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News2022November29

A viral cocktail calms gut inflammation
Nature, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03703-7 Abnormalities in gut bacteria can contribute to hard-to-treat illnesses, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Efforts to harness bacterium-targeting viruses reveal a promising way to tackle these conditions.
9h
Long-standing genomic mystery about the origins of introns explained in new study
One of the most long-standing, fundamental mysteries of biology surrounds the poorly understood origins of introns. Introns are segments of noncoding DNA that must be removed from the genetic code before it is translated in the process of making proteins. Introns are an ancient feature found across all eukaryotic life, a wide range of organisms that spans all animals, plants, fungi, and protists,
12h

LATEST

Amazing Artemis Photo Shows Every Human, Alive or Dead, Plus the Moon
On Monday, NASA's uncrewed Orion spacecraft reached its farthest distance from Earth at nearly 270,000 miles away as part of the agency's Artemis I mission. It's the farthest a spacecraft capable of carrying human passengers has ever traveled, in fact, at about 20,000 miles clear of the previous record set by the crewed Apollo 13 mission way back in 1970. At its journey's zenith, the Orion spacec
4min
Image: Hubble Telescope spies sparkling spray of stars in NGC 2660
This glittering group of stars, shining through the darkness like sparks left behind by a firework, is NGC 2660 in the constellation Vela, best viewed in the southern sky. NGC 2660 is an open cluster, a type of star cluster that can contain anywhere from tens to a few hundreds of stars loosely bound together by gravity.
16min
NASA scientists create black hole jets with supercomputer
Leveraging the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scientists ran 100 simulations exploring jets—narrow beams of energetic particles—that emerge at nearly light speed from supermassive black holes. These behemoths sit at the centers of active, star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way galaxy, and can weigh millions to billions of times the mass of the sun
31min
Researchers investigate neuron differentiation in fruit fly brains
The brains of all higher-order animals are filled with a diverse array of neuron types, with specific shapes and functions. Yet, when these brains form during embryonic development, there is initially only a small pool of cell types to work with. So how do neurons diversify over the embryo's development? Researchers know that neural stem cells called neuroblasts divide multiple times to sequential
38min
Researchers investigate neuron differentiation in fruit fly brains
The brains of all higher-order animals are filled with a diverse array of neuron types, with specific shapes and functions. Yet, when these brains form during embryonic development, there is initially only a small pool of cell types to work with. So how do neurons diversify over the embryo's development? Researchers know that neural stem cells called neuroblasts divide multiple times to sequential
39min
Former CEO Sues Company That Fired Him for Microdosing LSD in an Investor Meeting
A former Silicon Valley startup CEO and cofounder has filed a lawsuit against his former employer for what he says was discrimination based on race and his mental health challenge — though the company's stated reason for firing him was that he took acid at work, bringing the tech industry's subculture of microdosing psychedelics to a potentially grabby legal showdown. It was previously reported t
46min
Common vet drugs may control bed bugs on chicken farms
Two common drugs veterinarian use to combat parasites may be an effective way to control bed bugs on chicken farms, according to a new study. Researchers tested fluralaner and ivermectin, which are used to kill fleas and ticks on household pets like dogs and cats, among other uses, in the context of controlling resurgent bed bug populations on poultry farms. The researchers tested bed bug mortali
56min
Reactive metal boride nanoparticles trap lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan for bacteria-infected wound healing
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35050-6 Antibacterial wound healing approaches often target bacteria but overlook the inflammation response caused by products release by dead bacteria. Here, the authors report on the development of Boride nanoparticles to treat infection and prevent excessive inflammation by trapping lipopolysaccharides/peptidogly
1h
Developing the low-energy ion spectrometer for the Chinese BeiDou-3 satellite
In our daily lives, we rely on weather forecasts to know whether it will rain tomorrow. The monitoring and prediction of space weather such as geomagnetic storms and substorms are also vital for the operation safety of satellites outside the atmosphere and the living conditions of astronauts in space. However, space weather is far more unpredictable than the weather on Earth, which depends on in-s
1h
Serious mistakes found in recent paper by Connolly et al.
Guest post by Mark Richardson who is a Research Scientist in the Aerosol and Clouds Group at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. All opinions expressed are his own and do not in any way represent those of NASA, JPL or Caltech. Should scientists choose to believe provably false things? Even though that would mean more inclusive debates with a wider range of opinio
1h
Most Asian countries are far behind biodiversity targets for protected areas, finds study of 40 countries
Protected areas are one of the most effective tools for safeguarding biodiversity, but new research published today has found that most Asian countries failed to achieve a global minimum target of protecting at least 17% of land by 2020. Under current trends, the outlook for achieving the Global Biodiversity Framework's 2030 target to protect at least 30% of land is bleak, with Asia set to miss th
1h
Climate change will cause Pacific's low-oxygen zone to expand even more by 2100, study finds
For thousands of kilometers along the western coasts of the Americas, low-oxygen waters known as oxygen minimum zones stretch out into the Pacific Ocean. In part due to climate change, this oxygen-starved region is likely to get wider and deeper, expanding by millions of cubic kilometers by the end of the century, models in a new study predict. Larger oxygen minimum zones threaten marine ecosystem
1h
Entire Island Strangled by Choking Vines
Choking Vines Fiji's second largest island, Vanua Levu, is being absolutely overrun by vines, The Guardian reports , in a dramatic display of the sheer power of nature. Culprits abound. An invasive species introduced by US troops during WW2 is largely to blame, exacerbated by other challenging species and fierce natural disasters that are choking out competing flora. Experts have long predicted t
2h
Physicist identifies how electron crystals melt
The mysterious changes in phases of matter — from solid to liquid and back again — have fascinated some researchers. Researchers have now identified an intermediate phase between solid and liquid in electrons that has some regularity but not as much as a solid, and not as much freedom as a liquid. They found that the electrons in this state arrange themselves into tiny strips that can move aroun
2h
New paper highlights the co-benefits of coordinating climate action and peacebuilding
Climate change can manifest in different ways: stronger tropical droughts, extreme droughts, warmer climates and highly unpredictable rainfall patterns. All these endanger the availability of food, which in turn could increase conflict over resources, which can turn violent in the absence of spaces for dialogs and negotiations to transform conflict by peaceful means. Violent conflict affects livel
2h
Genomes OnLine Database introduces new features
Since its launch 25 years ago, the Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) has matured from six projects on a spreadsheet into a flagship genomic metadata repository, making curated microbiome metadata that follows community standards freely available, and enabling large-scale comparative genomics analysis initiatives.
2h
Researchers unveil evolution of paleodiet at Neolithic Qujialing site
The sustainable development of agriculture has laid a solid foundation for the birth of human civilization and countries. Early agriculture has long been a focus of archaeology. China is the only country in the world with two independent agricultural systems, that is, rice farming in the south and millet farming in the north.
2h
Astronomers see stellar self-control in action
Many factors can limit the size of a group, including external ones that members have no control over. Astronomers have found that groups of stars in certain environments, however, can regulate themselves.
2h
Searching for new particles using quantum sensors
In a recent study published in the journal National Science Review, a laboratory search for exotic spin-dependent interactions was conducted with an ensemble-NV-diamond magnetometer. New experimental constraints on two types of exotic interactions were established at the micron scale.
2h
Oldest Pterodactylus fossil found in Germany
Pterosaurs, the flying reptiles of the dinosaur era, originated in the Late Triassic (227 million years ago) and became extinct at the end-Cretaceous extinction event (66 million years ago). With wing spans ranging from 1 to 12 meters, they dominated the world's skies for more than 160 million years.
2h
Team creates nano-magnets that could restore damaged nerve cells
Neurons are the fundamental units of the brain and nervous system, the cells responsible for receiving sensory input from the external world, for sending motor commands to our muscles, and for transforming and relaying the electrical signals at every step in between. Neurons, also called nerve cells, are composed of three main parts: the cell body, the dendrites and the axon—a long, thin extension
2h
525-million-year-old fossil may rewrite history of brain evolution
Fossils of a tiny sea creature that died more than half a billion years ago may require revisions to science textbooks covering brain evolution. A new study provides the first detailed description of Cardiodictyon catenulum , a wormlike animal preserved in rocks in China's southern Yunnan province. Measuring barely half an inch (less than 1.5 centimeters) long and initially discovered in 1984, th
2h
Why are RSV infections surging this year?
What is RSV and why are infections surging? Experts have answers for you. Here, University of Chicago Medicine doctors explain how to protect children and high-risk patients: What is RSV? Respiratory syncytial virus, often called RSV, is a common virus that can cause infections in the nose, throat, lungs, and respiratory tract. Historically, almost all children are infected with RSV by age 2, and
2h
Flexible strain sensor enabled by carbon nanofibers can 'read lips'
Wearable, flexible strain sensors unobtrusively monitor tiny vibrations of human skin in real time and with great accuracy, thanks to innovative fabrication techniques using composite materials. High sensitivity and a wide working range are key parameters for a high-quality strain sensor, but it's difficult to attain both characteristics on the same sensor due to limitations in structure and condu
2h
Scientists propose framework for understanding establishment of plants after long-distance dispersal
Mechanisms of plant colonization after long-distance dispersal (LDD) and current related knowledge were the topic of a review by Prof. Li Dezhu's team at the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden of CAS, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the University of Edinburgh.
3h
Astronomers 'Troubled' as New Satellite Outshines Most Stars in the Sky
Trails in the night sky left by BlueWalker 3 are juxtaposed against the Nicholas U. Mayall 4-meter Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona, a Program of NSF's NOIRLab. The breaks in the trail are caused by breaks between four twenty second exposures that were stacked to create this image. Cell phone towers in space may be the next frontier of mobile communication, but astronomers a
3h
NASA Hires Company to 3D Print American Base on the Moon
Lunar Loft Mankind may not physically be back on the Moon just yet, but the Moon Economy is already booming. Case in point: Axios reports that an Austin-based 3D printing firm called ICON just landed a $57.2 million cash infusion from NASA for its Project Olympus, the hopefully-spacefaring company's endeavor to create 3D-printed lunar shelters. Per Axios , ICON plans to have its Moon huts ready f
3h
Scientists propose framework for understanding establishment of plants after long-distance dispersal
Mechanisms of plant colonization after long-distance dispersal (LDD) and current related knowledge were the topic of a review by Prof. Li Dezhu's team at the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden of CAS, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the University of Edinburgh.
3h
Increasing crop yields by breeding plants to cooperate
A simple breeding experiment, combined with genetic analysis, can rapidly uncover genes that promote cooperation and higher yields of plant populations, according to a new study published November 29 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, by Samuel Wuest of the University of Zurich and Agroscope, Switzerland, and colleagues. The results have the potential to quickly increase crop productivity th
3h
The Strength of the 'Soft Daddy'
The latest season of Netflix's animated comedy Big Mouth explores the mysterious world of father figures, and emerges with a revelation. The middle schooler Nick's dad, Elliot Birch, has been harboring a secret: He used to be a fearsome competitor in the macho martial art of "Scottish nipple twisting." Elliot is a sweetie pie, a family man who takes the concept of being a lover-not-a-fighter to t
3h
The Tormented Soul of Iranian Soccer
When soccer first appeared in Iranian villages in the 1920s, clerics began their long attempt to stifle the revolution that the game represents. They hated the sport—an import from Great Britain and championed by the shah, it was a symbol of modernity that featured men running around in heretical shorts. Clerics attended local matches for the sake of pelting players with stones. Throughout modern
3h
What We Ask of Black American Athletes
This is an edition of The Great Game, a newsletter about the 2022 World Cup—and how soccer explains the world. Sign up here. In a press conference yesterday, Tyler Adams, the 23-year-old captain of the U.S. men's national soccer team, was chastised by an Iranian journalist for mispronouncing the name of his country (Adams pronounced it eye- ran as opposed to ee- rahn ) before following up to ask
3h
Bats are the death metal singers of the animal world, research shows
Mammals can produce sound from ventricular folds, used by humans only for Tuvan throat singing and 'death metal grunting' It has long been known Ozzy Osbourne has a taste for bats. But now it seems the mammals are also fans of his. Bats greet each other with death metal growls, scientists have discovered, and possess a vocal range which far surpasses that of most humans. Continue reading…
3h
How is it at all possible to say that "you can't improve IQ" ?
If I were to take an IQ test multiple times, and study for it, I would increase IQ score correct? But then people would say "you didn't actually increase your IQ, just your score on the test" in which case I would say…what's the difference? Then we could then speak to the practicality of the idea of what IQ is and if it even matters. If I wanted to be a doctor, do I need an insane IQ to do that
3h
Increasing crop yields by breeding plants to cooperate
A simple breeding experiment, combined with genetic analysis, can rapidly uncover genes that promote cooperation and higher yields of plant populations, according to a new study published November 29 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, by Samuel Wuest of the University of Zurich and Agroscope, Switzerland, and colleagues. The results have the potential to quickly increase crop productivity th
3h
Experiment links perceiving emotions in music and people
People who can skillfully interpret other people's emotional states may also be better at assessing the emotions conveyed by music, new research shows. Humans have been making music throughout recorded history, "but it doesn't seem to serve any obvious biological function," says University of Oregon musicologist and cognitive scientist Zachary Wallmark. The new research lends support to one expla
3h
Virus undercuts fungus's attacks on wheat
A naturally occurring virus co-discovered by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and university scientists may offer a way to undermine a costly fungal threat to wheat, barley and other small-grain crops.
3h
Study explores link between shark nose shape, size and sensitivity of smell
Sharks have reputations as "super smellers" that use olfaction to detect odors related to finding prey and mates, communicating with their own species and avoiding predators. Their olfactory system is unique because it is separate from the respiratory system, unlike humans. Sharks and other fish use gills to facilitate the uptake of oxygen, while two nares or nostrils on the shark's head take in o
3h
The entanglement advantage
Researchers have demonstrated a way to entangle atoms to create a network of atomic clocks and accelerometers. The method has resulted in greater precision in measuring time and acceleration.
3h
Mom's dietary fat rewires male and female brains differently
New findings in mice show that excessive weight gain while pregnant tips the scales for male but not female mice to be more depressed in adulthood due to less brain serotonin. A similar result was found in humans, where the more fat measured in a placenta corresponded to less serotonin in the developing brains of males, but not females.
3h
Study explores link between shark nose shape, size and sensitivity of smell
Sharks have reputations as "super smellers" that use olfaction to detect odors related to finding prey and mates, communicating with their own species and avoiding predators. Their olfactory system is unique because it is separate from the respiratory system, unlike humans. Sharks and other fish use gills to facilitate the uptake of oxygen, while two nares or nostrils on the shark's head take in o
3h
Report: Much of the world was drier than usual last year despite La Niña
The World Meteorological Organization has published its first State of Global Water Resources report in order to assess the effects of climate, environmental and societal change on the Earth's water resources. The aim of this annual stocktake is to support monitoring and management of global freshwater resources in an era of growing demand and limited supplies.
4h
Lava from Hawaii volcano lights night sky amid warnings
Waves of orange, glowing lava and ash blasted and billowed from the world's largest active volcano in its first eruption in 38 years, and officials told people living on Hawaii's Big Island to be ready in the event of a worst-case scenario.
4h
Combination of behavior change campaigns and technology could help keep air pollution to a minimum in schools
Surrey's Global Center for Clean Air Research (GCARE) found that campaigns aimed at changing the behavior of parents, teachers and the local community can reduce outdoor nitrogen dioxide exposure by up to 23% compared to business-as-usual activities. However, the study's authors believe behavioral change campaigns should be more inclusive and should consider the school's diverse communities and th
4h
Graphene is a proven supermaterial, but manufacturing the versatile form of carbon at usable scales remains a challenge
"Future chips may be 10 times faster, all thanks to graphene"; "Graphene may be used in COVID-19 detection"; and "Graphene allows batteries to charge 5x faster"—those are just a handful of recent dramatic headlines lauding the possibilities of graphene. Graphene is an incredibly light, strong and durable material made of a single layer of carbon atoms. With these properties, it is no wonder resear
4h
Europa's plate tectonic activity is unlike Earth's
Plate tectonics represents a defining framework of modern geoscience, accounting for large-scale features on Earth's surface, such as mountains and valleys, as well as the processes that shape them, like volcanoes and earthquakes. Present-day plate tectonics have not been observed on any other world in the solar system, and evidence of past activity on planets such as Mars and Venus is circumstant
4h
Squirrel sperm and feet tell a different climate change story
Perhaps it's time to replace the canary in a coal mine metaphor with a squirrel in the ground. Because two University of Manitoba studies found that climate change is altering ground squirrels' sperm and feet, and this warns of big consequences potentially coming to endangered ecosystems.
4h
Adding a 'decoy option' may give extra boost to crowdfunding
Imagine walking into an ice cream shop and scanning your options. A sugar cone with one scoop is $3. A second scoop comes out to $4, but for just 50 cents more, you can get a large waffle cone with three scoops. Some people may not want that much ice cream. But for many, it's hard to pass up a good deal.
4h
Common veterinary drugs show effectiveness against bed bugs
Two common drugs used by veterinarians to combat parasites may be effective against bed bugs, with one showing especially strong potential, according to a new study from North Carolina State University that examined the drugs in the context of controlling resurgent bed bug populations on poultry farms.
4h
Study: Cognitive flexibility enhances mathematical reasoning
At school or in everyday life, proportional reasoning is essential for many activities. This type of reasoning allows us to adapt the quantity of ingredients in a recipe or to calculate the distance traveled as a function of speed by relying on ratios and proportions. In school settings, certain intuitive conceptions of proportions can mislead students and hinder their learning.
4h
Driver Says His Ford F-150 Lightning Made a "Loud Boom" and Died When He Plugged It In
Lightning Strikes Ford's F-150 Lightning is meant to be the automaker's flagship electric pickup truck, and for the most part has been heralded with glowing praise from across the industry . But as more Lightnings hit the streets and accumulate miles, the more we'll get to see of their reliability — or lack thereof. Take Eric Roe, a Ford Lightning owner and a fan of electric vehicles. In a tweet
4h
Astronomers Annoyed at Ludicrously Bright SpaceX-Launched Satellite
For Shame One of the world's preeminent astronomy organizations is decrying a newly-launched satellite that has, as critics warned, become one of the brightest objects in the sky. In a press release , the International Astronomical Union (IAU) called out the BlueWalker 3 satellite for becoming one of the brightest things in the heavens — more prominent, even, than some constellations and up there
4h
New dinosaur egg species helps crack mystery of Cretaceous ecosystem in Japan
Giant skeletons aren't the only evidence that dinosaurs left behind. Tiny eggshell fragments can reveal aspects of Mesozoic ecosystems that fossilized bones and teeth fail to capture, especially because the skeletons of smaller animals were less likely to be preserved. Early Cretaceous fragments have been found—the oldest eggshell fossils ever found in Japan—and provide an important window into th
4h
The whole in a part: Synchronizing chaos through a narrow slice of spectrum
Engineers have uncovered some intricate effects arising when chaotic systems, which typically generate broad spectra, are coupled by conveying only a narrow range of frequencies from one to another. The synchronization of chaotic oscillators, such as electronic circuits, continues to attract considerable fascination due to the richness of the complex behaviors that can emerge. Recently, hypothetic
4h
Making the most of quite little: Improving AI training for edge sensor time series
Engineers have demonstrated a simple computational approach for improving the way artificial intelligence classifiers, such as neural networks, can be trained based on limited amounts of sensor data. The emerging applications of the internet of things often require edge devices that can reliably classify behaviors and situations based on time series. However, training data are difficult and expens
4h
DNA sequence enhances understanding origins of jaws
Researchers have discovered and characterized a DNA sequence found in jawed vertebrates, such as sharks and humans, but absent in jawless vertebrates, such as lampreys. This DNA is important for the shaping of the joint surfaces during embryo development.
4h
Protein shapes indicate Parkinson's disease
Researchers have found that a set of proteins have different shapes in the spinal fluid of healthy individuals and Parkinson's patients. These could be used in the future as a new type of biomarker for this disease.
4h
When cyclones and fires collide…
As strong winds and torrential rains inundate Australia's south-eastern coast, new research suggests that high intensity bushfires might not be too far behind, with their dual effects extending damage zones and encroaching on previously low-risk residential areas.
4h
Using math to better treat cancer
Researchers have identified a new method for scheduling radiation therapy that could be as much as 22 percent more effective at killing cancer cells than current standard radiation treatment regimens.
4h
How women can reduce the risk of hip fracture
Increasing intake of protein and drinking regular cups of tea or coffee is a way women could reduce their risk of suffering a hip fracture, according to new research. Food scientists have found that for women, a 25g a day increase in protein was associated with, on average, a 14% reduction in their risk of hip fracture. In a surprise twist, they also discovered that every additional cup of tea or
4h
Neuroscientists discover a new drug candidate for treating epilepsy
Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most common types of epilepsy worldwide. Although symptomatic medications are available, one-third of TLE patients remain unresponsive to current treatment, so new drug targets are critically needed. Neuroscientist have recently identified and developed a new drug candidate that has potential for effectively treating TLE by suppressing neuroinflammation.
4h
Making the most of quite little: Improving AI training for edge sensor time series
Engineers have demonstrated a simple computational approach for improving the way artificial intelligence classifiers, such as neural networks, can be trained based on limited amounts of sensor data. The emerging applications of the internet of things often require edge devices that can reliably classify behaviors and situations based on time series. However, training data are difficult and expens
4h
Developing sliding nanomechanical resonators
In a recent study published in Nature Communications, a research team led by Prof. Guo Guangcan from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed nanomechanical resonators based on a graphene substrate, and made nanoresonators slidable across clamping points.
4h
Quantum algorithm of the direct calculation of energy derivatives developed for molecular geometry optimization
In recent years, research and development on quantum computers has made considerable progress. Quantum chemical calculations for electronic structures of atoms and molecules are attracting great attention as one of the most promising applications for quantum computers. In order to utilize quantum chemical calculations for chemistry and related fields, it is essential to develop geometry optimizati
4h
New chemistry toolkit speeds analyses of molecules in solution
A new open-source toolkit automates the process of computing molecular properties in the solution phase, clearing new pathways for artificial-intelligence design and discovery in chemistry and beyond. The Journal of Chemical Physics published the free, open-source toolkit developed by theoretical chemists at Emory University.
4h
New dinosaur egg species helps crack mystery of Cretaceous ecosystem in Japan
Giant skeletons aren't the only evidence that dinosaurs left behind. Tiny eggshell fragments can reveal aspects of Mesozoic ecosystems that fossilized bones and teeth fail to capture, especially because the skeletons of smaller animals were less likely to be preserved. Early Cretaceous fragments have been found—the oldest eggshell fossils ever found in Japan—and provide an important window into th
4h
Social media conversations are driven by those on the margins, says new research
Log on to your favorite social media site and you're likely to see a slew of posts and opinions on controversial topics like social justice, immigration, and corrupt elections. And while it may seem natural to assume that the prevailing online opinions represent the views of the majority, a new study from BYU says conversations on social media are being driven by the far left and right, not the ma
4h
From biomass to functional crystalline diamond nanothread
New research from a team of scientists led by Drs. Kuo Li and Haiyan Zheng from the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) reported the first synthesis of a three-dimensional crystalline carbon nanothread (CNThs) from a biomass precursor, 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA), through [4+2] Diels-Alder reactions.
4h
Developing more sustainable and recyclable polyurethane foams
A team of researchers from the Center for Education and Research on Macromolecules (CERM) at the University of Liège (Belgium) has developed an innovative process that rethinks the manufacturing of polyurethane (PU) foams without the use of isocyanates—highly toxic agents—while being recyclable. This study is published in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
4h
Mapping street-level pollution estimates to reveal safer routes
The United Nations has identified improving the walkability and bikeability of cities as a key goal in efforts to reduce dependence on greenhouse gas–emitting automobiles and promote routine exercise for public health. However, increased walking and cycling can come with their own health risks.
4h
rRNA modification found to play significant role in thermospermine-mediated development in Arabidopsis thaliana
Polyamines were first discovered in animal semen by Anthony van Leeuwenhoek in 1678, and subsequently found in bacteria, yeast and plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) are the main types of free polyamines, and once considered as a class of phytohormones that regulate various aspects of plant development and environmental adaptation. However, the c
4h
NASA's Juno mission spots two Jovian moons
On Nov. 29, 2021, NASA's Juno mission completed its 38th close flyby of Jupiter. As the spacecraft sped low over the giant planet's cloud tops, its JunoCam instrument captured this look at two of Jupiter's largest moons.
4h
Job satisfaction and the work-life balance
How does job satisfaction sit with the notion of work-life balance? Writing in the International Journal of Services and Operations Management, a research team from Portugal point out that a positive and stable work environment can improve an employee's sense of belonging in an organization. In parallel with such a concept, they say that can enhance commitment. The counterpoint is that this commit
4h
Challenges facing food and beverage companies seeking to export
A new Oregon State University study that examined exporting practices of Oregon food and beverage companies found that the likelihood of exporting increases with firm size and length of time in business and that the COVID-19 pandemic reduced the ability of firms to export.
4h
Examining the pandemic's impact on individual generosity
How did the COVID-19 pandemic affect people's volunteering, donating, and helping behaviors? A report by Penn's School of Social Policy and Practice (SP2) faculty and students summarizes a nationally representative study aiming to answer this question.
4h
A Tie Breaker Grudge Match! Daddy Dave vs Jerry Bird | Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings #StreetOutlaws #Streetracing #discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
4h
rRNA modification found to play significant role in thermospermine-mediated development in Arabidopsis thaliana
Polyamines were first discovered in animal semen by Anthony van Leeuwenhoek in 1678, and subsequently found in bacteria, yeast and plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) are the main types of free polyamines, and once considered as a class of phytohormones that regulate various aspects of plant development and environmental adaptation. However, the c
5h
Something Very Weird Is Going on at Elon Musk's Boring Company
Ghost Protocol After promising many major cities across the country that it could dig tunnels that would magically solve their traffic woes by moving them underground, Elon Musk's Boring Company has become oddly quiet, The Wall Street Journal reports . In fact, the paper reports, it's been repeatedly ghosting local officials after making big plans. The company has yet to make good on many of its
5h
Modified enzyme brings value to lignin monomers
The chemical industry faces the challenge of replacing fossil-based building blocks with green alternatives. Biomass is an interesting source of carbon-based molecules. It is also underused because some 25 percent of all plant biomass is in the form of lignin, a biopolymer that, so far, can only be used as a solid fuel.
5h
Modified enzyme brings value to lignin monomers
The chemical industry faces the challenge of replacing fossil-based building blocks with green alternatives. Biomass is an interesting source of carbon-based molecules. It is also underused because some 25 percent of all plant biomass is in the form of lignin, a biopolymer that, so far, can only be used as a solid fuel.
5h
Engineered proteins: A future treatment option for COVID-19
COVID-19 has had a lasting global health impact that continues to challenge the health care system. As the coronavirus continues to mutate, the current COVID-19 prevention strategies are plagued with supply chain disruptions, high vaccine manufacturing costs and inconvenient vaccine administration methods.
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A population-based serological study of post-COVID syndrome prevalence and risk factors in children and adolescents
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34616-8 The post-acute impacts of COVID-19 in children and adolescents are not well understood. In this population-based study in Geneva, the authors find evidence of COVID-19-related symptom persistence beyond 12 weeks in adolescents, and identify chronic conditions and lower socioeconomic status as risk factors.
5h
Taking anti-smoking med longer before quitting doesn't help
Extending the time that someone takes a smoking cessation medication before stopping tobacco use doesn't significantly improve the likelihood of staying smoke-free, a new study shows. Varenicline is the best medication available for helping people quit smoking. It has been sold since 2006 under the brand names Chantix and Champix, and recently became available in generic form. But even with varen
5h
Future vehicles could swim like gelatinous sea creatures
A gelatinous sea creature's swimming abilities could inform the design of underwater vehicles. Nanomia bijuga , a marine animal related to jellyfish , swims via jet propulsion. A dozen or more squishy structures on its body pump water backwards to push the animal forward. And it can control these jets individually, either syncing them up or pulsing them in sequence. These two different swimming s
6h
Mark Cuban Says SBF Should Be Afraid of Imprisonment "For a Long Time"
Sure Sounds Bad Billionaire crypto evangelist Mark Cuban, who's currently being sued for his involvement with the bankrupt crypto exchange Voyager Digital by the same law firm representing the class action suit against disgraced ex-FTX CEO Sam Bankman-Fried for extremely similar reasons , thinks that SBF should be "afraid" of "jail." Noted! "I don't know all the details," Cuban told TMZ when aske
6h
Mathematical Trio Advances Centuries-Old Number Theory Problem
Earlier this year, a trio of mathematicians decided to make lemons into lemonade — and ended up making major headway on a problem that mathematicians have been thinking about for centuries. The three were just finishing a project and thinking about next steps when, late in March, two of them — Levent Alpöge of Harvard University and Ari Shnidman of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem — contracted.
6h
Ancient monsoons offer clues to future southwest US climate
Researchers are looking for environmental clues from millions of years in the past to predict what the southwestern climate may look like in the future. The North American southwest has been suffering through weather extremes in recent years ranging from searing heatwaves and scorching wildfires to monsoon rainfalls that cause flash floods and mudslides. After analyzing ancient climate data, the
6h
Error at UK Covid testing lab might have led to 23 deaths, say experts
Mistake at Immensa Health Clinic Ltd lab in Wolverhampton led to 39,000 tests wrongly labelled negative At least 23 deaths might have been caused by a blunder at a privately run laboratory after thousands of positive Covid cases were reported as negative, public health experts have estimated. The error, at the Immensa Health Clinic Ltd lab in Wolverhampton, led to about 39,000 PCR tests returning
7h
Human creators stand to benefit as AI rewrites the rules of content creation
For years, the 150-year-old Colorado State Fair has held its fine art competition under little media glare. But when it announced the 2022 winners in August, this little-known local event immediately sparked controversy around the globe. Judges had picked synthetic media artist Jason Allen's artificial intelligence-generated work " Théâtre D'opéra Spatial " as the winner in the digital category.
7h
Vegetation-free patches encourage ground-nesting wild bees
Relatively little is known about the nesting requirements of ground-nesting wild bees, although nesting sites are of central importance for most wild bee species. There are almost 600 wild bee species in Germany and 75% nest in the soil. To date, however, most of the research has concentrated on the wild bee species that nest above ground in cavities.
7h
Thousands of phages found to have CRISPR gene editing system
A team of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and University of California, Los Angeles, working with a colleague from Vilnius University, has found evidence of thousands of phages with DNA strands that should allow them to conduct gene editing on other viruses or bacteria. Their paper has been published in the open-access journal Cell.
7h
Vegetation-free patches encourage ground-nesting wild bees
Relatively little is known about the nesting requirements of ground-nesting wild bees, although nesting sites are of central importance for most wild bee species. There are almost 600 wild bee species in Germany and 75% nest in the soil. To date, however, most of the research has concentrated on the wild bee species that nest above ground in cavities.
7h
Thousands of phages found to have CRISPR gene editing system
A team of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and University of California, Los Angeles, working with a colleague from Vilnius University, has found evidence of thousands of phages with DNA strands that should allow them to conduct gene editing on other viruses or bacteria. Their paper has been published in the open-access journal Cell.
7h
Startup Unveils Videogame for Dogs
In This Economy? From the Department of Why Not, Axios reports that a UK-based startup called Joipaw is prototyping a new kind of videogame… for dogs. While it might sound ridiculous, the folks behind Joipaw seem well intentioned. As the company's cofounder Dersim Avdar explained to Axios , the tech is intended to maintain — or even improve — aging doggos' cognition. Thus, as they sell it, it's
7h
10 tips for handling holiday stress while staying healthy
It can be easy to get stressed out during the holidays when so many activities seem to conflict with a healthy lifestyle. The holiday season is a time of gathering with family and friends, eating delicious foods, and making memories. However, it is easy to feel stressed and overwhelmed, especially when many holiday activities seem to conflict with a healthy lifestyle. University at Buffalo's Clin
7h
Theoretical understanding of electrocatalysis beyond thermodynamic analysis
As green and sustainable development relies on renewable energy, electrocatalysis has become a key technology. Advanced theoretical study is an important means to fundamentally understanding electrocatalytic reactions. Highly efficient methods of carbon-neutralization (eCO2RR), reverse artificial nitrogen cycle (RANC), and oxygen chemistry (OER and ORR) can all be driven by electrocatalysis.
7h
Human Enhancement Needs Ethical Oversight on a Global Scale, New Study Says
We all imagine better versions of ourselves. Smarter. More attractive. Physically nimble to rock the dance floor, conquer martial arts, or run that ultramarathon. And as we grow older, we want to live longer, healthier lives—or even reverse the aging process itself. For eons, people have tapped into various resources to give themselves an edge. You've likely indulged in a strong cup of coffee tha
7h
Discovery, rediscovery, and reassignment: Redefining fungal biodiversity
Despite fungi being some of the most important organisms in the world, their species diversity remains poorly understood. Taxonomy is the basis for biodiversity studies. Now, not only have researchers from Japan investigated a previously undescribed species of fungi, they have also reassigned another species to a different genus and rediscovered a further species in Japan.
7h
The role of Newtic1 protein in limb regeneration in adult newts
The animal kingdom exhibits a plethora of unique and surprising phenomena or abilities that include, for some animals, the ability to regenerate body parts irrespective of age. Now, researchers from Japan have discovered that the mechanisms behind this peculiar ability in newts have a few surprises of their own.
7h
Discovery, rediscovery, and reassignment: Redefining fungal biodiversity
Despite fungi being some of the most important organisms in the world, their species diversity remains poorly understood. Taxonomy is the basis for biodiversity studies. Now, not only have researchers from Japan investigated a previously undescribed species of fungi, they have also reassigned another species to a different genus and rediscovered a further species in Japan.
7h
Studying muonium to reveal new physics beyond the Standard Model
By studying an exotic atom called muonium, researchers are hoping misbehaving muons will spill the beans on the Standard Model of particle physics. To make muonium, they use the most intense continuous beam of low energy muons in the world at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI. The research is published in Nature Communications.
7h
Asiatic hard clams can synthesize antibiotics
Clams and other invertebrates often live in habitats with dense bacterial populations, despite lacking adaptive, lymphocyte-based immune systems. How clams resist bacterial pathogens in the environment is unclear.
7h
Do treeshrews break the 'rules' due to climate?
The Northern treeshrew, a small, bushy-tailed mammal native to South and Southeast Asia, defies two of the most widely tested ecological "rules" of body size variation within species, according to a new study. The unexpected finding, researchers say, may be attributable to climate change—the body size rules reversed in Northern treeshrews as average temperatures climbed—and likely exists in other
7h
Urgammal havsmask länk till leddjurens hjärna
Frågan om hur hjärnan hos spindlar, tusenfotingar och insekter har utvecklats har länge gäckat forskare. Men nu finns en viktig ledtråd. Forskare har analyserat vävnad från ett maskliknande urdjur – och hittat likheter med moderna leddjurs hjärnor. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
7h
Engineering receptors in the secretory pathway for orthogonal signalling control
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35161-0 Artificial receptors targeted to the secretory pathway often fail to exhibit the expected activity due to post-translational modifications and/or improper folding. Here, the authors engineer diverse synthetic receptors that reside in the cytoplasm, inside the endoplasmic reticulum, or on the plasma membrane
7h
Women achieving greater professional recognition in scientific fields, study finds
Using the Econometric Society and other international societies as the basis for their research, the group of researchers comprising Nagore Iriberri, David Card, Stefano DellaVigna and Patricia Funk explored the gender impact when recognizing excellence in contributions by their colleagues and peers. In other words, their study constituted a recognition process in which scientists in a field of kn
8h
Variable star GD 99 investigated by researchers
Using the 1-m Ritchey–Chrétien–Coudé telescope of the Konkoly Observatory in Budapest, Hungary and NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), Hungarian astronomers have observed a variable star known as GD 99. Results of the study, published November 21 on the arXiv pre-print server, shed more light on the properties of this variable.
8h
Mechanism discovered that helps viruses like monkeypox to block and evade our cellular defense system
A defense mechanism that human cells possess against viruses such as monkeypox, herpes simplex and human papillomavirus—all double-stranded DNA viruses—relies on proteins that patrol the cell, acting as sensors of the virus's DNA. This type of cellular defense was discovered only a decade ago and is still little studied. When the sensor proteins detect viral DNA they bind to it and the alarm is ra
8h
Tesla Releases Full Self-Driving Beta to Everyone in North America
Tesla has been promising its Full Self-Driving feature would be available "soon" for the last several years, and today might finally be the day. Tesla CEO Elon Musk has tweeted that the Full Self-Driving Beta is now live for anyone in North America who wants it — minus the most important feature. Of course, you need to have paid for Full Self-Driving in order to access it. Otherwise, you'll be st
8h
Study finds pay practices, job barriers to blame for women making less than men
Despite advances in gender equality, women still earn less than men in all advanced, industrialized societies. Who—or what—is to blame? A new 15-country study led by Andrew Penner at the University of California, Irvine, divides fault evenly between inequitable within-job salary structures and the decisions that route men and women into differently compensated roles.
8h
Book: Views on immigration haven't been so polarized
Has immigration to the United States ever been more contentious? A new book explores the history. Immigration: An American History (Yale University Press, 2022) is a sweeping new account that recounts the experiences of—and reactions to—those arriving from every corner of the globe, beginning with the "founding immigrants" of the colonial period. Coauthors Hasia Diner , professor of American Jewi
8h
Researchers develop highly CO-tolerant fuel cell anode catalyst
In a study published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition., a research team, led by Prof. Gao Minrui and Prof. Yang Qing from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), developed a new catalyst with excellent CO-tolerance and a low cost, realizing the improved performance of fuel cells.
8h
Mechanism discovered that helps viruses like monkeypox to block and evade our cellular defense system
A defense mechanism that human cells possess against viruses such as monkeypox, herpes simplex and human papillomavirus—all double-stranded DNA viruses—relies on proteins that patrol the cell, acting as sensors of the virus's DNA. This type of cellular defense was discovered only a decade ago and is still little studied. When the sensor proteins detect viral DNA they bind to it and the alarm is ra
8h
Microscopic chains that mimic DNA
Circular polycatenanes are chains that can move and change shape: they twist, stretch and wrap around themselves. Three physicists of the European Eutopia Cost network, coordinated by UniTrento, have dedicated themselves to the study of these structures.
8h
Researchers realize long-lived storage of multimode quantum states
Recently, a team led by Prof. Guo Guangcan achieved long-lived storage of high-dimensional orbital angular momentum (OAM) quantum states of photons based on cold atomic ensembles, using a guiding magnetic field combined with clock state preparation. Their work was published in Physical Review Letters.
8h
The Download: the West's AI myth, and Musk v Apple
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. The AI myth Western lawmakers get wrong While the US and the EU may differ on how to regulate tech, their lawmakers seem to agree on one thing: the West needs to ban AI-powered social scoring. As they understand it, social scoring is a practice in which author
8h
What Kind of Man Was Anthony Bourdain?
"T ravel isn't always pretty," Anthony Bourdain once said, wrapping up an episode of one of his shows in his distinct staccato voice-over. "It isn't always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts; it even breaks your heart. But that's okay. The journey changes you." Over his 15 or so years on television, Bourdain took Americans to places they were unlikely to go and introduced them to people they were un
8h
Tracking the Mountain Lion That Ate a Chihuahua
America's most famous mountain lion lives—as so many celebrities do—in the hills above Los Angeles. For more than a decade, P-22 ( P for puma, 22 because he's the 22nd tagged in a local study) has prowled the mountains bordering the city, occasionally dipping into more populated areas. Like any bona fide star, his movements are meticulously monitored, by both the park and the public . He wears a
8h
The Supreme Court Case That's All About Donald Trump
In just a few days, on December 7, the Supreme Court will consider a case that could have dire implications for American democracy, Moore v. Harper . Moore concerns the "independent state legislature" theory: the idea that the Constitution grants state legislatures some level of special authority in administering federal elections that may not be constrained by state courts or perhaps even state
8h
Researchers discover two new minerals on meteorite grounded in Somalia
'Phenomenal' finds are named elaliite and elkinstantonite, and Canadian scientists are analysing third mineral A team of researchers in Canada say they have discovered two new minerals – and potentially a third – after analysing a slice of a 15-tonne meteorite that landed in east Africa. The meteorite, the ninth largest recorded at over 2 metres wide, was unearthed in Somalia in 2020, although lo
8h
Hubble Telescope Captures a Surreal Galaxy Merger Resulting in a 'Colossal Ring'
The galaxy merger Arp-Madore 417-391 steals the spotlight in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The Arp-Madore catalogue is a collection of particularly peculiar galaxies spread throughout the southern sky, and includes a collection of subtly interacting galaxies as well as more spectacular colliding galaxies. Arp-Madore 417-391, which lies around 670 million light-years away in
9h
The Black Investors Who Were Burned by Bitcoin
Two years ago, a Maryland-based information-technology specialist—who asked to remain anonymous for reasons that will become apparent in a minute—started researching bitcoin in earnest. He'd seen the ubiquitous advertisements for it, he told me. He had a background in computer science and was interested in cryptography. He saw the promise of the blockchain, bitcoin's distributed-transactions ledg
10h
Slätare vägar ökar risken för trafikolyckor
Flera allvarliga olyckor har inträffat efter att bilar kört av svenska vägar. Det här kan bero på att nya dubbdäck, fler friktionsdäck och ökad trafik har gjort vägarna slätare – med sämre fäste som följd. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
IL6 supports long-term expansion of hepatocytes in vitro
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35167-8 Hepatocytes are very difficult to expand in vitro. Here the authors discover that IL6 promotes long-term expansion (>30 passages) of primary mouse hepatocytes in vitro by converting the cells into hepatic progenitor cells, which maintain full capacity of differentiation into hepatocytes.
10h
De är fattiga i Sverige trots att de jobbar
De som arbetar och trots det lever i fattigdom har länge varit ensamstående kvinnor. Men numera är det utrikesfödda män som dominerar, enligt en studie från Göteborgs universitet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
11h
China sends students home amid calls for crackdown on protests
Authorities flood streets with police as top security body urges action against 'hostile forces' China has sent university students home and flooded streets with police in an attempt to disperse the most widespread anti-government protests in decades, as the country's top security body called for a crackdown on "hostile forces". In an apparent effort to tackle anger at the zero-Covid policies tha
11h
The AI myth Western lawmakers get wrong
This story originally appeared in The Algorithm, our weekly newsletter on AI. To get stories like this in your inbox first, sign up here . While the US and the EU may differ on how to regulate tech, their lawmakers seem to agree on one thing: the West needs to ban AI-powered social scoring. As they understand it, social scoring is a practice in which authoritarian governments—specifically China—r
11h
High-throughput transcriptomics
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-23985-1 has revolutionised the field of transcriptome research by offering a cost-effective and powerful screening tool. Standard bulk RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) enables characterisation of the average expression profiles for individual samples and facilitates identification of the molecular functions associated with ge
11h
China's zero-Covid policy explained in 30 seconds
Rampant and sudden lockdowns have sparked anger as pressure piles on officials to curb outbreaks China's Covid lockdown protests: complete guide in videos, maps and charts Since the Covid pandemic began, China's government has operated a zero-tolerance policy on outbreaks . The resource-intensive system of targeted lockdowns, mass testing and quarantine successfully kept the virus at bay and the
11h
Asymptotically fault-tolerant programmable photonics
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34308-3 Fabrication errors limit the scaling of programmable photonic circuits. Here the authors show how a broad class of circuits can be made asymptotically fault-tolerant, where the effect of errors remains controlled regardless of the circuit's size.
12h
Human visual consciousness involves large scale cortical and subcortical networks independent of task report and eye movement activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35117-4 Isolating the neural mechanisms of consciousness is complicated by task report and other irrelevant signals. Here, the authors removed report and eye movement confounds to uncover large scale cortical-subcortical networks specific for human visual consciousness.
12h
HSP90-CDC37-PP5 forms a structural platform for kinase dephosphorylation
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35143-2 Binding to HSP90-CDC37 is essential for the activity of many protein kinases, but its function is unclear. Here, the authors show that HSP90-CDC37 provides a structural platform for the phosphatase PP5 to dephosphorylate a bound kinase, 'factory resetting' it prior to release.
12h
Shedding light on the base-pair opening dynamics of nucleic acids in living human cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34822-4 Base-pair opening is important for nucleic acids to exert biological functions, but studying its dynamics inside living cells is challenging. Here, the authors determine the base-pair opening kinetics of hairpin and G-quadruplex structures inside living human cells by the in-cell NMR technique, and demonstra
12h
Quadruple gene-engineered natural killer cells enable multi-antigen targeting for durable antitumor activity against multiple myeloma
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35127-2 The use of chimeric antigen receptor modified immune cell therapeutics has improved the treatment of a range of tumours. Here the authors explore a dual-target iPSC-derived NK cell product as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of multiple myeloma.
12h
This Giving Tuesday, please consider supporting Retraction Watch
Dear Retraction Watch reader: Sometime this week or early next week, we will publish our 6,000th post. That means we've averaged nearly 500 per year since we launched a bit more than 12 years ago. Wow. And yet that's not nearly all we do here at Retraction Watch. We — and by that I mean … Continue reading
12h
Explainable AI-based physical theory for advanced materials design
Microscopic materials analysis is essential to achieve desirable performance in next-generation nanoelectronic devices, such as low power consumption and high speeds. However, the magnetic materials involved in such devices often exhibit incredibly complex interactions between nanostructures and magnetic domains. This, in turn, makes functional design challenging.
12h
World's largest volcano erupts in Hawaii
The world's largest active volcano burst into life for the first time in 40 years, spewing lava and hot ash Monday in a spectacular display of nature's fury by Mauna Loa in Hawaii.
12h
Long-standing genomic mystery about the origins of introns explained in new study
One of the most long-standing, fundamental mysteries of biology surrounds the poorly understood origins of introns. Introns are segments of noncoding DNA that must be removed from the genetic code before it is translated in the process of making proteins. Introns are an ancient feature found across all eukaryotic life, a wide range of organisms that spans all animals, plants, fungi, and protists,
12h
Ultrastrong MXene films via the synergy of intercalating small flakes and interfacial bridging
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35226-0 Potential application of Titanium carbide MXene in wearable devices is limited by the formation of voids during assembly. Here, the authors demonstrate a synergistic densification strategy by intercalating small flakes and interfacial bridging to obtain high-performance MXene films.
13h
Typ av mutation styr hörselnedsättning vid mitokondriell sjukdom
När ett barn visar sig ha nedsatt hörsel – tänk då på att orsaken kan vara mitokondriell sjukdom. Det rådet ger Lundaforskare som tillsammans med amerikanska kollegor undersökt ett ovanligt stort antal personer med mitokondriell sjukdom. De har sett att det är avgörande var i DNA mutationen finns för när hörselnedsättningen debuterar.
13h
Tablet-based vaccine prevents urinary tract infections in mice
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a tablet-based vaccine for urinary tract infections (UTIs) that rapidly dissolves when placed under the tongue. The new treatment could offer an easy and practical alternative to high-dose, oral antibiotics which are the current standard for UTI treatments.
13h
Death and the salesman: the 22-year-old selling human bones for a living
Jon Ferry sells old bones used in the teaching of medicine. But the medical bone trade has a murky history of exploitation In a small, light-filled Bushwick studio space, a brown box rests on a wooden coffee table. Inside is a human head. "Wanna start?" asks Jon Pichaya Ferry, pulling a box cutter out of the pocket of his black skinny jeans. Inside is a lumpy form wrapped in thin aqua foam, which
14h
GOLO for Weight Loss
There are lots of testimonials from people who say they lost weight with GOLO, but its effectiveness is not supported by any scientific evidence. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
14h
Can This Man Stop Lying?
Christopher Massimine, whose compulsive lying derailed a promising career in theater, maintains that it's a mental illness that has dogged him since childhood.
14h
Plant-based diet can cut bowel cancer risk in men by 22%, says study
Researchers find no such link for women, suggesting connection between diet and bowel cancer is clearer for men Eating a plant-based diet rich in vegetables, whole grains, nuts and legumes can reduce the risk of bowel cancer in men by more than a fifth, according to research. A large study that involved 79,952 US-based men found that those who ate the largest amounts of healthy plant-based foods
16h
Lamellar carbon nitride membrane for enhanced ion sieving and water desalination
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35120-9 Traditional carbon nitride membranes are generally presented with random stacking behavior leading to undesired separation performance. Here, authors create lamellar membranes via polycation pillaring to afford adaptive subnanochannels, overcoming the selectivity-permeability trade-off in forward osmosis.
16h
What are leap seconds, and why have we scrapped them? – podcast
At a recent conference in France, scientists and government representatives voted to scrap the leap second by 2035. Leap seconds are added periodically to synchronise atomic time and astronomical time, which get out of sync because of variations in the Earth's rotation. Madeleine Finlay speaks to JT Janssen, the chief scientist at NPL, the National Physical Laboratory, about the differences betwe
17h
What are leap seconds, and why have we scrapped them?
At a recent conference in France, scientists and government representatives voted to scrap the leap second by 2035. Leap seconds are added periodically to synchronise atomic time and astronomical time, which get out of sync because of variations in the Earth's rotation. Madeleine Finlay speaks to JT Janssen, the chief scientist at NPL, the National Physical Laboratory, about the differences betwee
17h
Zero-Covid policy: why is China still having severe lockdowns?
Strict measures that continue almost three years into pandemic are prompting widespread protests. Here are the factors China's strategy of controlling Covid-19 with lockdowns, mass testing and quarantines has provoked the greatest show of public dissent against the ruling Communist party in decades. Initially, China succeeded in suppressing the virus, but then more transmissible variants emerged,
18h
The Authoritarian Right Is Regrouping
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Events of the past few weeks in Russia, Brazil, and America show the global right in disarray. But these are not signs of defeat, as liberals might hope; they are the disorderly attempt by antidemocra
21h
Adventurous bird personalities can help population cope with climate change
The areas in the Wadden Sea where red knots, plump migratory birds, spend the winter are under pressure. The Wadden Sea is changing due to human influences such as mining for gas, tourism and due to sea level rise. Ecologists have studied how 'personalities' of individual red knots differ and affect the way they search for food. Individuals that are fast explorers and take the risk to forage in di
21h
Green means GO! Ultra-violet means STOP!
A research group has revealed a new system that allows them to control the behavior of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, using two different animal opsins, a type of light-sensitive protein. The first opsin was expressed in the worms' sensory cells responsible for triggering avoidance behavior, making the worms move. This opsin was found to be approximately 7,000 times more sensitive to wh
21h
Ancient superpredator got big by front-loading its growth in its youth
Whatcheeria, a six-foot-long salamander-like creature that lived 340 million years ago, was the T. rex of its time: the biggest, baddest predator in its habitat. A new study reveals how they grew to their 'giant' size: instead of growing slow and steady throughout their lives like many modern reptiles and amphibians, they did most of their growing when they were young.
21h
Cannabis oil failed to improve pain or quality of life in palliative care cancer patients, study shows
Researchers say despite the lack of symptom relief, more trials are needed to focus on the targeted use of medicinal cannabis Get our morning and afternoon news emails , free app or daily news podcast The first high quality study looking at the impact of cannabidiol oil on palliative care patients with advanced cancer found it did not improve their pain, depression, anxiety, or quality of life. P
22h

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