhancers of the human SNCA gene predominantly regulate its expression in brain in vivo | Science Advances
Abstract Evidence from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and our previously reported α-synuclein (SNCA) transgenic rat model support the idea that increased SNCA protein is a substantial risk factor of PD pathogenesis. However, little is known about the transcription control of the human SNCA gene in the brain in vivo. Here, we identified that the DYT6 gene product THAP1 (THAP domain-contain
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Efficient catalyst screening using graph neural networks to predict strain effects on adsorption energy | Science Advances
Abstract Small-molecule adsorption energies correlate with energy barriers of catalyzed intermediate reaction steps, determining the dominant microkinetic mechanism. Straining the catalyst can alter adsorption energies and break scaling relationships that inhibit reaction engineering, but identifying desirable strain patterns using density functional theory is intractable because of the high-dime
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A sublingual nanofiber vaccine to prevent urinary tract infections | Science Advances
Abstract Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a major public health problem affecting millions of individuals each year. Recurrent UTIs are managed by long-term antibiotic use, making the alarming rise of antibiotic resistance a substantial threat to future UTI treatment. Extended antibiotic regimens may also have adverse effects on the microbiome. Here, we report the use of a supramolecular vacci
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TDP-43 safeguards the embryo genome from L1 retrotransposition | Science Advances
Abstract Transposable elements (TEs) are genomic parasites that propagate within the host genome and introduce mutations. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the major TE class, which occupies nearly 20% of the mouse genome. L1 is highly active in mammalian preimplantation embryos, posing a major threat to genome integrity, but the mechanism of stage-specific protection against
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An insecticide target in mechanoreceptor neurons | Science Advances
Abstract Hundreds of neurotoxic insecticides are currently in use. However, only a few direct targets have been identified. Here, using Drosophila and the insecticide flonicamid, we identified nicotinamidase (Naam) as a previous unidentified molecular target for an insecticide. Naam is expressed in chordotonal stretch-receptor neurons, and inhibition of Naam by a metabolite of flonicamid, TFNA-AM
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The rapid evolution of flagellar ion selectivity in experimental populations of E. coli | Science Advances
Abstract Determining which cellular processes facilitate adaptation requires a tractable experimental model where an environmental cue can generate variants that rescue function. The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is an excellent candidate—an ancient and highly conserved molecular complex for bacterial propulsion toward favorable environments. Motor rotation is often powered by H + or Na + ion t
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Alteration history of Séítah formation rocks inferred by PIXL x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, and multispectral imaging on Mars | Science Advances
Abstract Collocated crystal sizes and mineral identities are critical for interpreting textural relationships in rocks and testing geological hypotheses, but it has been previously impossible to unambiguously constrain these properties using in situ instruments on Mars rovers. Here, we demonstrate that diffracted and fluoresced x-rays detected by the PIXL instrument (an x-ray fluorescence microsc
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Oyster reef restoration fails to recoup global historic ecosystem losses despite substantial biodiversity gain | Science Advances
Abstract Human activities have led to degradation of ecosystems globally. The lost ecosystem functions and services accumulate from the time of disturbance to the full recovery of the ecosystem and can be quantified as a "recovery debt," providing a valuable tool to develop better restoration practices that accelerate recovery and limit losses. Here, we quantified the recovery of faunal biodivers
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Structural and biochemical characteristics of mRNA nanoparticles determine anti–SARS-CoV-2 humoral and cellular immune responses | Science Advances
Abstract The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic underlines the urgent need for effective mRNA vaccines. However, current understanding of the immunological outcomes of mRNA vaccines formulated under different nanoplatforms is insufficient. Here, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 receptor binding domain mRNA delivered via lipid nanoparticle (LNP), cationic nanoemulsion (CNE
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Widespread hypertranscription in aggressive human cancers | Science Advances
Abstract Cancers are often defined by the dysregulation of specific transcriptional programs; however, the importance of global transcriptional changes is less understood. Hypertranscription is the genome-wide increase in RNA output. Hypertranscription's prevalence, underlying drivers, and prognostic significance are undefined in primary human cancer. This is due, in part, to limitations of expre
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Generative and reproducible benchmarks or comprehensive evaluation machine learning classifiers | Science Advances
Abstract Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of machine learning (ML) algorithms is crucial to determine their scope of application. Here, we introduce the Diverse and Generative ML Benchmark (DIGEN), a collection of synthetic datasets for comprehensive, reproducible, and interpretable benchmarking of ML algorithms for classification of binary outcomes. The DIGEN resource consists of 40 ma
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Positive legacies of severe droughts in the Inner Mongolia grassland | Science Advances
Abstract Global change–induced extreme droughts are increasing in grasslands worldwide, and drought legacies may greatly affect the responses of grassland ecosystems to these changes. However, it remains poorly understood whether and how severe droughts have a positive legacy effect on grassland productivity. By combining a 4-year precipitation manipulation experiment with a 40-year observational
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Fully rubbery Schottky diode and integrated devices | Science Advances
Abstract A fully rubbery stretchable diode, particularly entirely based on stretchy materials, is a crucial device for stretchable integrated electronics in a wide range of applications, ranging from energy to biomedical, to integrated circuits, and to robotics. However, its development has been very nascent. Here, we report a fully rubbery Schottky diode constructed all based on stretchable elec
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Increased occurrences of early Indian Ocean Dipole under global warming | Science Advances
Abstract The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is a prominent mode of ocean-atmosphere interannual variability with great climate and socioeconomic impacts. Early positive IOD (pIOD), a newly discovered type of pIOD, induces pronounced rainfall anomalies in boreal summer more than canonical pIOD. It also contributes to more frequent consecutive pIODs, causing devastating droughts and floods. How early pI
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Macrophage acetyl-CoA carboxylase regulates acute inflammation through control of glucose and lipid metabolism | Science Advances
Abstract Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) regulates lipid synthesis; however, its role in inflammatory regulation in macrophages remains unclear. We generated mice that are deficient in both ACC isoforms in myeloid cells. ACC deficiency altered the lipidomic, transcriptomic, and bioenergetic profile of bone marrow–derived macrophages, resulting in a blunted response to proinflammatory stimulation. In
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Emplacement of the Franklin large igneous province and initiation of the Sturtian Snowball Earth | Science Advances
Abstract During the Cryogenian (720 to 635 Ma ago) Snowball Earth glaciations, ice extended to sea level near the equator. The cause of this catastrophic failure of Earth's thermostat has been unclear, but previous geochronology has suggested a rough coincidence of glacial onset with one of the largest magmatic episodes in the geological record, the Franklin large igneous province. U-Pb geochrono
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Integration of 3D genome topology and local chromatin features uncovers enhancers underlying craniofacial-specific cartilage defects | Science Advances
Abstract Aberrations in tissue-specific enhancers underlie many developmental defects. Disrupting a noncoding region distal from the human SOX9 gene causes the Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) characterized by the undersized lower jaw. Such a craniofacial-specific defect has been previously linked to enhancers transiently active in cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs). We demonstrate that the PRS region
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A solution to the biophysical fractionation of extracellular vesicles: Acoustic Nanoscale Separation via Wave-pillar Excitation Resonance (ANSWER) | Science Advances
Abstract High-precision isolation of small extracellular vesicles (sEVs) from biofluids is essential toward developing next-generation liquid biopsies and regenerative therapies. However, current methods of sEV separation require specialized equipment and time-consuming protocols and have difficulties producing highly pure subpopulations of sEVs. Here, we present Acoustic Nanoscale Separation via
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Functional specialization of different PI3K isoforms for the control of neuronal architecture, synaptic plasticity, and cognition | Science Advances
Abstract Neuronal connectivity and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity are fundamental properties that support brain function and cognitive performance. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) intracellular signaling controls multiple mechanisms mediating neuronal growth, synaptic structure, and plasticity. However, it is still unclear how these pleiotropic functions are integrated at molecular a
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A pleiotropic hypoxia-sensitive EPAS1 enhancer is disrupted by adaptive alleles in Tibetans | Science Advances
Abstract In Tibetans, noncoding alleles in EPAS1 —whose protein product hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) drives the response to hypoxia—carry strong signatures of positive selection; however, their functional mechanism has not been systematically examined. Here, we report that high-altitude alleles disrupt the activity of four EPAS1 enhancers in one or more cell types. We further characterize
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Machine learning tools autonomously classify 1,000 supernovae
Astronomers at Caltech have used a machine learning algorithm to classify 1,000 supernovae completely autonomously. The algorithm was applied to data captured by the Zwicky Transient Facility, or ZTF, a sky survey instrument based at Caltech's Palomar Observatory.
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4 in 10 people worldwide believe in witches
Around the world, belief in witches and witchcraft varied widely; more than 9 in 10 people in Tunisia believed that people could use supernatural powers to do harm, while fewer than 1 in 10 people in Sweden did.
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Pocket feature shared by deadly coronaviruses could lead to pan-coronavirus antiviral treatment
Scientists have discovered why some coronaviruses are more likely to cause severe disease, which has remained a mystery until now. Researchers of the University of Bristol-led study, published in Science Advances today (November 23), say their findings could lead to the development of a pan-coronavirus treatment to defeat all coronaviruses—from the 2002 SARS-CoV outbreak to omicron, the current va
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Pocket feature shared by deadly coronaviruses could lead to pan-coronavirus antiviral treatment
Scientists have discovered why some coronaviruses are more likely to cause severe disease, which has remained a mystery until now. Researchers of the University of Bristol-led study, published in Science Advances today (November 23), say their findings could lead to the development of a pan-coronavirus treatment to defeat all coronaviruses—from the 2002 SARS-CoV outbreak to omicron, the current va
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Twins Born From Donated Embryos That Were Frozen in 1992
On Halloween, a couple in Portland welcomed their twin son and daughter — born from donated embryos that were frozen 30 years ago, in 1992. As CNN reports , Portland, Oregon couple Rachel and Phillip Ridgeway had two "good-sized babies" from the embryos that broke the known record for oldest embryos resulting in births — and their minds are blown by the entire process. "There is something mind-bo
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Scientists Increasingly Calling to Dim the Sun
The idea of "solar geoengineering," or shooting untold dollars' worth of particles into the stratosphere to reduce the warming of the Sun, has long been seen as a last resort for tackling a growing climate crisis. Despite plenty of opposition to the idea of meddling with entire ecosystems at once, an increasing number of scientists are starting to seriously study the possibility, The New Yorker r
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What Were Elon Musk's Lenders Thinking?
When, earlier this year, Elon Musk went looking for financing for his bid to take over Twitter, he had little trouble finding institutions willing to give him the money he needed. Morgan Stanley took the lead and organized a syndicate of banks—including Bank of America and Barclays—that committed to lending Musk $13 billion. The whole thing took less than a week. Although Musk tried to back out o
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Mathematical theorem used to crack US government encryption algorithm
In the digital era and moving towards quantum computing, protecting data against hack attacks is one of our biggest challenges—and one that experts, governments, and industries worldwide work hard to address. While this is an effort to build a more connected and safe future, it can certainly learn from the past.
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Sig and Jake Finally Have a Monster Haul | Deadliest Catch: The Viking Returns
Stream Deadliest Catch: The Viking Returns on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch-the-viking-returns-us #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follo
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Coins study suggests 'fake emperor' was real, say scientists
Hoard once thought to be a fraud appears to be genuine, indicating mysterious Roman Sponsian lived A hoard of gold coins once thought to be fakes have been authenticated by researchers who say the artefacts reveal a long-lost Roman emperor. The coins bear the name and image of a shadowy historical figure, Sponsian, whose existence was previously placed in doubt by experts who suggested the coins
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Ancient Roman coins thought to be fakes now authenticated
A new analysis of several Roman coins unearthed in 1713—long thought to be forgeries—suggests that they are authentic, providing evidence that the leader portrayed on one of the coins was indeed in power during the 260s CE. Paul Pearson of University College London, U.K., and colleagues present these findings in PLOS ONE.
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Witchcraft beliefs are widespread, highly variable around the world
A newly compiled dataset quantitatively captures witchcraft beliefs in countries around the world, enabling investigation of key factors associated with such beliefs. Boris Gershman of American University in Washington, D.C., presents these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on November 23, 2022.
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Elon Musk's Crying About Trent Reznor Shows That He Is a Big, Big Baby
Amidst the mass exodus of celebrities following Elon Musk's takeover of Twitter, Trent Reznor is another big name that wanted out. Reznor's not a frequent tweeter, but the Nine Inch Nails frontman did speak out in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter . Not one to mince words, Reznor called the takeover an "embarrassment." "I'm about to depart," he said. "We don't need the arrogance of the bil
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Captive lyrebirds lose their culture
A fortnight after five lions escaped at Sydney's Taronga Zoo, an amused zoo visitor captured footage of Echo the superb lyrebird as he mimicked alarm sirens and evacuation calls with astonishing accuracy.
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In the UK, concern about climate change grows
Nearly half of the UK population (46%) are 'very' or 'extremely worried' about climate change, according to a new briefing released by the Centre for Climate Change and Social Transformations (CAST) at the University of Bath and Cardiff University.
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NASA's IXPE helps solve black hole jet mystery
Some of the brightest objects in the sky are called blazars. They consist of a supermassive black hole feeding off material swirling around it in a disk, which can create two powerful jets perpendicular to the disk on each side. A blazar is especially bright because one of its powerful jets of high-speed particles points straight at Earth. For decades, scientists have wondered: How do particles in
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A nanoscale view of bubble formation
: Using computer simulation, a research team succeeded in modeling the behavior of molecules at the liquid — gas interface at the nanometer scale, enabling them to describe the boiling process with extreme precision. The findings could be applied to future cooling systems for microprocessors, or to the production of carbon-neutral hydrogen, known as green hydrogen.
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Persistent asthma linked to increased buildup of plaque in arteries leading to the brain
A new study suggests individuals with persistent asthma have higher levels of inflammation and artery plaque, which may increase heart attack or stroke risk. An analysis of data for more than 5,000 adults has found that those with persistent asthma appeared to be at increased risk of heart attack or stroke. Individuals with persistent asthma had nearly twice the odds of having plaque in their caro
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Domino's Buying Hundreds and Hundreds of Electric Delivery Vehicles
Domino Effect In a bid to bolster its understaffed workforce of drivers, Domino's Pizza is splashing cash on a fleet of 800 electric Chevrolet Bolts, painted in Domino's livery. As the largest pizza chain in the world, Domino's investment in EVs marks a particularly high profile adoption by the fast food industry of electric transportation. "We've got a long way to go, but we will have the bigges
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Rates of carrying loaded handgun double in 4 years
The number of adult handgun owners carrying a loaded handgun on their person doubled from 2015 to 2019 in the United States, according to new research. Data come from the 2019 National Firearms Survey (NFS), an online survey of US adults living in households with firearms , including nearly 2,400 handgun owners . Compared to estimates from prior research, the new study suggests that in 2019 appro
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The World Could Be Entering a New Era of Climate War
Back in 2015, when I started covering climate change, climate war meant one thing. At the time, if someone said that climate change posed a threat to the world order, you would assume they were talking about the direct impacts of warming, or its second-order consequences. Analysts and scholars worried over scenarios in which unprecedented droughts or city-destroying floods would prompt mass migra
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The Atlantic Announces Hire of Charlie Warzel as Staff Writer
Charlie Warzel , who has been a contributing writer with The Atlantic since November 2021, is joining The Atlantic as a staff writer. Charlie will cover technology, with a broad interest in online extremism and tech's most powerful platforms and players. He will also continue to write Galaxy Brain , an Atlantic subscriber newsletter. In a note to staff, deputy editor Paul Bisceglio wrote: "Charli
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Transporting of two-photon quantum states of light through a phase-separated Anderson localization optical fiber
Invented in 1970 by Corning Incorporated, low-loss optical fiber became the best means to efficiently transport information from one place to another over long distances without loss of information. The most common way of data transmission nowadays is through conventional optical fibers—one single core channel transmits the information. However, with the exponential increase of data generation, th
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Farthest galaxy candidate yet known discovered by James Webb Space Telescope
Less than a week after the James Webb Space Telescope was ready for science, the first reports of discoveries of galaxies at record distances and, consequently, at record-early times appeared in preprints. Even more remarkably, these galaxies seem to be so massive that they challenge our understanding of how structure forms in the universe.
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Genome studies uncover a new branch in fungal evolution
About 600 seemingly disparate fungi that never quite found a fit along the fungal family tree have been shown to have a common ancestor, according to a University of Alberta-led research team that used genome sequencing to give these peculiar creatures their own classification home.
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Water wars: Causes and possible solutions
Will today's wars over oil be over water in the future? For years this question has been at the heart of a scientific debate on the causes of these wars and how they should be studied.
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How great gray owls find prey under deep blankets of snow
A trio of researchers from the University of California, Discover Owls and the University of Washington has discovered how great gray owls are able to find and capture voles under two feet of snow. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Christopher Clark, James Duncan and Robert Dougherty describe using acoustic cameras to spatially locate sound sources under the snow.
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Coinbase May Be in Real Serious Trouble Now
House of Cards Coinbase, the second largest cryptocurrency exchange by trading volume, is really feeling the pressure following the collapse of rival exchange FTX. The company's shares hit astonishing lows this week, sliding a whopping nine percent on Monday alone. Major cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin and Ether have also tumbled, with the former hitting two-year lows this week. Coinbase's sha
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Companies Already Investing in Tech to Scan Employees' Brains
Brain Spies It's no secret that a lot of bosses out there would love to get inside their employees' heads. And now, perhaps unfortunately for said employees, they might be starting to actually do so. A number of companies have cropped up in recent years offering employers mind-reading devices for their workforce. InnerEye, for example, is an Israeli company that claim its headsets combine machine
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How great gray owls find prey under deep blankets of snow
A trio of researchers from the University of California, Discover Owls and the University of Washington has discovered how great gray owls are able to find and capture voles under two feet of snow. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Christopher Clark, James Duncan and Robert Dougherty describe using acoustic cameras to spatially locate sound sources under the snow.
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Mercedes to Charge $1,200 Per Year for EV 'Acceleration Increase'
(Photo: Mercedes-Benz) Remember when luxury automakers—or, ahem, one in particular—began charging customers extra to enjoy features their vehicles already had? Well, Mercedes-Benz is joining the club. The company has begun offering an "acceleration increase" subscription to electric vehicle owners for the cool price of $1,200 per year. The subscription package applies only to the Mercedes-EQ EQE
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Paralympic athlete from UK in latest intake of ESA astronauts
John McFall, 41, becomes first astronaut with physical disability to be recruited by European space agency A Paralympic sprinter from the UK has been named among the latest intake of astronauts recruited by the European Space Agency. John McFall, 41, becomes the first astronaut with a physical disability, or para-astronaut, to be recruited by the space agency in a drive to overcome the barriers t
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Study highlights the dangers of white ice conditions in lakes
The quality of lake ice is of paramount importance for ice safety and lake ecology under ice, but its temporal and spatial variability is largely unknown. From 2021–2022, an international research team with IGB researcher Hans-Peter Grossart conducted a coordinated sampling campaign of lake ice quality throughout the Northern Hemisphere during one of the warmest winters since 1880.
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Emergent charge order in pressurized kagome superconductor CsV3Sb5
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05351-3 The evolution of CDW and superconductivity with pressure in CsV3Sb5 by 51V NMR measurements shed new light on the interplay of superconductivity and CDW, revealing new electronic correlation effects in kagome superconductors AV3Sb5.
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Polarized blazar X-rays imply particle acceleration in shocks
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05338-0 Polarization measurements are reported for the blazar Mk501, revealing a degree of X-ray polarization that is more than twice the optical value and supporting the shock-accelerated energy-stratified electron population scenario.
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How two intermingled sensory pathways combine to encode touch
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03614-7 Touch signals from the skin are carried to the brain by intermingled projections of two pathways in the spinal cord. These pathways convey distinct features of tactile stimuli, and converge differentially on brainstem neurons that direct different aspects of touch to various brain regions.
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A proton-pumping enzyme in the brain switches between modes
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03617-4 The enzyme V-ATPase pumps protons into vesicles at the synaptic connections between neuronal cells, and is crucial for neuronal communication. Observations of individual V-ATPase molecules reveal that they randomly switch between proton-pumping, rest and leaking modes, which each last for several minutes, with potential im
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Shock waves spark blazing light from black holes
Nature, Published online: 23 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03768-4 Radiation from a jet of ultrafast particles powered by a supermassive black hole suggests that the particles are accelerated by shock waves propagating along the jet, making them shine with the brightness of 100 billion Suns.
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Zombie viruses on a hijacking trip: How retroviral gene fragments affect embryonic cells
Ancient, dormant sequences in the genome impact embryonic development in unexpected ways. The mammalian genome contains retroviral sequences that are in an undead but mostly "harmless" state. An international research team recently discovered how some of these retroviral gene fragments affect embryonic cells if they are unleashed. Unexpectedly, not the viral proteins, but rather copies of the gene
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Whose land are you on? What to know about the Indigenous Land Back movement | Lindsey Schneider
Land thrives in Indigenous hands, and there are real, tangible ways you can help return what was stolen by colonizers from tribes across North America. Indigenous scholar Lindsey Schneider addresses the ill-gotten legacy of settler colonialism with an introduction to the Land Back movement: the push to return stewardship of the Earth to its rightful guardians and restore balance to ecosystems for
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Zombie viruses on a hijacking trip: How retroviral gene fragments affect embryonic cells
Ancient, dormant sequences in the genome impact embryonic development in unexpected ways. The mammalian genome contains retroviral sequences that are in an undead but mostly "harmless" state. An international research team recently discovered how some of these retroviral gene fragments affect embryonic cells if they are unleashed. Unexpectedly, not the viral proteins, but rather copies of the gene
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