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News2022November28

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Earth's many new lakes
The number of lakes on our planet has increased substantially in recent decades, according to a unique global survey of 3.4 million lakes. There has been a particular increase in the number of small lakes, which unfortunately, emit large amounts of greenhouse gas. The development is of great importance for Earth's carbon account, global ecosystems, and human access to water resources.
9min
Chemotherapy could increase disease susceptibility in future generations
A common chemotherapy drug could carry a toxic inheritance for children and grandchildren of adolescent cancer survivors, new research indicates. The study found that male rats who received the drug ifosfamide during adolescence had offspring and grand-offspring with increased incidence of disease. While other research has shown that cancer treatments can increase patients' chance of developing di
9min
What ancient underwater food webs can tell us about the future of climate change
What a tangled web we weave. When it comes to the impact of the climate crisis on marine food webs, we apparently have not known the half of it. That's according to a new University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) study, which compared ancient and modern ocean ecosystems in a bid to understand how to make them healthier and more resilient.
54min
Study: Canada geese beat humans in longstanding territory battle
Canada geese collide with aircraft, intimidate unassuming joggers, and leave lawns and sidewalks spattered with prodigious piles of poop. They're widely considered nuisance birds, and municipalities invest considerable time and money harassing geese to relocate the feisty flocks. But new University of Illinois research shows standard goose harassment efforts aren't effective, especially in winter
54min
NASA's Lunar Flashlight SmallSat readies for launch
When NASA's Lunar Flashlight launches no earlier than Nov. 30, the tiny satellite will begin a three-month journey, with mission navigators guiding the spacecraft far past the moon. It will then be slowly pulled back by gravity from Earth and the sun before settling into a wide science-gathering orbit to hunt for surface water ice inside dark regions on the moon that haven't seen sunlight in billi
54min
Image: Hubble glimpses a glittering gathering of stars
This glittering gathering of stars is Pismis 26, a globular star cluster located about 23,000 light-years away. Many thousands of stars gleam brightly against the black backdrop of the image, with some brighter red and blue stars located along the outskirts of the cluster. The Armenian astronomer Paris Pismis first discovered the cluster in 1959 at the Tonantzintla Observatory in Mexico, granting
54min
Study reveals genomic potential of active soil microbial populations under simulated winter conditions
Scientists estimate that northern peatlands contain one third of the Earth's soil carbon. This makes them important ecosystems for carbon storage, which keeps carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and controls climate change. In northern peatlands, carbon losses from soil during the winter can exceed carbon storage during the warm growing season. This is primarily because of the activity of microbe
54min
A waste windfall: New process shows promise turning plastic trash into pharmaceuticals
Catalina Island, located 22 miles off the coast of Los Angeles, once collected Hollywood royalty, smugglers and silver miners. Now, it collects trash. Its windward-facing harbor is a collection point of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, an enormous spread of microplastics with accumulated larger debris that stretches more 1.6 million square kilometers. It is stark evidence of the impact of ever-inc
54min
What ancient underwater food webs can tell us about the future of climate change
What a tangled web we weave. When it comes to the impact of the climate crisis on marine food webs, we apparently have not known the half of it. That's according to a new University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) study, which compared ancient and modern ocean ecosystems in a bid to understand how to make them healthier and more resilient.
54min
Study: Canada geese beat humans in longstanding territory battle
Canada geese collide with aircraft, intimidate unassuming joggers, and leave lawns and sidewalks spattered with prodigious piles of poop. They're widely considered nuisance birds, and municipalities invest considerable time and money harassing geese to relocate the feisty flocks. But new University of Illinois research shows standard goose harassment efforts aren't effective, especially in winter
1h
Study reveals genomic potential of active soil microbial populations under simulated winter conditions
Scientists estimate that northern peatlands contain one third of the Earth's soil carbon. This makes them important ecosystems for carbon storage, which keeps carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and controls climate change. In northern peatlands, carbon losses from soil during the winter can exceed carbon storage during the warm growing season. This is primarily because of the activity of microbe
1h
Miami Nightclubs Horrified That Big-Spending Crypto Bros Are Broke Now
Fallen High-Rollers Like a lot of other folks out there, the sullen owners of Miami nightclubs have lost out in the crypto crash — although not necessarily because they invested their savings into the cryptocurrencies. Instead, they're missing out on the business of high-rolling crypto millionaires, who according to club owners sought to loudly flaunt their newfound wealth on the city's world-ren
1h
The task of magnetic classification suddenly looks easier, thanks to machine learning
Knowing the magnetic structure of crystalline materials is critical to many applications, including data storage, high-resolution imaging, spintronics, superconductivity, and quantum computing. Information of this sort, however, is difficult to come by. Although magnetic structures can be obtained from neutron diffraction and scattering studies, the number of machines that can support these analys
1h
New analysis finds pandemic didn't dampen deforestation
Despite the massive upheavals in the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, deforestation globally proceeded more or less as expected from the trends established over the last 15 years, according to a recent study from researchers at the Alliance of Bioversity International and CIAT.
1h
Calcifying organisms are under threat from a combination of ocean warming and acidification
A new study led by the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC), with colleagues from the British Antarctic Survey, the Institute of Oceanology, the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Gdańsk, has revealed that global warming and ocean acidification threaten marine organisms that build their skeletons and shells with calcium carbonate (chalk) such as corals, bryozoans, mollusks, sea ur
1h
Calcifying organisms are under threat from a combination of ocean warming and acidification
A new study led by the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC), with colleagues from the British Antarctic Survey, the Institute of Oceanology, the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Gdańsk, has revealed that global warming and ocean acidification threaten marine organisms that build their skeletons and shells with calcium carbonate (chalk) such as corals, bryozoans, mollusks, sea ur
1h
Social media can be a lifesaver for new international ventures
The use of social media can be beneficial to international new ventures and help them to survive. A new study from the University of Vaasa, Finland, shows that newly established international firms and start-ups with limited resources can effectively use social media to learn about their new foreign markets and customers in a fast and inexpensive way.
2h
Scientists Gene Hack Random Plant to Grow Cocaine
In what's surely exciting news for some of you out there, scientists in China claim to have genetically modified an obscure plant to produce cocaine in its leaves. According to New Scientist , researchers have been trying to determine how the coca plant — the flora from which the drug cocaine is derived — produces the party-friendly compound for decades. It's a complex biochemical affair, and whi
2h
The Gift of Civil Discussion
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week I asked, "For whom or what are you thankful this year?" One thing I'm thankful for this year are the emails that you send ea
2h
New, small lakes are bad news for greenhouse gas emissions
The number of lakes on our planet has increased substantially in recent decades, according to a new study. There has been a particular increase in the number of small lakes, which unfortunately, emit large amounts of greenhouse gas, the researchers report. The findings are of great importance for Earth's carbon account, global ecosystems, and human access to water resources. Bacteria and fungi fe
2h
Trends and biases in African large carnivore population assessments
African large carnivores have undergone significant range and population declines over recent decades. Although conservation planning and the management of threatened species requires accurate assessments of population status and monitoring of trends, there is evidence that biodiversity monitoring may not be evenly distributed or occurring where most needed.
2h
Examining US policy-making and China's efforts in Southeast Asia
Was there effectively a "Chinese problem" in Southeast Asia in the decades following World War II, with millions of Chinese in the region potentially sympathetic to communist China? American policy-makers seem to have thought so at the start of the Cold War, given China's influence around the region. At a time of immense turmoil and upheaval in Asia, including the Vietnam War, US politicians warne
2h
Friendly fire: How conflicts can reduce stress in the workplace
Stress and conflict are unavoidable aspects of life and can be highly destructive forces when left unchecked. A survey conducted by the UK government found that work-related stress led to a loss of 17.9 million working days in 2019, which directly affected the country's economic productivity.
2h
Adventurous bird personalities can help population cope with climate change
Red knots of all ages and sexes show behavioral traits. These remain mostly unchanged over time but differ across individuals. Some individuals are more adventurous and show more exploratory behaviors a in new environment than others. Other individuals take less risks and hardly dare to move around in a new environment. These "personalities" have ecological and evolutionary consequences, but to wh
2h
Adventurous bird personalities can help population cope with climate change
Red knots of all ages and sexes show behavioral traits. These remain mostly unchanged over time but differ across individuals. Some individuals are more adventurous and show more exploratory behaviors a in new environment than others. Other individuals take less risks and hardly dare to move around in a new environment. These "personalities" have ecological and evolutionary consequences, but to wh
2h
Americans would rather harm their own political cause than help an opposing one, finds study
Both Democrats and Republicans would rather take away funding from their political party than give money to the other party, reveals a new University of California San Diego Rady School of Management study. The research also assesses people's preferences regarding two other contentious issues—gun rights and reproductive rights—and finds the same result: people would rather hurt the cause they beli
3h
Novel sex-determination mechanism revealed in mammals
In mammals, the distinction between male and female at the chromosomal level is due to the X and Y chromosomes. Typically, females have two X chromosomes (XX) while males have an X and a Y chromosome (XY). The Sry gene on the Y chromosome triggers the formation of the testes. However, there exist a handful of rodent species in which the Y chromosome has disappeared, taking with it the Sry gene. Th
3h
The evolution of Asia's mammals was dictated by ancient climate change and rising mountains, study reveals
The idea that climate change and geological events can shape evolution isn't a new one: anyone who's heard of dinosaurs knows that a big change in the environment (like, say, a meteor hitting the Earth 66 million years ago and causing a chain reaction of storms, earthquakes, cold, and darkness) can dictate how animals live, die, and evolve.
3h
Novel sex-determination mechanism revealed in mammals
In mammals, the distinction between male and female at the chromosomal level is due to the X and Y chromosomes. Typically, females have two X chromosomes (XX) while males have an X and a Y chromosome (XY). The Sry gene on the Y chromosome triggers the formation of the testes. However, there exist a handful of rodent species in which the Y chromosome has disappeared, taking with it the Sry gene. Th
3h
Beavers found to have lived in family clans in the Allgäu for more than 11 million years
For paleontologists, Hammerschmiede in the Allgäu region—the site where the great ape Danuvius was discovered—is a treasure trove unlike any other: More than 140 fossil vertebrate species have been found here. Finds have now also enabled them to outline the way of life and development of an extinct species of beaver: Steneofiber depereti was a little smaller than the modern beaver and settled in t
3h
BlockFi Just Filed for Bankruptcy
Domino Effect Yet another major cryptocurrency lender has filed for bankruptcy, a sign of a deepening "crypto winter" that's continuing to take down the hype giants one by one. Crypto lender BlockFi is filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection just weeks after FTX, once the second largest cryptocurrency exchange by trading volume, imploded in spectacular fashion , sending ripples throughout the
3h
Beavers found to have lived in family clans in the Allgäu for more than 11 million years
For paleontologists, Hammerschmiede in the Allgäu region—the site where the great ape Danuvius was discovered—is a treasure trove unlike any other: More than 140 fossil vertebrate species have been found here. Finds have now also enabled them to outline the way of life and development of an extinct species of beaver: Steneofiber depereti was a little smaller than the modern beaver and settled in t
3h
Science ahead of its time: 157-year-old Darwin manuscript made available online
November 24 is Evolution day—a day commemorating the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species on November 24, 1859. Darwin's seminal work is now considered the most influential book of science in history and has inspired countless new disciplines. As recently found by the Darwin Online project at the National University of Singapore (NUS), the book has been translated into fifty languages
3h
Photos: Europe's Christmas Markets Return
In many European cities with a tradition of hosting a Christmas market, 2022 is a year of difficult choices. High energy costs are forcing some to scale down on bright lights and decorations, while other places are scaling up and hoping the unrestricted return of the markets after two years of COVID-19 closures will boost holiday spending. Below are images of some of the Christmas markets that re
3h
I'm Scared of My Baby Monitor
You can now know everything about your baby at all times. An expectant parent of a certain type—cash-flush and availed of benzodiazepine, or maybe just fretful—will be dizzied by the options. Consider the $300 "dream sock," for sale again after a hiccup with the FDA, which latches on to your infant and beams numbers to your smartphone—numbers such as "110 beats per minute" observed from baby's li
3h
A Ploy, Not a Principle
For once, Donald Trump has a point. Shortly before Thanksgiving, Trump had dinner with the artist and aspiring presidential candidate Kanye West. Among West's entourage was a 24-year-old livestreamer named Nick Fuentes. Fuentes, as all the world now knows, traffics in Holocaust denial, among other provocations. West is an outspoken anti-Semite in his own right. Some former Trump supporters have r
3h
Vaping may lead to more cavities
People who vape may be more likely to have a higher risk of cavities, according to a new study. With CDC surveys reporting that 9.1 million American adults—and 2 million teenagers—use tobacco-based vaping products, that means a lot of vulnerable teeth. The findings on the association between vaping and risk of caries—the dental term for cavities—serve as an alert that this once seemingly harmless
3h
The replication crisis: Researchers reveal a hidden universe of uncertainty
The University of Luxembourg's Department of Social Sciences contributed to a large-scale replication study that aimed to understand the role of decisions that scientists make during the research process. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study highlights the importance of open science and collaboration among scientists.
3h
Offshore wind farms change marine ecosystems, study shows
The expansion of offshore wind farms in the North Sea is making progress. But the consequences for the marine environment they are built in have not yet been fully researched. Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon have already provided valuable insights into the effects of wind farms in past studies.
3h
Science ahead of its time: 157-year-old Darwin manuscript made available online
November 24 is Evolution day—a day commemorating the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species on November 24, 1859. Darwin's seminal work is now considered the most influential book of science in history and has inspired countless new disciplines. As recently found by the Darwin Online project at the National University of Singapore (NUS), the book has been translated into fifty languages
3h
Mapping the future of micromotors
It's the stuff of cartoons and movies: a team of scientists shrinks down and flies a ship the size of a blood vessel through tissue and sinew to the site of injury or disease. They directly repair or attack the site—whatever is needed—without disturbing surrounding tissue. When the job is done, the patient gives a mighty sneeze and out pops the team, problem solved.
3h
Daily briefing: Parasite gives wolves what it takes to be leaders
Nature, Published online: 25 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04177-3 Wolves infected with a parasite that commonly infects cats are more likely to become leaders of the pack or strike out on their own. Plus, a call to include aerosols in climate risk assessments and Europe's Mars rover mission plugs a Russia-shaped funding hole.
3h
Daily briefing: NASA's Orion spacecraft reaches the Moon
Nature, Published online: 24 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04144-y Stunning photographs snapped by NASA's Artemis I mission, how to make COP27's breakthrough 'loss and damage' fund work and a possible fix for time-sapping peer review.
3h
We Are Alarmed by Every Detail of Elon Musk's Bedside Table
Table Fable Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has shared an image of his bedside table — and we have questions. The image shows what appears to be a video game gun replica , four opened cans of caffeine-free Coke, and a flintlock gun inside a display box that features a famous painting of George Washington crossing the Delaware, along with what appears to be a Buddhist amulet used for meditation. My
4h
Crypto Guys Spend $600,000 on Hideous Wormlike Elon Musk Statue, Causing Their Coin to Crash
Smote GOAT A bunch of crypto-pilled Elon Musk fans spent $600,000 to build a giant statue that features the new Twitter czar's head on a goat's body, riding a rocket — and their coin crashed after they took the grotesque work of "art" public. Over the holiday weekend, the great minds behind the Elon Goat Token — an in-your-face homage to the man they consider to be the "Greatest of All Time," or
4h
Hawaii's Mauna Loa Volcano is Erupting for the First Time Since 1984
(Photo: USGS) For the first time in nearly four decades, the world's largest active volcano—Hawaii's Mokuʻāweoweo, or Mauna Loa—has begun to erupt. The US Geological Survey (USGS) issued a red alert late Sunday night at the first sign of activity. Mauna Loa's impact was confined to its summit at the time, precluding any immediate evacuations nearby. On Monday morning, lava was still overflowing f
4h
Shape of proteins may point to Parkinson's disease
A new study presents 76 proteins that might serve as biomarkers for the detection of Parkinson's disease. Many human diseases can be detected and diagnosed using biomarkers in blood or other body fluids. Parkinson's disease is different: to date, there is no such biomarker being used in the clinic to indicate this neurodegenerative disease. The new research, published in the journal Nature Struct
4h
Research identifies 'danger zones' for wandering albatrosses
Over half of wandering albatrosses breeding on Bird Island, in the sub-Antarctic, encounter fishing vessels when feeding, putting them at risk of being accidentally caught or killed in fishing gear, according to new research led by British Antarctic Survey and Birdlife International. The results will help conservation efforts for a species that is in decline.
4h
Why steamed hay can lead to protein deficiency in horses
Hay treated with hot steam is safer for horses but provides them with less protein. The horse forage is treated with steam to rid it of potentially harmful microorganisms and to bind particles that could otherwise be inhaled. However, a team of scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has discovered that this also causes a chemical reaction which damages the proteins in the
4h
Research identifies 'danger zones' for wandering albatrosses
Over half of wandering albatrosses breeding on Bird Island, in the sub-Antarctic, encounter fishing vessels when feeding, putting them at risk of being accidentally caught or killed in fishing gear, according to new research led by British Antarctic Survey and Birdlife International. The results will help conservation efforts for a species that is in decline.
4h
Why steamed hay can lead to protein deficiency in horses
Hay treated with hot steam is safer for horses but provides them with less protein. The horse forage is treated with steam to rid it of potentially harmful microorganisms and to bind particles that could otherwise be inhaled. However, a team of scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has discovered that this also causes a chemical reaction which damages the proteins in the
4h
Subaru Telescope can now analyze 2,400 galaxies simultaneously
First light is an exciting time for astronomers and engineers who help bring new telescopes up to speed. One of the most recent and significant first light milestones recently occurred at the Subaru Telescope in Hawai'i. Though it has been in operation since 2005, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's (NAOJ) main telescope recently received an upgrade that will allow it to simultaneousl
4h
Air-breathing ion engines could continuously boost spacecraft anywhere there's an atmosphere
Staying in orbit can be challenging, at least for lower orbits that are more affected by Earth's atmosphere. But, such orbits also come with advantages, such as better vantage points for new commercial operations such as Earth Observation and telecommunications connections. So there is an incentive for anyone who can figure out how to functionally keep a satellite in orbit at those lower altitudes
4h
Teens who take this sleep med may face higher overdose risk
Teens and young adults who are treated for sleep disorders with benzodiazepines such as Xanax may be at a higher risk of overdose, according to a new study. For the study, published in JAMA Network Open , researchers examined how often young people with sleep disorders had a drug overdose in the months after starting a prescription sleep medication. According to the National Institute on Drug Abu
4h
The first SLS launch caused damage to the launch pad. How bad was it?
When you test launch the most powerful rocket ever successfully flown, there's bound to be some collateral damage. With 8.8 million pounds of thrust at liftoff, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) packs a mighty punch (the Saturn V, which carried astronauts to the moon in 1969, produced 7.5 million pounds). After November 16's test flight of SLS, dubbed Artemis I, the pad was a little worse for wear,
4h
What happened to those CubeSats that were launched with Artemis I?
NASA made history on November 16 when the Artemis I mission took off from Launch Complex 39B at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on its way to the moon. This uncrewed mission is testing the capabilities of the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft in preparation for the long-awaited return to the moon in 2025 (the Artemis III mission). Rather than astronauts, this mission carries a group of manne
4h
Ancient DNA from medieval Germany tells origin story of Ashkenazi Jews
Excavating ancient DNA from teeth, an international group of scientists peered into the lives of a once thriving medieval Ashkenazi Jewish community in Erfurt, Germany. The findings, shared today in the JournalCell, show that the Erfurt Jewish community was more genetically diverse than modern day Ashkenazi Jews.
5h
China's Zero Tolerance for Xi's COVID Restrictions
Something dramatic happened in China over the weekend: The people fought back. Citizens frustrated by years of oppressive COVID-prevention controls erupted in protest across China. In the western metropolis of Chengdu; Guangzhou, in the country's south; and Nanjing, in the east, protesters called for an end to the lockdowns that have paralyzed lives and livelihoods. In the capital, Beijing, they
5h
New AI Shows What You'd Look Like in Different Eras
Made-Up Heritage Ever wondered what you would've looked like if you were alive during ancient Greek times or were reborn as a nineteenth century Arctic explorer ? A new app called AI Time Machine by DNA analysis company MyHeritage is taking the internet by storm, allowing anybody to generate pixel-perfect renditions of their faces in the style of different historical periods. "Using AI Time Machi
5h
Focus on lifestyle factors to prevent Alzheimer's disease | Letters
Prof A David Smith highlights an effective approach to the disease Your otherwise excellent survey on the treatment of Alzheimer's disease ( 'This looks like the real deal': are we inching closer to a treatment for Alzheimer's?, 22 November ) hardly mentions the most promising approach, which is disease prevention. Alzheimer's has multiple causes, and identifying those causes that can be modified
5h
Long Covid: the patient who's made an app to track symptoms
The app Visible is also geared towards people living with conditions such as chronic fatigue syndrome When Harry Leeming developed symptoms of long Covid , he found the lack of understanding of the condition alarming. "They became so severe that I went to A&E and I was turned away, being told that I had anxiety or that it was deconditioning," he said. "It's been very frustrating to not be taken s
5h
Broadband low-loss all-optical phase modulator using gas-filled hollow-core fiber
Optical phase modulators are key components in optical communication, sensing, and signal processing systems. All-optical modulators, which modulate the phase or intensity of a light signal by a control light beam, have attracted much research interest. The phase of the signal beam is controlled by the control light beam rather than an electronical signal, which avoids electro-optical conversion i
5h
Chickens from live poultry markets in Nigeria could be bad for your health—scientists explain why
Many livestock farmers treat their animals with antimicrobial medications. These are drugs that target bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. But using them the wrong way can have unwanted results. Animals are known to develop resistance to the drugs. This resistance has knock-on effects on animal and human health.
5h
How 2022 has substantially, and favorably, changed global climate outlook
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections Anew analysis by the Global Carbon Budget , published in the journal Earth System Science Data , shows global carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels have fully recovered from the temporary dip driven by the COVID-19 pandemic, setting new records in 2021 and 2022. But it's not all bad news: With most of that rebound occurring in 2021, global foss
5h
Image: Hubble hunts an unusual galaxy
The galaxy merger Arp-Madore 417-391 steals the spotlight in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The Arp-Madore catalog is a collection of particularly peculiar galaxies spread throughout the southern sky, and includes a collection of subtly interacting galaxies as well as more spectacular colliding galaxies. Arp-Madore 417-391, which lies around 670 million light-years away in th
6h
Physicist identifies how electron crystals melt
The mysterious changes in phases of matter—from solid to liquid and back again—have fascinated Eun-Ah Kim since she was in lower elementary school in South Korea. Without cold drinking water readily available, on hot days the children would bring bottles of frozen water to school.
6h
Do Australian tenancy reforms to protect renters cause landlords to exit the market? No, but maybe they should
More Australians are renting their housing longer than in the past. But they have relatively little legal security against rent increases and evictions compared to tenants in other countries. When state governments suggest stronger protections for tenants, landlords and real estate agents claim it will cause disinvestment from the sector, increasing pressure on already tight rental markets.
6h
Did you solve it? Puzzles for blockheads
Were you a Clevor Trever? The solutions to today's puzzles Earlier today I set you these five puzzles from Mathigon 's advent calendar. Here they are again, with solutions. Sorry if you came here to read about Ian Dury, but in recompense you get to get your head around these blocks: 1. Hit me with your four cube stick Continue reading…
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A crystal shape conundrum is finally solved
A crystal's shape is determined by its inherent chemistry, a characteristic that ultimately determines its final form from the most basic of details. But sometimes the lack of symmetry in a crystal makes the surface energies of its facets unknowable, confounding any theoretical prediction of its shape.
6h
The World's Largest Volcano Is Erupting for the First Time in Nearly 40 Years
Independence Day The world's biggest active volcano is erupting for the first time since Ronald Reagan was president. For the first time since 1984 and just in time for Hawaiian Independence Day , the Mauna Loa volcano has come to life — and authorities like the United States Geological Survey are warning Big Island residents to remain vigilant. As the USGS' Hawaiian Volcano Observatory notes in
6h
There's no 'golden rule' for when kids should get their first phone
A new study finds no meaningful association between the age at which children receive their first phones and their well-being, as measured by grades, sleep habits, and depression symptoms. The study is unusual because it followed a group of more than 250 children for five years during which most of them acquired their first cell phones. Instead of comparing phone-using kids with those who don't h
6h
WHO renames monkeypox as mpox, citing racist stigma
"Removing 'monkey' removes the stigma that monkeypox comes with," an expert tells NPR. But he questions why the World Health Organization will wait a year for the change to take full effect. (Image credit: NIH-NIAID/IMAGE POINT FR/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
6h
Fungi convert polyethylene waste into pharmacologically useful metabolic products
Plastic waste is one of the most significant ecological and economic problems of our time. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a research team has now introduced a chemical–biological method for upcycling polyethylene waste: catalytic cleavage is used to make carboxylic diacids that are subsequently converted into pharmacologically useful natural products by genetically engineered fungi.
6h
Unique features of octopus create 'an entirely new way of designing a nervous system'
Octopuses are not much like humans—they are invertebrates with eight arms, and more closely related to clams and snails. Still, they have evolved complex nervous systems with as many neurons as in the brains of dogs, and are capable of a wide array of complicated behaviors. In the eyes of Melina Hale, Ph.D., and other researchers in the field, this means they provide a great opportunity to explore
6h
Unique features of octopus create 'an entirely new way of designing a nervous system'
Octopuses are not much like humans—they are invertebrates with eight arms, and more closely related to clams and snails. Still, they have evolved complex nervous systems with as many neurons as in the brains of dogs, and are capable of a wide array of complicated behaviors. In the eyes of Melina Hale, Ph.D., and other researchers in the field, this means they provide a great opportunity to explore
6h
Researchers take first step toward controlling photosynthesis using mirrors
With the help of mirrors, placed only a few hundred nanometers apart, a research team has managed to use light more efficiently. The finding could eventually be useful for controlling solar energy conversion during photosynthesis, or other reactions driven by light. For example, one application could be converting carbon dioxide into fuel.
6h
Scientists develop novel mode of linear hybridization chain reaction
Hybridization chain reaction refers to an enzyme-free nucleic acid polymerization reaction. A target molecule triggers cascade hybridization reactions by several thermodynamically stable DNA fuel strands, producing ultra-long DNA nanostructures with nicks. Signal amplification of the target molecule can be achieved by the application of a hybridization chain reaction.
6h
Fungi convert polyethylene waste into pharmacologically useful metabolic products
Plastic waste is one of the most significant ecological and economic problems of our time. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a research team has now introduced a chemical–biological method for upcycling polyethylene waste: catalytic cleavage is used to make carboxylic diacids that are subsequently converted into pharmacologically useful natural products by genetically engineered fungi.
6h
Scientists provide structural insights into NaV1.7 modulation by inhibitors, to block pain signals to the brain
Chronic pain is an extremely common condition that affects about 20% of the general population. Given the shortage of effective and non-addictive analgesics, new anti-pain drugs are eagerly awaited. Voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 plays an essential role in the transmission of pain signals to the brain, and multiple mutations in NaV1.7 have been directly linked to a variety of human pain disor
6h
Scientists provide structural insights into NaV1.7 modulation by inhibitors, to block pain signals to the brain
Chronic pain is an extremely common condition that affects about 20% of the general population. Given the shortage of effective and non-addictive analgesics, new anti-pain drugs are eagerly awaited. Voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 plays an essential role in the transmission of pain signals to the brain, and multiple mutations in NaV1.7 have been directly linked to a variety of human pain disor
6h
A life-inspired system that dynamically adjusts to its environment
Researchers have developed a synthetic system that responds to environmental changes in the same way as living organisms, using a feedback loop to maintain its internal conditions. This not only keeps the material's conditions stable but also makes it possible to build mechanisms that react dynamically to their environment, an important trait for interactive materials and soft robotics.
6h
Why joy is a state of mind | Angélique Kidjo
With infectious energy, singer-songwriter Angélique Kidjo ties together the threads of her legendary career as a creative force and global activist. In conversation with journalist Femi Oke, she discusses how joy powers her music (and sings an incredible impromptu song), details her work spreading educational opportunities to women and girls across Africa and shares her belief that everybody has t
6h
The fight for freedom in Iran and Ukraine | Christiane Amanpour
Neutrality isn't an option when it comes to the fight for personal and political freedom, says world-trotting journalist Christiane Amanpour. Offering context on some of the most significant stories impacting the world today, Amanpour details her experience covering the women-led protests ignited by the death of Mahsa Amini in Iran and shares insights on the war against totalitarianism in Ukraine,
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Chiral assemblies of pinwheel superlattices on substrates
Nature, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05384-8 Chiroptically active pinwheel assemblies on substrates are formed by tetrahedral gold nanoparticles from the effective 'compression' of a perovskite-like, low-density phase, thereby enabling the manufacture of metastructured coatings with special chiroptical characteristics as identified by photon-induced near-field electr
6h
Work conditions are better in firms led by 'neighborhood CEOs,' paper claims
In his "Neighborhood CEOs" (with Morten Bennedsen, INSEAD, and Birthe Larsen, Copenhagen Business School), Amore, a Full Professor at Bocconi Department of Management and Technology, shows that "firms led by neighborhood CEOs—defined by physical distance and personal values—exhibit better workplace conditions as perceived both by a regulatory authority and firms' own employees."
7h
New species of tyrannosaur, Daspletosaurus wilsoni, hints at ancestor of T. rex
Tyrannosaurids, the family of dinosaurs that includes T. rex, has been known from North America and Asia for over a century, yet many details of their evolutionary history remain unclear. Since the 1990s, debate has surrounded Daspletosaurus, a large tyrannosaurid known from Montana and Alberta, which has been proposed to be an ancestor of T. rex itself.
7h
New species of tyrannosaur, Daspletosaurus wilsoni, hints at ancestor of T. rex
Tyrannosaurids, the family of dinosaurs that includes T. rex, has been known from North America and Asia for over a century, yet many details of their evolutionary history remain unclear. Since the 1990s, debate has surrounded Daspletosaurus, a large tyrannosaurid known from Montana and Alberta, which has been proposed to be an ancestor of T. rex itself.
7h
The Brain Uses Calculus to Control Fast Movements
A mouse is running on a treadmill embedded in a virtual reality corridor. In its mind's eye, it sees itself scurrying down a tunnel with a distinctive pattern of lights ahead. Through training, the mouse has learned that if it stops at the lights and holds that position for 1.5 seconds, it will receive a reward — a small drink of water. Then it can rush to another set of lights to receive another
7h
Bringing the Kelvin problem solutions to life with the first-ever polymeric Weaire-Phelan structures
An interesting class of problems in geometry concerns tiling or tessellation, in which a surface or three-dimensional space is covered using one or more geometric shapes with no overlaps or gaps in between. One such tessellation problem is the "Kelvin problem," named after Lord Kelvin who solved it, which concerns the "tessellation of space into cells of equal volume with the least surface area."
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Passenger Jet Flies Over Launchpad Right as SpaceX Rocket Takes Off
World Class View Passengers on board a United Airlines commercial jet flying over Florida's Cape Canaveral were able to spot an amazingly rare sight in the distance: a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifting off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, far below. The video , shared by NBC photojournalist Nick Leimbach, shows the tiny white rocket blasting off and gaining altitude at a dazzling rate, leaving behi
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Embroidery stitches make low-cost wearable sensors
A new technique offers a low-cost, scalable potential method for making wearable devices. Embroidering power-generating yarns onto fabric allowed researchers to embed a self-powered, numerical touch-pad and movement sensors into clothing. "Our technique uses embroidery, which is pretty simple—you can stitch our yarns directly on the fabric," says Rong Yin, assistant professor of textile engineeri
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The Future of Monkeypox
The World Health Organization has recommended a new name for monkeypox, asking countries to forget the original term in favor of a new one, "mpox," that scientists hope will help destigmatize the disease. But in the United States, the request seems to be arriving late. The outbreak here has been in slow retreat for months—and has already left many Americans' minds. About 15 cases are now being re
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Tyson Moves Parker's Big Red Up a Steep Hill | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #Discovery #discoveryplus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discover
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Hearty corals can 'rescue' more vulnerable ones
Under the right living arrangement, disease-resistant corals can help "rescue" corals that are more vulnerable to disease, according to a new study. For the study in the journal Scientific Reports , researchers monitored a disease outbreak at a coral nursery in Little Cayman, Cayman Islands. The finding shows that when people grow corals of the same genotype—or genetic makeup—together, those cora
7h
Sociability genes found in some spiders
A team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, Texas Tech University, Cornell University and Australian National University has found similar genes between species of spiders that have some degree of sociability. They have published their paper in the journal Nature Communications.
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Leading plastics scientists call for inclusion of all associated chemicals in global plastics treaty
Plastic pollution is a global health and environmental problem, with serious social and economic consequences. Without political intervention, the amount of plastic waste in the environment is expected to double by 2030 to around 53 million tons per year, according to the UNEP. UN member states have therefore agreed to open international negotiations with a view to drawing up a global plastics tre
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Astronomers inspect two galactic open clusters
Using the Tubitak National Observatory (TUG) and ESA's Gaia satellite, Turkish astronomers have inspected Berkeley 68 and Stock 20—two galactic open clusters. Results of the study, presented November 17 on the arXiv pre-print server, deliver important insights into the nature and properties of these stellar groupings.
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New Wireless Smart Bandage Accelerates Chronic Wound Healing
(Photo: Jian-Cheng Lai, Bao Research Group/Stanford University) Chronic wounds are an under-acknowledged medical concern. At any given time, more than 600,000 Americans are thought to experience physiologically-stunted wounds that won't heal. Chronic wounds aren't just inconvenient and painful; they also rack up individual healthcare costs and prevent people from engaging in certain activities, r
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Meta's New AI Ranked in the Top 10% at the Game 'Diplomacy'—and Human Players Were None the Wiser
AI has mastered some of the most complex games known to man, but while it often excels at competition, cooperation doesn't come as naturally. Now an AI from Meta has mastered the game Diplomacy, which requires you to work with other players to win. Google's mastery of the game of Go was hailed as a major milestone for AI, but despite its undeniable complexity, it is in many ways well-suited to th
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Seagrass crucial to stemming the tide of coastal erosion
The sea devours large tracts of land when storms wash sand out to sea from the coast. A new study involving a researcher from the University of Gothenburg has shown that seagrass can reduce cliff erosion by up to 70% thanks to its root mats binding the sand.
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Team synthesizes multifunctional nanoparticle for diagnosis and treatment of glioma
A Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) collaborative research team has synthesized a nanoparticle named TRZD that can perform the dual function of diagnosing and treating glioma in the brain. It emits persistent luminescence for the diagnostic imaging of glioma tissues in vivo and inhibits the growth of tumor cells by aiding the targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs.
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Tracking Earth's many new lakes and their emerging role in carbon emissions
The number of lakes on our planet has increased substantially in recent decades, according to a unique global survey of 3.4 million lakes that the University of Copenhagen has taken part in. There has been a particular increase in the number of small lakes, which unfortunately, emit large amounts of greenhouse gas. The development is of great importance for Earth's carbon account, global ecosystem
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The first potent COQ8 inhibitor targets ubiquinone biosynthesis
A new collaborative study from the University of Eastern Finland, Washington University in St. Louis, University of Wisconsin–Madison, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Promega Corporation discloses the discovery and application of a new chemical probe to selectively inhibit human COQ8A in cells. The results were published in Nature Chemical Biology.
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Researchers certify device-independent genuine multipartite entanglement
Prof. Li Chuanfeng, Prof. Huang Yunfeng, Prof. Chen Geng, and their colleagues from Prof. Guo Guangcan's group at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), collaborating with Swiss academicians, have certified device-independent genuine multipartite entanglement for the first time and invented a new method to certify genuine multipartite ent
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Researchers find positive legacy effects after grassland droughts
Global climate-change-induced extreme droughts are increasing in grasslands worldwide. Severe droughts not only reduce current-year grassland productivity substantially, but also have a legacy effect on productivity in subsequent years. Such drought legacies can greatly affect the response of grassland ecosystems to climate change. In general, severe droughts tend to have a negative legacy effect
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Integrated rupture mechanics for slow slip events and earthquakes
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34927-w A new model elucidates the connections between silent earthquakes ("slow slip events") and regular ones by accounting for their finite rupture depth. It reconciles debated features of slow slip events and explains how they might lead to earthquakes.
8h
How cave nectar bats respond to viral infection
Researchers have sequenced the response to viral infection in colony-bred cave nectar bats, Eonycteris spelaea , at single-cell resolution. Published in the journal Immunity , the findings contribute to insights into bat immunity that could be harnessed to protect human health. Bats harbor many types of viruses. Even when they are infected with viruses deadly to humans, they show no notable signs
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Forskare styr fotosyntes med speglar
Med hjälp av speglar, placerade bara hundratals nanometer ifrån varandra, har forskare lyckats dra nytta av ljus på ett effektivt sätt. Deras upptäckt kan användas för att styra fotosyntesens första steg – för att (på sikt) omvandla koldioxid till bränsle. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Researchers find positive legacy effects after grassland droughts
Global climate-change-induced extreme droughts are increasing in grasslands worldwide. Severe droughts not only reduce current-year grassland productivity substantially, but also have a legacy effect on productivity in subsequent years. Such drought legacies can greatly affect the response of grassland ecosystems to climate change. In general, severe droughts tend to have a negative legacy effect
8h
Paw and order: Lucy the labrador provides support as Australia's first full-time court dog
In Melbourne's family court, Lucy visits hearings, legal interviews and mediations – all to relieve people's stress as they navigate the justice system Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our morning and afternoon news emails , free app or daily news podcast When Lucy enters a courtroom at the federal circuit and family court in Melbourne, she bows to the judge – as is
9h
'Life no longer as we know it': war in space would have devastating effects, military expert says
Attacks on satellites could take out GPS systems, banking systems, power grids, and affect military operations, panel at space conference says It would no longer be "life as we know it" if a space war destroyed the satellites that the world now relies on, space commanders have warned, and China and Russia have demonstrated that they're capable of doing just that. Senior military leaders from the
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The Kingdom Is the Strangest Medical Drama You'll Ever See
The Kingdom , Lars von Trier's 1990s miniseries about the supernatural goings-on in a Copenhagen hospital, isn't your average medical drama . The focus isn't on mass emergencies, rushed consultations, or code blues. Instead, the first episode features a tedious argument about who has administrative clearance to order CT scans. Also: A medical student steals a cadaver's head, an occultist masquera
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Seven Books That Will Make You Smarter
The cover of a nonfiction book is like the hood of an automobile: Nudge it open, and you'll find sentences like cylinders and pistons folded and coiled together, an engine ready to propel us toward answers to daunting questions. How did life begin? What is art for? What transpires inside our cells? How do our nation's values hold up in an era of accelerating change? The best nonfiction does more
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The Transcendent Power of Reading Diaries
Between the two of us, my father and I have more than 50 diaries. Mine are a wealth of embarrassments: elementary-school poems that rhyme first base with corn flakes , a photo of an ex–best friend with the edges burned in some teenage rage, gushing during college about first love and infidelity, and more recently, a list of baby names that I'm relieved were never chosen. (Was I really considering
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The Pandemic Exposed the Inequality of American Motherhood
In the early days of the pandemic, the outlook for women seemed bleak. Experts predicted that, faced with an uncertain economy in the midst of a public-health crisis, women would have fewer kids , accelerating America's long-running drop in fertility. For those who already had children, researchers foresaw plunging employment. Schools and day cares were closing. Family members couldn't come help
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An Unequal Liberty
The conservative justices have a selective and destructive notion of "liberty." In overruling Roe v. Wade last term , the Supreme Court found that the "liberty" explicitly protected by the Fourteenth Amendment's due-process clause does not include freedom against forced childbearing. In contrast, in cases that concern the Constitution's structural provisions creating and empowering the institutio
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The Download: cybersecurity's next act, and mass protests in China
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. What's next in cybersecurity In the world of cybersecurity, there is always one certainty: more hacks. That is the unavoidable constant in an industry that will spend an estimated $150 billion worldwide this year without being able, yet again, to actually stop
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Researchers publish 31,618 molecules with potential for energy storage in batteries
Scientists from the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) have created a database of 31,618 molecules that could potentially be used in future redox-flow batteries. These batteries hold great promise for energy storage. Among other things, the researchers used artificial intelligence and supercomputers to identify the molecules' properties. Today, they publish their findings in
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The Challenge of Green Aviation
There is some good new when it comes to decarbonizing our civilization (reducing the amount of CO2 from previously sequestered carbon that our industries release into the atmosphere) – we already have the technology to accomplish most of what we need to do. Right now the world's electricity generation is 63.3% from fossil fuels. We have the technology, through wind, solar, geothermal, hydroelectr
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Microplastics Found in Formerly 'Pristine' Antarctic Water, Air, Sediment
(Photo: Nekton Mission) We've long thought Antarctica to be relatively free from human influence, thanks to its extreme climate, general lack of human presence, and distance from inhabited land. Unfortunately, what was once considered the last "pristine" wilderness might no longer be. An Antarctic research expedition has found microplastics in the continent's water, air, and sediment, suggesting
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Monkeypox to be renamed mpox to avoid stigma, says WHO
Disease is found in various animals and it is inaccurate to associate global outbreak with Africa Monkeypox has been given a new name by the World Health Organization (WHO), which has announced the disease will now be called "mpox" in a bid to help tackle discrimination and stigma. The WHO announced its intention to rename the disease in June after concerns were raised that its original name is m
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The Next Afghan-Refugee Crisis Is Right Here in the U.S.
The night before the midterm elections , Jake Sullivan, the president's national security adviser, addressed a packed room in the basement of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City. The topic was billed as "Common Sense and Strategy in Foreign Policy." For an hour, Sullivan held forth on a host of topics, including Ukraine, Taiwan, digital clean energy, and Iran. For the last 15 minute
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Political Hobbyism Has Entered the Workplace
I n a 2005 episode of The Office , Michael Scott, the office manager, requires his employees to choose an upside-down index card from a tray and place it on their forehead. The cards bear a racial or ethnic label— Black, Jewish, Italian, and so on—and Michael tells the employees to treat one another according to the label listed on the card and to "stir the melting pot" by playing to racial stere
11h
MIT Is Working on Self-Assembling Robots
Today, humans build robots, but in the future, robots could be programmed to build more of themselves. Researchers at MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA) have created robotic subunits called "voxels" that can self-assemble into a rudimentary robot, and then collect more voxels to assemble larger structures or even more robots. The researchers, led by CBA Director Neil Gershenfeld, concede that
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What can wellness programmes teach the NHS? A sceptic's guide to wellness – video
Many people with autoimmune conditions across the UK are facing difficult decisions about funding complementary therapies. In the final episode of the series, Guardian journalist Richard Sprenger, who has multiple sclerosis, looks at how access to wellness therapies is under threat amid an acute cost of living crisis – and meets an NHS consultant in Devon championing a more progressive, integrati
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Sjögräs stoppar stranderosion – funkar som armering
Sjögräs kan hejda stranderosion med upp till 70 procent, enligt en studie. Sjögräsrötterna funkar som sand-armering. Och det går att återplantera sjögräs där det har försvunnit, till exempel på Västkusten. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Author Correction: Elucidation of resistance signaling and identification of powdery mildew resistant mapping loci (ClaPMR2) during watermelon-Podosphaera xanthii interaction using RNA-Seq and whole-genome resequencing approach
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-24544-4 Author Correction: Elucidation of resistance signaling and identification of powdery mildew resistant mapping loci ( ClaPMR2 ) during watermelon- Podosphaera xanthii interaction using RNA-Seq and whole-genome resequencing approach
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Paired electrolysis-enabled nickel-catalyzed enantioselective reductive cross-coupling between α-chloroesters and aryl bromides
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35073-z Precise matching of reaction rate and electric potential of electrodes in paired electrolysis is challenging. Here, the authors develop paired-electrolysis-enabled nickel-catalyzed enantioselective reductive cross-coupling of α-chloroesters and aryl bromides.
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Expanding registered reports
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34107-w Since 2020 Nature Communications has been considering Registered Reports for publication in the areas of cognitive neuroscience, human behaviour and psychology, and epidemiology. We are excited to announce the publication of our first Registered Report. With this milestone, we also want to open the format to
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A conversation on bringing the Registered Report format to Nature Communications
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34325-2 We recently published our first Registered Report entitled 'Value-free random exploration is linked to impulsivity'. We believe the format offers many benefits to strengthen hypothesis-driven research and are keen to share our experience with our readers as we open up the format to all fields of research. We
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Opportunities and challenges for Registered Reports in ecology and evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32900-1 Nature Communications is now welcoming Registered Report submissions from all fields of research (read our editorial here), and we want to encourage submissions from the ecology and evolutionary biology fields. To introduce this format to researchers in those fields, we interviewed two founding members of th
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PCGF1-PRC1 links chromatin repression with DNA replication during hematopoietic cell lineage commitment
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34856-8 Here the authors show that a Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) containing PCGF1 prevents excessive loading of transcriptional activators and chromatin remodelers on nascent DNA, allowing proper deposition of nucleosomes immediately after the passage of the DNA replication fork to optimize downstream chrom
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Thiocarbazate building blocks enable the construction of azapeptides for rapid development of therapeutic candidates
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34712-9 The rapid protease degradation of peptides is currently limiting their therapeutic utility. Here, the authors report functionalised thiocarbazate scaffolds as precursors of aza-amino acids that can be integrated in peptide sequences, extending their bioavailability, and demonstrate this on FSSE/P5779 and bra
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Breast cancer plasticity is restricted by a LATS1-NCOR1 repressive axis
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34863-9 LATS1 is reported to regulate the transition of luminal-basal-like cell plasticity in breast cancer. Here the authors report that LATS1 limits the progression of luminal breast cancer by associating with NCOR1 nuclear corepressor to repress ERα-downregulated genes in luminal cells.
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What's next in cybersecurity
This story is a part of MIT Technology Review's What's Next series, where we look across industries, trends, and technologies to let you know what to expect in the coming year. In the world of cybersecurity, there is always one certainty: more hacks. That is the unavoidable constant in an industry that will spend an estimated $150 billion worldwide this year without being able, yet again, to actu
13h
Cracking open a fossil bone reveals rapid juvenile growth in early tetrapods
The rise of tetrapods (four-limbed vertebrates) is one of the iconic evolutionary transitions preserved in the fossil record. These animals, which lived about 385 to 320 million years ago during the Devonian and Carboniferous periods of Earth's history, set the stage for the evolution and diversification of all other terrestrial vertebrates as we know them today, including amphibians, reptiles, bi
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Så underlättas flytten till ett aktivitetsbaserat kontor
Alla älskar inte tanken på att förlora den egna lilla kontorsplatsen och övergå till aktivitetsbaserat kontor. Men det finns saker som gör en sådan övergång smidigare, enligt forskning. – Vi har nu ett vetenskapligt stöd för hur man kan underlätta denna stora omställning i stället för att göra saker på känn, säger Eva Bergsten, forskare vid Högskolan i Gävle. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.
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Cracking open a fossil bone reveals rapid juvenile growth in early tetrapods
The rise of tetrapods (four-limbed vertebrates) is one of the iconic evolutionary transitions preserved in the fossil record. These animals, which lived about 385 to 320 million years ago during the Devonian and Carboniferous periods of Earth's history, set the stage for the evolution and diversification of all other terrestrial vertebrates as we know them today, including amphibians, reptiles, bi
13h
Scottish footballers to be banned from heading ball before and after matches
Clubs also advised to limit heading training after research showing link with brain disease Professional footballers in Scotland will be banned from heading the ball the day before and the day after matches after studies showing how it can affect the brain. Clubs are also being advised to limit heading balls in training to one session a week because of the links between repetitive heading of a fo
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Inflammation promotes resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors in high microsatellite instability colorectal cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35096-6 Inflammatory conditions often affect colorectal cancer patients, and their effect on their ongoing treatment is a pressing medical question. Here authors show that inflammation interferes with local anti-tumour immune response and inhibits response to immune checkpoint blockade therapy via immunosuppressive
13h
Ancient barn conversion with steam room found at Roman villa in Rutland
Fresh evidence of owners' lavish lifestyle discovered at same site as rare Iliad mosaic If you thought barn conversions were a relatively recent development for the property-owning classes, you'd be wrong – probably by 16 or 17 centuries. Archaeologists at the site of a Roman villa complex in the east Midlands have discovered that its wealthy owners converted an agricultural timber barn into a dw
14h
Bird flu prompts slaughter of 1.8M chickens in Nebraska
Nebraska agriculture officials say another 1.8 million chickens must be killed after bird flu was found on a farm in the latest sign that the outbreak that has already prompted the slaughter of more than 50 million birds nationwide continues to spread.
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Starwatch: the moon and Saturn will look great together
Keep an eye out for the planet, appearing like a bright star with a slightly yellowish tinge Look for a pretty pairing of the moon and the planet Saturn this week. Saturn is currently due south in the early evening and cruising through the constellation of Capricornus. It will appear to be the brightest star in that particular region of sky, and will have a slightly yellowish tinge. The moon will
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What does "antivaccine" really mean since the pandemic hit?
We frequently use terms like "antivaccine," "antivax," and "antivaxxers." Critics think it's a "gotcha" to ask how we define "antivax" or to accuse us of reflexively label "questioning" of vaccines as "antivax." I's not. There are gray areas, but not so gray that the word is never appropriate. Has anything changed since I first tried to define "antivaccine" in 2010? The answer: Less than you migh
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Morfinbehandlingens effekt på patienter med KOL och svår andnöd
Idag saknas effektiv läkemedelsbehandling mot svår kronisk andnöd. Ibland behandlar vården med opioidpreparat såsom morfin för att lindra symtomen, men evidensen har varit bristande för om detta hjälper. I en randomiserad fas 3-studie som forskare vid Lunds universitet och ett forskningsnätverk i Australien genomfört, såg man att morfin inte minskade andnöden hos patienterna.
15h
Agroforestry is the future of national security
Agroforest are not only more sustainable then standard crops, they are also more secure, and nutritionally diverse. Agroforests can minimize many natural disasters, and provide cover from home man made destruction. They provide homes for wildlife, food for life, and more jobs for people. An agroforest can stand up to neglect better then annual crops, and can provide food for small communities and
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Can you solve it? Puzzles for blockheads
There ain't half been some clever brainteasers UPDATE: You can read the solutions here Today's questions come from this year's Mathigon puzzle advent calendar. One of the many reason to be cheerful (Pt. 3) at this time of year. If you have a head for blocks, the first one is for you. Continue reading…
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Covid blood-thinner drug treatment dangerous and does not work – study
UK government-backed Heal-Covid trial finds Apixaban can cause dangerous bleeding and does not improve prognosis A blood-thinning drug given as a potential life-saver to many patients recovering from severe Covid does not work and can cause major bleeding, research shows. The findings have led to calls for doctors to stop advising people to take Apixaban, because it does not stop them from dying
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High antibody levels and reduced cellular response in children up to one year after SARS-CoV-2 infection
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35055-1 Severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection is different in adults and children which involves the immune response. Here using a parent and children cohort with 4 month and 12 month sampling times, the authors show enhanced levels and increased breadth of anti-spike antibody level over time but reduced specific T cell
18h
Backfire-effekten
Att bekämpa myter, konspirations­idéer och missupp­fattningar Det kan verka vara en självklarhet att bemöta felaktigheter med korrekta uppgifter och fakta. De av oss som har försökt har dock ofta upptäkt att det inte alltid är så lätt som man skulle kunna tro. Forskarna Brendan Nyhan och Jason Reifler myntade 2010 begreppet backfireeffekten, vilket beskrev hur … Continued Inlägget dök först upp
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