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News2022November30

It Was Sedition
It's fitting that Merriam-Webster's word of the year is gaslighting . Since a violent mob assaulted the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021, apologists have tried to argue that the thing everyone saw with their own eyes, captured in videos and photographs, simply wasn't what it appeared to be. If it was so violent, they say, why wasn't anyone armed? But, of course, the images show rioters using flagp
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Physicists observe wormhole dynamics using a quantum computer
Scientists have, for the first time, developed a quantum experiment that allows them to study the dynamics, or behavior, of a special kind of theoretical wormhole. The experiment has not created an actual wormhole (a rupture in space and time), rather it allows researchers to probe connections between theoretical wormholes and quantum physics, a prediction of so-called quantum gravity. Quantum gra
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Traversable wormhole dynamics on a quantum processor
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05424-3 A sparsified SYK model is constructed using learning techniques and the corresponding traversable wormhole dynamics are observed, representing a step towards a program for studying quantum gravity in the laboratory.
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LATEST

Student Journalists Expose Claims of Scientific Misconduct Against Stanford's President
Stanford University is circling the wagons around its president after student journalists uncovered serious allegations of scientific misconduct in academic papers he'd published. As the young journalists reported in The Stanford Daily , university president Marc Tessier-Levigne is currently under investigation by the school's board of directors over the alleged manipulation of slides in neurobio
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NASA Shows Off Artemis "Party Mode," Powered by Amazon (TM) Alexa (TM)
Party Mode In space, nobody can hear your blatant product placement. Lockheed Martin, which built the Orion capsule currently making a tour around the Moon as part of NASA's debut Artemis mission, showed off an Amazon Alexa-enabled "party mode" on the spacecraft in a video that failed to go viral . The video shows an Earth-based scientist say "Alexa, party mode" through a small speaker on board t
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Ode to the French Baguette
I remember you, baguette. I made thousands of you. That's one of the nice things about being a baker (which I was, for a few glorious years): You're as ancient as Egypt, but you're also Andy Warhol in an apron, mass-producing your art object. Baguettes in glowing dozens, repeating editions and series of baguettes, out of the great oven and onto the metal rack. How do they look? How do they sound?
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How Should We Deal With High-Profile Anti-Semites?
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week What is the best response to anti-Semitism in America? Send your responses to conor@theatlantic.com or simply rep
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Everyone's Over Instagram
Earlier this fall, while riding the subway, I overheard two friends doing some reconnaissance ahead of a party. They were young and cool—intimidatingly so, dressed in the requisite New York all black, with a dash of Y2K revival—and trying to figure out how to find a mutual acquaintance online. "Does she have Instagram?" one asked, before adding with a laugh: "Does anybody?" "I don't even have it
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Fear of professional backlash may keep women from speaking up at academic conferences
Academic conferences provide invaluable opportunities for researchers to present their work and receive feedback from attendees during question-and-answer sessions. Women are less likely to ask questions during these sessions, however, and research in Psychological Science suggests that this may be due to anxiety about how colleagues will receive their comments.
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How big should a lesson be?
Big question, I know. And the answer is (I'm guessing) dependent on student population, topic, prior experience, etc. But ballpark – how much new information should you present to a student before they practice it? submitted by /u/BeerIsTheMindKiller [link] [comments]
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FTX's Worst Sin: It Owes an Immense Bill to Jimmy Buffett's Margaritaville
Cheeseburgers in Hell There is, as it turns out, a tenth circle of hell, and disgraced ex-FTX CEO Sam Bankman-Fried is in it. Insider reports that , according to new court documents filed in the ongoing FTX bankruptcy coinpocalypse, the SBF-tied hedge fund Alameda Research has one particularly egregious debt: it owes approximately $55,319 to Jimmy Buffett's Margaritaville, the Bahamian resort sty
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Researchers demonstrate light-induced locomotion in a nonliquid environment and report a new type of liquid-like motion
Motion is everywhere in living systems and is necessary for mechanical functions in artificial systems, such as robots and machines. Functional mechanical structures that can change volume and shape in response to external stimuli (such as light, heat, electricity, humidity, and chemistry) have a wide range of application prospects in the field of biomechanics and bionic robots. They have attracte
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Concussion and head trauma in contact sports to be examined by parliamentary inquiry, Greens say
Lidia Thorpe says Labor and Coalition back hearings while 'sports organisations need to be transparent about evidence that informs concussion policies' Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our morning and afternoon news emails , free app or daily news podcast A federal parliamentary committee will examine concussion and repeated head trauma in contact sports, with the Gr
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Researchers build powerful model for discovering new drugs
Researchers have developed a new computer framework that holds promise in the work to discover new drugs. Their framework uses an artificial intelligence method called a convolutional neural network to provide global information about potential novel drug candidates.
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Steep fall in implementation of physical activity policy in Ontario schools
Children have become less physically active in school, despite teachers recognizing the importance of daily movement. Now, a new study published in BMC Public Health reveals the implementation of Ontario's Daily Physical Activity (DPA) policy is in sharp decline. The reasons, according to the study, include time constraints and low confidence among teachers about their ability to implement the pol
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Individuals' cognitive transformations key to understanding desistance from crime, argues expert
Much of U.S. criminal justice policy focuses on recidivism, and probation and parole violators make up a considerable share of jail and prison populations. In a new article, a 2022 winner of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology argues that to understand desistance—the process of reducing or ending criminal behavior—we must consider the role of individuals' cognitive transformations.
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Physicists produce symmetry-protected Majorana edge modes on quantum computer
Physicists at Google Quantum AI have used their quantum computer to study a type of effective particle that is more resilient to environmental disturbances that can degrade quantum calculations. These effective particles, known as Majorana edge modes, form as a result of a collective excitation of multiple individual particles, like ocean waves form from the collective motions of water molecules.
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Stable optical lateral forces from inhomogeneities of the spin angular momentum | Science Advances
Abstract Transverse spin momentum related to the spin angular momentum (SAM) of light has been theoretically studied recently and predicted to generate an intriguing optical lateral force (OLF). Despite extensive studies, there is no direct experimental evidence of a stable OLF resulting from the dominant SAM rather than the ubiquitous spin-orbit interaction in a single light beam. Here, we theor
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spKAS-seq reveals R-loop dynamics using low-input materials by detecting single-stranded DNA with strand specificity | Science Advances
Abstract R-loops affect transcription and genome stability. Dysregulation of R-loops is related to human diseases. Genome-wide R-loop mapping typically uses the S9.6 antibody or inactive ribonuclease H, both requiring a large number of cells with varying results observed depending on the approach applied. Here, we present strand-specific kethoxal-assisted single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) sequencing (s
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The long noncoding RNA FEDORA is a cell type– and sex-specific regulator of depression | Science Advances
Abstract Women suffer from depression at twice the rate of men, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we identify marked baseline sex differences in the expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a class of regulatory transcripts, in human postmortem brain tissue that are profoundly lost in depression. One such human lncRNA, RP11-298D21.1 (which we termed FEDORA),
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Zika virus noncoding RNA cooperates with the viral protein NS5 to inhibit STAT1 phosphorylation and facilitate viral pathogenesis | Science Advances
Abstract All flaviviruses, including Zika virus, produce noncoding subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), which plays an important role in viral pathogenesis. However, the exact mechanism of how sfRNA enables viral evasion of antiviral response is not well defined. Here, we show that sfRNA is required for transplacental virus dissemination in pregnant mice and subsequent fetal brain infection. We als
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Tunable guided resonance in twisted bilayer photonic crystal | Science Advances
Abstract We experimentally demonstrate tunable guided resonance in twisted bilayer photonic crystals. Both the numerically and the experimentally obtained transmission spectra feature resonances with frequencies strongly dependent on the twist angle, as well as resonances with frequencies that are largely independent of the twist angle. These resonant features can be well understood with a simple
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GATA3 mediates nonclassical β-catenin signaling in skeletal cell fate determination and ectopic chondrogenesis | Science Advances
Abstract Skeletal precursors are mesenchymal in origin and can give rise to distinct sublineages. Their lineage commitment is modulated by various signaling pathways. The importance of Wnt signaling in skeletal lineage commitment has been implicated by the study of β-catenin–deficient mouse models. Ectopic chondrogenesis caused by the loss of β-catenin leads to a long-standing belief in canonical
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Glucose-responsive microneedle patch for closed-loop dual-hormone delivery in mice and pigs | Science Advances
Abstract Insulin and glucagon secreted from the pancreas with dynamic balance play a vital role in regulating blood glucose levels. Although distinct glucose-responsive insulin delivery systems have been developed, the lack of a self-regulated glucagon release module limits their clinical applications due to the potential risk of hypoglycemia. Here, we describe a transdermal polymeric microneedle
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Enhanced quantum sensing with room-temperature solid-state masers | Science Advances
Abstract Quantum sensing with solid-state electron spin systems finds broad applications in diverse areas ranging from material and biomedical sciences to fundamental physics. Exploiting collective behavior of noninteracting spins holds the promise of pushing the detection limit to even lower levels, while to date, those levels are scarcely reached because of the broadened linewidth and inefficie
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Structure and host specificity of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteriophage Andhra | Science Advances
Abstract Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic pathogen of the human skin, often associated with infections of implanted medical devices. Staphylococcal picoviruses are a group of strictly lytic, short-tailed bacteriophages with compact genomes that are attractive candidates for therapeutic use. Here, we report the structure of the complete virion of S. epidermidis –infecting phage Andhr
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Pixels2Pose: Super-resolution time-of-flight imaging for 3D pose estimation | Science Advances
Abstract Single-photon–sensitive depth sensors are being increasingly used in next-generation electronics for human pose and gesture recognition. However, cost-effective sensors typically have a low spatial resolution, restricting their use to basic motion identification and simple object detection. Here, we perform a temporal to spatial mapping that drastically increases the resolution of a simp
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The SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binds and modulates estrogen receptors | Science Advances
Abstract The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike (S) protein binds angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 as its primary infection mechanism. Interactions between S and endogenous proteins occur after infection but are not well understood. We profiled binding of S against >9000 human proteins and found an interaction between S and human estrogen receptor α (ERα). Using bio
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Decreasing Wapl dosage partially corrects embryonic growth and brain transcriptome phenotypes in Nipbl+/− embryos | Science Advances
Abstract Cohesin rings interact with DNA and modulate the expression of thousands of genes. NIPBL loads cohesin onto chromosomes, and WAPL takes it off. Haploinsufficiency for NIPBL causes a developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), that is modeled by Nipbl +/− mice. Mutations in WAPL have not been shown to cause disease or gene expression changes in mammals. Here, we show dysreg
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Molecular architecture of the Chikungunya virus replication complex | Science Advances
Abstract To better understand how positive-strand (+) RNA viruses assemble membrane-associated replication complexes (RCs) to synthesize, process, and transport viral RNA in virus-infected cells, we determined both the high-resolution structure of the core RNA replicase of chikungunya virus and the native RC architecture in its cellular context at subnanometer resolution, using in vitro reconstit
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Gas-liquid two-phase flow-based triboelectric nanogenerator with ultrahigh output power | Science Advances
Abstract Solid-liquid triboelectric nanogenerators (SL-TENGs) have shown promising prospects in energy harvesting and application from water resources. However, the low contact separation speed, small contact area, and long contacting time during solid-liquid electrification severely limit their output properties and further applications. Here, by leveraging the rheological properties of gas-liqu
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Concentrated poverty, ambient air pollution, and child cognitive development | Science Advances
Abstract Why does growing up in a poor neighborhood impede cognitive development? Although a large volume of evidence indicates that neighborhood poverty negatively affects child outcomes, little is known about the mechanisms that might explain these effects. In this study, we outline and test a theoretical model of neighborhood effects on cognitive development that highlights the mediating role
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Stimulation of RAS-dependent ROS signaling extends longevity by modulating a developmental program of global gene expression | Science Advances
Abstract We show that elevation of mitochondrial superoxide generation increases Caenorhabditis elegans life span by enhancing a RAS-dependent ROS (reactive oxygen species) signaling pathway (RDRS) that controls the expression of half of the genome as well as animal composition and physiology. RDRS stimulation mimics a program of change in gene expression that is normally observed at the end of p
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Phosphofructokinase P fine-tunes T regulatory cell metabolism, function, and stability in systemic autoimmunity | Science Advances
Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defective regulatory T (T reg ) cells. Here, we demonstrate that a T cell–specific deletion of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CaMK4) improves disease in B6. lpr lupus-prone mice and expands T reg cells. Mechanistically, CaMK4 phosphorylates the glycolysis rate-limiting enzyme 6-phosphofructokinas
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DNA repair during nonreductional meiosis in the asexual rotifer Adineta vaga | Science Advances
Abstract Rotifers of the class Bdelloidea are microscopic animals notorious for their long-term persistence in the apparent absence of sexual reproduction and meiotic recombination. This evolutionary paradox is often counterbalanced by invoking their ability to repair environmentally induced genome breakage. By studying the dynamics of DNA damage response in the bdelloid species Adineta vaga , we
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Tin from Uluburun shipwreck shows small-scale commodity exchange fueled continental tin supply across Late Bronze Age Eurasia | Science Advances
Abstract This paper provides the first comprehensive sourcing analysis of the tin ingots carried by the well-known Late Bronze Age shipwreck found off the Turkish coast at Uluburun (ca. 1320 BCE). Using lead isotope, trace element, and tin isotope analyses, this study demonstrates that ores from Central Asia (Uzbekistan and Tajikistan) were used to produce one-third of the Uluburun tin ingots. Th
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DeepVelo: Single-cell transcriptomic deep velocity field learning with neural ordinary differential equations | Science Advances
Abstract Recent advances in single-cell sequencing technologies have provided unprecedented opportunities to measure the gene expression profile and RNA velocity of individual cells. However, modeling transcriptional dynamics is computationally challenging because of the high-dimensional, sparse nature of the single-cell gene expression measurements and the nonlinear regulatory relationships. Her
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Reconstitution of a minimal motility system based on Spiroplasma swimming by two bacterial actins in a synthetic minimal bacterium | Science Advances
Abstract Motility is one of the most important features of life, but its evolutionary origin remains unknown. In this study, we focused on Spiroplasma , commensal, or parasitic bacteria. They swim by switching the helicity of a ribbon-like cytoskeleton that comprises six proteins, each of which evolved from a nucleosidase and bacterial actin called MreB. We expressed these proteins in a synthetic
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WiChR, a highly potassium selective channelrhodopsin for low-light one- and two-photon inhibition of excitable cells | Science Advances
Abstract The electric excitability of muscle, heart and brain tissue relies on the precise interplay of Na + – and K + -selective ion channels. The involved ion fluxes are controlled in optogenetic studies using light-gated channelrhodopsins (ChRs). While non-selective cation-conducting ChRs are well-established for excitation, K + -selective ChRs (KCRs) for efficient inhibition have only recentl
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Ant pupae 'milk' keeps entire colony healthy
Ant pupae secrete a never-before observed fluid that adults and larvae immediately drink to keep the entire colony healthy, a new study finds. Life in an ant colony is a symphony of subtle interactions between insects acting in concert, more like cells in tissue than independent organisms bunking in a colony. The previously unknown social interaction unites the colony links ants across developmen
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Retinal cells may have the potential to protect themselves from diabetic retinopathy
About one third of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) develop diabetic retinopathy (DR), a leading cause of blindness in working-age individuals. DR typically develops after many years of DM, and some patients do not develop DR for more than 50 years. New research suggests that an endogenous system that protects human retinal endothelial cells from harmful effects of the hyperglycemia (an excess
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Machine-learning model instantly predicts polymer properties
Hundreds of millions of tons of polymer materials are produced globally for use in a vast and ever-growing application space with new material demands such as green chemistry polymers, consumer packaging, adhesives, automotive components, fabrics and solar cells.
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Raw Liver Eating Bodybuilder Accused of Injecting Himself With $11,000 Worth of Steroids Every Month
Brian "Liver King" Johnson, a caveman-esque bodybuilder who credits his extremely muscular physique to eating raw animal liver, has been accused by a different bodybuilder influencer of making heavy use of steroids to achieve his extremely muscular physique, Rolling Stone reports . It's a debate that has been going on for decades. Most recently, "natty or not" content has become an entire online
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Courtroom Erupts in Cheers After Bitcoin Plant Rejected From Opening in Community
Not in My Backyard A courtroom in Washington County, Tennessee, erupted in applause after county commissioners rejected a proposal to build a Bitcoin mining plant in the area. Bitcoin miner Red Dog Technologies was already operating a 25-megawatt Bitcoin mine in Limestone, Tennessee since late 2020, but the county has been trying to get it to shut down due to zoning violations, News Channel 11 re
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New method of spinal cord tissue repair
Unique new material has shown significant promise in the treatment of spinal cord injury. The new hybrid biomaterials, in the form of nanoparticles and building on existing practice in the tissue engineering field, were successfully synthesized to promote repair and regeneration following spinal cord injury, according to the researchers.
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New method of spinal cord tissue repair
Unique new material has shown significant promise in the treatment of spinal cord injury. The new hybrid biomaterials, in the form of nanoparticles and building on existing practice in the tissue engineering field, were successfully synthesized to promote repair and regeneration following spinal cord injury, according to the researchers.
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Hunting brain cancer cells
Understanding how cancer cells evolve from healthy brain cells and evade treatment could open up potential new drug therapies for glioblastomas, one of the most common and lethal brain cancers, new research has revealed. By bringing together neuroscience and oncology, the team is hopeful of finding a new method to treat the deadly disease.
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Cooling down solar cells, naturally
Too much sun and too much heat can reduce the efficiency of photovoltaics. A solar farm with optimally spaced panels facing the correct direction could cool itself through convection using the surrounding wind. Researchers explored how to exploit the geometry of solar farms to enhance natural cooling mechanisms.
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For memory formation, organization matters
Researchers have found that cells in the rat hippocampus — a brain region that is essential for making memories — are specifically organized into small clusters when fear-based memories are formed. Furthermore, when rats slept after a learning period, they had improved memory and stabilized cluster formation in the hippocampus. A better understanding of memory formation at the cellular level may
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New target in the fight against heart disease
Soon after cholesterol and fat start depositing on the lining of the blood vessels that supply your heart, the smooth muscle cells that give the blood vessels strength and flexibility start to get bigger and multiply. While scientists studying the phenomenon suspect these vascular smooth muscle cells are trying to help, this atypical behavior for these strong cells instead contributes to coronary
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Apollo 17: The Last Time Humans Walked on the Moon
Next week will mark the 50th anniversary of the launch of NASA's final Apollo mission, which took three astronauts to the moon and back in December 1972. Apollo 17 was the sixth mission to successfully land astronauts on the moon, bringing the total number of humans who have walked on another world to 12. Budget cuts brought the Apollo program to an end, and space-exploration efforts shifted to m
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Cooling down solar cells, naturally
Too much sun and too much heat can reduce the efficiency of photovoltaics. A solar farm with optimally spaced panels facing the correct direction could cool itself through convection using the surrounding wind. Researchers explored how to exploit the geometry of solar farms to enhance natural cooling mechanisms.
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Exploring nanodiamonds that can be activated as photocatalysts with sunlight
Nanodiamond materials have great potential as catalysts. Inexpensive nanoparticles made of carbon provide very large surfaces compared to their volume. However, to catalytically accelerate chemical reactions in an aqueous medium, electrons from the catalyst need to go into solvation and in pure diamond materials this requires high-energy UV light for excitation. On the other hand, the extremely sm
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New monochromator optics for tender X-rays
A climate-neutral energy supply requires a wide variety of materials for energy conversion processes, for example catalytically active materials and new electrodes for batteries. Many of these materials have nanostructures that increase their functionality. When investigating these samples, spectroscopic measurements to detect the chemical properties are ideally combined with X-ray imaging with hi
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'Digital footprints' central to new approach for studying post-disturbance recreation changes
The Columbia River Gorge is a crown jewel for recreation in the Pacific Northwest, stretching more than 80 miles along the borders of Washington and Oregon and providing a wide variety of trails, campgrounds, waterfalls, and wilderness areas for recreational use. In 2017, the western portion of the area was burned by the Eagle Creek Fire, a human-caused, wind-driven blaze that ultimately burned ne
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How giant-faced owls snag voles hidden in snow
Several of great gray owls' physical features, especially parts of their wings and face, help them correct for sonic distortions caused by snow, enabling them to find hidden, moving food with astonishing accuracy, according to a new study.
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Team recycles previously unrecyclable plastic
Researchers have discovered a way to chemically recycle PVC into usable material, finding a way to use the phthalates in the plasticizers — one of PVC's most noxious components — as the mediator for the chemical reaction.
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Leaked Messages Show FTX Insiders Begging SBF to Step Down as Crisis Deepened
In the early days of the FTX collapse, wunderkind founder Sam Bankman-Fried was so stuck in the mud about saving the exchange that people near him were spinning their wheels trying to get him to do the right thing and step down as CEO. As the New York Times reports , a trove of leaked internal messages among FTX's inner sanctum reveal that those around SBF were so frazzled by his reaction to the
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Findings from 2,000-year-old Uluburun shipwreck reveal complex trade network
More than 2,000 years before the Titanic sunk in the North Atlantic Ocean, another famous ship wrecked in the Mediterranean Sea off the eastern shores of Uluburun—in present-day Turkey— carrying tons of rare metal. Since its discovery in 1982, scientists have been studying the contents of the Uluburun shipwreck to gain a better understanding of the people and political organizations that dominated
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Smallest mobile lifeform created
The origin of all biological movements, including walking, swimming, or flying, can be traced back to cellular movements; however, little is known about how cell motility arose in evolution.
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Scientists discover a new mechanism to generate cartilage cells
As any weekend warrior understands, cartilage injuries to joints such as knees, shoulders, and hips can prove extremely painful and debilitating. In addition, conditions that cause cartilage degeneration, like arthritis and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ), affect 350 million people in the world and cost the U.S. public health system more than $303 billion every year. Patients suffering from
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Small asteroids are probably young
The impact experiment conducted on the asteroid Ryugu by the Japanese Hayabusa2 mission which took place two years ago resulted in an unexpectedly large crater. With the use of simulations, a team has recently succeeded in gaining new insights from the experiment regarding the formation and development of asteroids.
3h
Scientists discover a new mechanism to generate cartilage cells
As any weekend warrior understands, cartilage injuries to joints such as knees, shoulders, and hips can prove extremely painful and debilitating. In addition, conditions that cause cartilage degeneration, like arthritis and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ), affect 350 million people in the world and cost the U.S. public health system more than $303 billion every year. Patients suffering from
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Fewer key immune cells may contribute to Alzheimer's
The underproduction of poorly understood immune cells may contribute to Alzheimer's disease and other forms of cognitive decline, according to a new study with mice. The research shows that increasing these cells could reverse the damage. The researchers deactivated the gene that produces mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs) in mice and compared the cognitive function of normal and MAIT c
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Gaining more control over plasma accelerators by combining acceleration methods
If one particle accelerator alone is not enough to achieve the desired result, why not combine two accelerators? An international team led by physicists at the Center for Advanced Laser Applications (CALA) at LMU Munich has implemented this idea. It combined two plasma-based acceleration methods for electrons, namely a laser-driven wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with a particle-beam-driven wakefield
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The technique for detecting meteors could be used to find dark matter particles entering the atmosphere
Researchers from Ohio State University have come up with a novel method to detect dark matter, based on existing meteor-detecting technology. By using ground-based radar to search for ionization trails, similar to those produced by meteors as they streak through the air, they hope to use the Earth's atmosphere as a super-sized particle detector. The results of experiments using this technique woul
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FDA ban on flavored e-cigs didn't stop vapers
An FDA ban on flavored e-cigarettes didn't result in adults quitting e-cigarette use and may have driven some back to smoking regular cigarettes, a new survey shows. On February 6, 2020, the US Food and Drug Administration banned the sale of many flavored e-cigarettes, with some important exceptions. "…the ban doesn't appear to be working." The researchers point to policy loopholes as the main re
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Plant‑based protein, the pandemic and the agrifood supply chain
Each time Dr. Gumataw Abebe visits his local grocery store, he is pleasantly surprised to discover more plant-based protein items on the shelves. Not just for the added choice it offers consumers like him but also because he can see the financial and sustainability opportunities the sector offers for Atlantic Canadian farmers.
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How the Amelia Earhart mystery may inform microplastics research
The aluminum panel is dull, corroded and covered in a patina of scratches from tumbling around the Pacific Ocean, likely for decades, before washing up on the small atoll of Nikumaroro. Parallel rivet lines puncture the panel, similar to the ones that dotted the Lockheed Electra Amelia Earhart flew on her ill-fated round-the-world trip in 1937, but they're not a precise match. It is possible that
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Astronomers directly image a Jupiter-sized planet orbiting a sunlike star
According to the most widely-accepted theory, planetary systems form from large clouds of dust and gas that form disks around young stars. Over time, these disks accrete to create planets of varying size, composition, and distance from their parent star. In the past few decades, observations in the mid- and far-infrared wavelengths have led to the discovery of debris disks around young stars (less
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San Francisco Cops Now Allowed to Use Robots to Kill People
San Francisco police have been granted permission by city supervisors to kill civilians using robots. Yes, that's a real thing that just happened — though it sounds like an episode of "Black Mirror," it's an actual turn of events that highlights the emergence of a deeply worrying new trend in policing. The SFPD is claiming officers could deploy the robots during mass shootings or against suicide
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Ant pupae secrete fluid as 'milk' to nurture young larvae
Life in an ant colony is a symphony of subtle interactions between insects acting in concert, more like cells in tissue than independent organisms bunking in a colony. Now, researchers have discovered a previously unknown social interaction that unites the colony, linking ants across developmental stages — adults, larvae, and pupae, an immobile stage, not unlike a butterfly's chrysalis, during wh
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Heightened activity of specific brain cells following traumatic social experience blocks social reward and promotes sustained social avoidance
Past social trauma is encoded by a population of stress/threat-responsive brain cells that become hyperactivated during subsequent interaction with non-threatening social targets. As a consequence, previously rewarding social targets are now perceived as social threats, which promotes generalized social avoidance and impaired social reward processing that can contribute to psychiatric disorders.
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While everyone waits for GPT-4, OpenAI is still fixing its predecessor
Buzz around GPT-4, the anticipated but as-yet-unannounced follow-up to OpenAI's groundbreaking large language model , GPT-3, is growing by the week. But OpenAI is not yet done tinkering with the previous version. The San Francisco-based company has released a demo of a new model called ChatGPT , a spin-off of GPT-3 that is geared toward answering questions via back-and-forth dialogue. In a blog p
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The socio-ecological benefits of mountain grazing
Mountain grazing, together with quality products, brings socio-ecological benefits to society. This is one of the conclusions of a research project led by the UPV/EHU, and which also proposes a multidisciplinary participatory methodology to manage the conflicts that may arise regarding mountain grazing, and to combine different interests.
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New research unlocks clues about the iconic flight of the wandering albatross
Wandering albatrosses, which are an iconic sight in the Southern Ocean, are highly adapted to long-distance soaring flight. Their wingspan of up to 11 feet is the largest known of any living bird, and yet wandering albatrosses fly while hardly flapping their wings. Instead, they depend on dynamic soaring—which exploits wind shear near the ocean surface to gain energy—in addition to updrafts and tu
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New strategy to modulate reaction pathway of Zn-Fe double oxide Fenton catalyst
A research group led by Prof. Wang Junhu from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has proposed a new strategy to effectively regulate the reaction pathway of a zinc-ferrum double oxide Fenton-like catalyst through visible light irradiation, which can help to modulate the mechanism from radical to non-radical of heterogeneous catalyst in Fenton-l
5h
New research unlocks clues about the iconic flight of the wandering albatross
Wandering albatrosses, which are an iconic sight in the Southern Ocean, are highly adapted to long-distance soaring flight. Their wingspan of up to 11 feet is the largest known of any living bird, and yet wandering albatrosses fly while hardly flapping their wings. Instead, they depend on dynamic soaring—which exploits wind shear near the ocean surface to gain energy—in addition to updrafts and tu
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Here's my guess: Neuralink will unveil a vision implant at today's "show and tell"
Elon Musk's brain-computer interface company Neuralink likes to give progress reports via theatrically staged events that it livestreams. Its next event, scheduled for tonight at 6 pm Pacific time, was announced by the company via a brief video invitation in which the words "please join us for show and tell" appeared as if they were being typed in green letters on a screen. The mysterious message
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Scientists discover secret to waking up alert and refreshed
If you're blaming your genes for morning sluggishness, think again. A new study finds that genetics plays a minor role in morning alertness. Instead, test subjects were most alert after sleeping longer and later than typical for them, exercising the previous day, and eating a low sugar breakfast high in complex carbohydrates, with only moderate amounts of protein. It's also important to pay attent
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1930s Dust Bowl led to extreme heat around Northern Hemisphere
The 1930s Dust Bowl affected heat extremes across much of North America and as far away as Europe and East Asia, according to new research. The study found that the extreme heating of the Great Plains triggered motions of air around the Northern Hemisphere in ways that suppressed cloud formation in some regions and contributed to record heat thousands of miles away.
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Unfortunately, the Sexy Teen-Cannibal Romance Is a Letdown
The recent film The Menu , a restaurant satire with a horror twist, had such a menacing edge to its marketing that I felt compelled to open my review with a disclaimer: This movie is not about cannibalism. Now less than a week later comes the release of Bones and All , a dreamy-looking road film about two beautiful youngsters who travel around America whispering sweet nothings in each other's ear
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White butterflies are filling Johannesburg's skies earlier than usual. Climate change is to blame
Each year around mid-summer, somewhere between December and mid-January, the skies of South Africa's Gauteng province, including the city of Johannesburg, fill with small white butterflies. Some land in people's gardens, allowing a closer look at the thin brown markings on their wings. Those markings give the butterflies their name: the brown-veined white butterfly (Benenois aurota).
5h
Spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen and dissolved organic matter in large, shallow degenerating lake
Abnormal climate, urban expansion, and human activities make the nitrogen-containing nutrients in many productive or functional lakes maintain a high level for a long time. The transport and transformation of nitrogen, a key nutrient element affecting lake eutrophication, in the water column is closely related to the structure and composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM).
5h
Graphene heading to space and to the moon
Graphene Flagship Partners University of Cambridge (U.K.) and Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB, Belgium) paired up with the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center (MBRSC, United Arab Emirates), and the European Space Agency (ESA) to test graphene on the moon. This joint effort sees the involvement of many international partners, such as Airbus Defense and Space, Khalifa University, Massachusetts Insti
5h
The World Cup Is So High Tech That They Have to Charge the Balls
Serious Balls Officiating World Cup games comes with extraordinary pressure, and over the years FIFA has been introducing new technology like video assisted refereeing (VAR) and goal-line observation tech to give referees a helping hand. Now, the next revelation in soccer technology may lie in the balls themselves. The World Cup is not without its iconic balls , but the 2022 World Cup in Qatar ea
5h
SBF Says His Lawyers Can "Go F*ck Themselves"
Four Letters In spite of — or perhaps because of — being raised by lawyers , Sam Bankman-Fried of the collapsed FTX crypto exchange seems to have a very adversarial relationship to those representing him. In a newly-released interview with vlogger Tiffany Fong , recorded on November 16 just after the FTX crash , SBF had some choice words for his attorneys after they tried to give him some sound l
5h
White butterflies are filling Johannesburg's skies earlier than usual. Climate change is to blame
Each year around mid-summer, somewhere between December and mid-January, the skies of South Africa's Gauteng province, including the city of Johannesburg, fill with small white butterflies. Some land in people's gardens, allowing a closer look at the thin brown markings on their wings. Those markings give the butterflies their name: the brown-veined white butterfly (Benenois aurota).
5h
Spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen and dissolved organic matter in large, shallow degenerating lake
Abnormal climate, urban expansion, and human activities make the nitrogen-containing nutrients in many productive or functional lakes maintain a high level for a long time. The transport and transformation of nitrogen, a key nutrient element affecting lake eutrophication, in the water column is closely related to the structure and composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM).
5h
Could AI play a role in the justice system?
The rapid development of artificial intelligence (AI) has led to its deployment in courtrooms overseas. In China, robot judges decide on small claim cases, while in some Malaysian courts, AI has been used to recommend sentences for offenses such as drug possession.
5h
Cocaine synthesized in a tobacco plant
A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, working with a colleague from Syngenta Jealott's Hill International Research Centre in the U.K., has developed a way to synthesize cocaine using a tobacco plant. The group describes how they synthesized the notorious drug and possible uses for their process in their paper published in Journal of the American Chemical Society.
5h
Organic cation transporters: Research into their structure facilitates targeted development of new drugs
Monoamines are neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems and they also transmit signals between cells and the brain. This transmission is followed by their reuptake into the cells by means of transporters. While the specific monoamine transporters have already been well studied, not enough is known about the organic cation transporters, which are high-capacity monoamine trans
5h
Drive male stalk-eyed flies found to avoid fertility reduction by increasing size of testes
A team of researchers at University College London's Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment has found that drive male, stalk-eyed flies do not suffer fertility reduction, despite losing half their sperm, by increasing the size of their testes. The group describes their study of the flies and their reproductive physiology in their paper published in the journal Biology Letters.
5h
Drive male stalk-eyed flies found to avoid fertility reduction by increasing size of testes
A team of researchers at University College London's Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment has found that drive male, stalk-eyed flies do not suffer fertility reduction, despite losing half their sperm, by increasing the size of their testes. The group describes their study of the flies and their reproductive physiology in their paper published in the journal Biology Letters.
5h
Cocaine synthesized in a tobacco plant
A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, working with a colleague from Syngenta Jealott's Hill International Research Centre in the U.K., has developed a way to synthesize cocaine using a tobacco plant. The group describes how they synthesized the notorious drug and possible uses for their process in their paper published in Journal of the American Chemical Society.
5h
Photonics chip allows light amplification
The ability to achieve quantum-limited amplification of optical signals contained in optical fibers is arguably among the most important technological advances that are underlying our modern information society. In optical telecommunications, the choice of 1550 nm wavelength band is motivated not only by loss minima of silica optical fibers (a development recognized with the 2008 Nobel Prize in Ph
5h
Organic cation transporters: Research into their structure facilitates targeted development of new drugs
Monoamines are neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems and they also transmit signals between cells and the brain. This transmission is followed by their reuptake into the cells by means of transporters. While the specific monoamine transporters have already been well studied, not enough is known about the organic cation transporters, which are high-capacity monoamine trans
5h
Social trauma engages lateral septum circuitry to occlude social reward
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05484-5 The authors show that, in a chronic social defeat stress rodent model, a subset of male and female mice avoided social interaction with non-aggressive, same-sex juvenile mice and did not develop context-dependent social reward following these encounters.
6h
A photonic integrated continuous-travelling-wave parametric amplifier
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05329-1 By using Si3N4 photonic integrated circuits on a silicon chip, a continuous-travelling-wave parametric amplifier is shown to yield a parametric gain exceeding both on-chip propagation loss as well as fibre–chip–fibre coupling losses.
6h
Dendrocentric learning for synthetic intelligence
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05340-6 The concept of dendrocentric learning artificial intelligence is proposed to replace synaptocentric learning, reducing the energy use requirement and removing the thermal constraint.
6h
Strong cloud–circulation coupling explains weak trade cumulus feedback
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05364-y Analysis of new observations from the EUREC4A field campaign shows that lower-tropospheric mixing does not desiccate the base of trade cumulus clouds, refuting the mixing-desiccation hypothesis and explaining the weak trade cumulus feedback.
6h
Human fetal cerebellar cell atlas informs medulloblastoma origin and oncogenesis
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05487-2 Integrated single-cell atlases of human fetal cerebella and MBs show potential cell populations predisposed to transformation and regulatory circuitries underlying tumour cell states and oncogenesis, highlighting hitherto unrecognized transitional progenitor intermediates predictive of disease prognosis.
6h
Ras drives malignancy through stem cell crosstalk with the microenvironment
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05475-6 Aberrant crosstalk between cancer stem cells and their microenvironment triggers angiogenesis and TGFβ signalling, creating conditions that are conducive for hijacking leptin and leptin receptor signalling, which in turn launches downstream PI3K–AKT–mTOR signalling during the benign-to-malignant transition.
6h
Deglacial increase of seasonal temperature variability in the tropical ocean
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05350-4 Mass spectrometry imaging of long-chain alkenones in sediments from the Cariaco Basin shows that average temperatures remained stable during the Younger Dryas to Holocene transition but seasonality more than doubled and interannual variability intensified.
6h
Global hotspots of salt marsh change and carbon emissions
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05355-z Analysis of Landsat imagery from the past two decades allows quantification of the changes in salt marsh ecosystems, as well as associated carbon emissions resulting from net global losses.
6h
A membrane-based seawater electrolyser for hydrogen generation
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05379-5 An efficient and scalable direct seawater electrolysis method for hydrogen production that addresses the side-reaction and corrosion problems associated with using seawater instead of pure water is demonstrated.
6h
Common and rare variant associations with clonal haematopoiesis phenotypes
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05448-9 Exome sequence data from 628,388 individuals was used to identify 24 risk loci in 40,208 carriers of clonal haematopoiesis of indeterminate potential and link them to other conditions including COVID-19, cardiovascular disease and cancer.
6h
A fluid role in ant society as adults give larvae 'milk' from pupae
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03722-4 Parental-care behaviours include mammalian lactation to provide milk for offspring. The discovery that adult ants harvest nutritious fluid from pupae and give larvae this fluid reveals social feeding that aids colony success.
6h
Rapid warming linked to leap in tropical ocean seasonality
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03833-y Seasonal variation in tropical sea surface temperatures doubled during an abrupt warming event 11,700 years ago. This shows that seasonal changes must be considered when inferring past climatic events, and predicting those to come.
6h
Swollen axons impair neuronal circuits in Alzheimer's disease
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03800-7 Abnormal protein aggregates are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. It emerges that these plaques cause swellings in neuronal projections called axons that prevent proper circuit function.
6h
Observations refute the idea that warming strongly reduces cloudiness
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03640-5 The response of cumulus clouds in trade-wind regions to warming is a large uncertainty in climate projections. Observations now indicate that the mechanism leading to the strongest cloud reductions in models does not occur in nature, suggesting that extreme sensitivity of Earth's temperatures to climate change is less like
6h
Fossil find suggests ancestral bird beak was mobile
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03692-7 A 67-million-year-old fossil bird found in Europe provides evidence suggesting that scientists should reconsider centuries-old ideas about the nature of the ancestral avian beak.
6h
Speed of learning depends on turning
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03681-w The neurotransmitter dopamine has been shown to serve as a signal for learning in the fly's navigation centre. The rate at which the fly learns depends on turning, so only useful visual information is used to update the fly's mental map.
6h
Charted changes in salt-marsh areas and related carbon emissions
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03637-0 Changes in salt-marsh areas around the world between 2000 and 2019 were quantified using satellite records, and the effects of these changes — collectively representing a slowing net global loss — on carbon emissions were estimated. Storm events were found to be key drivers of salt-marsh loss in the United States.
6h
A practical method for splitting seawater into hydrogen fuel
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03601-y The electrolytic splitting of saline water is a highly desirable and sustainable method for the mass production of green hydrogen, but seawater contains many impurities that hinder the long-term stability of conventional electrolysis systems. A method for enabling the electrolysis of seawater has been developed that addres
6h
A holographic wormhole traversed in a quantum computer
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-03832-z A system of nine quantum bits has been used to simulate a state known as a holographic wormhole, a concept that features in attempts to reconcile quantum mechanics with the general theory of relativity.
6h
Researcher Awareness & Research Integrity in the Human Brain Project
Hosted by Manuel Guerrero, leader of the Ethics Rapporteur Programme at the Human Brain Project, this video introduces the work for researcher awareness and research integrity in the Human Brain Project, followed by a presentation by professor Stefan Eriksson, expert in research ethics and research integrity matters from Uppsala University. About the presenters Manuel Guerrero is a sociologist an
6h
The Fyre Fest Guy Is Off House Arrest and of Course His New Scheme Involves the Metaverse and Crypto
Billy McFarland, the colorful personality behind the dumpster fire that was 2017's Fyre Fest , is officially off house arrest. And boy does he have a new opportunity for the most gullible people out there! McFarland wants you to meet him for something that's apparently not a festival (despite it featuring a "handful of artists, content creators," and "entrepreneurs") and not an event (despite it
6h
Physicists Create a Wormhole Using a Quantum Computer
Physicists have purportedly created the first-ever wormhole, a kind of tunnel theorized in 1935 by Albert Einstein and Nathan Rosen that leads from one place to another by passing into an extra dimension of space. The wormhole emerged like a hologram out of quantum bits of information, or "qubits," stored in tiny superconducting circuits. By manipulating the qubits, the physicists then sent… So
6h
CT scans of toothed bird fossil leads to jaw-dropping discovery
Dating back more than 65m years, specimen's mobile palate challenges understanding of avian evolution Fossil experts have cooked the goose of a key tenet in avian evolution after finding a premodern bird from more than 65m years ago that could move its beak like modern fowl. The toothy animal was discovered in the 1990s by an amateur fossil collector at a quarry in Belgium and dates to about 66.7
6h
Do voluntary corporate pledges help reduce plastic pollution?
A new analysis finds that while 72 percent of the top 300 companies on the Fortune 500 list have made voluntary pledges to reduce their plastic footprints, most are overwhelmingly focused on downstream waste-reduction strategies centered on recycling and packaging rather than on finding ways to reduce their use of virgin plastic, which is a main cause of the global plastic pollution problem.
6h
Bats use death metal 'growls' to make social calls
Bats use distinct structures in the larynx to produce high-frequency echolocation calls and lower-frequency social calls, according to a new study. The structures used to make the low-pitched calls are analogous to those used by death metal vocalists in their growls.
6h
Increasing crop yields by breeding plants to cooperate
A simple breeding experiment, combined with genetic analysis, can rapidly uncover genes that promote cooperation and higher yields of plant populations, according to a new study. The results have the potential to quickly increase crop productivity through conventional breeding methods.
6h
Most distant detection of a black hole swallowing a star
Earlier this year, the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) was alerted after an unusual source of visible light had been detected by a survey telescope. The VLT, together with other telescopes, was swiftly repositioned toward the source: a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy that had devoured a star, expelling the leftovers in a jet. The VLT determined it to be
6h
Clouds may be less climate-sensitive than assumed
In a major field campaign in 2020, Dr. Raphaela Vogel who is now at Universität Hamburg's Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) and an international team from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique in Paris and the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg analyzed observational data they and others collected in fields of cumulus clouds near the Atlantic island of Barb
6h
Anatomy of a superorganism: Ant pupae secrete fluid as 'milk' to nurture young larvae
Life in an ant colony is a symphony of subtle interactions between insects acting in concert, more like cells in tissue than independent organisms bunking in a colony. Now, researchers have discovered a previously unknown social interaction that unites the colony, linking ants across developmental stages: adults, larvae, and pupae (an immobile stage, not unlike a butterfly's chrysalis, during whic
6h
Anatomy of a superorganism: Ant pupae secrete fluid as 'milk' to nurture young larvae
Life in an ant colony is a symphony of subtle interactions between insects acting in concert, more like cells in tissue than independent organisms bunking in a colony. Now, researchers have discovered a previously unknown social interaction that unites the colony, linking ants across developmental stages: adults, larvae, and pupae (an immobile stage, not unlike a butterfly's chrysalis, during whic
6h
Former vaccines chief sounds warning about UK pandemic readiness
Kate Bingham raises concerns to committee of MPs as head of UKHSA suggests Covid could be on rise again UK politics live – latest news updates The UK is not in a significantly better place to deal with a new pandemic, the former vaccine taskforce chief has said, as a leading public health expert suggested Covid infections may be on the rise again. Dame Kate Bingham, the managing partner at the li
6h
Researchers find junction is key in how pore space geometry impacts transport of substances through fluids
What laws govern how chemicals pass through filters? How do droplets of oil move through layers of stone? How do blood cells travel through a living organism? A team of researchers led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) has discovered how pore space geometry impacts transport of substances through fluids.
7h
Tropical wildlife keep similar routines around the world
How do wildlife use their time? A new study shows what motivates the daily ramble of tropical populations. The study finds that communities of mammals across the wet tropics divide their days in similar ways, all generally geared toward finding their next meal. (Or avoiding being the next meal.) Using millions of images from camera trap networks in 16 protected forests around the world, the resea
7h
A Provincial Roman Town
Translated by Clare Cavanagh The town swept clean by archaeologists no longer holds secrets. Since they lived exactly like us. They gazed at the sea each evening, sipped sweet wine lazily, and dreamed the same things we do. They knew that dreams go unfulfilled. They had their gods, quarrelsome, preoccupied, neglectful. But there was also divinity, hidden everywhere, invisible. They tried to catch
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Jake Forced to Return to Town Twice! | Deadliest Catch: The Viking's Return
Stream Deadliest Catch: The Viking Returns on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch-the-viking-returns-us #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follo
7h
A new tool to block protein-protein interactions
Inside cells, proteins constantly interact with each other to carry out different functions. For some diseases in which these functions are altered, blocking the binding between two or more proteins emerges as a possible therapeutic approach.
7h
Impoverished Crypto Bros Desperately Trying to Sell Luxury Cars
Crash and Burn With cryptocurrency values continuing to plummet amid the crash of FTX and BlockFi , it looks like the industry's acolytes are trying to make some fiat cash on the expensive cars they bought in the bull market. As the New York Post reports , folks in the exotic car resale industry are seeing correlations between the great crypto crash(es) of 2022 and the lowering of used luxury car
7h
Q&A: How Islam and Buddhism can help prisoners
As religious diversity grows in Quebec, the province's prisons are having to adapt to inmates' diverse religious needs. Some inmates turn to alternative faiths such as Islam or Buddhism. Why do they do this? What do they get out of it?
7h
This 'Shark Tank' Startup Is Making Vegan Bacon Out of Seaweed
More people are opting to go vegetarian or vegan as factory farming's impact on the planet becomes more apparent. But one carnivorous delight they may not have to give up is bacon, especially if they're willing to be a bit flexible. A Dutch startup has been working on cultured bacon for a few years now, and New York-based MyForest Foods is producing a bacon substitute made from mushroom roots . T
7h
Wealth doesn't ease racial gap in maternal, infant health
Wealthy Black mothers and infants fare worse than the poorest white mothers and infants, research finds. When Serena Williams, the tennis star, first recounted how she struggled to get medical attention after developing complications following childbirth, her experience seemed to some like an aberration. How was it possible that health care providers initially ignored one of the world's top celeb
7h
The Kibble-Zurek mechanism for nonequilibrium phase transitions
The Kibble-Zurek (KZ) mechanism, confirmed experimentally only for equilibrium phase transitions, is also applicable for non-equilibrium phase transitions, as is now shown by Tokyo Tech researchers in a new study. The KZ mechanism is characterized by the formation of topological defects during continuous phase transition away from the adiabatic limit. This breakthrough finding could open the doors
7h
Low-income families in Scotland are facing soaring debt to public bodies
A new report written by Heriot-Watt University for Aberlour Children's Charity reveals that low-income families are facing high levels of debt to public bodies. The report shows that more than half of families (55%) with children in Scotland receiving Universal Credit are having their incomes reduced by the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) to pay off these debts.
7h
Mapping the chemistry of the Earth's mantle
The Earth's mantle makes up about 85% of the Earth's volume and is made of solid rock. But exactly what rock types is the mantle made of, and how are they distributed throughout the mantle? An international team of researchers—including UT researcher Dr. Juan Carlos Afonso (Faculty of ITC)—have been able to reveal the existence of pockets of rocks with abnormal properties that suggest that they we
7h
Hårdt prøvede brystkræftpatienters sidste håb afvist
Medicinrådet sagde på rådsmødet i sidste uge nej til Gileads ADC Trodelvy. Prisen er for høj, vurderer rådet. Klinikere, patientforeninger og Kræftens Bekæmpelse finder afvisningen dybt problematisk, men døren til ibrugtagning står endnu på klem, og Gilead er stålsat på at få deres produkt på det danske marked.
8h
Daily briefing: Mpox — a new name for monkeypox
Nature, Published online: 29 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04233-y 'Mpox' is the new preferred term for the disease caused by the monkeypox virus. Plus, three problems a plastics treaty could solve and deep bass makes people dance — even when they can't hear it.
8h
Daily briefing: Hawaii's Mauna Loa volcano is erupting
Nature, Published online: 28 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04184-4 The world's largest active volcano is erupting for the first time in almost 40 years. Plus, mosquitos' blood meals reveal past infections and how to improve the European Union's ambitious climate plan.
8h
Ex-engineer files age discrimination complaint against SpaceX
Filing is latest action against Elon Musk's rocket venture as Twitter and Tesla are also roiled by lawsuits SpaceX has become the subject of another worker dispute just weeks after unfair labor complaints were filed against the company. A former engineer at SpaceX, the Elon Musk-run rocket company, filed an age discrimination complaint against the firm with the state of Washington, alleging he wa
8h
3D Radiogram of Mars' North Pole Uncovers a 'Hidden Canyon'
Mars is the only known planet aside from Earth that has polar ice caps, but unlike Earth, the ice on Mars is mostly of the "dry" carbon dioxide variety. Naturally, there's great interest in better understanding the Martian polar regions. A new analysis of Mars using data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has revealed previously hidden structures under the northern ice cap — as seen ab
8h
Feeling good about aging enhances older adults' sex lives
Positive perceptions of aging can benefit sexual satisfaction among older adults, a new study shows. "There's really robust and quickly growing literature about perceptions of aging," says Hanamori Skoblow, the lead author of the study published in The Gerontologist . "We know positive perceptions of aging can be really beneficial, but when they are negative, they can be really detrimental. "Nega
8h
Pulses driven by artificial intelligence tame quantum systems
It's easy to control the trajectory of a basketball: Just apply mechanical force coupled with human skill. But controlling the movement of quantum systems such as atoms and electrons is much more challenging, as these minuscule scraps of matter often fall prey to perturbations that knock them off their path in unpredictable ways. Movement within the system degrades—a process called damping—and noi
8h
The observation of an anomalous Hall effect in altermagnetic ruthenium dioxide
The Hall effect is a conduction phenomenon discovered by physicist Edwin Herbert Hall that describes the development of a transverse electric field in solid materials carrying electric current that are placed in a magnetic field perpendicular to this current. In the 1950s, Martin Karplus and Joaquin Mazdak Luttinger showed that an anomalous Hall conductivity could also be observed in ferromagnetic
8h
Researchers develop high-efficiency afterglow material
A research group led by Dr. Yang Bin from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has developed cadmium (Cd)-based perovskite single crystals with long afterglow and high luminous quantum yield, and investigated its afterglow luminescence dynamics mechanism.
8h
Simulations of impact crater show small asteroids are probably young
The impact experiment conducted on the asteroid Ryugu by the Japanese Hayabusa2 mission that took place two years ago resulted in an unexpectedly large crater. With the use of simulations, a team led by the University of Bern and the National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS has recently gained new insights from the experiment regarding the formation and development of asteroids. Th
8h
A genetic circuit guides microorganisms to stop fighting and work together in a cell factory
Bacteria, fungi, and microalgae—living things too small to be seen with the naked eye—are microorganisms that are commonly used for chemical production via their fermentation. The development of Mycoplasma mycoides in 2010, an artificial microorganism, has highlighted the technology that is utilized to develop industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast as "cell factories" for pro
8h
A genetic circuit guides microorganisms to stop fighting and work together in a cell factory
Bacteria, fungi, and microalgae—living things too small to be seen with the naked eye—are microorganisms that are commonly used for chemical production via their fermentation. The development of Mycoplasma mycoides in 2010, an artificial microorganism, has highlighted the technology that is utilized to develop industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast as "cell factories" for pro
8h
Two new young open clusters discovered
By analyzing the data from ESA's Gaia satellite, astronomers have detected two new young open clusters. The newfound clusters, designated Casado 82 and Casado-Hendy 1, are located in a nearby primordial group of open clusters. The finding is reported in a paper published November 23 on arXiv.org.
8h
Machine learning pinpoints where epilepsy seizures begin
Two new models could solve a problem that's long frustrated millions of people with epilepsy and the doctors who treat them: how to find precisely where seizures originate to treat exactly that part of the brain. By helping surgeons decide if and where to operate, the tools could help patients avoid risky and often-ineffective surgeries as well as prolonged hospital stays. "If you find that zone
8h
The Download: Twitter's toxicity, and what China's protestors want
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Elon Musk has created a toxic mess for the LGBTQ+ community. I would know. By Scott Wiener, a California state senator who represents San Francisco and northern San Mateo County. A mere day after Elon Musk reactivated Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene's Twitter acco
9h
Trailblazing Orion Snaps Stunning Selfie With Earth, Moon
Image: NASA Just over halfway through its 26-day mission, the Orion capsule has reached its greatest distance away from Earth. Previously, the Apollo 13 mission had held the all-time record: 248,000 miles. But at its farthest, Orion was 270,000 miles away from the planet's surface. And while it was out there, it snapped this selfie of itself and the Earth: Image: NASA In the full image, you can s
9h
Method predicts asymmetrical edges of 2D crystals
A new method can predict the shapes of asymmetrical crystals. A crystal's shape is determined by its inherent chemistry, a characteristic that ultimately determines its final form from the most basic of details. But sometimes the lack of symmetry in a crystal makes the surface energies of its facets unknowable, confounding any theoretical prediction of its shape. Theorists say they've found a way
9h
Gorgeous rainbow-colored, stretchy film for distinguishing sugars
Rainbows and sugar may conjure up images of a certain leprechaun-branded breakfast cereal. But now, researchers in ACS Nano report a kaleidoscope-like film for telling different sweeteners apart that displayed multiple colors when stretched by hand. When evenly stretched with a simple apparatus, the material enhanced the unique shifts in fluorescence intensity of 14 sugars tagged with a dye, disti
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Designing better water filters with AI
Even the best water filters let some things through, but designing improved materials and then testing them is time consuming and difficult. Now, researchers in ACS Central Science report that artificial intelligence (AI) could speed up the development of promising materials. In a proof-of-concept study, they simulated different patterns of water-attracting and water-repelling groups lining a filt
9h
How chemists are tackling the plastics problem
We tend to lump all plastics into one category, but water bottles, milk jugs, egg cartons, and credit cards are actually made from different materials, as you've probably noticed while trying to figure out what can go in your recycling bin. Once they've reached a recycling facility, the plastic must be separated, a process that can be slow and costly, and ultimately limits which materials, and ho
10h
Samsung's New GDDR6W Graphics Memory Rivals HBM2
Samsung's new memory features Fan-Out, Wafer-Level Packaging. (Image: Samsung) In the past, chip companies such as AMD have dabbled in High-Bandwidth Memory (HBM) instead of GDDR to increase memory bandwidth for GPUs. This vertically stacked memory boasts incredible bandwidth, but it's a costly endeavor. AMD abandoned it in favor of GDDR memory after its ill-fated R9 Fury and Vega GPUs. Now Samsu
10h
Perfluorodecalin-based oxygenated emulsion as a topical treatment for chemical burn to the eye
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35241-1 Chemical injuries to the eye are medical emergencies with limited acute treatment options and can cause permanent vision loss. Here, the authors show that perfluorodecalin-based supersaturated oxygen emulsion is a safe and effective topical therapeutic in treating acute ocular chemical burn by reducing tissu
11h
Slut med lægepraksis på Orø
Flere års forsøg på at skabe et stabilt lægetilbud på øen Orø, der er beliggende i Isefjorden, er endnu engang strandet. Region Sjælland forbereder nu et tredje udbud, mens de lokale udtrykker deres frustration.
11h
What Shanghai protesters want and fear
China Report is MIT Technology Review's newsletter about technology developments in China. Sign up to receive it in your inbox every Tuesday. The past week has meant many sleepless nights for people in China, and for people like me who are intently watching from afar. You may have seen that nearly three years after the pandemic started, protests have erupted across the country. In Beijing, Shangh
11h
You Should Probably Wait to Buy a Home
Should you even try to buy a house right now? Asking real-estate agents, economists, and potential homebuyers that question is likely to elicit something between a whimper and a scream these days. "It never feels like a great time to buy a house," Danielle Hale, the chief economist at Realtor.com, told me. "You're committing yourself to paying this enormous mortgage over a really long period of t
11h
Just Wait Until You Get to Know Ron DeSantis
G overnor Ron DeSantis has a growing store of admirers. This includes many who have watched the cantankerous Floridian only from afar. They have heard glowing things. He was the biggest winner of an otherwise dark election cycle for Republicans. He has impeccable bona fides as a Donald Trump disciple—without being Trump himself, whom many see as the biggest loser of said dark election cycle. This
11h
In praise of research in fundamental biology
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-04172-8 Science funders must remember the value of addressing the intrinsic biological questions that help to explain the natural world.
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HTLV-1 infection of donor-derived T cells might promote acute graft-versus-host disease following liver transplantation
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35111-w Acute graft versus host disease is a rare but deadly complication following liver transplantation. Author show here, upon screening a large cohort of liver transplanted patients and detailed immune phenotyping of samples from the 7 affected individuals and appropriate controls, that human T cell lymphotropic
12h
Extensive androgen receptor enhancer heterogeneity in primary prostate cancers underlies transcriptional diversity and metastatic potential
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35135-2 Epigenetic reprogramming of the androgen receptor (AR) has been identified as an important process driving prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Here, the authors analyze the role of AR chromatin binding heterogeneity in PCa clinical outcomes, metastasis and relapse.
12h
Emergence of zero-field non-synthetic single and interchained antiferromagnetic skyrmions in thin films
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35102-x An intrinsic antiferromagnetic skyrmion is located entirely within a single atomic layer, rather than two coupled layers. Here, the authors predict the existence of intrinsic antiferromagnetic skyrmions in a chromium monolayer deposited on a PdFe/Ir(111) substrate, which can form interlinked chain structures
12h
Deciphering the heterogeneity of the Lyve1+ perivascular macrophages in the mouse brain
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35166-9 Perivascular macrophages (pvMs) are important for brain drainage and immune regulation. Here the authors analyse various reporter mouse strains for finer mapping of pvM subsets and lineage differentiation, and propose CX3CR1negative and CD45low as additional markers of intermediate pvMs for studying this het
12h
NHS 'nowhere near ready' to deliver new Alzheimer's drug, doctors say
Patients unlikely to receive lecanemab before 2026 and health service does not yet have necessary infrastructure Drug slows cognitive decline in Alzheimer's patients, study reveals A reorganisation of NHS dementia care is needed to ensure UK patients can receive a groundbreaking drug that slows the progression of Alzheimer's disease, doctors say. Detailed results from a clinical trial of lecanema
12h
Elon Musk has created a toxic mess for the LGBTQ+ community. I would know.
A mere day after Elon Musk reactivated Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene's Twitter account, she tweeted that I'm a "communist groomer ," presumably because I'm a gay Jewish Democratic elected official from San Francisco. Greene's tweet also promoted her proposed federal law to ban gender-affirming care for transgender youth and to make it effectively impossible for adult transgender people to receive t
12h
Researchers discover new form of antimicrobial resistance
Australian researchers have uncovered a new form of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), undetectable using traditional laboratory testing methods, in a discovery set to challenge existing efforts to monitor and tackle one of the world's greatest health threats.
12h
It's just a first step, but this new Alzheimer's drug could be a huge breakthrough | Jonathan Schott
Recent lecanemab trials are reason for hope. But the NHS and other health services may struggle to deliver these new treatments NHS 'nowhere near ready' to deliver new Alzheimer's drug, doctors say It is 20 years since the last drug for Alzheimer's was licensed in the UK. Since then, huge advances have been made in our understanding of the disease's causes. Better diagnostic tests are available,
12h
Her dying wish: why Toni Crews chose to let her dead body be filmed
When Toni Crews died at 30 of a very rare cancer, her parents were determined to carry out her last request – and allow a documentary team unprecedented access. Here, they share why filming the dissection of their daughter's body will benefit so many others Nestled together on the sofa, in the front room of their home on the Kent coast, Jo and Jason Crews are scrolling through a stream of Facebook
13h
Panama confronts illegal trafficking of animals
In a tropical forest beside the Panama Canal, two black-handed spider monkeys swing about their wire enclosure, balanced by their long tails. They arrived at this government rehabilitation center after environmental authorities seized them from people who had been keeping them as pets.
13h
Post-covid medical complaints following infection with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron vs Delta variants
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35240-2 The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant is associated with less severe disease but less is known about variant-specific risk of long-term complaints. Monitoring 1.3 million individuals from Norway for post-acute COVID-19 complaints up to 126 days shows that the burden is similar for Omicron and Delta for most complai
13h
Hawaii volcano eruption has some on alert, draws onlookers
The first eruption in 38 years of the world's largest active volcano is attracting onlookers to a national park for "spectacular" views of the event, and it's also dredging up bad memories among some Hawaii residents who have been through harrowing volcanic experiences in the past.
13h
New study examines success of Monterey Bay Aquarium sea otter rehabilitation program
A new study, authored by experts at Monterey Bay Aquarium and their partners, examines the development of its landmark sea otter rehabilitation program and how it can support sea otter recovery and reintroduction. Published in the Journal of Zoological and Biological Gardens, the research recounts its successes and challenges, showing how the program benefits both species recovery and ecosystem be
13h
In Alaska, A Mystery Over Disappearing Whales
With climate change and other human activities reshaping the world at an alarming rate, belugas will have to rely on innovative cultural practices to adapt. But among the whales — and the Indigenous people who've hunted them for generations — it's likely that cultural knowledge is already being lost.
13h
New quantum computing feat is a modern twist on a 150-year-old thought experiment
A team of quantum engineers at UNSW Sydney has developed a method to reset a quantum computer—that is, to prepare a quantum bit in the '0' state—with very high confidence, as needed for reliable quantum computations. The method is surprisingly simple: it is related to the old concept of 'Maxwell's demon', an omniscient being that can separate a gas into hot and cold by watching the speed of the in
14h
New study examines success of Monterey Bay Aquarium sea otter rehabilitation program
A new study, authored by experts at Monterey Bay Aquarium and their partners, examines the development of its landmark sea otter rehabilitation program and how it can support sea otter recovery and reintroduction. Published in the Journal of Zoological and Biological Gardens, the research recounts its successes and challenges, showing how the program benefits both species recovery and ecosystem be
14h
Either in lockdown or preparing for lockdown: life amid zero-Covid in Beijing
Resident tells of days filled with health codes, constant threat of shutdowns and moments of hope Life in Beijing these days is spent either in lockdown or preparing for lockdown. Stockpiling food at home, just in case, has become the new norm. Meeting friends is hard because every few weeks one of us is sealed inside their home for days. Carrying out the daily routine of only working, eating and
14h
Science is making it possible to 'hear' nature. It does more talking than we knew | Karen Bakker
With digital bioacoustics, scientists can eavesdrop on the natural world – and they're learning some astonishing things Scientists have recently made some remarkable discoveries about non-human sounds. With the aid of digital bioacoustics – tiny, portable digital recorders similar to those found in your smartphone – researchers are documenting the universal importance of sound to life on Earth. B
15h
Publishing a long overdue explainer about a scientific consensus
Recently, we happened upon a neat and detailed article , explaining what a scientific consensus is. This made us realize, that – even though we have a lot of material about the consensus – we were lacking an explainer about what a scientific consensus actually is. We have now remedied this and created a page with an explainer and an accompanying glossary entry which will point our readers towards
16h
A nuclease-mimetic platinum nanozyme induces concurrent DNA platination and oxidative cleavage to overcome cancer drug resistance
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-35022-w One of the mechanisms underlying platinum (Pt) resistance is the spontaneous nucleotide-excision repair of cancer cells. Here, nuclease-mimetic Pt nanozymes are targeted to the cancer cell nucleus and induce concurrent DNA platination and oxidative cleavage to overcome Pt resistance.
16h
Entropically engineered formation of fivefold and icosahedral twinned clusters of colloidal shapes
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34891-5 Fivefold and icosahedral symmetries in multiply twinned crystals can be used to influence the shape of synthetic nanoparticles. Simulations now show the entropy-driven formation of fivefold and icosahedral twinned clusters of truncated tetrahedra that self-assemble into colloidal crystals.
16h
Discovered in the deep: is this the world's longest animal?
A submersible off the coast of Western Australia chanced upon an 45-metre-long deep-sea siphonophore arranged in a feeding spiral, trailing its deadly tentacles In 2020, about 600 metres (2,000ft) down in an underwater canyon off the coast of Western Australia, scientists encountered a long gelatinous creature suspended in a giant spiral . "It was like a rope on the horizon. You couldn't miss it,
16h
Discovery of a maximally charged Weyl point
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-34978-z Here the authors experimentally demonstrate a maximally charged Weyl point in a three dimensional photonic crystal, with topological charge of four — the maximal charge number that a two-fold Weyl point can host, which supports quadruple-helicoid Fermi arcs
17h
Which Came First: Reproduction or Pain? – Biology/Evolution Question
"Which is older: self-preservation or the need to reproduce?" Take pain to mean more aversion, self-preservation, an intelligent way to identify threats… The first living organisms, supposedly, reproduced asexually.. But I wonder what was going on before reproduction? Where there beings recognizable as life-forms? How intelligent were they? Could they learn? Feel pain? Are we related to them? A
19h
Protons fix a long-standing issue in silicon carbide electronics
Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising semiconductor material for power electronic devices, but it suffers from bipolar degradation, which severely limits its lifespan. To address this long-standing issue in a cost-effective manner, researchers have developed a proton implantation-based suppression method that can prevent the expansion of stacking faults, which lie at the root of bipolar degradation
19h
High-performance and compact vibration energy harvester created for self-charging wearable devices
A research team has developed a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) piezoelectric vibration energy harvester, which is only about 2 cm in diameter with a U-shaped metal vibration amplification component. The device allows for an increase of approximately 90 times in the power generation performance from impulsive vibration. Since the power generation performance can be improved without increasing
19h
Transcranial magnetic stimulation design goes deeper into brain
As a noninvasive neuromodulation method, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows great potential to treat a range of mental and psychiatric diseases, including major depression. Current methods don't go quite deep enough and are largely restricted to superficial targets within the brain, but a new TMS array with a special geometrical-shaped magnet structure will help stimulate deeper tissue.
19h
Breaking the scaling limits of analog computing
A new technique greatly reduces the error in an optical neural network, which uses light to process data instead of electrical signals. With their technique, the larger an optical neural network becomes, the lower the error in its computations. This could enable them to scale these devices up so they would be large enough for commercial uses.
19h
New tools map seizures, improve epilepsy treatment
Two new models could solve a problem that's long frustrated millions of people with epilepsy and the doctors who treat them: how to find precisely where seizures originate to treat exactly that part of the brain. By helping surgeons decide if and where to operate, the tools could help patients avoid risky and often-ineffective surgeries as well as prolonged hospital stays.
20h
Nanoengineers develop a predictive database for materials
Nanoengineers have developed an AI algorithm that predicts the structure and dynamic properties of any material — whether existing or new — almost instantaneously. Known as M3GNet, the algorithm was used to develop matterverse.ai, a database of more than 31 million yet-to-be-synthesized materials with properties predicted by machine learning algorithms. Matterverse.ai facilitates the discovery o
21h
Imaging the dynamic cellular zoo made easier
Researchers have genetically engineered a protein to emit the shortest-wavelength fluorescence light reported to date. They did this by optimizing the interactions between the fluorescence center (chromophore) and its surroundings, in a manner that differs from previous reports. The resulting fluorescence emission was bright and stable over a useful range of pH values. This work will aid basic and
21h
Study explores link between shark nose shape, size and sensitivity of smell
Differences in sharks' olfactory systems are of interest not only because of their reputation for having an incredible sense of smell but also because they have been around since before the dinosaurs. They managed to thrive in every known marine habitat for millions of years — their sense of smell may have been key. A study is the first to quantify olfactory organ morphology by examining rosette
21h
How the brain processes language
Humans accomplish a phenomenal amount of tasks by combining pieces of information. We perceive objects by combining edges, categorize scenes by combining objects, interpret events by combining actions, and understand sentences by combining words. But researchers don't yet have a clear understanding of how the brain forms and maintains the meaning of the whole — such as a sentence — from its part
21h
New study provides evidence for three-year interval for multi-target stool DNA screening for those at average risk of colon cancer
A scientific study exploring the appropriate interval for colorectal cancer screening via non-invasive multi-target stool DNA testing for individuals with average risk for the disease reported finding no colorectal cancers three years after an initial negative multi-target stool DNA test. These results suggest that at least a three-year interval between screenings using this method is clinically a
21h
Toward early detection of pathological social withdrawal, Hikikomori
In 2018, researchers developed the 'Hikikomori Questionnaire (HQ-25)' to assess and identify hikikomori, a condition of pathological social withdrawal lasting more than six months. Now, the team has developed a new questionnaire they call HQ-25M in hopes of identifying the condition within just one month. Their initial analysis showed validation of the questionnaire as a possible tool for early de
21h
Nanoengineers develop a predictive database for materials
Nanoengineers have developed an AI algorithm that predicts the structure and dynamic properties of any material — whether existing or new — almost instantaneously. Known as M3GNet, the algorithm was used to develop matterverse.ai, a database of more than 31 million yet-to-be-synthesized materials with properties predicted by machine learning algorithms. Matterverse.ai facilitates the discovery o
21h
Drug slows cognitive decline in Alzheimer's patients, study reveals
Antibody therapy lecanemab removes clumps of protein called beta amyloid that builds up in brain NHS 'nowhere near ready' to deliver new Alzheimer's drug, doctors say Researchers have hailed the dawn of a new era of Alzheimer's therapies after a clinical trial confirmed that a drug slows cognitive decline in patients with early stages of the disease. The result comes after decades of failure in t
21h
Explainable AI-based physical theory for advanced materials design
Microscopic image data is key to developing low-power, high-speed electronic devices. However, the complex interactions in nanoscale magnetic materials are difficult to understand. A research group has now realized a new functional design theory called 'extended Landau free energy model' that combines topology and AI with free energy to automate the interpretation of the microscopic image. This mo
22h
Explainable AI-based physical theory for advanced materials design
Microscopic image data is key to developing low-power, high-speed electronic devices. However, the complex interactions in nanoscale magnetic materials are difficult to understand. A research group has now realized a new functional design theory called 'extended Landau free energy model' that combines topology and AI with free energy to automate the interpretation of the microscopic image. This mo
22h
Canada geese beat humans in longstanding territory battle
Canada geese collide with aircraft, intimidate unassuming joggers, and leave lawns and sidewalks spattered with prodigious piles of feces. They're widely considered nuisance birds, and municipalities invest considerable time and money harassing geese to relocate the feisty flocks. But new research shows standard goose harassment efforts aren't effective, especially in winter when birds should be m
22h
Research unearths obscure heat transfer behaviors
Researchers have found that boron arsenide, which has already been viewed as a highly promising material for heat management and advanced electronics, also has a unique property. After reaching an extremely high pressure that is hundreds of times greater than the pressure found at the bottom of the ocean, boron arsenide's thermal conductivity actually begins to decrease. The results suggest that t
22h
Never Trump Means Never
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Never Trump is—still—a movement that is about more than just one man. It stands in opposition to everything Donald Trump has done to American civic life, and rejects those who would wear his mantle. B
23h
Please Look at My Metal Credit Card
Although it may be difficult to imagine a universe in which George Clooney needs a little help charming women, that's the case in Up in the Air , the 2009 movie in which he plays a frequent-flying HR consultant in charge of executing mass layoffs. In a Dallas hotel bar, he flirts with a comely business traveler played by Vera Farmiga, needling her over her preferred rental-car loyalty program; so
23h
The Mauna Loa Eruption Is a Gift for Science
The world's largest volcano is erupting for the first time since 1984. Hawaii's Mauna Loa, a giant mound of a volcano that looks so much like Mars that researchers actually hold Mars simulations there , has stirred. Authorities say the eruption does not threaten any local communities ; no evacuation orders have been issued. For scientists, it's an exciting development. I talked with Jess Phoenix,
23h

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