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Nyheder2017august07

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Google DeepMind AI Declares Galactic War on StarCraftAn artificial intelligence bot that beat StarCraft would be much more impressive than mastering the board game Go.
10d Gizmodo
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Don't Get Too Excited About Alien Life on Tau Ceti Image: Wikimedia Mildly encouraging news for Earthlings hoping to escape the scorched ruins of our own planet: A team of astronomers has found evidence for four Earth-sized (ish) worlds orbiting tau Ceti, a Sun-like star located just 12 light years away. Two of these planets, the researchers say, might barely be on the edge of the habitable zone, that not-too-hot, not-too-cold region that can pot
10d New Scientist – News
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Are atheists really morally depraved? The idea defies logicEven in secular countries people are instinctively biased against atheists, a study has found. But the prejudice will hopefully die out soon, says Bob Holmes
10d New on MIT Technology Review
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What AI Needs to Learn to Master Alien WarfareAI agents need new ideas to compete in the popular strategy game StarCraft.
10d NYT > Science
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Matter: When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, Mammals Took to the SkiesNew fossil discoveries show that prehistoric “squirrels” glided through forests at least 160 million years ago, long before scientists had thought.
10d Gizmodo
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Did Scientists Just Discover the Last Common Ancestor of All Apes? Alesi, the skull of the new extinct ape species Nyanzapithecus alesi (Image: Fred Spoor) Fossils of ancient apes are even rarer than those of ancient humans, so very little is known about these important evolutionary missing links. The unexpected discovery of a 13 million-year-old infant ape skull in Kenya is offering a tantalizing glimpse of a new species that lived well before humans and apes e
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New 13-million-year-old infant skull sheds light on ape ancestryThe discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to an infant that lived about 13 million years ago. The research was done by an international team led by Isaiah Nengo of Stony Brook University-affiliated Turkana Basin Ins
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Fruit fly mutation foretells 40 million years of evolutionSmall, seemingly insignificant mutations in fruit flies may actually hold clues as to how a species will evolve tens of millions of years in the future.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers discover first winged mammals from the Jurassic periodTwo 160 million-year-old mammal fossils discovered in China show that the forerunners of mammals in the Jurassic Period evolved to glide and live in trees. With long limbs, long hand and foot fingers, and wing-like membranes for tree-to-tree gliding, Maiopatagium furculiferum and Vilevolodon diplomylos are the oldest known gliders in the long history of early mammals.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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What it takes to recover from droughtDrought-stricken areas anxiously await the arrival of rain. Full recovery of the ecosystem, however, can extend long past the first rain drops on thirsty ground.
10d Latest Headlines | Science News
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Infant ape’s tiny skull could have a big impact on ape evolutionFossil comes from a lineage that had ties to the ancestor of modern apes and humans, researchers argue.
10d Latest Headlines | Science News
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Ancient people arrived in Sumatra’s rainforests more than 60,000 years agoHumans reached Indonesia not long after leaving Africa.
10d Blog » Languages » English
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August open promos are coming! Hello Eyewirers! Our next round of open promotions for Scouts, Scythes , Mods , and Mentors is approaching. We will also consider new Mystics ! During this time you can fill out the open promotion form here to be considered by HQ without requiring player sponsors. Scout, Scythe, and Mentor Qualifications: Have at least earned 50,000 points and completed 500 cubes Maintain at least 90% accuracy ov
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Researchers create biomaterial that delivers both a powerful drug and gene silencersClinicians today have a huge arsenal of drugs at their disposal for treating cancers. But many chemotherapeutic agents pose stubborn challenges: they cause serious side effects, some cancers develop resistance, and many chemotherapies demonstrate low bio-availability. A potential solution lies in the synergistic combination of a chemotherapeutic drug with engineered genetic material. New hybrid ma
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Updated computer code improves prediction of particle motion in plasma experimentsA computer code used by physicists around the world to analyze and predict tokamak experiments can now approximate the behavior of highly energetic atomic nuclei, or ions, in fusion plasmas more accurately than ever.
10d BBC News – Science & Environment
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James Webb: Telescope's giant origami shield takes shapeThe size of a tennis court, it will shield the vision of the biggest space telescope ever built.
10d BBC News – Science & Environment
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A year in ozone over the South PoleA video tracks the behaviour of the protective atmospheric layer over Antarctica across all of 2016.
10d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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Thousands across India march in support of science Protesters demand respect for research — but some scientists were told to stay away. Nature 548 270 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22439
10d Gizmodo
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Newly Named Titanosaur Was the Largest Land Animal Our Planet Has Ever Seen A replica of the newly described titanosaur at AMNH. (Image: AP) Four years after six specimens were discovered in Argentina, scientists have finally given a name to what is now considered the largest animal to ever have walked the Earth. Say hello to Patagotitan mayorum —a Cretaceous-era dinosaur that weighed an astonishing 152,000 pounds. Before we get into the details of the new study , publis
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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Citizen Scientists Chase Total Solar EclipseNon-scientists are being recruited to collect data on everything from the Sun’s outer atmosphere to animal behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Defining standards for genomes from uncultivated microorganismsAs genomic data production has ramped up over the past two decades and is being generated on various platforms around the world, scientists have worked together to establish definitions for terms and data collection standards that apply across the board. In Nature Biotechnology, an international team led by DOE JGI researchers has developed standards for the minimum metadata to be supplied with si
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Bipartisan collaboration opens door to strengthen nation's healthcare system, AGSWith renewed calls for bipartisan collaboration supporting high-quality, person-centered, and affordable health coverage for us all as we age, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) has reached out to leaders from the US Senate and House of Representatives to reinforce core priorities "that matter to the millions of older adults and caregivers who we serve in the clinic–and who you serve in Congre
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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A personalized approach to Alzheimer's disease preventionIn a new study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, James E. Galvin, MD, MPH, Professor of Integrated Medical Science and Associate Dean for Clinical Research, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, examined potential Alzheimer's disease prevention strategies.
10d The Atlantic
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W. Kamau Bell Doesn't Want to Fit In Comedian W. Kamau Bell struggled with his identity growing up. As a self-described “nerd,” he favored martial arts over basketball and rock over hip-hop. This struggle carried over into adulthood and his early efforts at standup comedy. At one point, he even considered giving up comedy entirely. It was at this crossroads that Bell stumbled upon a Rolling Stone article, which became the catalyst f
10d Ars Technica
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Facing libel lawsuit, Techdirt takes large donations to broaden coverage Techdirt founder Mike Masnick in 2012. (credit: Joel Sage / flickr ) In the wake of an ongoing, expensive libel lawsuit that could drag on for years, Mike Masnick, the founder of Techdirt, announced Wednesday that his website would accept more than $250,000 in donations "to further reporting on free speech." In a lengthy post, Masnick explained that the Freedom of the Press Foundation, along with
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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Closest Supermassive Black Hole Tests Einstein's RelativityNew observations of stars orbiting the Milky Way’s central giant black hole confirm Einstein’s theory yet again — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d BBC News – Science & Environment
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'Unusual' Greenland wildfires linked to peatNew images have been released of wildfires that continue to burn close to the Greenland ice sheet.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Older adults may need better follow-up after ER screenings for suicideWhen healthcare providers see older adults in the ED, some may be too quick to assume that the warning signs for suicide are just a natural part of aging.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Potentially inappropriate medications still pose challenge in nursing homeA Canadian research team investigated how often healthcare providers prescribed PIMs to older adults living with dementia or other mental health concerns and who were being admitted to nursing homes. The research team examined records from more than 40,000 people with dementia or cognitive impairments who were over the age of 66 and had been admitted to nursing homes between 2011 and 2014. The tea
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energyAn experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New optical method pinpoints weak spots in jet engine thermal coatingsIn The Optical Society journal Optics Express, the researchers demonstrated that changes in refractive index, a measure of how fast light travels through a material, could be observed when a piece of metal coated with a ceramic thermal barrier coating was pulled in a controlled manner.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers 'count cars' — literally — to find a better way to control heavy trafficThere's 'Counting Crows,' counting sheep, counting blessings and now researchers at Florida Atlantic University have their own version of 'counting cars' — literally — in an attempt to improve traffic flow on South Florida's and our nation's overcrowded roads. And with more than 263 million registered passenger vehicles in the United States and more than 14 million registered vehicles in Florida
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Smart windows that go from clear to dark in under a minuteStanford University engineers have developed dynamic windows that can switch from transparent to opaque or back again in under a minute and do not degrade over time. The prototypes are plates of conductive glass outlined with metal ions that spread out over the surface, blocking light, in response to electrical current. The group recently filed a patent for the work, presented Aug. 9 in the journa
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A battery-inspired strategy for carbon fixationScientists working toward the elusive lithium-air battery discovered an unexpected approach to capturing and storing carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere. Using a design intended for a lithium-CO2 battery, researchers in Japan and China have developed a way to isolate solid carbon dust from gaseous carbon dioxide, with the potential to also separate out oxygen gas through the same method. Their
10d Popular Science
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How art could help encourage kids to study science Science "You gotta Crash and Learn." STEAM is a growing movement in education to teach art and science together. Learn why it makes the former Mythbuster's host so excited, and how it can help kids learn to…
10d Ars Technica
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Maybe Americans don’t need fast home Internet service, FCC suggests (credit: Getty Images | Yuri_Arcurs) Americans might not need a fast home Internet connection, the Federal Communications Commission suggests in a new document. Instead, mobile Internet via a smartphone might be all people need. The suggestion comes in the FCC's annual inquiry into broadband availability. Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act requires the FCC to determine whether broadband (o
10d NYT > Science
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The Sea Level Did, in Fact, Rise Faster in the Southeast U.S.Scientists may have found the culprit of sudden tidal flooding: Two atmospheric patterns that combined to cause fast-rising waters along the coast.
10d Live Science
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A Guide to Hurricane Season 2017Here’s a guide to the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season including predictions, naming conventions and how to make storm preparations.
10d The Atlantic
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The Dodgers Aim for History—and a Championship On the afternoon of July 31, Major League Baseball’s trade deadline, the Los Angeles Dodgers acquired Yu Darvish, the best pitcher on the market, from the Texas Rangers. Four days later, Darvish debuted in his new team’s gray and blue road uniforms, lasering fastballs and looping curves for seven shutout innings. The Dodgers beat the New York Mets, 6-0, improving the best record in baseball this
10d The Atlantic
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Mueller Closes In on Manafort Updated at 3:05 p.m. ET FBI agents directed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller raided a home owned by Paul Manafort last month in the latest sign that the Russia investigation is taking an aggressive new posture toward the former Trump campaign chairman. According to The Washington Post , federal agents appeared with a search warrant at an Alexandria, Virginia, home owned by Manafort on the mornin
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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The effects of increased inflammatory markers during pregnancyResearchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin in collaboration with colleagues from the University of California — Irvine, Oregon Health and Science University and the University of North Carolina in the USA have shown that increased levels of inflammatory markers during pregnancy can lead to changes in fetal brain development. Results from this study have been published in the journal B
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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Insomnia Linked to Premature Birth in Study of 3 Million MothersWomen with sleep disorders were about twice as likely to deliver babies more than six weeks early — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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A battery-inspired strategy for carbon fixationScientists working toward the elusive lithium-air battery discovered an unexpected approach to capturing and storing carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere. Using a design intended for a lithium-CO2 battery, researchers in Japan and China have developed a way to isolate solid carbon dust from gaseous carbon dioxide, with the potential to also separate out oxygen gas through the same method. Their
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Travis Kalanick won't return as CEO of Uber, co-founder Garrett Camp saysRumors have been circulating that Uber's former chief executive, Travis Kalanick, is angling for a return to the helm of the ride-hailing company.
10d Gizmodo
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How Medical Woes Turned a Retired Professor Into the Face of Fatalism Online Image: iStock /Ann Baldwin/Gizmodo You’ve probably seen it: a stock photo of a white-haired old man in a plain red turtleneck with the words “guess I’ll die” scrawled across his chest. But the story of how Mike Baldwin, a 76-year-old retired chemistry and biochemistry professor, actually became the internet’s preeminent expression of fatalism has remained a mystery. As it turns out, an ailing art
10d Gizmodo
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Today's Best Deals: Bosch Tools, Portal Router, Star Trek, and More An insane deal on a Bosch tool set , an exclusive discount on the Portal router , and the entire Star Trek Original Series Blu-ray lead off Wednesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals The past year or so has seen a welcome deluge of Wi-Fi router innovation, and Portal seems to be one of the best newcomers in the space, particularly fo
10d New on MIT Technology Review
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Softbank Is Investing $1.1 Billion to Help a Biotech Firm’s Tech Drive
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Sea urchins: From pest to plateThe genital gland of a sea urchin, the so-called gonad, is found inside the urchin. This organ stores nutrients, and contains milt and roe during the spawning season in spring. The gonads are very popular in sushi dishes in especially Asia, but also in other parts of the world.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Blocking enzyme linked to Alzheimer's may reverse memory lossResearchers can reverse memory loss in mice by interfering with the enzyme that forms the blockade. The enzyme, known as HDAC2, turns genes off by condensing them so tightly that they can't be expressed.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Should we be worried about how our kids use the internet?Part of Jacqueline Vickery's job is to be constantly concerned.
10d Latest Headlines | Science News
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A lot of life on planet Earth is awful and incredibleActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses how the natural world feeds our sense of wonder.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite takes a double look at Tropical Storm FranklinWhen NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Franklin instruments aboard provided a night-time view of the storm's clouds and measured their temperatures, revealing a strengthening storm.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds patients needed fewer opioid tablets than prescribed after hernia surgeryA study by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and Newton-Wellesley Hospital found that patients prescribed opioid medications after inguinal hernia surgery used significantly fewer tablets than prescribed, even though they had received fewer than typically administered for such surgery.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Increased risk of suicide, mental health conditions linked to sexual assault victimizationAn analysis of nearly 200 independent studies involving more than 230,000 adult participants finds that having been sexually assaulted is associated with significantly increased risk of anxiety, depression, suicidality, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, obsessive-compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder. The analysis, reported in the journal Clinical Psychology Review, represents a
10d Science : NPR
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When Oceans Give You Jellyfish Blooms, Turn Them Into Tasty Chips Scientists think human pressures on oceans could cause more jellyfish blooms. What to do? Eat them, says a Danish gastrophysicist who has cracked the science of making them palatable. (Image credit: Courtesy of Kristoff Styrbæk)
10d Gizmodo
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The Wayback Machine Was Quietly Blocked in India Photo: Wikimedia On Tuesday evening, citizens of India were appalled to find that the Internet Archive had been blocked by a growing number of local ISPs. Instead of finding the Wayback Machine, users saw a message that is routinely used when the government restricts access to an online organization. First reported by Indian outlet Medianama , the blockage is still unexplained. The site currently
10d Inside Science
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Superconductors — Powering Our Future Superconductors — Powering Our Future The search for room temperature superconductors. Superconductors — Powering Our Future Video of Superconductors — Powering Our Future Physics Wednesday, August 9, 2017 – 11:00 Keith Landry, Contributor (Inside Science) — A maglev train hovers above its track. A doctor uses an MRI scanner to detect disease. Fast digital circuits send superfast, clear signa
10d Latest Headlines | Science News
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Readers fascinated by critters’ strange biologyReaders responded to fish lips, monkey brains, sunless tanner and more.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Can a venture capital blacklist stop sexual harassment in Silicon Valley?Badly shaken over a flood of female founders accusing investors of sexual harassment, Silicon Valley's venture capital community is searching for a new kind of pitch – one that will end unwanted workplace come-ons, groping and off-color jokes.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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More veterans have enrolled in college with post-9/11 G.I. billThe Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, which covers educational costs for veterans beyond tuition, has boosted college enrollment rates among veterans by 3 percentage points compared with the earlier G.I. Bill, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. However, the increase in enrollment was much larger immediately after the bill's adoption and has waned in recen
10d Feed: All Latest
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Google Memo Author James Damore Offended Fellow Students in Grad School SkitThe Google memo author performed in an off-color skit during a class retreat and used suggestive phrases that one attendee said "crossed the line."
10d Futurity.org
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Is it fair to equate Trump with Nixon? From his earliest days in the White House, President Donald Trump has inspired some to muse on his perceived similarities to Richard Nixon. But it wasn’t until after President Trump fired FBI director James Comey on May 9—in the midst of an investigation into whether members of the Trump campaign colluded with the Russian government to influence the outcome of the 2016 election—that the debate ca
10d Futurity.org
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Drone shoots awesome scenes for movies on its own A new algorithm could let drones independently film spectacular action scenes. Take, for example, the scene in Skyfall in which James Bond fights his adversary on the roof of a train as it races through the desert that includes a series of rapidly changing camera angles. Several camera operators worked for hours on end at a number of different locations. And a camera crane even had to be mounted
10d Science | The Guardian
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Why are there so few women in tech? The truth behind the Google memo An engineer at the company has suggested male domination of Silicon Valley is down to biological differences between the sexes. But the root causes are much more complicated It is time to be “open about the science of human nature”. This was the assertion of software engineer James Damore to his colleagues at Google, in an internal memo that has since led to his sacking . “I’m simply stating,” Da
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Review: Cholera vaccines effective for adults, much less so for childrenA new review of the research literature led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that cholera vaccines provide substantial protection for adults but provide significantly less protection for children under age 5, a population particularly at risk for dying from this diarrheal disease.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

This week from AGU: Scientists discover cause of Atlantic coast's sea level rise hot spotsThis Week from AGU features new research published in AGU journals.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

More veterans have enrolled in college with post-9/11 G.I. billThe Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, which covers educational costs for veterans beyond tuition, has boosted college enrollment rates among veterans by 3 percentage points compared with the earlier G.I. Bill, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. However, the increase in enrollment was much larger immediately after the bill's adoption and has waned in recen
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

C-section delivery associated with increased risk of complications from hysterectomyHaving a previous cesarean delivery significantly increased the risk of reoperation and complications among women undergoing a hysterectomy later in life, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Increases in alcohol use, especially among women, other groupsAlcohol use, high-risk drinking and alcohol use disorders increased in the US population and across almost all sociodemographic groups, especially women, older adults, racial/ethnic minorities and individuals with lower educational levels and family income, according to a new study published by JAMA Psychiatry.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Racial gap in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest narrowsThere has been a substantial reduction in racial differences in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest, with a greater improvement in survival among black patients compared with white patients, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Feds probed anglers linked to shark-dragging but closed case last yearFederal wildlife agents who last year investigated a group of Gulf coast anglers linked to a brutal shark-dragging video were foiled by uncooperative witnesses and an inability to confirm when the illegal acts occurred.
10d Feed: All Latest
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Foursquare May Have Grown Up, But the Check-In Still MattersWith updates to the Swarm app, Foursquare hopes to gather even more data about where people spend their time and money.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The mystery of the yellowing sugarcaneSince 2011, a mysterious illness known as Yellow Canopy Syndrome (YCS) has afflicted Australian sugarcane causing $40 million in losses. Researchers used supercomputers to perform large-scale investigations of the sugarcane genome. They detected signals in the data that could indicate a bacteria or stress causing YCS. They are conducting further computational studies to test their hypotheses.
10d Science : NPR
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Video Games May Affect The Brain Differently, Depending On What You Play Millions of people play video games, but there's plenty of disagreement on whether they're good or bad for brains. Action games may have a different effect than something like Super Mario. (Image credit: mustafahacalaki/Getty Images)
10d Gizmodo
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Mammalian Ancestors Went Airborne Earlier Than We Thought Reconstruction by April I. Neander/UChicago The origin of flight remains a perplexing topic in the scientific community, as tends to be the case with any origin story. Flight probably evolved multiple times in different groups. Insects probably started flying over 300 million years ago, and pterosaurs, large flying reptiles, evolved 230 million years ago. Add gliding and the complex origins of ma
10d Ars Technica
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Rez Infinite on PC is a better game—all because of mouse support Enhance Games When you see the phrases "classic Dreamcast game Rez " and "author Sam Machkovech" near each other, you can probably fill in the blanks yourself. I've raved . I've cried . I've covered myself in vibrators . I love the game, and I previously thought the classic game had reached its peak via a 4K- and VR-friendly re-release on PlayStation 4 last year. Turns out Enhance Studios had a s
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Parents' disagreements about bedtime can affect coparenting relationshipPositive parental teamwork is key to promoting healthy child development, but when mothers have stronger opinions than fathers about how to tend to their infants in the middle of the night, the coparenting relationship can suffer, says a group of researchers.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Proper eating habits can help young athletes on and off the fieldHow can parents help their student-athletes gain a competitive edge? By boning up on nutrition basics, say experts.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Lizard venom may contain clues to treating blood clotsVarious types of lizard venom are being studied as possible treatments for blood clotting diseases that lead to millions of cases of stroke, heart attack, and deep-vein thrombosis annually. While snake venom research has been extensive, lizard venom research was still in its infancy.
10d The Atlantic
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Are Mercenaries Really a Cheaper Way of War? The world is sliding in a strange direction when a Prince wishes to become a viceroy. That’s Erik Prince, the founder of the mercenary Academi, previously Xe, né Blackwater, who has been pushing a plan to privatize the war in Afghanistan. At 16 years, it’s the country’s longest war, it continues to cost huge sums of money—$40 billion this year alone—and there’s no obvious end in sight. So Prince’
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Mozilla and fact-checker engine join fight on fake newsMozilla, the non-profit which runs the Firefox internet browser, said Wednesday it was launching a drive against "fake news" as fact-checking software backed by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar got its first run-out in public.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Family break-ups lead to domestic violence in fruit fly relationshipsMale fruit flies with strong family ties are less likely to become abusive during mating than others, according to new Oxford research.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists discover cause of Atlantic coastline's sea level rise hot spotsSea level rise hot spots—bursts of accelerated sea rise that last three to five years—happen along the U.S. East Coast thanks to a one-two punch from naturally occurring climate variations, a new University of Florida study shows.
10d Ingeniøren
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Brud med penicillin-dogme spreder sigBritiske forskere kommer med et ifølge myndighederne vovet postulat. I Danmark arbejder de praktiserende læger allerede ud fra det. Patienter skal ikke altid færdiggøre kuren med antibioitka.
10d Latest Headlines | Science News
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Ticks are here to stay. But scientists are finding ways to outsmart themResearchers acknowledge that there’s no getting rid of ticks, so they are developing ways to make them less dangerous.
10d TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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Let's end ageism | Ashton ApplewhiteIt's not the passage of time that makes it so hard to get older. It's ageism, a prejudice that pits us against our future selves — and each other. Ashton Applewhite urges us to dismantle the dread and mobilize against the last socially acceptable prejudice. "Aging is not a problem to be fixed or a disease to be cured," she says. "It is a natural, powerful, lifelong process that unites us all."
10d New Scientist – News
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England’s dire north-south health gap is a scandal that must endThe north-south divide in England needs fixing or the country risks more despair, premature death and political earthquakes, says James Bloodworth
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Insights into causes of miscarriages for some women revealed by mice studyResearchers have identified how natural killer cells in the mouse placenta can cause a fetus to fail to grow in the womb or cause miscarriages.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Extreme heat linked to climate change may adversely affect pregnancyA systematic review links extreme heat exposure to changes in gestation length, birth weight, stillbirth and neonatal stress.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Magnetic fields turn up the heat on bacterial biofilmsA short exposure to an alternating magnetic field might someday replace multiple surgeries and weeks of IV antibiotics as treatment for stubborn infections on artificial joints, new research suggests.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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'Ego-dissolving' psychedelic drugs could assist with mental healthThe altered state of consciousness and temporary lack of ego that results from using psychedelic drugs could help some mental health patients recover from their symptoms, according to academics.
10d New on MIT Technology Review
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Mazda’s New Gas Engine Proves There’s Still Life in Internal Combustion
10d The Atlantic
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Trump's Pointless Untruths About U.S. Nuclear Weapons In a global crisis, much less a possible nuclear showdown, credibility is essential. President Trump, as I noted yesterday , faces a serious deficit in that regard, since his record of untruthfulness means that Americans don’t know whether to trust him and that foreign leaders have no reason to take his threats seriously. Right on cue, the president demonstrated the gravity of the problem with a
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists unearth cell 'checkpoint' that stops allergic diseasesScientists from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, have made a significant breakthrough in understanding the regulation of immune cells that play a pivotal role in allergic diseases such as asthma and eczema. They have identified a 'checkpoint' manned by these immune cells that, if barred, can halt the development of the lung inflammation associated with allergies.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Family break-ups lead to domestic violence in fruit fly relationshipsMale fruit flies with strong family ties are less likely to become abusive during mating than others, according to new Oxford research.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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UF scientists discover cause of Atlantic coastline's sea level rise hot spotsA new study, published online today, shows that seas rose in the southeastern US between 2011 and 2015 by more than six times the global average sea level rise that is already happening due to human-induced global warming. The combined effects of El Niño (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both of which are naturally occurring climate processes, drove this recent sea level rise hot sp
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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How U.S. States Have Used Emergency Declarations to Fight the Opioid EpidemicThe Trump administration has declined to invoke this status nationally — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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It Was Necessary to Use Nukes against Japan–but North Korea Is More ComplicatedKim Jong-un's increasing threats bring to mind the world's only nuclear attack, which happened 72 years ago this week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Gizmodo
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The Concourse Game Of Thrones Is Only Just Starting To Burn It All Down | Jezebel ‘No One Thinks’ An The Concourse Game Of Thrones Is Only Just Starting To Burn It All Down | Jezebel ‘No One Thinks’ Angelina and Brad Will Ever Get Divorced, and She Might Even ‘Take Him Back’ | The Root How Russia Used Racism to Hack White Voters | Splinter Comic: The GOP Might Want to Check Its Own ‘Cosmopolitan Bias’ |
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Chaco Canyon petroglyph may represent ancient total eclipseAs the hullabaloo surrounding the Aug. 21 total eclipse of the sun swells by the day, a University of Colorado Boulder faculty member says a petroglyph in New Mexico's Chaco Canyon may represent a total eclipse that occurred there a thousand years ago.
10d New on MIT Technology Review
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Mazda’s New Gas Engine Could Help Internal Combustion Live a Little Longer
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How ambient energy could power the Internet of thingsIn the modern world, we are increasingly surrounded by digital sensors, cameras and communications devices sending data cloud-based analysis services. Those devices need power, and designers are finding new ways to draw it from ambient sources rather than rely on batteries or hard-wired grid connections. This week Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the newsmagazine of the American Chemical Societ
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Chaco Canyon petroglyph may represent ancient total eclipse says CU professorAs the hullabaloo surrounding the Aug. 21 total eclipse of the sun swells by the day, a University of Colorado Boulder faculty member says a petroglyph in New Mexico's Chaco Canyon may represent a total eclipse that occurred there a thousand years ago.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Increased endometrial cancer rates found in women with high levels of cadmiumThrough a five-year observational study recently published in PLOS One, researchers at the University of Missouri found that women with increased levels of cadmium — a metal commonly found in foods such as kidneys, liver and shellfish as well as tobacco — also had an increased risk of endometrial cancer. It's an observation the researchers hope could lead to new treatments or interventions to pr
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Biosimilar insulin lispro shown not inferior to Humalog® in efficacy or safetyA study comparing the safety and efficacy of SAR342434, a biosimilar (follow-on form) of insulin lispro-Humalog®, found it to be comparable to that of the brand name drug in patients also using insulin glargine.
10d Popular Science
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UK climate report confirms 2016 was really hot Environment New findings are in line with NASA and NOAA estimates. The United Kingdom's Global and Regional Climate report for 2016 mirrors NASA and NOAA's conclusion that 2016 was hot and climate change is to blame.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Spider peptides battle superbugs and cancerAs antibiotic resistance rises and fears over superbugs grow, scientists are looking for new treatment options. One area of focus is antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which could someday be an alternative to currently prescribed antibiotics, many of which are becoming increasingly useless against some bacteria. Now, a team reports in ACS Chemical Biology that they have improved the antimicrobial—and
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Improving detection of a 'date rape' drugBecause gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), commonly known as a "date rape drug" is rapidly absorbed and metabolized by the body, it's difficult for law enforcement to tell if someone has been given GHB. Now, scientists report in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry that they have identified a potential biomarker that might lead to tests to detect the compound that could be performed much later than cur
10d Gizmodo
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Portal Is Like an Express Lane For Your Home Wi-Fi, and We Have an Exclusive Discount Code The past year or so has seen a welcome deluge of Wi-Fi router innovation, and Portal seems to be one of the best newcomers in the space, particularly for smaller dwellings in congested, urban environments . Portal includes app-based configuration, nine internal antennas, and mesh capabilities if you buy more than one…table stakes these days for a good router. But while almost all home Wi-Fi rou
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Anker’s Genie Is Just Like the Echo Dot, Only CheaperThe Chinese company is launching a $35 version of the Echo Dot smart speaker, powered by Amazon's Alexa.
10d Gizmodo
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Could This Squishy Robot Be the Future of Robotics? GIF GIF: YouTube The phones in our pockets might be getting more and more complicated, but many researchers advancing the field of robotics are actually engineering simpler bots designed to reliably perform very basic tasks. So instead of one day facing a terrifying future filled with terminators, these squishy rolling donuts might be our biggest threat. Yoichi Masuda and Masato Ishikawa detail t
10d Futurity.org
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Little nozzles could propel nano satellites Researchers have developed a new type of micropropulsion system for miniature satellites (called CubeSats) that uses tiny nozzles that release precise bursts of water vapor to maneuver the spacecraft. Low-cost “microsatellites” and “nanosatellites” far smaller than conventional spacecraft, have become increasingly prevalent. Thousands of the miniature satellites might be launched to perform a var
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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How ambient energy could power the internet of thingsIn the modern world, we are increasingly surrounded by digital sensors, cameras and communications devices sending data cloud-based analysis services. Those devices need power, and designers are finding new ways to draw it from ambient sources rather than rely on batteries or hard-wired grid connections. This week Chemical & Engineering News, the news magazine of the American Chemical Society, exa
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Spider peptides battle superbugs and cancerAs antibiotic resistance rises and fears over superbugs grow, scientists are looking for new treatment options. One area of focus is antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which could someday be an alternative to currently prescribed antibiotics, many of which are becoming increasingly useless against some bacteria. Now, a team reports in ACS Chemical Biology that they have improved the antimicrobial — a
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research opens possibility of reducing risk of gut bacterial infections with next-generation probioticIn laboratory-grown bacterial communities, the co-administration of probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri and glycerol selectively killed C. difficile.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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When you're blue, so are your Instagram photosInstagram photos can be examined by a computer to successfully detect depressed people, new research shows. The computer results are more reliable (70 percent) than the diagnostic success rate (42 percent) of general-practice doctors. The approach promises a new method for early screening of mental health problems through social media.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Replacing some old pipes can still result in lead-contaminated waterLead in drinking water is a decades-old problem and still poses serious public health risks today. In response, utilities are replacing segments of old lead pipes that are causing the contamination. Surprisingly, researchers report that although partial line replacements can decrease lead levels in tap water, concentrations spike right after line replacement and can remain elevated for months afte
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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UK: North-South health divide bigger than ever with alarming rise in deaths of northern 25-44 year oldsDying early (under age 75) is 20% more likely in northern compared with southern England according to research led by The University of Manchester:
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Amniotic sac in a dish: Stem cells form structures that may aid of infertility researchThe first few weeks after sperm meets egg still hold many mysteries. Among them: what causes the process to fail, leading to many cases of infertility. But scientists haven't had a good way to explore the biology behind this phenomenon. Now, a new achievement using human stem cells could give researchers a chance to see what they couldn't before, while avoiding ethical issues associated with study
10d Futurity.org
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Use nuclear bomb to save U.S. soldiers, Americans say American public opinion on nuclear weapons hasn’t changed much since 1945 and many Americans would support their use to kill millions of civilians if the United States found itself in a similar wartime situation, a new study suggests. Researchers used a survey experiment to recreate the situation that the United States faced in 1945 in the Hiroshima nuclear bombing with a hypothetical American wa
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How Palantir, Peter Thiel's Secretive Data Company, Pushed Its Way Into PolicingA Backchannel investigation reveals the difficult issues police and communities face when they adopt Palantir's secretive data-scooping software.
10d Feed: All Latest
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Japanese Telecom Giant SoftBank Bets $1 Billion on the Clever Pharma Startup RoivantSoftBank's aquisition-and-investment spree extends to a drug development business with a slick new strategy
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Mazda Will Bring the First Compression Ignition Gasoline Engine to MarketThe Skyactiv-X engine will arrive in 2019.
10d Feed: All Latest
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NASA's Smartest Satellite Is Gone. Can Private Space Replace It?A private company called Satellogic wants to give Earth scientists hyperspectral data from a fleet of satellites for free.
10d Feed: All Latest
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How to Watch the Total Solar Eclipse (Even If You're Running Behind)Here’s how to muscle your way into the moon’s shadow on August 21.
10d Feed: All Latest
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Yes, Bitcoin Has No Intrinsic Value. Neither Does a $1 BillFears about virtual currency bitcoin echo concerns about earlier financial innovations, like paper money.
10d Feed: All Latest
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Of Course This Is What Homeopathic Healing Machines Look LikeIt's kinda sci-fi, but it's not science.
10d Feed: All Latest
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The Long, Hot Summer of Netflix's Ever-Accelerating ExpansionForget summer vacation: In the last three months alone, Netflix has announced dozens of properties, continuing its global spread.
10d Feed: All Latest
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How Baidu Will Win China’s AI race—and, Maybe, the World’sIn an exclusive interview, Baidu COO Qi Lu explains why the Chinese search giant will be smarter than Alexa and drive better than Google.
10d Feed: All Latest
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Ethereum Is Coding's New Wild WestEthereum is more than just digital cash. It's also a decentralized computing platform—and developers are all over it.
10d Feed: All Latest
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Jeff Bezos Should Put His Billions Into LibrariesIf Jeff Bezos really wants make an impact, he should look to places where books aren't sold—but lent.
10d Feed: All Latest
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Bitcoin Makes Even Smart People Feel DumbWhen investors love a cryptocurrency like Bitcoin without fully understanding it, things could end badly.
10d Live Science
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Marijuana Use Linked to Increased Risk of Dying from High Blood PressureSmoking pot is often considered safer than smoking cigarettes, but a new study suggests that marijuana use may increase a person's risk of death from high blood pressure.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Improving detection of a 'date rape' drugBecause gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), commonly known as a 'date rape drug' is rapidly absorbed and metabolized by the body, it's difficult for law enforcement to tell if someone has been given GHB. Now, scientists report in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry that they have identified a potential biomarker that might lead to tests to detect the compound that could be performed much later than cur
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How cicadas manage to 'wing it'Unlike locusts and many other flying insects, cicadas don't soar through the air with the greatest of ease. Now in a study appearing the ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, scientists report that certain chemical components in the insect's wings could explain why.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Outrage over S.Korean stem cell scandal official's new postHundreds of South Korean scientists expressed outrage Wednesday after a controversial figure accused of covering up a notorious stem cell research fraud was appointed as the country's top technology official.
10d The Atlantic
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The President vs. His Own Secretary of State The job of the secretary of state, according to the U.S. State Department, is to carry “out the president’s foreign policies.” So when Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Wednesday that he doesn’t believe there’s “any imminent threat” of conflict with North Korea, technically he should have been reflecting President Trump’s view. But just moments after Tillerson’s remarks, made to reporters en
10d The Scientist RSS
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Researchers Petition to Bring Back Grant CapsNearly 1,000 signatories are asking the National Institutes of Health to reinstitute the Grant Support Index proposal.
10d Ars Technica
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As eclipse madness spreads, so do conspiracy theories Enlarge / In this Maurice Leloir painting, The Sun King—King Louis XIV—and the ladies of the Court on the terrace of the Marly Castle, watch a Solar Eclipse. (credit: Christophel Fine Art/UIG via Getty Images) The first solar eclipse to span the entire United States has lots of people justifiably excited. The midday disappearance of the Sun is a truly novel and moving experience. For many people,
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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American flight underscores hazards posed by turbulenceAt some point during many flights, the captain will calmly announce that there could be some bumps ahead and so passengers must be seated with their seat belts on.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How cicadas manage to 'wing it'Unlike locusts and many other flying insects, cicadas don't soar through the air with the greatest of ease. Now in a study appearing the ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, scientists report that certain chemical components in the insect's wings could explain why.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Spying on malaria parasites at -196 CelsiusMalaria research: By combining two advanced microscope techniques an international team of scientists led by postdoc Sergey Kapishnikov from the Niels Bohr Institute has managed to obtain new information about the ravaging mode of operation applied by malaria parasites when attacking their victims. This information can be utilized when designing new medication to more effectively fight malaria – a
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Biochar shows benefits as manure lagoon coverManure is a reality in raising farm animals. Manure can be a useful fertilizer, returning valued nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium to the soil for plant growth. But manure has problems. Odor offensiveness, gas emissions, nutrient runoff, and possible water pollution are just a few.
10d New on MIT Technology Review
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South Korea Is Decreasing Tax Breaks on Automation, and That’s Probably a Bad Idea
10d Futurity.org
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Can electric charges disrupt ALS protein clumps? By imitating a natural process of cells, researchers report that they have prevented the formation of protein clumps associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)—also called Lou Gehrig’s disease—and frontotemporal dementia. In lab cultures of human and yeast cells, the scientists stopped the harmful clumping of FUS proteins by exposing them to phosphorylation, a process that makes precise
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Crystallography provides battle-plan blueprints for attacking disease-causing bacteriaScientists from Trinity College Dublin have gained key structural insights into the machinery employed by opportunistic, disease-causing bacteria, which may help chemists design new drugs to inhibit them.
10d Science : NPR
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At CERN, In Search Of Nature's Building Blocks In a world so divided by cultural and economic warfare, what happens at the European laboratory for particle physics stands out as a celebration of the best we have to offer, says Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto)
10d Viden
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Astrofysikers anbefalinger: 5 bøger du kan blive klogere afMichael Linden-Vørnle foreslår fem bøger, du med fordel kan læse i sommeren.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Damming and its effects on fishThe BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Preparing for longevity — we don't need to become frail as we ageAge-related frailty may be a treatable and preventable health problem, just like obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, highlights a review in Frontiers in Physiology.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Spying on malaria parasites at -196 CelsiusBy combining two advanced microscope techniques an international team of scientists led by postdoc Sergey Kapishnikov from the Niels Bohr Institute has managed to obtain new information about the ravaging mode of operation applied by malaria parasites when attacking their victims. This information can be utilized when designing new medication to more effectively fight malaria — a disease claiming
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Personalized melanoma genomic risk triggers family conversationsA new study published in the British Journal of Dermatology indicates that personalized melanoma genomic risk information can prompt discussions about skin cancer prevention and skin examinations with family and health professionals.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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The mystery of the pulsating blue starsIn the middle of the Chilean Atacama desert, a team of Polish astronomers are monitoring millions of celestial bodies. In 2013, the team was surprised when they discovered, in the course of their survey, stars that pulsated much faster than expected. In the following years, the team that included an astronomer from the Astronomical Institute of Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, st
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Crystallography provides battle-plan blueprints for attacking disease-causing bacteriaX-rays helped scientists to look under the bonnet of two common bacteria that opportunistically infect people, so as to better understand the mechanics involved. The blueprints may be used to design new drugs, which are badly needed.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Successful filming of fastest aurora flickeringResearchers conducted a 3 year continuous high-speed imaging observation at Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, USA, and identified the physics behind the flickering of aurora. At the same time, they discovered faster flickerings at speeds of 1/60-1/50 and 1/80 of a second.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Extinction mystery solved? Evidence suggests humans played a role in monkey's demise in JamaicaRadiocarbon dating of a fossilized leg bone from a Jamaican monkey called Xenothrix mcgregori suggests it may be the one of the most recent primate species anywhere in the world to become extinct, and it may solve a long-standing mystery about the cause of its demise. The short answer: human settlement of its island home.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Biochar shows benefits as manure lagoon coverManure is a reality in raising farm animals. Manure can be a useful fertilizer, returning valued nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium to the soil for plant growth. But manure has problems. Odor offensiveness, gas emissions, nutrient runoff, and possible water pollution are just a few. New methods may reduce these negatives while potentially adding some positives: biochar covers.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Loggerhead sea turtle released after rehabA loggerhead sea turtle that was rescued in Virginia and named Humphrey has been released back into the ocean after undergoing rehabilitation in New Jersey.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The mystery of the pulsating blue starsIn the middle of the large Chilean Atacama desert, a team of Polish astronomers are patiently monitoring millions of celestial bodies night after night with the help of a modern robotic telescope. In 2013, the team was surprised when they discovered, in the course of their survey, stars that pulsated much faster than expected. In the following years, the team that included Dr. Marilyn Latour, an a
10d Futurity.org
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Stress makes past threats seem scary again We’re likely to perceive danger in harmless circumstances when memories of past negative experiences combine with stress, research shows. The findings shed light on fear generalization, a core component of anxiety and stress-related disorders. “The human mind uses cues to danger learned over time for self-defense, but certain circumstances can cause people to misidentify those cues,” says Joseph
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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School driving lessons offer multiple benefitsCompulsory driver's licence education at secondary schools is being endorsed by new research from Massey University on the grounds it will make a big difference in helping young people get jobs.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Why abseiling spiders don't spin out of control—new researchSeeing an abseiling spider descend gracefully using its dragline silk instead of spinning unpredictably and uncontrollably, led us to try and understand the science behind it.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The science of how 83 German officers tunnelled out of a Welsh prison camp in 1945It only takes the opening notes of the theme tune to 1963 classic film The Great Escape for most people to conjure up images of the lives of prisoners of wars – and their escapes – during World War II. The film, based on the best-selling book of the same name, tells the story of how British Commonwealth prisoners escaped from Stalag Luft III in Sagan (now Żagań, Poland), in Nazi Germany.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Super-heatwaves of 55 C to emerge if global warming continuesHeatwaves amplified by high humidity can reach above 40°C and may occur as often as every two years, leading to serious risks for human health. If global temperatures rise with 4°C, a new super heatwave of 55°C can hit regularly many parts of the world, including Europe.
10d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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Telescope protest, GM salmon and a giant 'dead zone' The week in science: 4–10 August 2017. Nature 548 140 doi: 10.1038/548140a
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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Demystifying the Black Box That Is AIHumans are increasingly entrusting our security, health and safety to “black box” intelligent machines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Popular Science
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Consumer drones are causing problems for the military Military New rules ban Army from using commercial drones, allow bases to shoot them down. New rules ban Army from using commercial drones, allow bases to shoot down drones…
10d Ingeniøren
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Selvflyvende fly er på vej – men ville du sætte dig ind i et?Det vil spare milliarder at tage piloterne ud af cockpittet. Men hvor mange vil sætte sig ind i et fly uden piloter? Ifølge en ny rapport næsten ingen.
10d Futurity.org
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Kidnapped brides give birth to smaller babies In the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan, bride kidnapping—abducting young women and girls for the purpose of marriage—remains widespread. Children born to these kidnapped brides weighed 80 to 190 grams less than infants born in arranged marriages. Birthweight provides an important marker of both mothers’ and babies’ health, says Charles Becker, a research professor of economics at Duke Univer
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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'Robin Hood effects' on motivation in mathStudents from families with little interest in math benefit more from a school intervention program that aims at increasing math motivation than do students whose parents regard math as important. A study by researchers at the Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology indicates the intervention program has a "Robin Hood effect" which reduces the "motivational gap" between stud
10d Gizmodo
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There Could Be More Hunger Games and Twilight Movies in the Future Karen Gillen talks Nebula’s mysterious new BFF in Infinity War . The Gifted recruits another Marvel mutant. There’s more rumors about the focus of Sony’s first Spidey spinoff, Silver and Black . Plus, new pictures from Inhumans , Seth McFarlane on The Orville ’s influences, and a new look at Pennywise in It . Spoilers now! The Hunger Games/Twilight Lionsgate CEO Jon Feltheimer believes there are
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Do men and women really find different words funny? Here's what the research saysIs the word "booty" really funnier than "ass"? And does the word "bondage" raise a laugh more than "giggle"? A new behaviour research study looks at the perceived funniness of individual English words, and finds that women and men consider different words amusing. But is this really the case?
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Lufton Villa excavations reveal new details about famous fish mosaicA two-week excavation of a Roman villa by a team of Newcastle University students has uncovered new details about its famous octagonal fish mosaic.
10d Ingeniøren
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Ny teori: Når sorte huller spiser neutronstjerner, får vi guldObservationer af dværggalakser har bidraget til mysteriet om, hvor og hvordan grundstoffer som guld, platin og uran dannes. Ny spekulativ, men gennemarbejdet og attraktiv forklaring, kan testes med gravitationsbølgeobservatorier.
10d Dagens Medicin

Pjækkebøder til patienterne – er det vejen frem?Før vi indfører disse gebyrer til samfundets absolut svageste, nemlig de svært syge, bør vi optimere vores rutiner for påmindelser.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Transforming skin cells to insulinNorwegian researchers are one step closer to curing diabetes by making insulin-producing cells from skin cells.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antidepressant use increases risk of head injuries among persons with Alzheimer's diseaseAntidepressant use is associated with an increased risk of head injuries and traumatic brain injuries among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Antidepressant use has previously been linked with an increased risk of falls and hip fractures, but the risk of head injuries has not been studied before. The results were published in Alzheim
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Researchers advise caution about recent US advice on aggressively lowering blood pressureMedical researchers at Trinity College Dublin are advising caution when treating blood pressure in some older people — after results from a study contrasted with recent advice from the US, based on the SPRINT trial, to attempt to aggressively lower blood pressure in all adults to targets of 120mmHg.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Early diagnostic imaging to prevent kidney diseaseOsaka University researchers, in collaboration with several Japanese companies, translate neuroimaging tools to study renal fibrosis in rat kidney. The technique is expected to replace the invasive biopsies currently used to identify patients at risk of developing chronic kidney disease.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Assembling nanomachines in bacteriaOsaka University researchers use X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to resolve the assembly of the export gate apparatus in Salmonella. The new details of this nanomachine are expected to clarify how bacteria infect eukaryotic cells and present new molecular targets for drug discovery.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Post-glacial history of lake of the woodsThe extent and depth of lakes in glaciated regions of North America are controlled by climate and the influence of differential isostatic rebound of the land's surface that began when Pleistocene ice melted from the continent. This relationship and the post-glacial history of Lake of the Woods is presented for the first time in a new study by five Canadian researchers.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Opto-mechanical technique circumvents mechanical losses using the action of lightA research collaboration between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the University of Maryland has revealed a new technique by which scattering of sound waves from disorder in a material can be suppressed on demand. All of this, can be simply achieved by illuminating with the appropriate color of laser light.
10d The Atlantic
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America Is Not Ready for a War in North Korea If you want to know why you should be concerned that the United States could blunder into an ill-conceived war on the Korean peninsula, consider three statements: “We’ll handle North Korea. We’ll be able to handle North Korea. It will be handled. We handle everything.” (Donald Trump, July 31) “The president’s been very clear about it. He said he’s not gonna tolerate North Korea being able to thre
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Forest conservation approaches must recognise the rights of local peopleUntil the 1980s, biodiversity conservation in the tropics focused on the "fines and fences" approach: creating protected areas from which local people were forcibly excluded. More recently, conservationists have embraced the notion of "win-win": a dream world where people and nature thrive side by side.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New microfluidic chip boosts the sensitivity of immunoassays by >1000xProteins are one of the most important classes of biomarkers – biological molecules indicative of a disease or health of an individual. The detection of proteins is critical in a variety of tests; from the diagnosis of malaria, through the detection of heart attacks, to cancer screening and monitoring. The most common way to detect these biomarkers is to use a biochemical test known as an immunoas
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Earth observations guided efforts to aid communities swamped by historic floodingFlooding killed more than 125 people in the U.S. in 2016. When disasters threaten the lives of Americans, NASA Earth Science uses its perspective from space to assist response and recovery efforts. We maintain a close partnership with many federal agencies, including USGS, NOAA, and FEMA.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Image: Thirty year-old microbiology experimentThis humble parcel-sized hardware is Europe's very first closed-loop life-support experiment to fly in space, 30 years ago this week.
10d Futurity.org
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Watch: Scientists find 3 new mini frogs in Peru A team of scientists has discovered three new frog species in a remote protected forest in the Peruvian Andes, adding to the two the team found previously. The three newly found species live in the mountain forests and Andean grasslands of the Pui Pui Protected Forest in central Peru. All three species measure an inch or less in length, from snout to vent. “Our team has now described five new spe
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Failure Gets a Gold-Standard TrialA treatment aims to reverse long-term scar-tissue damage — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Ars Technica
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Bay Area: Join us tonight, 8/16, to talk about Silicon Valley and the inequality crisis Enlarge / Catherine Bracy will be our guest at Ars Technica Live on 8/16, discussing how the tech industry can address issues of inequality in the Bay Area. (credit: Catherine Bracy) Anyone who has been in the Bay Area in recent years knows that the tech industry plays an outsized role in our daily lives. We feel it in things like our rent and the price of our drinks—regardless of whether we work
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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2016 was another warm year, report confirmsA new report confirms that 2016 was another exceptionally warm year, with global temperature having reached 0.77± 0.09 degrees C above its level between 1961 and 1990.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New theory on the origin of dark matterScientists have come up with a new theory on how dark matter may have been formed shortly after the origin of the universe. This new model proposes an alternative to the WIMP paradigm that is the subject of various experiments in current research.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Potentially harmful nanoparticles produced through burning coalEnvironmental scientists have discovered that the burning of coal produces incredibly small airborne particles of a highly unusual form of titanium oxide with the potential to be toxic to humans.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Machine learning could be key to producing stronger, less corrosive metalsResearchers have studied grain boundaries for decades and gained some insight into the types of properties grain boundaries produce, but no one has been able to nail down a universal system to predict if a certain configuration of atoms at grain boundaries will make a material stronger or more pliable. An interdisciplinary team of researchers have cracked the code by juicing a computer with an alg
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New ultrafast method for determining antibiotic resistanceResearchers have developed a new method for very rapidly determining whether infection-causing bacteria are resistant or susceptible to antibiotics.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists prevent neurodegeneration-associated protein clumping in lab studyBy artificially exposing FUS proteins to the natural process of phosphorylation, researchers were able to prevent them from forming the harmful clumps associated with ALS and frontotemporal dementia.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Increased floodlighting reducing bat populations in Sweden's churches(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two from Sweden and one from Spain has found that installing floodlighting around rural churches drives away roosting bats. In their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, Jens Rydell, with Lund University, Johan Eklöf, with Graptolit Ord och Natur and Sonia Sánchez-Navarro with Estación Biológica de Doñana-CSIC describe their comparison of church bat popu
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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What Self-Talk Reveals about the BrainStudies of the conversations people have with themselves open a window on the hidden workings of the mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Weight loss surgery's effects on bone marrow fat and bone massBone marrow fat is thought to regulate bone metabolism, and high levels of marrow fat are seen in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Marijuana associated with three-fold risk of death from hypertensionMarijuana use is associated with a three-fold risk of death from hypertension, according to new research.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Tiny molecule has big effect on brain's ability to learnPrenatal brain development is a crucial period, and as new research has found, even small alterations to the way brain cells develop can have significant effects later in life. Scientists have shed light on the role that small molecules called microRNAs play in early brain development. The research found a close link between early brain developmental events and changes in cognitive function in adu
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Successful guide dogs have 'tough love' moms, study findsMuch has been written on the pitfalls of being a helicopter parent, one who insulates children from adversity rather than encouraging their independence. A new study seems to back up this finding — in dogs.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Big data yields surprising connections between diseasesUsing health insurance claims data from more than 480,000 people in nearly 130,000 families, researchers at the University of Chicago have created a new classification of common diseases based on how often they occur among genetically-related individuals.
10d Live Science
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Eclipses Were Regarded As Omens in the Ancient WorldAugust 21, people living in the continental United States will be able to see a total solar eclipse.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Replacing some old pipes can still result in lead-contaminated waterLead in drinking water is a decades-old problem and still poses serious public health risks today. In response, utilities are replacing segments of old lead pipes that are causing the contamination. Surprisingly, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that although partial line replacements can decrease lead levels in tap water, concentrations spike right after line replacem
10d Gizmodo
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This One-Day Amazon Deal Is One of the Best Tool Discounts We've Ever Seen Bosch 4-Tool Combo Kit , $285 If you have any home improvement projects on the horizon, or just want to upgrade your tool collection, Amazon’s running an insane one-day deal on a 4-tool Bosch combo kit . $285 gets you a 1/2" drill/driver, a 1/4" hex impact driver, a reciprocating saw, and a circular saw, all of which will run off the two included 18V battery packs. Advertisement I did the math, a
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Team researches thermal conductivity of cable bedding materialsThe trouble-free operation of the energy distribution grid presents a challenge in the era of renewable energy sources. Researchers at TU Darmstadt demonstrate how grid operators can operate and expand underground cabling in a more efficient manner.
10d The Atlantic
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The Eclipse That Made America Great Historians have identified the period between 1861 and 1877—from the beginning of the Civil War to the end of Reconstruction—as the era that created the America we recognize today, when a continental power finally coalesced north and south, ocean to ocean. At the time of the 1878 total solar eclipse, the country was still adjusting to this new reality. Like an ungainly teenager after a growth spu
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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Is Your Metabolism to Blame?Is a slow metabolism keeping you from losing weight? Can you do anything to speed it up? A closer look at what we can realistically do to change our metabolism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Gizmodo
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Rex Tillerson Says There's No Imminent Threat From North Korea, Americans Should Sleep Well Photo: Getty Images Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and President Trump are rarely on the same page. But nowhere is that divide more obvious than when the two talk about North Korea. Tillerson is currently on a plane heading from Malaysia to Washington, DC, and just talked to reporters during a refueling stop in Guam . The Secretary of State stressed that he doesn’t believe North Korea poses “an
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Replacing some old pipes can still result in lead-contaminated waterLead in drinking water is a decades-old problem and still poses serious public health risks today. In response, utilities are replacing segments of old lead pipes that are causing the contamination. Surprisingly, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that although partial line replacements can decrease lead levels in tap water, concentrations spike right after line replacem
10d Ingeniøren
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Datatilsynet: Vi bliver sat skakmat, når myndigheder ignorerer vores kritik Tilsynet mangler muligheder, når kommuner ikke retter op på brud på persondataloven. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/datatilsynet-vi-bliver-sat-skakmat-naar-myndigheder-ignorere-vores-kritik-1078928 Version2
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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What social media reveals about your personalitySince the inception of social media, a prodigious amount of status updates, tweets, and comments have been posted online. The language people use to express themselves can provide clues about the kind of people they are, online and off. Current efforts to understand personality from writing samples rely on theories and survey data from the 1980s. New research from the New England Complex Systems I
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Genetics takes fight to gardeners' green foeA scientist from The University of Manchester has hit upon an innovative way to control greenflies which infest our gardens and farms.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ancient dog bones hint at male initiation rituals during Bronze Age(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Hartwick College in the U.S. has found evidence of young male humans eating dog meat as part of initiation rituals during the Bronze Age. In their paper published in Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, David Anthony and Dorcas Brown describe attributes of ancient bones and the evidence they found suggesting dog and possibly wolf eating as a rite of passage
10d Science-Based Medicine
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Video Games and the BrainA new article looked at the effect of playing video games on the brain. Its results confirm what was previously suspected from prior research. First, it is another demonstration of use-dependent plasticity in the brain. Further, it supports a direct relationship between the types of activity in which people engage and increases or decreases in the respective parts of the brain. And finally it supp
10d Live Science
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Google Manifesto: Does Biology Explain Gender Disparities in Tech?A Google employee wrote a manifesto arguing that innate differences between men and women may partly explain the gender gap in tech jobs, but experts say that's off-base
10d Live Science
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Man Left Wheelchair-Bound from Using Denture CreamA 62-year-old man in the United Kingdom lost feeling in both his legs in an unusual case that linked his neurological problems to heavy use of a zinc-containing denture fixative.
10d Live Science
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Maori Artifacts Point to Early Polynesian Settlement in New ZealandArcheologists in New Zealand are starting to unravel the mysteries of an early settlement near the northern tip of the islands that may have been founded by some of the first Polynesians to arrive in the region.
10d Live Science
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In Photos: Exploring an Early Maori Site in New ZealandArchaeologists in New Zealand are exploring an early Maori site on Moturua island in the Bay of Islands that they think may have been home to some of the first Polynesian settlers in New Zealand around 700 years ago.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Climate gloom and doom? Bring it on. But we need stories about taking action, tooThere's been no shortage of pessimistic news on climate change lately. A group of climate scientists and policy experts recently declared that we have just three years left to dramatically turn around carbon emissions, or else. Meanwhile a widely circulated New York magazine article detailed some of the most catastrophic possible consequences of climate change this century if we continue with busi
10d Science | The Guardian
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Why do cephalopods produce ink? And what's ink made of, anyway? Cephalopods such as octopuses and squid have been known for their ink since antiquity. But what do we know about the evolution of ink and inking? Cephalopods, the group of molluscs that includes octopuses, cuttlefish, squids, ammonites, nautiluses and belemnites, are a weird bunch. Not only are they strange when anatomically compared to their shelled relatives like bivalves, snails and chitons bu
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How acoustics can be an early warning system for bridgesJinying Zhu's emerging technology is on the ball, off the chain and poised to make bridges safe by sound.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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What algae can tell us about political strategyWhile single-celled organisms typically only make it into political discussion during insults, it turns out that modeling their behavior may give researchers a better handle on how political movements survive and spread.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How to save zoos? Focus on education, conservationOne of my earlier memories from my childhood is visiting the Frankfurt zoo in Germany. I watched several elephants in an indoor enclosure, and while they were huge and fascinating, it also saddened me to see such magnificent animals in captivity. I also remember having straw thrown in my face by one of those elephants, although my parents dispute this.
10d Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Gravide har mindre risiko for kejsersnit, hvis de spiser sundere og er mere fysisk aktiveMan kan mindske risikoen for at føde ved kejsersnit med omkring 10%, hvis man spiser sundere og…
10d Ingeniøren
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Klimaforskere: Upålidelige klimatal kan få Parisaftalen til at kollapseBBC-undersøgelse viser, at det kan være svært at stole på de opgørelser, som verdens lande selv opgiver for udledning af klimagasser. Det gælder blandt andre tal fra Kina, Rusland og Indien.
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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What Does Your Dog Really Want?With MRI, scientists are beginning to answer that question in a much more sophisticated way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How to kill fruit flies, according to a scientistAs a researcher who works on fruit flies, I often get asked how to get them out of someone's kitchen. This happens to fly researchers often enough that we sit around fly conferences (these actually exist) and complain about getting asked this question.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Are sex offender registries reinforcing inequality?Public sex offender registries are at the forefront of what I've described in my research as a "war on sex."
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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With a gentle touch, scientists push us closer to flash memory successorSometimes a light touch is best: When you're telling a joke or hammering a tiny finishing nail into a wall, a gentle delivery often succeeds most effectively. Research at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) suggests it also may be true in the microscopic world of computer memory, where a team of scientists may have found that subtlety solves some of the issues with a novel me
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Engineers pioneer platinum shell formation process, achieve first-ever observationUCI researchers have devised a new method of dynamically forming a platinum shell on a metallic alloy nanoparticle core, a development that may lead to better materials for oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells that power some cars and electronic devices. In a first, engineers were able to observe the process directly, in real time, in UCI's state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy fac
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Optical illusion garments can create desired effect if chosen correctlyOptical illusion garments have been popular for as long as people have tried to use clothing to enhance appearances, from A-line dresses that accentuate the waist to striped trousers that visually elongate an individual's stride. However, knowing what outfit is right for one's body can be challenging. New research from the University of Missouri reveals the future of fashion could lie in the use o
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Chemical looping combustion for CO2-neutral gas facilitiesA novel gas combustion method removing the need for expensive gas separation has been successfully scaled-up. The novel method has gas-to-steam efficiency penalties much lower than alternative CO2 capture technologies, as well as a CO2 avoidance cost reduced by 60 % compared to amine scrubbing. The consortium is already looking to extend it to biomass combustion.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Assembling nanomachines in bacteriaOsaka University researchers use X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to resolve the assembly of the export gate apparatus in Salmonella. The new details of this nanomachine are expected to clarify how bacteria infect eukaryotic cells and present new molecular targets for drug discovery.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Post-glacial history of Lake of the WoodsThe extent and depth of lakes in glaciated regions of North America are controlled by climate and the influence of differential isostatic rebound of the land's surface that began when Pleistocene ice melted from the continent. This relationship and the post-glacial history of Lake of the Woods—one of the largest lake complexes in North America and the source of water for the city of Winnipeg—is pr
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Novel poxvirus threatens juvenile squirrelsA previously unknown poxvirus causes severe disease in European red squirrels from Germany. Molecular genetic investigations revealed a new virus species in the family of Poxviridae. Results of the study are published in the scientific journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Surgeons go green—recycling general anaestheticOne of the paradoxes of the medical marvel known as general anaesthesia is that in helping us to get well, those anaesthetic gases are also heating our planet. Now, a remedy may be at hand in the form of an innocuous-looking white powder developed by University of Melbourne scientists.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists creating an atomic 'Lego set' of 2-D wonder materialsThe strongest material known to mankind was first discovered with sticky tape. Today, this two-dimensional (2-D) version of carbon known as graphene is the subject of intense research around the world. Many hope its unique properties could lead to breakthroughs in fields from electronics to medicine.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Air quality measurements in the sky over EuropeIt looks like a bucket list for city trips, but it's the current route of the HALO research aircraft. Until the end of July, atmosphere researchers from all over Germany will study air pollution above European conurbations. They want to better understand and predict the impacts of pollution on the Earth's atmosphere. Two instruments on board HALO have been developed by researchers of Karlsruhe Ins
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Enterprise models that help alleviate povertyWhile the understanding of how specific business enterprises alleviate poverty continues to grow, research that compares impacts across business models remains scarce.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Some workers 'cyberloaf' if they think they can get away with it, so employers need to get creativeSending personal emails, a bit of online shopping, checking out your friend's holiday snaps on Facebook: if you break up your work day with online activities that aren't work-related, you may be guilty of "cyberloafing".
10d Science | The Guardian
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How to see the total solar eclipse across America Want to see the total eclipse on 21 August but overwhelmed by advice? Here’s all you need to know The American solar eclipse is less than a fortnight away. It will be visible across the United States during the morning and early afternoon of Monday 21 August. If you’ve never seen a total eclipse of the sun, the chances are that you are going to turn to the internet for some tips on how to make th
10d Latest Headlines | Science News
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Fossil find suggests this ancient reptile lurked on land, not in the waterAn exquisitely preserved fossil shows that an ancient armored reptile called Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi wasn’t aquatic, as scientists had suspected.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Fossil evidence suggests humans played a role in monkey's demise in JamaicaRadiocarbon dating of a fossilized leg bone from a Jamaican monkey called Xenothrix mcgregori suggests it may be the one of the most recent primate species anywhere in the world to become extinct, and it may solve a long-standing mystery about the cause of its demise. The short answer: human settlement of its island home.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Analyzing winter storm risk and resilience in a changing climateThe northeastern United States, marked by dense population centers and extensive infrastructure, is at particular risk for both physical and economic effects of climate hazards, including sea level rise and extreme weather events. While we tend to think of extreme weather largely in terms of tropical cyclones like Superstorm Sandy, the Northeast is also prone to extratropical cyclones – winter sto
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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It was Necessary and Moral to Use Atomic Weapons against JapanThe bombings 72 years ago this week almost certainly saved vastly more lives than they took — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Parasites, snails may factor in Adirondack moose declineThe apparent declining moose population in New York 's Adirondack Mountains may be caused partly by tiny parasite-transmitting snails eaten by moose as they forage vegetation, according to new research presented by two Cornell undergraduate students at the annual Ecological Society of America meeting, in Portland, Oregon, Aug. 8.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Invasive gobies may change Oneida Lake's complexion—againOneida Lake, a kissing cousin to New York's Finger Lakes, may soon get an environmental makeover due to another in a series of invasive species bringing havoc to the body's ecosystem and disturbing its recreational waters.
10d Science | The Guardian
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If Mary Beard is right, what's happened to the DNA of Africans from Roman Britain? There are many reasons why a genetic legacy might not be seen in contemporary populations – Mary Beard was right to defend the BBC’s cartoon If you have been on social media at all for the last couple of weeks, you are likely aware of what may be one of the silliest controversies ever: whether a dark-skinned man should be present in a BBC cartoon for children about life in Roman Britain. Critics
10d Scientific American Content: Global
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Giving Dead Migrants a NameBy pushing forensics to its limits, a courageous scientist is attempting to identify the badly decomposed remains of 700 people who drowned in the Mediterranean Sea — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10d Viden
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Rådgiver til Brinkmann: Vi bliver ikke ”ramt” af robotterneFrygt for at blive udkonkurreret af robotter skaber bekymring i danske virksomheder. Men vi får det bedre, hvis vi fokuserer på alt dét, maskiner ikke kan, siger rådgiver fra Teknologisk Institut.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Image: Moonrise from the space stationFrom his vantage point in low Earth orbit aboard the International Space Station, NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik pointed his camera toward the rising Moon and captured this beautiful image on August 3, 2017.
10d Ingeniøren
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Tøjkoncern vil opføre Danmarks højeste hus i BrandeBestsellerkoncernen vil bygge et nyt område med butikker, uddannelsesinstitutioner og et mindst 200 meter højt hus med kontorer og hotel i hjembyen Brande.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Four Earth-sized planets detected orbiting the nearest sun-like starA new study by an international team of astronomers reveals that four Earth-sized planets orbit the nearest sun-like star, tau Ceti, which is about 12 light years away and visible to the naked eye. These planets have masses as low as 1.7 Earth mass, making them among the smallest planets ever detected around nearby sun-like stars. Two of them are super-Earths located in the habitable zone of the s
10d Dagens Medicin

PLO håber på overenskomstmøder efter ferien PLO regner med at genoptage kontakten med RLTN efter at have holdt pause fra forhandlingerne over sommerferien.
10d The Atlantic
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When Success Means Leaving Your Mentor The natural evolution of mentorship isn’t necessarily a lifetime of collaboration. Instead, mentorship is often considered most successful when mentees can take what they’ve learned and use it to branch out on their own. The chef Jeremiah Langhorne spent five years learning from his mentor Sean Brock, the executive chef at the locally sourced Southern restaurant McCrady’s in South Carolina, befor
10d The Atlantic
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Restaurants Are the New Factories Donald Trump's ideal economy is defined by brawn. He praises steelworkers, speaks wistfully of coal mining, and tweets boastfully about new manufacturing factories. But 200 days into his presidency, the most promising sector of the U.S. labor market isn’t steel-plating. It’s dinner-plating. Restaurant jobs are on fire in 2017, growing faster than health care, construction, or manufacturing. The B
10d The Atlantic
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Financial Fraud: It Takes Two At a time when Americans are divided on matters of criminal justice, the conviction last week of Martin Shkreli for securities fraud seemed a momentary unifying force. Many were overjoyed to see the widely disliked former hedge-fund manager found guilty, and there was perhaps an additional layer of public satisfaction given how many bankers escaped punishment in the aftermath of the financial cri
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Drone tech offers new ways to manage climate changeAn innovation providing key clues to how humans might manage forests and cities to cool the planet is taking flight. Cornell researchers are using drone technology to more accurately measure surface reflectivity on the landscape, a technological advance that could offer a new way to manage climate change.
10d Gizmodo
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Einstein's Theory Passes a Massive Test Artist depiction of the three stars orbiting Sgr A* (Image: ESO/M Parsa/L. Calçada) The most basic physical laws you’ve learned—those drafted up by Isaac Newton in the 17th century—don’t work for everything. Once you try to applying them to really fast things moving nearly at the speed of light or things heavier than stars, they start to fall apart. That’s where Albert Einstein’s expanded theory
10d Ingeniøren
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Amager Bakke-start udskydes igen: Direktøren er skuffet over leverandørenDer er stadig lange udsigter til, at Amager Ressource Center kan overtage affaldsforbrændingsanlægget Amager Bakke. Hen over sommeren har ødelagte fødevandspumper endnu engang udsat idriftsættelsen. Det ærger ARC’s direktør.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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'Gene drives' could wipe out whole populations of pests in one fell swoopWhat if there was a humane, targeted way to wipe out alien pest species such as mice, rats and rabbits, by turning their own genes on themselves so they can no longer reproduce and their population collapses?
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ants dominate waste management in tropical rainforestsA study by the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with the Natural History Museum, has found that ants are responsible for moving more than half of food resources from the rainforest floor, playing a key role in maintaining a healthy ecosystem.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New ultrafast method for determining antibiotic resistanceResearchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method for very rapidly determining whether infection-causing bacteria are resistant or susceptible to antibiotics. The findings have now been published in the U.S. journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Warm periods in the 20th century are not unprecedented during the last 2,000 yearsA great deal of evidence relating to ancient climate variation is preserved in proxy data such as tree rings, lake sediments, ice cores, stalagmites, corals and historical documents, and these sources have great significance in evaluating 20th century climate warming in the context of the last two millennia.
10d Dagens Medicin

Ændringer i tilskud kan føre til revurdering af 250.000 ordinationerApotekerforeningen frygter administrative gener, hvis forslag til ændringer i lægemiddeltilskud til astma- og KOL-medicin gennemføres som foreslået.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Japan gives world-beating fidget spinner a whirlOne company in perfectionism-obsessed Japan is claiming it has developed a fidget spinner that whirls longer than any rival on the market—12 minutes and counting.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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UNEP chief urges China to do more on climateThe world's biggest polluter China has a "big job" ahead of it in the global fight against climate change, the UN's environment chief said Wednesday.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Smartphone screen maker Japan Display cutting 30% of workforceJapan Display said Wednesday it would slash 3,700 jobs, or about 30 percent of its workforce, as the struggling smartphone screen maker's chief executive warned it was the "last chance" for a turnaround.
10d Viden
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Facebook og Messenger hærges af reklamevirusOndsindet virus har indtaget det sociale medie Facebook og sender virusbefængte beskeder videre.
10d Ingeniøren
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Rundspørge blandt it-professionelle: Myndigheder skal have bøder for datasjusk Syv ud af ti it-professionelle ønsker mulighed for at give bøde til myndigheder, der overtræder persondataloven. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/rundspoerge-it-professionelle-vil-give-myndigheder-boeder-datasjusk-1078941 Version2
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Science report: Who gets hotter, wetter with climate changeA draft federal science report on the effects of global warming breaks down how climate change has already hit different regions of the United States. It also projects expected changes by region.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rogue elephant tramples 15 to death in India, faces cullingAn elephant that has killed 15 people in eastern India over a months-long rampage could be shot within days if it is not brought under control, an official said Wednesday.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Take down: Hackers looking to shut down factories for payThe malware entered the North Carolina transmission plant's computer network via email last August, just as the criminals wanted, spreading like a virus and threatening to lock up the production line until the company paid a ransom.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Study in mice may reveal insights into causes of miscarriages for some womenResearchers at St. Michael's Hospital have identified how natural killer cells in the mouse placenta can cause a fetus to fail to grow in the womb or cause miscarriages.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Scientists develop improved, potentially safer Zika vaccineASU Biodesign Institute scientist Qiang 'Shawn' Chen has led his research team to develop the world's first plant-based Zika vaccine that could be more potent, safer and cheaper to produce than any other efforts to date.
10d Ingeniøren
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Firmaer tørster efter talent: Behov for nyuddannede og studerende Både it-folk og ingeniører er eftertragtede på månedens liste for nyligt uddannede og studerende. Forsvaret, Siemens, Netcompany, Skat, Rambøll og mange flere har ledige stillinger og studiejob. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/firmaer-toerster-efter-talent-behov-nyuddannede-studerende-9405 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
10d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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Mysteries of Sun’s corona on view during upcoming eclipse From ground, sky and space, researchers are ready to test latest technologies on the Great American Eclipse. Nature 548 146 doi: 10.1038/548146a
10d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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Citizen scientists chase total solar eclipse Non-scientists are being recruited to collect data on everything from the Sun’s outer atmosphere to animal behaviour. Nature 548 147 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22415
10d Ingeniøren
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Mazda: Nu øger vi benzinmotorens effektivitet med 20-30 procentI 2019 kommer en Mazda på markedet med en teknologi, der delvist overflødiggøre tændrøret. Det vil forbedre effektiviteten med 20-30 procent og gøre motoren mere effektiv en de nuværende dieselmotorer.
10d Science : NPR
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'Pay For Success' Approach Used To Fund A Program That Supports New Moms South Carolina says it will contribute up to $7.5 million to help fund the expansion of the "Nurse-Family Partnership" in the state if the program can show it is improving pregnancy outcomes. (Image credit: Courtesy of Deona Scott)
10d Dagens Medicin

Medicinstuderende i Aalborg har live eksamen i almen praksis Som det eneste sted i landet foregår almen praksis eksamen for medicinstuderende i Aalborg live. Det gør eksamen sværere, vurderer ekstern lektor på uddannelsen.
10d Dagens Medicin

Lægefaglig hospitalsdirektør: Vi skal overveje værnepligt for læger Stadig flere nyuddannede læger vælger at arbejde i udlandet, og lægemanglen er stor. En tvungen arbejdsperiode i Danmark, en slags værnepligt, kan være en løsning, lyder det fra blandt andre Claus Brøckner Nielsen, lægefaglig direktør på Regionshospital Nordjylland.
10d Gizmodo
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Top Security Firm May Be Leaking 'Terabytes' of Confidential Data From Fortune 100 Companies [Updated] Photo: Getty A leading American security company and purveyor of anti-malware detection services is waking up to a damning report about a massive vulnerability in its flagship product. The report describes an unimaginable leak, the scope of which covers a wide range of confidential data, including customer credentials and financial records, among other sensitive files. In a blog posted late Tuesd
10d Ingeniøren
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Det amerikanske forsvar frygter populære kinesiske dronerDroneproducenten DJI afviser, at de opsamler data fra deres droner. Alligevel vil det amerikanske forsvar ikke bruge det kinesiske firmas droner længere.
10d Gizmodo
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A Band Rocks So Hard Its Music Turns Radioactive in Funny Short The Privates Image: Vimeo Aspiring rock stars The Privates have a problem, and it ain’t the usual band drama. It ain’t even Spinal Tap -style, exploding-drummer drama. It’s the fact that the band’s music hits a strange frequency in the precise right way to generate radioactive energy. So, uh, should they still play that house party or what? Dylan Allen’s short is very funny—it’s really more about the dynamics
10d Dagens Medicin

Ung Ærø-læge: Vi har mange flere af de ting, der er sjove Som nynedsat læge på Ærø oplever Iza Alfredsen, hvordan man ikke uden videre kan henvise patienten til en skadestue, hvis en skulder for eksempel er gået af led. Det giver større faglige udfordringer for Alfredsen, og det er netop det, som har fået hende til at vælge en karriere på en ø, der længe har kæmpet med rekrutteringsproblemer.
10d Ars Technica
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ACLU: Absent warrant standard, police could monitor anyone via location data Enlarge (credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images News ) Lawyers representing a man convicted of six robberies in the Detroit area have now filed their opening brief at the Supreme Court in one of the most important digital privacy cases in recent years. This case, Carpenter v. United States , asks a simple question: is it OK for police to seize and search 127 days of cell-site location information (CSLI)
10d Ingeniøren

Rundspørge: VR-briller og wearables er for alvor på vej ind i industrienVR-briller og andre former for wearable-teknologi bliver ifølge en rundspørge blandt 1.100 fremstillingsvirksomheder en del af dagligdagen på hvert andet fabriksgulv om fem år.
10d Dagens Medicin

Første professor i åndelig omsorg til kræftpatienter Nyt professoratet i Eksistentiel og Åndelig Omsorg er forankret ved Forskningsenheden for Almen Praksis ved Syddansk Universitet.
10d Dagens Medicin

Marihuana øger risiko for at dø af forhøjet blodtrykFolk, der har et forbrug af rusmidlet marihuana, tredobler deres risiko for at dø af forhøjet blodtryk, viser resultaterne fra et nyt studie.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Marijuana associated with three-fold risk of death from hypertensionMarijuana use is associated with a three-fold risk of death from hypertension, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
10d Dagens Medicin

Nyt ledelsesteam i Kirurgisk Center på Regionshospitalet Randers Anne-Sofie Kannerup er ny ledende overlæge.
10d iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Randy Schekman (HHMI & UCB) 3: How human cells secrete small RNAs in extracellular vesicles Part 1: The Secretory Pathway: How cells package and traffic proteins for export: Randy Schekman overviews the secretory pathway and reviews historical experiments that shaped our molecular understanding of this pathway. Part 2: Genes and proteins required for secretion: Randy Schekman explains how his laboratory used baker’s yeast to uncover major proteins involved in the secretory pathway, and
10d iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Randy Schekman (HHMI & UCB) 2: Genes and proteins required for secretion Part 1: The Secretory Pathway: How cells package and traffic proteins for export: Randy Schekman overviews the secretory pathway and reviews historical experiments that shaped our molecular understanding of this pathway. Part 2: Genes and proteins required for secretion: Randy Schekman explains how his laboratory used baker’s yeast to uncover major proteins involved in the secretory pathway, and
10d iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
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Randy Schekman (HHMI & UCB) 1: Secretory Pathway: How cells package & traffic proteins for export Part 1: The Secretory Pathway: How cells package and traffic proteins for export: Randy Schekman overviews the secretory pathway and reviews historical experiments that shaped our molecular understanding of this pathway. Part 2: Genes and proteins required for secretion: Randy Schekman explains how his laboratory used baker’s yeast to uncover major proteins involved in the secretory pathway, and
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rice to riches: Vietnam's shrimp farmers fish for fortunesWith a flashy gold watch and a chunky matching ring, Tang Van Cuol looks a far cry from the average Vietnamese farmer as he slings back a shot of rice wine and boasts about his projected earnings.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Patagotitan mayorum: New study describes the biggest dinosaur everA study proclaims a newly named species the heavyweight champion of all dinosaurs, making the scary Tyrannosaurus rex look like a munchkin.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Disney to launch streaming services for movies, live sportsWith new streaming services in the works, Disney is trying to set itself up for a future that's largely been framed by Netflix: Providing the stuff you want to watch, when you want to watch it.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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US trade commission probing Qualcomm iPhone complaintThe US International Trade Commission on Tuesday said it will look into Qualcomm's complaint that Apple is violating its patents in some iPhones.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New supercomputer seen as big boost for science, WyomingOne of the world's fastest supercomputers is helping scientists better understand the sun's behavior and predict weather months in advance but also got touted Tuesday as an important tool for diversifying Wyoming's economy, which has seen better days.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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US scientists contradict Trump's climate claimsAs President Donald Trump touts new oil pipelines and pledges to revive the nation's struggling coal mines, federal scientists are warning that burning fossil fuels is already driving a steep increase in the United States of heat waves, droughts and floods.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Motorhead's 'Lemmy' has dino croc named after himA team of music-mad scientists unveiled an extinct, sea-dwelling crocodile from the Jurassic period on Wednesday, which they named in honour of Motorhead lead singer Ian "Lemmy" Kilmister who died in 2015.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Strong quake strikes southwest China, 13 dead, 175 injuredA strong earthquake shook a mountainous region in southwestern China near a famous national park, killing 13 people, injuring 175 others and knocking out power and phone networks.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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State crime researchers uncover role of Western companies in Uzbek corruption scandalEvidence in a new research report published today shows that the government of Uzbekistan acted as an organised crime network, with state agencies conducting racketeering activity that benefited political heiress Gulnara Karimova, the elder daughter of Islam Karimov, the leader of Uzbekistan from 1989 to his death in 2016.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Turning homes into power stations could cut household fuel bills by more than 60 percent: reportEnergy bills could be cut by more than 60% – saving the average household over £600 a year—if homes were designed to generate, store and release their own solar energy, a report published today has revealed.
10d Ingeniøren
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Datatilsynet: Vi bliver sat skakmat, når myndigheder ignorerer vores kritik Tilsynet mangler muligheder, når kommuner ikke retter op på brud på persondataloven. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/datatilsynet-vi-bliver-sat-skakmat-naar-myndigheder-ignorere-vores-kritik-1078928 Version2
10d Science | The Guardian
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Forget ‘the environment’: we need new words to convey life’s wonders | George Monbiot Language is crucial to how we perceive the natural world. Help me to find better ways of describing nature and our relationships with it so we can better defend it If Moses had promised the Israelites a land flowing with mammary secretions and insect vomit, would they have followed him into Canaan? Though this means milk and honey, I doubt it would have inspired them. Related: The word-hoard: Rob
10d Gizmodo
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Leaked Emails Reveal Bill de Blasio Gets Kind of Dad-Feisty When His Staff Forgets to Help Him Speak Spanish Photo: AP On Tuesday, notorious rag the New York Post took a swing at the king , publishing excerpts from emails sent by NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio to staffers and claiming that the emails proved beyond all doubt de Blasio is an “imperious bully of a boss who threatens his underlings with dire punishment if they fail to meet his demands.” Spoilers: This particular political email controversy is rea
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Parents' disagreements about bedtime can affect coparenting relationshipPositive parental teamwork is key to promoting healthy child development, but when mothers have stronger opinions than fathers about how to tend to their infants in the middle of the night, the coparenting relationship can suffer, says a group of researchers.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Early puberty may mean less time in education for girlsThe age at which girls have their first period may influence how long they stay in education.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Managers can help prevent employees from working while sickA new study indicates that managerial support can help prevent employees who work extremely hard out of an obsessive drive ('workaholics') from forcing themselves to attend work when feeling sick.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers examine contaminants in hunted wildlifeConcerning environmental contaminants, game species are not subject to the same safety testing as commercially marketed livestock.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The ethics of animal researchThe ethics pertaining to animal research have evolved over centuries, but there is still need for refining and improving them.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Apathy is common and may decrease life expectancy in nursing home patientsIn a study of nursing home patients, apathy was linked with an increased risk of dying over a four-month period, even after controlling for depression.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Report confirms 2016 was another warm yearA new report published in Weather confirms that 2016 was another exceptionally warm year, with global temperature having reached 0.77± 0.09 degrees C above its level between 1961 and 1990.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Finger prick test allows patients taking autoimmune drug to avoid blood drawsA new study shows that patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune conditions who take the drug adalimumab can monitor drug levels in their bodies with a finger prick rather than undergoing a full blood draw.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Weight loss surgery's effects on bone marrow fat and bone massBone marrow fat is thought to regulate bone metabolism, and high levels of marrow fat are seen in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study compares treatment and outcomes in asthma patients in 2 countriesIn two countries with a Western lifestyle, similar health systems, and similar asthma prevalence, investigators observed differences in asthma management and treatment costs, despite comparable outcomes.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Vitamin therapy may help prevent melanomaA new review highlights the potential of nicotinamide (vitamin B3) for preventing melanoma in high-risk individuals.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Young breast cancer patients undergoing breast conserving surgery see improved prognosisA new analysis indicates that breast cancer prognoses have improved over time in young women treated with breast conserving surgery.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Eating disorders linked to increased risk of theft and other criminal behaviorIn an analysis of nearly 960,000 females, individuals with eating disorders were more likely to be convicted of theft and other crimes.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Prairie-chicken nests appear unaffected by wind energy facilityWind energy development in the Great Plains is increasing, spurring concern about its potential effects on grassland birds, the most rapidly declining avian group in North America. However, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that for one grassland bird species of concern — the greater prairie-chicken — wind energy infrastructure has little to no effect on nesting.
10d New on MIT Technology Review
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Mind-Controlled VR Game Really WorksStartup Neurable is making a strange sci-fi virtual-reality video game in which you select objects with your brain.
10d New on MIT Technology Review
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“Alexa, Understand Me”Voice-based AI devices aren’t just jukeboxes with attitude. They could become the primary way we interact with our machines.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Report confirms 2016 was another warm yearA new report published in Weather confirms that 2016 was another exceptionally warm year, with global temperature having reached 0.77± 0.09?C above its level between 1961 and 1990. Although 2016 was not measurably warmer than 2015, both 2015 and 2016 were clearly warmer than any other year in the record.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Managers can help prevent employees from working while sickA new study indicates that managerial support can help prevent employees who work extremely hard out of an obsessive drive ('workaholics') from forcing themselves to attend work when feeling sick. Such support from managers can also help address work-family conflict in workaholics.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers examine contaminants in hunted wildlifeConcerning environmental contaminants, game species are not subject to the same safety testing as commercially marketed livestock. A recent study sampled feral pigs, gray squirrels, and waterfowl from relatively uncontaminated habitats and areas of contamination.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Prairie-chicken nests appear unaffected by wind energy facilityWind energy development in the Great Plains is increasing, spurring concern about its potential effects on grassland birds, the most rapidly declining avian group in North America. However, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that for one grassland bird species of concern—the Greater Prairie-Chicken—wind energy infrastructure has little to no effect on nesting. Instea
10d Gizmodo
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That Wave of Jewish Community Center Bomb Threats Might Have Been Bought in Bitcoin on AlphaBay Jewish men stand outside Brooklyn’s Jewish Children’s Museum after a bomb threat on March 9, 2017. Photo: AP Earlier this year, authorities accused 18-year-old dual US-Israeli citizen Michael Kadar of being the individual behind a terrifying, nationwide wave of bomb threats at predominantly Jewish schools and community centers. This week, it emerged authorities also believe Kadar was advertising
10d Ingeniøren
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Tilbage fra ferie? Løft dit humør.. og måske din karriere Tankens kraft har stor magt. Også når det kommer til din arbejdsindsats og ikke mindst karriere. Dansk coach og forfatter kommer med et kneb, der kan skubbe begge fremad. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/vaerktoejet-loefter-baade-karriere-humoeret-9399 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
10d Ingeniøren
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Løsrevne IC4-pumper skaber stadig problemer for DSBArbejdet med at forhindre hydraulikpumperne på IC4 i igen at rive sig løs og falde ned på skinnerne under kørslen betyder, at DSB ikke kan sende nok IC4-tog i drift. DSB har fundet en løsning, men problemet er først endeligt løst i 2019.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Playing with your brain: Negative impact of some action video gamesHuman-computer interactions, such as playing video games, can have a negative impact on the brain, says a new Canadian study. For over 10 years, scientists have told us that action video game players exhibit better visual attention, motor control abilities and short-term memory. But, could these benefits come at a cost?
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Some land conservation measures unpopular among property ownersWhile popular with conservation groups, coastal easements that prevent development in order to protect marshland from changes brought about by climate change and rising sea levels are not favored by property owners. The findings, based on the results of surveys conducted in 2015 of 1,002 owners of Connecticut coastal properties, suggest that relying on education about sea level rise and the ecosys
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Sleep disorders linked to preterm birth in large California studyPregnant women who are diagnosed with sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia appear to be at risk of delivering their babies before reaching full term, according to an analysis of California births.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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'Killer peptide' discovered that helps eliminate resistant cancer cellsWhen therapy-sensitive cancer cells die, they release a 'killer peptide' that can eliminate therapy-resistant cells, new research indicates.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Not all glaciers in Antarctica have been affected by climate changeThe effects of climate change, which are apparent in other parts of the Antarctic continent, are not yet observed for glaciers in the western Ross Sea coast, new research indicates.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Longevity hormone boosts memory and protects against brain aging in miceIn a study that augues well for the therapeutic potential of klotho — a life-extending protein hormone that a minority of people naturally produce at high levels — scientists have found that administering a fragment of the klotho protein to young, aging or impaired mice rapidly improves their cognitive and physical performance.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Human gut microbe may lead to treatment for multiple sclerosisA human gut microbe may help treat autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, report scientists in a new article.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Tiny terahertz laser could be used for imaging, chemical detectionFor more than 20 years, researchers have been working on sources of terahertz radiation that can be etched onto microchips. In a new article, they now describe a novel design that boosts the power output of chip-mounted terahertz lasers by 80 percent.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Can a Zika outbreak be sustained sexually? It's complicatedUnlike other mosquito-borne outbreaks, Zika doubles as a sexually transmitted infection, with men retaining the virus 10 times longer in their semen than women do in their vaginal fluids. According to research, populations least likely to get tested for Zika could sustain a silent outbreak.
10d Gizmodo
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Leaked Documents Show The New Nissan Leaf Is Cheaper, Less Powerful Than The Tesla Model 3 And Chevy Bolt Photo via . As other automakers and electric-minded newcomers continue to take a swing at replacing the everyday commuter car with something powered solely with batteries, Nissan seems to be interested in staying in a smaller part of the slowly-growing EV segment with its upcoming next-generation Leaf . We caught a glimpse of the new Leaf’s design earlier this week, and now it seems specification
10d Gizmodo
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Fired Google Memo Writer Took Part in Controversial, 'Sexist' Skit While at Harvard for Which Administration Issued Formal Apology Image: Getty / Gizmodo Google fired software engineer James Damore on Monday after his 10-page anti-diversity screed went viral within the company. According to emails obtained by Gizmodo, and accounts from four individuals who attended a Ph.D program retreat with Damore, this is not the first time he offended his peers with sexist ideologies. According to emails provided to Gizmodo, Andrew Murra
10d Ars Technica
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Valve announces Artifact, a Dota-themed digital card game Enlarge / Want more info on Valve's upcoming card-battling game Artifact ? Too bad! All you get for now is this logo. (credit: Valve ) Rather than wait until the end of The International, the major Dota 2 tournament taking place in Seattle all week , to announce major Dota news, Valve surprise-announced an entirely new video game on the event's second, early-rounds evening. "It's not Half-Life 3
10d Feed: All Latest
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Google Manifesto Author James Damore Just Might Have a Legal CaseJames Damore has filed complaint with NLRB and says his firing violated California law.
10d Big Think
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Worldwide Sperm Counts Are Dropping at an Alarming Rate A new study shows sperm counts have dropped by 59% globally over the last 40 years. Read More
10d Inside Science
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BRIEF: Tracking Penguins by the Tail BRIEF: Tracking Penguins by the Tail Chemical signatures in penguin tail feathers reveal where the birds go in winter months. penguinforensics_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: M. Polito, LSU Rights information: This photo may only be republished in conjunction with this Inside Science story. Creature Tuesday, August 8, 2017 – 20:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — At the end of the Anta
10d Gizmodo
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Surprise, This Sig Sauer Pistol That 'Won't Fire Unless You Want It To' Fires When You Drop It Photo: TexasWarhawk/ Wikimedia Commons Firearms manufacturer Sig Sauer is offering a “voluntary upgrade” to owners of its P320 line of semi-automatic pistols, which have been on the market since 2014, after they became aware that the damn things fire when dropped on the ground. Per CNBC , Sig Sauer admitted on Tuesday that dropping the pistols could cause an “unintentional discharge” and said it
10d New Scientist – News
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Church floodlights are driving away the bats that roost thereChurches are often floodlit at night to show off their architecture – but the lights are preventing bats from roosting in the ancient buildings
10d New Scientist – News
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Penguin tail feathers reveal secrets of where they swim for foodConservationists need to track penguin populations, but tagging hundreds of birds is impractical. A technique borrowed from forensics offers a solution
10d New Scientist – News
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Largest ever dinosaur may have been as long as 7 elephantsAnalysis of fossils from six Patagotitan mayorum dinosaurs suggests the animals may have weighed 62 tonnes and measured more than 35 metres from nose to tail
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Penguin forensicsKnowing where and how Antarctic penguins, and other seabirds and marine predators, migrate is critical for conservation efforts. Although electronic tracking devices have helped scientists track marine animals' migration patterns, the devices can be expensive, invasive for the animal and challenging to retrieve. Scientists have discovered a new and potentially better way to track where penguins go
10d Ars Technica
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No Man’s Sky version 1.3 is live, adds “joint exploration,“ more [updated] Hello Games Update, Friday, August 11 : No Man's Sky version 1.3 is now live for players on PC and PlayStation 4. "30 hours" of campaign plot have been added, Hello Games says, and other updates to the game support that increased plot content, including new types of missions and an interstellar "politics" map that looks at economies and warring alien factions. Arguably the most intriguing update
10d The Atlantic
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Why North Korea Is Threatening Guam North Korea said Wednesday it was considering using intermediate-range ballistic missiles near Guam, the U.S. territory that is home to strategic military installations, dramatically raising tensions with the United States. The country’s military said it was “carefully examining the operational plan for making an enveloping fire at the areas around Guam with medium-to-long-range strategic ballist
10d Live Science
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Ginormous, 70-Ton Titanosaur Is the Largest Dinosaur on RecordAbout 100 million years ago, when flowering plants had diversified into an array of blossoms, the largest known land animal — a massive, long-necked titanosaur — stomped around, searching for plants it could eat to fuel its enormous body.
10d Live Science
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Titanosaur Photos: Meet the Largest Dinosaur on RecordThere's a heavyweight champion in the books: Patagotitan mayorum, a long-necked titanosaur, is not only the world's largest dinosaur on record but also the largest known land-dwelling animal in history, a new study finds.
10d Live Science
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Glen Campbell's Death: How Does Alzheimer's Kill?Country music legend Glen Campbell has died at age 81 following a long battle with Alzheimer's disease, his family announced today.
10d Popular Science
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Bats are disappearing from churches in Sweden, and that's not a good thing Animals Shining a light isn't always the enlightened thing to do. Bats in Europe are regular churchgoers. Or, at the very least, they were before the enlightenment.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Turning homes into power stations could cut household fuel bills by more than 60 percent — reportEnergy bills could be cut by more than 60 percent — saving the average household over £600 a year — if homes were designed to generate, store and release their own solar energy, a report published today has revealed. The concept has already been proven and is operating successfully on a building in Swansea: the UK's first energy-positive classroom.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

State crime researchers uncover role of Western companies in Uzbek corruption scandalEvidence in a new research report published today shows that the government of Uzbekistan acted as an organised crime network, with state agencies conducting racketeering activity that benefited political heiress Gulnara Karimova, the elder daughter of Islam Karimov, the leader of Uzbekistan from 1989 to his death in 2016.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Eradicating exotic pests with 'infertility genes' may be possibleUniversity of Adelaide researchers have shown that it may be possible to eradicate populations of invasive pest animals through the inheritance of a negative gene — a technique known as gene drive. The researchers showed by computer simulation that a single introduction of 100 mice carrying a gene drive causing sterility could eradicate an island mouse population of 50,000 individuals within four
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Penguin forensics: Tracking the winter whereabouts of penguins by analyzing tail feathersKnowing where and how Antarctic penguins, and other seabirds and marine predators, migrate is critical for conservation efforts. Although electronic tracking devices have helped scientists track marine animals' migration patterns, the devices can be expensive, invasive for the animal and challenging to retrieve. Scientists have discovered a new and potentially better way to track where penguins go
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Eradicating exotic pests with 'infertility genes' may be possibleUniversity of Adelaide researchers have shown that it may be possible to eradicate populations of invasive pest animals through the inheritance of a negative gene – a technique known as gene drive.
10d BBC News – Science & Environment
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Penguin feathers record migration routeScientists study the chemistry of penguin plumage to track the birds' movements.
10d The Atlantic
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Meet Patagotitan, the Biggest Dinosaur Ever Found In 2013, an old Argentinian shepherd named Aureliano Hernandez found a fossilized bone protruding from a rock at the farm where he worked. The remains of giant dinosaurs festoon Argentina’s landscape, and knowing the strict rules that govern such fossils, the farm’s owners—the Mayo family—contacted local paleontologists. By the time the team arrived, Hernandez had passed away. He never knew that
10d Science : NPR
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PHOTOS: A 'Massive' Wildfire Is Now Blazing In Greenland NASA satellites detected the blaze just over a week ago. Since then, the rare wildfire in western Greenland has continued to burn through a region far better known for its ice and snow. (Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory)
10d Live Science
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July Was Record Hot for Parts of Alaska and the WestJuly was record warm for Alaska's northernmost city and the hottest month on record for the globe at Death Valley.
10d Feed: All Latest
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North Korea's Miniature Nuke Spells Big Trouble For the WorldNow that North Korea can miniaturize a nuke, it's time to tread very, very carefully.
10d The Atlantic
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What's the Logic Behind Trump's Threat to North Korea? Members of Donald Trump’s administration have repeatedly signaled that they might be willing to use military force against North Korea—even if it inflicted on the Korean peninsula the worst human catastrophe in living memory—if it meant preventing Kim Jong Un from acquiring the capability to strike the United States with a nuclear weapon. But on Tuesday, the president himself did something differ
10d The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Daily: Warning Words What We’re Following North Korea: President Trump said that threats to the U.S. from North Korea would “be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen” after The Washington Post reported that the country had produced a miniature nuclear warhead to fit inside its missiles. The news comes just days after the United Nations imposed strict new sanctions on North Korea, but even these measure
10d Feed: All Latest
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The Guy Disguised as a Car Seat Is Part of a Virginia Study on Autonomous VehiclesA goofy way to get vital answers.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research shows indigenous peoples are much more likely to be infected by hepatitis B and/or CA new meta-analysis of global hepatitis data — presented at this year's World Indigenous Peoples' Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Anchorage, Alaska, USA — shows that indigenous peoples are up to 10 times more likely to be infected by viral hepatitis than the general population in their respective countries.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Cherokee Nation American Indian Tribe showing it is possible to eliminate hepatitis CThe Cherokee Nation American Indian population is aiming to eliminate hepatitis C virus (HCV) among its tribal citizens, where already almost half have been screened for the virus and around one quarter of those estimated to be infected have already been cured. The tribe will present its progress at the World Indigenous People's Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Anchorage, Alaska.
10d Gizmodo
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How to Make a Jon Snow Cloak Out of an IKEA Rug Image credit: HBO I bet you, like me, took a gander at the cloaks of the Night’s Watch on Game of Thrones and thought “Damn, if they weren’t so flea-infested and covered in the blood of the dead I’d wear that in a heartbeat. Where do I even get a cloak like that?” Well you can fashion a cloak of your own the same way the show’s costume designer does: with SKOLD and LUDDE sheepskin rugs from frigg
10d Popular Science
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Your kitchen sponge could have more bacteria than a toilet seat Science Five of the ten most abundant bacteria species are categorized as potential pathogens. A study by German researchers shows that kitchen sponges could host potentially pathogenic bacteria, and oftentimes sanitizing doesn't help knock them out.
10d The Atlantic
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The Sound of an Atomic Bomb Popular imagery of the atom bomb is oddly sterile. For all we know of the horrors of nuclear weapons, the visual that’s most often evoked is ethereal, if ominous: a silent, billowing cloud, aloft in black and white. The reasons for this are understandable. Nuclear weapons have been tested far more often than they’ve been used against people. And the only two times they were used in warfare—in Hir
10d Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
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Are These Survivalists Hungry Enough To Eat Cactus For Breakfast? #NakedAndAfraid | Thursdays at 9p Warm, slimy, prickly pears provide a bitter snack for the survivalists. At least it's an option. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://tw
10d Gizmodo
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What's So Great About Mechanical Keyboards There’s been a lot of talk on Kotaku about mechanical keyboards over the past six months, talking about customizing them, building them and making them pretty . We put together a little video to explain why many of us are so smitten with those clicky keys. In the video you’ll hear me explaining how important keyboards are in this digital age and why the rest of the world is starting to pick up on
10d Gizmodo
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President Trump Moves Doomsday Clock to Half Past 'Oh My God' Photo: AP After The Washington Post reported that North Korea is believed to have successfully miniaturized a nuclear weapon to fit inside its functioning missiles, President Trump addressed the news while speaking to reporters Tuesday afternoon. There was absolutely nothing reassuring about his comments. “North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States,” said Trump. “They will be
10d The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Fire and Fury Today in 5 Lines President Trump warned that North Korea “will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen” if it continues to threaten the United States. Earlier in the day, North Korea said it would take “physical action” in retaliation against newly imposed sanctions. Trump also vowed that the United States “will win” the fight against the opioid epidemic, but introduced no new pol
10d Feed: All Latest
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Internal Messages Show Some Google Employees Supported James Damore’s ManifestoLeaked internal messages show that several coworkers rallied around James Damore's now-infamous Google memo.
10d Ars Technica
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US government’s grim climate summary draft gets unofficially published Enlarge (credit: NASA ) In 1990, during the presidency of the first George Bush, Congress passed the Global Change Research Act . Along with reorganizing government-funded climate research, the Act stipulates that, every four years, the federal agencies involved provide an update on the state of climate science. It has been four years, and the next report's draft has been completed and has underg
10d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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Insomnia linked to premature birth in study of 3 million mothers Women with sleep disorders were about twice as likely to deliver babies more than six weeks early. Nature 548 145 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22419
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sleep disorders linked to preterm birth in large California studyPregnant women who are diagnosed with sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia appear to be at risk of delivering their babies before reaching full term, according to an analysis of California births by researchers at UC San Francisco.
10d The Atlantic
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Why Trump Is Wholly Unsuited to the North Korea Crisis For months, worried observers of the Trump administration have wondered what would happen when the president first faced a bona fide, urgent international crisis out of his own control. This week, the world seems terrifyingly close to getting an answer. On Monday, the United Nations Security Council approved new sanctions on North Korea. On Tuesday, The Washington Post reported that the North Kor
10d Popular Science
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Honeywell Lyric C1 Wi-Fi Security Camera review: This affordable, indoor cam is smarter than it looks Gadgets Backup storage in the form of an SD card is a nice touch. This affordable indoor security camera lacks resolution but has a robust feature set overall.
10d Gizmodo
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Disney Is Planning to Pull All of Its Movies From Netflix and Start Its Own Streaming Service [Updated] The original programming might have been a bit grim, but Jan Dodonna thought his Disney subscription was worth every credit. Image: Lucasfilm It’s barely been a year since Netflix became the exclusive site for streaming Disney movies. Now, in a stunning reversal, the House of Mouse has announced it plans to pull its films from the service and start up one of its own in 2019. Announced during its
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Fired Google engineer files complaint, weighs legal options (Update)A 28-year-old former Google engineer who was fired over a memo he wrote about gender differences said Tuesday he's exploring all his legal options and has already filed a labor complaint over his treatment.
10d Ars Technica
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Disney to give Netflix the white-gloved Mickey middle finger in 2019 Enlarge / “O-ho! Oh boy! We're leaving Netflix!” (credit: Aurich / Disney / Netflix ) Disney's latest quarterly report included a major announcement about its online video-streaming plans—and how sharply they will diverge from the company's current Netflix partnership. Starting in 2019, Disney will operate its own paid video-streaming service. This news came about as Disney announced on Tuesday t
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A Meme Shared on an Internal Google Meme Network Depicted a Leaker Being Beaten A Google engineer was fired yesterday after he wrote a memo arguing that women are biologically less suited for software engineering jobs compared to men and that Google’s diversity efforts are misguided. The engineer’s memo was circulated widely inside the company on Google+ and on an internal meme generator, Memegen, before Gizmodo published it on Saturday . Shortly after Gizmodo published the
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New Cyberattack Could Take Out Solar Arrays
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Scientists Fear Trump Administration Will Counter Climate Report A comprehensive government report on climate change has leaked to the public. The report clearly states that humans are changing the climate, and the consequences could be serious. Those views are at odds with statements by many in the Trump administration.
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Solar Arrays Found to Be Vulnerable to Cyberattack
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Not all glaciers in Antarctica have been affected by climate changeA new study by scientists at Portland State University and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder has found that the effects of climate change, which are apparent in other parts of the Antarctic continent, are not yet observed for glaciers in the western Ross Sea coast.
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The Great Solar Eclipse of 2017Millions of people will view this spectacular event in person. Will you be one of them? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Fallout board game announced as competitive four-player RPG adventure Fallout Is it better to be alone than in bad company? We'll find out once we learn more about the co-op specific parts of the Fallout board game in "Q4 2017." (credit: Fantasy Flight Games / Bethesda Softworks) Time to start saving up your bottle caps, because the Fallout RPG series is getting its first real board game soon. Fantasy Flight Games teased a familiar-looking "please stand by" image o
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Baby, It's Cold Inside AC is central to American life — more than 8 out of 10 homes have it. (Image credit: Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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Price Mistake! Get Splatoon 2 For Just $41, While It Lasts Splatoon 2 , $48 for Prime members. Discount shown at checkout. Update 8/8 – This is almost surely a price mistake, but it’s currently ringing up at $41 for Prime members . Splatoon 2 is out for the Nintendo Switch, and it’s even better than the original . If you haven’t picked up a copy yet, Prime members can still save 20% on a physical copy, which brings it down to $48 (discount shown at check
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Not all glaciers in Antarctica have been affected by climate changeA new study by scientists at Portland State University and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder has found that the effects of climate change, which are apparent in other parts of the Antarctic continent, are not yet observed for glaciers in the western Ross Sea coast.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Youthful plasticity restored to brains of adult miceLike the rest of the body, the brain loses flexibility with age, impacting the ability to learn, remember, and adapt. Now, scientists report they can rejuvenate the plasticity of the mouse brain, specifically in the visual cortex. The study shows that manipulating a single gene triggers the shift, revealing it as a target for new treatments to recover the brain's youthful potential.
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Development of molecular container with caps that can regulate uptake/release of objectsScientists have designed a host-guest system using a non-equilibrium kinetically trapped state for on-demand and time-programmable control of molecular functions, and synthesized a macrocyclic metallohost that has anion caps at both sides of the cation-binding site. The anion caps effectively inhibit the guest uptake/release so that we can easily make a non-equilibrium kinetically trapped state. G
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Are learning and unlearning bedfellows?We know that sleep helps us integrate knowledge acquired during the day. But can we learn new things while sleeping? By exposing subjects to repeated auditory stimuli, a team of researchers has just demonstrated that the brain is capable of learning such sound patterns during certain sleep stages — though they may be forgotten during deep sleep.
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New battery is activated by your spitResearchers have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs): a battery activated by spit that can be used in extreme conditions where normal batteries don't function.
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Sleep makes it possible for babies to associate words with content, and not with noiseFor babies every moment is a new experience — until the infant brain organizes the flood of stimulations. It has to save new information in its long-term memory, aggregate similar experiences and categorize them. Therefore, one thing seems to be crucial: sufficient sleep. Researchers have now discovered that babies can even associate them with meanings the first time — much earlier than supposed
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Dino hips discovery unravels species riddleOne of North America's most broadly identified dinosaur species, Troodon formosus, is no longer a valid classification, naming two others in its stead. A new discovery leaves North America's paleontology community in upheaval.
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One broadband choice still counts as “competition” after court decision Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Dimitri Otis ) A Federal Communications Commission decision to eliminate price caps in much of the business broadband market can remain in place after a federal judge denied a petition to halt the FCC order. The FCC's Republican majority in April imposed a new standard that deems certain local markets competitive even when they have only one broadband provider. In
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New Research Shows Yoga Helps Alleviate Depression A number of studies presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association verify yoga's role in curbing depression. Read More
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Researchers use TACC supercomputers to uncover the genetic roots of Yellow Canopy SyndromeSince 2011, a mysterious illness known as Yellow Canopy Syndrome, or YCS, has afflicted Australian sugarcane. The condition causes the mid-canopy leaves of otherwise healthy plants to rapidly turn yellow to a degree that the plant's sugar yield can decrease by up to 30 percent.
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Can AI prevent the spread of HIV in homeless youth?There are nearly 2 million youth who spend at least one night homeless each year in the United States. An estimated 7 percent of homeless youth are likely to be HIV positive.
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Can AI prevent the spread of HIV in homeless youth?Researchers from the USC Center for AI for Society (CAIS), a joint research initiative between the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work have developed algorithms that are over 150 percent more effective in spreading public health information than methods currently used by many social service agencies
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U.S. Already Feeling Consequences Of Global Warming, Draft Report Finds The document, which was leaked ahead of publication, states that humans are causing climate change. The findings are at odds with statements by President Trump and key members of his administration. (Image credit: Stephane Mahe/Reuters)
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Asian hornet to colonize UK within 2 decades without actionThe yellow legged or Asian hornet — a voracious predator of honey bees and other beneficial insects — could rapidly colonize the UK unless its spread is combated, according to new research.
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Even bacteria have baggage, and understanding that is key to fighting superbugsNew research points to treatment strategies for multi-drug antibiotic resistance using currently available drugs. The study demonstrates how different adaptation histories of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics leads to distinct evolutionary dynamics of multi-drug resistance.
10d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Like father like son? How we balance work, family life may be learned from our parentsThe extent to which we prioritize work versus family life may be shaped by our childhood experiences in the family home, according to a study.
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Amateur collectors in Japan discover country's first and oldest fossil diving birdTwo brothers from a small town in Hokkaido, Japan, made the discovery of their lives — the first and oldest fossil bird ever identified in their country. Identified as a new species, it has been named Chupkaornis keraorum.
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Kayaking Through an Abandoned Shipwreck Is Like Discovering an Ancient Alien Spaceship GIF Mother Nature has done a good job at dotting the planet with hidden caves and caverns that yield amazing footage once they’re discovered . Humans have created similarly spectacular secret locales, albeit accidentally, as this kayaker discovered while paddling through the abandoned MV E Evangelia cargo ship off the coast of Romania. It’s lacking the hanging stalactites you’d find in an ancient
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Shotgun Sequencing Outdone by AmpliconThe shotgun approach, typically thought to be the superior method, may substantially underestimate diversity in environments that have not already been classified, researchers find.
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NYITCOM researcher discovers potential cancer treatment breakthroughIn a July issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Dong Zhang Ph.D., associate professor of Biomedical Sciences at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) and a team of researchers detail findings that suggest new synthetic lethal interactions could inhibit the growth of tumors in mesenchymal cells, cells that develop into conn
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The mystery of the yellowing sugarcaneSince 2011, a mysterious illness known as Yellow Canopy Syndrome (YCS) has afflicted Australian sugarcane causing $40 million in losses. Researchers from The University of Texas at Tyler and Sugar Research Australia used supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to perform large-scale investigations of the sugarcane genome. They detected signals in the data that could indicate a bacter
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Here's What It's Like to Be the Planetary Protection Officer at NASAJohn Rummel, a biology professor at East Carolina University, reflects on his experiences as NASA's planetary protection officer, a job that requires a lot of science, but no alien combat.
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Suspected sextortionist hiding behind Tor is outed by booby-trapped video Enlarge (credit: Al Ibrahim ) The FBI used a booby-trapped video to identify a California man who allegedly used the Tor network to anonymously extort sexually explicit material from minors online. Buster Hernandez, 26, of Bakersfield, California, allegedly ran his sextortion campaign since at least 2012. It came to the attention of the FBI in late 2015 when the suspect allegedly used Facebook to
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Rocket Lab says ground equipment marred New Zealand launchA California aerospace company says a rocket it launched from New Zealand last May did not reach orbit because a problem with ground equipment caused a loss of telemetry that forced range safety officials to terminate the flight.
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James Damore, Fired for Writing the 'Google Memo,' Just Might SueGoogle dismissed Damore for "perpetuating gender stereotypes" in a memo he posted to internal forums last week.
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Ready Player One Finds The Bleak Limits Of Nostalgia Illustration by Angelica Alzona/GMG It’s not hard to fracture the internet with a movie adaptation of a popular bad book. They’re made into movies all the time. They read like screenplays because they skip complex language that defies being replaced with pictures, and producers can’t resist a baked-in audience, which creates a baked-in counter-audience of critics. These people then meet online an
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Apple will reportedly release an LTE Apple Watch: reportApple will reportedly introduce an Apple Watch with LTE capabilities later this year, according to a report Friday.
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A look at Rwanda’s genocide helps explain why ordinary people kill their neighborsNew research on the 1994 Rwanda genocide overturns assumptions about why people participate in genocide. A sense of duty, not blind obedience, drives many perpetrators.
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Climate Change's Impact in the US? It's Already Here, Scientists SayThe impacts of climate change across the U.S. are dramatic, according to a new report.
10d The Atlantic
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Trump and the Chickenhawk Chronicles Late last night I did an item arguing that Donald Trump represented a classic “chickenhawk” figure from the Vietnam era—someone who didn’t complain about the war, as long as it didn’t inconvenience him personally. With that background behind him, I claimed, it was all the more unseemly for Trump to criticize what anyone else had done in that era, from the long-time prisoner of war John McCain to
10d The Atlantic
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The Urgent Message of M.I.A.'s Kala at 10 The story of M.I.A.’s Kala is one of being locked out of somewhere and having a great time anyways. The London rapper Maya Arulpragasam had planned to record the follow-up to her acclaimed 2005 debut Arular in the United States largely with the legendary producer Timbaland, but she said that immigration authorities prevented her entry. It’s hard to verify why that was the case—she’d been to Ameri
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Canary Islands keep beaches open despite algae bloomAuthorities in Spain's Canary Islands kept beaches open to the public Tuesday but warned holidaymakers against touching potentially irritating microalgae blooms that have infested the waters.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Draft US report says extreme storms driven by climate changeDirectly contradicting President Donald Trump, a draft report produced by 13 federal agencies concludes that the United States is already feeling the negative impacts of climate change, with a stark increase in the frequency of heat waves, heavy rains and other extreme weather over the last four decades.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study discovers 'killer peptide' that helps eliminate resistant cancer cellsA new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers shows that when therapy-sensitive cancer cells die, they release a 'killer peptide' that can eliminate therapy-resistant cells.
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Sign language orangutan dead at 39Chantek, a male orangutan that learned to communicate in sign language, has died at the age of 39, a US zoo announced.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA program gives students access to astronautsOn June 23, NASA astronaut Jack Fischer spoke with 22 Girl Scouts of North East Ohio, while he was aboard the International Space Station. More than 400 people attended the event, with many more watching live footage online.
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NASA's scientific balloon program reaches new heightsFor decades, NASA has released enormous scientific balloons into Earth's atmosphere, miles above the altitude of commercial flights. The Balloon Program is currently preparing new missions bearing sensitive instruments, including one designed to investigate the birth of our universe and another with ballooning origins that will fly on the International Space Station.
10d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Tiny terahertz laser could be used for imaging, chemical detectionTerahertz radiation—the band of the electromagnetic spectrum between microwaves and visible light—has promising applications in medical and industrial imaging and chemical detection, among other uses.
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Disney's 'Magic Bench' Puts You in the Picture with Animated FiguresTake a seat on a new "Magic Bench" designed by Disney Research, and interact with animated characters — no special glasses or headsets required.
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Why Your Moscow Mule Drink May Be HazardousYour Moscow mule cocktail may look pretty in a copper mug, but officials in Iowa say that using copper containers for this beverage could be hazardous.
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New ‘golden rice’ offers 3 micronutrients A new version of genetically modified rice contains multiple micronutrients, rather than just one, overcoming a limitation of early modified rice plants. Almost 50 percent of people globally eat rice to meet their daily calorie needs. While a meal of rice stops hunger, it contains very few essential micronutrients, if any. As a consequence, large segments of the human population are malnourished,
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Amateur collectors in Japan discover country's first and oldest fossil diving birdDuring a walk near a reservoir in a small Japanese town, amateur collectors made the discovery of their lives – the first and oldest fossil bird ever identified in their country.
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The Guy Who Invented Those Annoying Password Rules Now Regrets Wasting Your Time GIF Image: Gizmodo We’ve all been forced to do it: create a password with at least so many characters, so many numbers, so many special characters, and maybe an uppercase letter. Guess what? The guy who invented these standards nearly 15 years ago now admits that they’re basically useless. He is also very sorry . The man in question is Bill Burr, a former manager at the National Institute of Stan
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Tiny terahertz laser could be used for imaging, chemical detectionFor more than 20 years, Qing Hu, a distinguished professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, and his group have been working on sources of terahertz radiation that can be etched onto microchips. In the latest issue of Nature Photonics, members of Hu's group and colleagues at Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Toronto describe a novel design that boosts the powe
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Did North Korea Just Inch Closer to the 'Red Line'? Updated at 3:34 p.m. ET Last month, when North Korea tested two intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) capable of reaching the U.S., experts said Pyongyang would be able to fit those ICBMs with nuclear warheads by next year. That assessment dramatically shortened the timeline on previous assessments predicting that the North was on track to have that capability by the end of Trump’s first te
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Possible Anti-Aging Brain Therapy Shows Promise in MiceOld animals injected with the hormone component klotho learn and remember better — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Tiny detector is 1st to see neutrinos bump nucleus In 1974, a physicist predicted a new way for ghostly particles called neutrinos to interact with matter. More than four decades later, the world’s smallest neutrino detector has observed the elusive interaction for the first time. Neutrinos are a challenge to study because their interactions with matter are so rare. Particularly elusive has been what’s known as coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus s
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What's Your Destination For The Solar Eclipse? What's Your Destination For The Solar Eclipse? There’s still time — book a spot to see the upcoming total solar eclipse. What Is Your Destination For The Solar Eclipse? Video of What Is Your Destination For The Solar Eclipse? Space Tuesday, August 8, 2017 – 14:30 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) — If you haven’t heard about the total solar eclipse coming to America this summe
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The Best Beats Alternative Just Got Better All images: Adam Clark Estes/Gizmodo A couple years ago, I declared the JBL Everest Elite 700 the best alternative to the pricier, trickier Beats . They sound great, cost less, and even look a heck of a lot like the Beats Studio Wireless. Now, JBL has released a new model that offers even more—the Everest Elite 750NC—and boy are they excellent. The most noticeable difference between the $250 Ever
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One fall too manyAdults age 65 and older who go to the emergency department (ED) for a fall-related injury are not likely to participate in a fall prevention program after being discharged, despite being given a flyer for a local program before leaving the hospital.
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New genes discovered regulating brain metastases in lung cancerResearchers set out to find which genes can regulate the cells that initiate brain metastases, the genes that are sending the signal to leave the lung tumour, go into the blood stream, invade the blood-brain barrier and form a tumour in the brain.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Magnetic fields turn up the heat on bacterial biofilmsA short exposure to an alternating magnetic field might someday replace multiple surgeries and weeks of IV antibiotics as treatment for stubborn infections on artificial joints, new research suggests.
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Amateur collectors in Japan discover country's first and oldest fossil diving birdTwo brothers from a small town in Hokkaido, Japan, made the discovery of their lives — the first and oldest fossil bird ever identified in their country. Identified as a new species, it has been named Chupkaornis keraorum. The scientific paper describing the find — entitled 'The oldest Asian Hesperornithiform from the Upper Cretaceous of Japan, and the phylogenetic reassessment of Hesperornithif
10d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Even bacteria have baggage — and understanding that is key to fighting superbugsNew research points to treatment strategies for multi-drug antibiotic resistance using currently available drugs. The study, publishing August 8 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Phillip Yen and Jason Papin at the University of Virginia demonstrates how different adaptation histories of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics leads to distinct evolutionary dynamics of multi-drug resistance.
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Closing Down a Notorious Heroin Camp in Philadelphia Earlier this year, AFP photographer Dominick Reuter and Getty photographer Spencer Platt both visited the Kensington neighborhood in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to photograph “El Campamento,” one of the largest open-air drug markets and shooting galleries on the East Coast, before it was shut down. According to Getty: “People come from throughout the city, and some as far away as the Midwest, for
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Sampling DNA From a 1,000-Year-Old Illuminated Manuscript The York Gospels were assembled more than a thousand years ago. Bound in leather, illustrated, and illuminated, the book contains the four gospels of the Bible as well as land records and oaths taken by clergymen who read, rubbed, and kissed its pages over centuries. The Archbishops of York still swear their oaths on this book. The York Gospels are also, quite literally, a bunch of old cow and sh
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All the Secret Stuff That Happens When You Visit Google.com Image: Gizmodo From snapping photos with a cellphone to streaming music through a browser, much of the tech trickery we take for granted in 2017 looks simple on the surface but involves a complex series of computations and calculations behind the scenes to make the magic happen. As an example, take Google.com . You not might think much of visiting the most well-known search engine in your browser
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Memo to all tech bros: Sexism, not biology, holds women backWomen are not biologically predestined to be bit players in tech firms no matter what one (ex) Google engineer thinks of diversity programmes, says Lara Williams
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How to share huge files online DIY For serious data dumps. If you want to move large files from one place to another, you need a service that can handle lots of bytes. Here are the best options for sharing all that data.
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The New DuckTales Is a Perfect Example of How Today's Cartoons Are the Best They've Ever Been All images: Disney XD Disney XD’s revitalized and rebooted DuckTales is a testament to the staying power of Scrooge McDuck and his nephews Huey, Dewey, and Louie. It’s also a grand showing of how far animation in general has come since 1987. Comparing the TV movie that serves as the pilot for the new DuckTales to the first few episodes in the 1987 run is an interesting exercise, since the new sho
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New ultrafast method for determining antibiotic resistanceResearchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method for very rapidly determining whether infection-causing bacteria are resistant or susceptible to antibiotics. The findings have now been published in the US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Neutrino experiment may hint at why matter rules the universeT2K experiment hints at an explanation for what happened to antimatter.
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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The Great American EclipseIn advance of the big solar eclipse on August 21, author and journalist David Baron talks about his new book American Eclipse: A Nation's Epic Race to Catch the Shadow of the Moon and Win the Glory… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What It's Like to Draw Blood From a Whale Shark A speckled fin, three feet long, flicked out of the water as Al Dove surfaced in a morass of fish guts and foam. Behind him, a nightmarish cartilage slit of mouth gasped above the waterline, then lowered back into the spray. As the sun sank over Cenderawasih Bay, the wind sent swells the color of spilled ink surging through a tangle of fishing nets, which Dove was sharing with a whale shark. It w
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An extra dose of this longevity hormone helped make mice smarter Health Protein associated with longer life helps turn Pinky into the Brain. Mice seem to get smarter when injected with a shot of klotho, a protein that similar to a naturally occurring hormone found in mice – and in humans.
11d Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
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There's A Full-On Gold Rush This Season On Bering Sea Gold #BeringSeaGold Shawn's discovery leads to an all-out gold rush. This season, it's not where the gold is, it's who get to it first. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/bering-sea-gold/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BeringSeaGold https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitt
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Even bacteria have baggage—and understanding that is key to fighting superbugsNew research points to treatment strategies for multi-drug antibiotic resistance using currently available drugs. The study, publishing August 8 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Phillip Yen and Jason Papin at the University of Virginia demonstrates how different adaptation histories of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics leads to distinct evolutionary dynamics of multi-drug resistance. In
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Foxes spotted in a Foxes fan's gardenThe eight foxes have started "training" in the back garden of a family in Leicester.
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Voice Recognition Software Flunks Irish Visa Applicant’s English Proficiency Test Image: Gizmodo Australia uses five different tests to evaluate potential immigrants’ mastery of English, but only one of those tests uses computer-assisted voice recognition. Louise Kennedy, a native English speaker from Ireland, was unfortunate enough to receive the automated test when she was applying for residency in Australia. She failed. According to The Guardian , Kennedy has been in Austra
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How Fossil Fuel Money Made Climate Change Denial the Word of God In 2005, at its annual meeting in Washington, D.C., the National Association of Evangelicals was on the verge of doing something novel: affirming science. Specifically, the 30-million-member group, which represents 51 Christian denominations, was debating how to advance a new platform called “ For the Health of a Nation .” The position paper—written the year before An Inconvenient Truth kick-star
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Vacuum All of the Things With This Dyson V6 Deal, No Cord Required Dyson V6 , $245 The Dyson V6 cordless vacuum is ideal for cleaning rugs, hardwood floors, car seats, ceilings, shelves…pretty much anything really, and you can get a brand new one on Amazon today for $245, down from its usual $300.We see refurbished Dyson deals pretty frequently, but this is a great chance to save one that’s unsullied by any previous owners. Update: The Motorhead version , with
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Concern over lack of funding for IVF and sterilisation options in England | Letters Diane Munday says vasectomy and female sterilisation operations should not have funding withdrawn, Diane Chandler says IVF ought not be restricted to those who can afford to pay for it, and Clare Munks says the ‘turkey baster’ method – properly called intrauterine insemination (IUI) – may be worth considering Even worse than the postcode lottery on IVF treatment being introduced by clinical commi
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Settling vs. Settling Down: 2 Ways of Looking at the Bachelorette Finale This post reveals plot points for the finale of The Bachelorette Season 13. Women are often told to settle. For just a little less money. A little less respect. A little less space in the world. The tellings aren’t generally meant unkindly—they’re meant more as realistic reflections of the world and what it is—but they tend to accumulate over time, injecting themselves into women’s understandings
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New Horizons' Next Mission to a 'Provocatively' Shaped Object Just Got Weirder Image: NASA Two years ago, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew by Pluto , capturing never-before-seen views of the dwarf planet and its icy heart. Since then, the intrepid spacecraft has been speeding toward a reddish object in the Kuiper Belt known as MU69 (nice). It’s set to rendezvous with its next target in less than two years. But new observations from the New Horizons team show that the spa
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A Potential Remedy for the Aging BrainIn mice, injected fragments of a naturally occurring protein boost memory in young and old animals and improve cognition and mobility in a model of neurodegenerative disease.
11d The Atlantic
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Sage, Ink: The Damage-Control Doodle
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Mazda says it has made a long-awaited breakthrough in engine technology Enlarge (credit: Mazda) Fresh on the heels of last week's tie-up with Toyota , Mazda announced on Tuesday that it has finally made a breakthrough in gasoline engine technology. Mazda is calling it Skyactive-X; we know it better as homogeneous charge compression ignition, or HCCI. It should mean a 20- to 30-percent boost in efficiency compared to Mazda's current gasoline direct-injection engines,
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These Jelly-Like Critters Form Serpentine Chains to Become Incredible Swimmers GIF Video: University of Oregon Jellyfish-like salp are amazing swimmers, converting their gelatinous bodies into efficient undersea propulsion systems. But these tiny creatures can move even faster and further when banding together to create long, snake-like chains. Researchers have finally figured out how this unusual configuration makes salp even better swimmers. Salps are tiny, barrel-shaped
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New Shapes Solve Infinite Pool-Table Problem Strike a billiard ball on a frictionless table with no pockets so that it never stops bouncing off the table walls. If you returned years later, what would you find? Would the ball have settled into some repeating orbit, like a planet circling the sun, or would it be continually tracing new paths in a ceaseless exploration of its felt-covered plane? These kinds of questions occurred to mathematic
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There's a Freakishly Large Fire Blazing Across Western Greenland Image: NASA Earth Observatory In news that is making the recent Pacific Northwest wildfires look downright ordinary, scientists have spotted a large wildfire raging across western Greenland, a place better known for its enormous glaciers. Satellite evidence of a “sizable fire” about 90 miles (150 km) northeast of the town of Sisimiut was first detected on July 31st, according to NASA’s Earth Obse
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Chic, plant-based “Impossible Burger” meets FDA that’s hungry for data Enlarge / A stack of Impossible Burgers. (credit: Impossible Foods ) For the plant-based “Impossible Burger” that bleeds like real meat, venture capitalists have forked over millions, and high-profile chefs have called in orders for their swanky eateries. But the Food and Drug Administration, it seems, has chewed it up and spit out safety concerns. The agency informed Impossible Foods, the compan
11d Ars Technica
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Dealmaster: Get a quad-core Dell desktop with 16GB RAM for $599 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have a new list of deals to share. A great price is back for a powerful Dell desktop: now you can get a Dell Inspiron 3650 desktop with a quad-core Core i7 CPU, 16GB of RAM, and a 2TB hard drive for just $599. There's also a great deal on an Xbox One S bundle that includes four games for just $249. Check out the rest of the deals be
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Ice Cream Classic: Chocolate vs. Vanilla vs. Strawberry Sometimes, a debate is so contentious you’re afraid to dive into it. The great ice cream debate? That might be more than contentious. It’s outright dangerous . What happens if we do an ice cream VS? Will the admins wake up on Friday morning to discover the game laid waste by the biggest food fight of all time? Oh, who are we kidding, we live for this stuff on Eyewire! Choose your team: Chocolate:
11d Inside Science
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To Sleep, Perchance To Learn To Sleep, Perchance To Learn French researchers find that individuals can learn new information fed to them during certain phases of sleep. sleep-and-learning.jpg Image credits: Inara Prusakova via Shutterstock Human Tuesday, August 8, 2017 – 12:45 Peter Gwynne, Contributor (Inside Science) – The idea that individuals can learn while they sleep inevitably elicits hope among high schoolers who rea
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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An updated classification for freshwater crayfishesA new paper published in the Journal of Crustacean Biology provides an updated classification system that includes all the known crayfishes worldwide. This makes available a single, comprehensive taxonomic summary of all the recognized species of crayfish of the world.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Calcium in arteries influences heart attack riskPatients without calcium buildup in the coronary arteries had significantly lower risk of future heart attack or stroke despite other high risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or bad cholesterol levels, new research from UT Southwestern cardiologists shows.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An updated classification for freshwater crayfishesA new paper published in the Journal of Crustacean Biology provides an updated classification system that includes all the known crayfishes worldwide. This makes available a single, comprehensive taxonomic summary of all the recognized species of crayfish of the world.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First-in-class drug holds promise for therapy-resistant breast cancerUT Southwestern Simmons Cancer Center researchers have shown that a first-in-class molecule can prevent breast cancer growth when traditional therapies stop working.
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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Gene Therapy Is Now Available, but Who Will Pay for It?European regulators have approved two such treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d New Scientist – News
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Americans already feeling effects of climate change, says reportA leaked report says evidence that humans are responsible for climate change is strong – but it remains to be seen how the Trump White House will react
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SUMOylation determines the voltage required to activate cardiac IKs channels [Physiology]IKs channels open in response to depolarization of the membrane voltage during the cardiac action potential, passing potassium ions outward to repolarize ventricular myocytes and end each beat. Here, we show that the voltage required to activate IKs channels depends on their covalent modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins….
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PIF3 is a negative regulator of the CBF pathway and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Light and temperature are major environmental factors that coordinately control plant growth and survival. However, how plants integrate light and temperature signals to better adapt to environmental stresses is poorly understood. PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3 (PIF3), a key transcription factor repressing photomorphogenesis, has been shown to play a pivotal role in…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stem parasitic plant Cuscuta australis (dodder) transfers herbivory-induced signals among plants [Plant Biology]Cuscuta spp. (i.e., dodders) are stem parasites that naturally graft to their host plants to extract water and nutrients; multiple adjacent hosts are often parasitized by one or more Cuscuta plants simultaneously, forming connected plant clusters. Metabolites, proteins, and mRNAs are known to be transferred from hosts to Cuscuta, and…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

LEC1 sequentially regulates the transcription of genes involved in diverse developmental processes during seed development [Plant Biology]LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1), an atypical subunit of the nuclear transcription factor Y (NF-Y) CCAAT-binding transcription factor, is a central regulator that controls many aspects of seed development including the maturation phase during which seeds accumulate storage macromolecules and embryos acquire the ability to withstand desiccation. To define the gene networks…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The critical phase for visual control of human walking over complex terrain [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]To walk efficiently over complex terrain, humans must use vision to tailor their gait to the upcoming ground surface without interfering with the exploitation of passive mechanical forces. We propose that walkers use visual information to initialize the mechanical state of the body before the beginning of each step so…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Barry et al., Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using quantum defects in diamond [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE, PHYSICS Correction for “Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using quantum defects in diamond,” by John F. Barry, Matthew J. Turner, Jennifer M. Schloss, David R. Glenn, Yuyu Song, Mikhail D. Lukin, Hongkun Park, and Ronald L. Walsworth, which was first published November 22, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1601513113 (Proc Natl…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Wu et al., Fibroblast growth factor signaling instructs ensheathing glia wrapping of Drosophila olfactory glomeruli [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Fibroblast growth factor signaling instructs ensheathing glia wrapping of Drosophila olfactory glomeruli,” by Bing Wu, Jiefu Li, Ya-Hui Chou, David Luginbuhl, and Liqun Luo, which was first published July 3, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1706533114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:7505–7512). The authors note that an additional affiliation should be…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Breuer et al., System-wide organization of actin cytoskeleton determines organelle transport in hypocotyl plant cells [Correction]SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “System-wide organization of actin cytoskeleton determines organelle transport in hypocotyl plant cells,” by David Breuer, Jacqueline Nowak, Alexander Ivakov, Marc Somssich, Staffan Persson, and Zoran Nikoloski, which was first published June 27, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1706711114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:E5741–E5749). The authors.
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Parasitic plant acts as plant signaling network Rootless and leafless Cuscuta australis parasitizing a wild tomato plant. Dodders, which are parasitic plants of the genus Cuscuta, form tendrils that coil around and penetrate host plant stems to obtain nutrients and water. The tendrils branch into vines that often bridge gaps…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Helix instability and self-pairing prevent unnatural base pairs from expanding the genetic alphabet [Biological Sciences]Several papers have described the use of hydrophobic unnatural base pairs (UBPs) to study mechanisms of DNA replication and transcription (1–7). In PNAS, the study by Zhang et al. (8) claims that UBPs can form stable complementary structures in the absence of hydrogen bonds between base pairs, and that UBPs…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Hettinger: Hydrophobic unnatural base pairs and the expansion of the genetic alphabet [Biological Sciences]We have recently reported the successful creation of a semisynthetic organism that has an expanded genetic alphabet by virtue of the retention on a plasmid of either the dNaM-d5SICS or dNaM-dTPT3 unnatural base pair (UBP), the latter of which can be retained at natural-like levels with the use of a…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Joe Lutkenhaus [QnAs]Bacterial cell division is an intricate process involving the highly coordinated interplay of many different proteins. Joe Lutkenhaus, a microbiology professor at Kansas University Medical Center, was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2014 for his key contributions to unraveling the complexities of this process. Among other findings,…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Extinction tsunami can be avoided [Ecology]In many senses, the recent publication in PNAS by Ceballos et al. (1) on population losses and declines in vertebrates can be traced back to efforts early in the 20th century led by the American Committee for International Wildlife Protection to document the extinction phenomenon (2–4). The focus at the…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Clash between energy landscape theory and foldon-dependent protein folding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In PNAS, Englander and Mayne (1) review their earlier published evidence that proteins fold and unfold by foldons. The foldon evidence indicates that protein folding follows single folding pathways because the pathways are foldon-directed. The authors point out an important clash between foldon-dependent folding and using energy landscape theory (ELT)…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Haemophilus spills its guts to make a biofilm [Microbiology]Most bacteria do not live as single cells but form communities on surfaces called biofilms (1). Similar to human communities, some are fairly homogeneous, whereas others contain a diversity of microbes. Biofilms are important for the growth and survival of all sorts of bacteria: bacteria that live in water or…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Solution structure of the TLR adaptor MAL/TIRAP reveals an intact BB loop and supports MAL Cys91 glutathionylation for signaling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]MyD88 adaptor-like (MAL) is a critical protein in innate immunity, involved in signaling by several Toll-like receptors (TLRs), key pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Crystal structures of MAL revealed a nontypical Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain fold stabilized by two disulfide bridges. We therefore undertook a structural and functional analysis of the role…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lipophilic siRNA targets albumin in situ and promotes bioavailability, tumor penetration, and carrier-free gene silencing [Engineering]Clinical translation of therapies based on small interfering RNA (siRNA) is hampered by siRNA's comprehensively poor pharmacokinetic properties, which necessitate molecule modifications and complex delivery strategies. We sought an alternative approach to commonly used nanoparticle carriers by leveraging the long-lived endogenous serum protein albumin as an siRNA carrier. We synthesized…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genomic landscape of human diversity across Madagascar [Anthropology]Although situated ∼400 km from the east coast of Africa, Madagascar exhibits cultural, linguistic, and genetic traits from both Southeast Asia and Eastern Africa. The settlement history remains contentious; we therefore used a grid-based approach to sample at high resolution the genomic diversity (including maternal lineages, paternal lineages, and genome-wide…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Serum amyloid A forms stable oligomers that disrupt vesicles at lysosomal pH and contribute to the pathogenesis of reactive amyloidosis [Biochemistry]Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute-phase plasma protein that functions in innate immunity and lipid homeostasis. SAA is a protein precursor of reactive AA amyloidosis, the major complication of chronic inflammation and one of the most common human systemic amyloid diseases worldwide. Most circulating SAA is protected from proteolysis…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effect of ATP and regulatory light-chain phosphorylation on the polymerization of mammalian nonmuscle myosin II [Biochemistry]Addition of 1 mM ATP substantially reduces the light scattering of solutions of polymerized unphosphorylated nonmuscle myosin IIs (NM2s), and this is reversed by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC). It has been proposed that these changes result from substantial depolymerization of unphosphorylated NM2 filaments to monomers upon addition…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis of a histidine-DNA nicking/joining mechanism for gene transfer and promiscuous spread of antibiotic resistance [Biochemistry]Relaxases are metal-dependent nucleases that break and join DNA for the initiation and completion of conjugative bacterial gene transfer. Conjugation is the main process through which antibiotic resistance spreads among bacteria, with multidrug-resistant staphylococci and streptococci infections posing major threats to human health. The MOBV family of relaxases accounts for…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unique structural features of the AIPL1-FKBP domain that support prenyl lipid binding and underlie protein malfunction in blindness [Biochemistry]FKBP-domain proteins (FKBPs) are pivotal modulators of cellular signaling, protein folding, and gene transcription. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1) is a distinctive member of the FKBP superfamily in terms of its biochemical properties, and it plays an important biological role as a chaperone of phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6), an effector…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Protein diversity in discrete structures at the distal tip of the trypanosome flagellum [Cell Biology]The distal end of the eukaryotic flagellum/cilium is important for axonemal growth and signaling and has distinct biomechanical properties. Specific flagellum tip structures exist, yet their composition, dynamics, and functions are largely unknown. We used biochemical approaches to identify seven constituents of the flagella connector at the tip of an…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CDCP1 drives triple-negative breast cancer metastasis through reduction of lipid-droplet abundance and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation [Cell Biology]Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is notoriously aggressive with high metastatic potential, which has recently been linked to high rates of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Here we report the mechanism of lipid metabolism dysregulation in TNBC through the prometastatic protein, CUB-domain containing protein 1 (CDCP1). We show that a “low-lipid” phenotype…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Embryo implantation evolved from an ancestral inflammatory attachment reaction [Evolution]The molecular changes that support implantation in eutherian mammals are necessary to establish pregnancy. In marsupials, pregnancy is relatively short, and although a placenta does form, it is present for only a few days before parturition. However, morphological changes in the uterus of marsupials at term mimic those that occur…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Two functionally distinct E2/E3 pairs coordinate sequential ubiquitination of a common substrate in Caenorhabditis elegans development [Genetics]Ubiquitination, the crucial posttranslational modification that regulates the eukaryotic proteome, is carried out by a trio of enzymes, known as E1 [ubiquitin (Ub)-activating enzyme], E2 (Ub-conjugating enzyme), and E3 (Ub ligase). Although most E2s can work with any of the three mechanistically distinct classes of E3s, the E2 UBCH7 is…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cortical actin recovery at the immunological synapse leads to termination of lytic granule secretion in cytotoxic T lymphocytes [Immunology and Inflammation]CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminate virally infected cells through directed secretion of specialized lytic granules. Because a single CTL can kill multiple targets, degranulation must be tightly regulated. However, how CTLs regulate the termination of granule secretion remains unclear. Previous work demonstrated that centralized actin reduction at the immune…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Protein nanocages that penetrate airway mucus and tumor tissue [Medical Sciences]Reports on drug delivery systems capable of overcoming multiple biological barriers are rare. We introduce a nanoparticle-based drug delivery technology capable of rapidly penetrating both lung tumor tissue and the mucus layer that protects airway tissues from nanoscale objects. Specifically, human ferritin heavy-chain nanocages (FTn) were functionalized with polyethylene glycol…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rho-associated kinase is a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma [Medical Sciences]Neuroblastoma is a peripheral neural system tumor that originates from the neural crest and is the most common and deadly tumor of infancy. Here we show that neuroblastoma harbors frequent mutations of genes controlling the Rac/Rho signaling cascade important for proper migration and differentiation of neural crest cells during neuritogenesis….
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mitogenic stimulation accelerates influenza-induced mortality by increasing susceptibility of alveolar type II cells to infection [Medical Sciences]Development of pneumonia is the most lethal consequence of influenza, increasing mortality more than 50-fold compared with uncomplicated infection. The spread of viral infection from conducting airways to the alveolar epithelium is therefore a pivotal event in influenza pathogenesis. We found that mitogenic stimulation with keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) markedly…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Therapeutically targeting glypican-2 via single-domain antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors and immunotoxins in neuroblastoma [Medical Sciences]Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is fatal in almost half of patients despite intense multimodality treatment. This cancer is derived from neuroendocrine tissue located in the sympathetic nervous system. Glypican-2 (GPC2) is a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is important for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. In…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae releases DNA and DNABII proteins via a T4SS-like complex and ComE of the type IV pilus machinery [Microbiology]Biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) are central to the chronicity, recurrence, and resistance to treatment of multiple human respiratory tract diseases including otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, and exacerbations of both cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) and associated DNABII proteins are essential to the…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

HEMO, an ancestral endogenous retroviral envelope protein shed in the blood of pregnant women and expressed in pluripotent stem cells and tumors [Microbiology]Capture of retroviral envelope genes is likely to have played a role in the emergence of placental mammals, with evidence for multiple, reiterated, and independent capture events occurring in mammals, and be responsible for the diversity of present day placental structures. Here, we uncover a full-length endogenous retrovirus envelope protein,…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Antibacterial photosensitization through activation of coproporphyrinogen oxidase [Microbiology]Gram-positive bacteria cause the majority of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), resulting in the most common reason for clinic visits in the United States. Recently, it was discovered that Gram-positive pathogens use a unique heme biosynthesis pathway, which implicates this pathway as a target for development of antibacterial therapies….
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Thalamocortical synchronization during induction and emergence from propofol-induced unconsciousness [Neuroscience]General anesthesia (GA) is a reversible drug-induced state of altered arousal required for more than 60,000 surgical procedures each day in the United States alone. Sedation and unconsciousness under GA are associated with stereotyped electrophysiological oscillations that are thought to reflect profound disruptions of activity in neuronal circuits that mediate…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SIK3-HDAC4 signaling regulates Drosophila circadian male sex drive rhythm via modulating the DN1 clock neurons [Neuroscience]The physiology and behavior of many organisms are subject to daily cycles. In Drosophila melanogaster the daily locomotion patterns of single flies are characterized by bursts of activity at dawn and dusk. Two distinct clusters of clock neurons—morning oscillators (M cells) and evening oscillators (E cells)—are largely responsible for these…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural organization of the actin-spectrin-based membrane skeleton in dendrites and soma of neurons [Neuroscience]Actin, spectrin, and associated molecules form a membrane-associated periodic skeleton (MPS) in neurons. In the MPS, short actin filaments, capped by actin-capping proteins, form ring-like structures that wrap around the circumference of neurites, and these rings are periodically spaced along the neurite by spectrin tetramers, forming a quasi-1D lattice structure….
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Salate derivatives found in sunscreens block experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice [Applied Biological Sciences]UV light suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely used animal model of MS, in mice and may be responsible for the decreased incidence of MS in equatorial regions. To test this concept further, we applied commercially available sunblock preparations to mice before exposing them to UV radiation. Surprisingly, some…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conceptual framework of the eco-physiological phases of insect diapause development justified by transcriptomic profiling [Applied Biological Sciences]Insects often overcome unfavorable seasons in a hormonally regulated state of diapause during which their activity ceases, development is arrested, metabolic rate is suppressed, and tolerance of environmental stress is bolstered. Diapausing insects pass through a stereotypic succession of eco-physiological phases termed “diapause development.” The phasing is varied in the…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

On the question of fractal packing structure in metallic glasses [Applied Physical Sciences]This work addresses the long-standing debate over fractal models of packing structure in metallic glasses (MGs). Through detailed fractal and percolation analyses of MG structures, derived from simulations spanning a range of compositions and quenching rates, we conclude that there is no fractal atomic-level structure associated with the packing of…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A promiscuous split intein with expanded protein engineering applications [Biochemistry]The protein trans-splicing (PTS) activity of naturally split inteins has found widespread use in chemical biology and biotechnology. However, currently used naturally split inteins suffer from an “extein dependence,” whereby residues surrounding the splice junction strongly affect splicing efficiency, limiting the general applicability of many PTS-based methods. To address this,…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interdomain conformational flexibility underpins the activity of UGGT, the eukaryotic glycoprotein secretion checkpoint [Biochemistry]Glycoproteins traversing the eukaryotic secretory pathway begin life in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where their folding is surveyed by the 170-kDa UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT). The enzyme acts as the single glycoprotein folding quality control checkpoint: it selectively reglucosylates misfolded glycoproteins, promotes their association with ER lectins and associated chap
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Crystal structure of an orthomyxovirus matrix protein reveals mechanisms for self-polymerization and membrane association [Biochemistry]Many enveloped viruses encode a matrix protein. In the influenza A virus, the matrix protein M1 polymerizes into a rigid protein layer underneath the viral envelope to help enforce the shape and structural integrity of intact viruses. The influenza virus M1 is also known to mediate virus budding as well…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatial gene drives and pushed genetic waves [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Gene drives have the potential to rapidly replace a harmful wild-type allele with a gene drive allele engineered to have desired functionalities. However, an accidental or premature release of a gene drive construct to the natural environment could damage an ecosystem irreversibly. Thus, it is important to understand the spatiotemporal…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effective intermediate-spin iron in O2-transporting heme proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Proteins carrying an iron-porphyrin (heme) cofactor are essential for biological O2 management. The nature of Fe-O2 bonding in hemoproteins is debated for decades. We used energy-sampling and rapid-scan X-ray Kβ emission and K-edge absorption spectroscopy as well as quantum chemistry to determine molecular and electronic structures of unligated (deoxy), CO-inhibited…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular mechanism of photoactivation of a light-regulated adenylate cyclase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) detects light through a flavin chromophore within the N-terminal BLUF domain. BLUF domains have been found in a number of different light-activated proteins, but with different relative orientations. The two BLUF domains of OaPAC are found in close…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lipid rafts sense and direct electric field-induced migration [Cell Biology]Endogenous electric fields (EFs) are involved in developmental regulation and wound healing. Although the phenomenon is known for more than a century, it is not clear how cells perceive the external EF. Membrane proteins, responding to electrophoretic and electroosmotic forces, have long been proposed as the sensing molecules. However, specific…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ubiquitination of exposed glycoproteins by SCFFBXO27 directs damaged lysosomes for autophagy [Cell Biology]Ubiquitination functions as a signal to recruit autophagic machinery to damaged organelles and induce their clearance. Here, we report the characterization of FBXO27, a glycoprotein-specific F-box protein that is part of the SCF (SKP1/CUL1/F-box protein) ubiquitin ligase complex, and demonstrate that SCFFBXO27 ubiquitinates glycoproteins in damaged lysosomes to regulate autophagic…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Design and synthesis of theranostic antibiotic nanodrugs that display enhanced antibacterial activity and luminescence [Chemistry]We report the modular formulation of ciprofloxacin-based pure theranostic nanodrugs that display enhanced antibacterial activities, as well as aggregation-induced emission (AIE) enhancement that was successfully used to image bacteria. The drug derivatives, consisting of ciprofloxacin, a perfluoroaryl ring, and a phenyl ring linked by an amidine bond, were efficiently synthesized…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cavitation onset caused by acceleration [Engineering]Striking the top of a liquid-filled bottle can shatter the bottom. An intuitive interpretation of this event might label an impulsive force as the culprit in this fracturing phenomenon. However, high-speed photography reveals the formation and collapse of tiny bubbles near the bottom before fracture. This observation indicates that the…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synthetic quorum sensing in model microcapsule colonies [Engineering]Biological quorum sensing refers to the ability of cells to gauge their population density and collectively initiate a new behavior once a critical density is reached. Designing synthetic materials systems that exhibit quorum sensing-like behavior could enable the fabrication of devices with both self-recognition and self-regulating functionality. Herein, we develop…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rainforest-initiated wet season onset over the southern Amazon [Environmental Sciences]Although it is well established that transpiration contributes much of the water for rainfall over Amazonia, it remains unclear whether transpiration helps to drive or merely responds to the seasonal cycle of rainfall. Here, we use multiple independent satellite datasets to show that rainforest transpiration enables an increase of shallow…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Functional characterization of odorant receptors in the ponerine ant, Harpegnathos saltator [Evolution]Animals use a variety of sensory modalities—including visual, acoustic, and chemical—to sense their environment and interact with both conspecifics and other species. Such communication is especially critical in eusocial insects such as honey bees and ants, where cooperation is critical for survival and reproductive success. Various classes of chemoreceptors have…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Activin signaling mediates muscle-to-adipose communication in a mitochondria dysfunction-associated obesity model [Genetics]Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with obesity and metabolic disorders. However, whether mitochondrial perturbation in a single tissue influences mitochondrial function and metabolic status of another distal tissue remains largely unknown. We analyzed the nonautonomous role of muscular mitochondrial dysfunction in Drosophila. Surprisingly, impaired muscle mitochondrial function via com
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Detection and quantification of inbreeding depression for complex traits from SNP data [Genetics]Quantifying the effects of inbreeding is critical to characterizing the genetic architecture of complex traits. This study highlights through theory and simulations the strengths and shortcomings of three SNP-based inbreeding measures commonly used to estimate inbreeding depression (ID). We demonstrate that heterogeneity in linkage disequilibrium (LD) between causal variants and…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deacetylase activity of histone deacetylase 3 is required for productive VDJ recombination and B-cell development [Genetics]Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is the catalytic component of NCoR/SMRT corepressor complexes that mediate the actions of transcription factors implicated in the regulation of B-cell development and function. We crossed Hdac3 conditional knockout mice with Mb1-Cre knockin animals to delete Hdac3 in early progenitor B cells. The spleens of Hdac3F/−Mb1-Cre+/−…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sequence intrinsic somatic mutation mechanisms contribute to affinity maturation of VRC01-class HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies [Immunology and Inflammation]Variable regions of Ig chains provide the antigen recognition portion of B-cell receptors and derivative antibodies. Ig heavy-chain variable region exons are assembled developmentally from V, D, J gene segments. Each variable region contains three antigen-contacting complementarity-determining regions (CDRs), with CDR1 and CDR2 encoded by the V segment and CDR3…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nuclear carbonic anhydrase 6B associates with PRMT5 to epigenetically promote IL-12 expression in innate response [Immunology and Inflammation]Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is critical for induction of protective immunity against intracellular bacterial infection. However, the mechanisms for efficient induction of IL-12 in innate response remain poorly understood. Here we report that the B type of carbonic anhydrase 6 (Car6-b, which encoded CA-VI B) is essential for host defense against Listeria…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Medial temporal lobe and topographical memory [Neuroscience]There has been interest in the idea that medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures might be especially important for spatial processing and spatial memory. We tested the proposal that the MTL has a specific role in topographical memory as assessed in tasks of scene memory where the viewpoint shifts from study…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BACE inhibition-dependent repair of Alzheimer’s pathophysiology [Neuroscience]Amyloid-β (Aβ) is thought to play an essential pathogenic role in Alzheimer´s disease (AD). A key enzyme involved in the generation of Aβ is the β-secretase BACE, for which powerful inhibitors have been developed and are currently in use in human clinical trials. However, although BACE inhibition can reduce cerebral…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interactions between feedback and lateral connections in the primary visual cortex [Neuroscience]Perceptual grouping of line segments into object contours has been thought to be mediated, in part, by long-range horizontal connectivity intrinsic to the primary visual cortex (V1), with a contribution by top-down feedback projections. To dissect the contributions of intraareal and interareal connections during contour integration, we applied conditional Granger…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neural basis for hand muscle synergies in the primate spinal cord [Neuroscience]Grasping is a highly complex movement that requires the coordination of multiple hand joints and muscles. Muscle synergies have been proposed to be the functional building blocks that coordinate such complex motor behaviors, but little is known about how they are implemented in the central nervous system. Here we demonstrate…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Revised M06-L functional for improved accuracy on chemical reaction barrier heights, noncovalent interactions, and solid-state physics [Physics]We present the revM06-L functional, which we designed by optimizing against a larger database than had been used for Minnesota 2006 local functional (M06-L) and by using smoothness restraints. The optimization strategy reduced the number of parameters from 34 to 31 because we removed some large terms that increased the…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nature does not rely on long-lived electronic quantum coherence for photosynthetic energy transfer [Physics]During the first steps of photosynthesis, the energy of impinging solar photons is transformed into electronic excitation energy of the light-harvesting biomolecular complexes. The subsequent energy transfer to the reaction center is commonly rationalized in terms of excitons moving on a grid of biomolecular chromophores on typical timescales <100 fs….
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mapping of human brown adipose tissue in lean and obese young men [Physiology]Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) can be activated to increase glucose uptake and energy expenditure, making it a potential target for treating obesity and metabolic disease. Data on the functional and anatomic characteristics of BAT are limited, however. In 20 healthy young men [12 lean, mean body mass index (BMI)…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Optimal decision making and matching are tied through diminishing returns [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]How individuals make decisions has been a matter of long-standing debate among economists and researchers in the life sciences. In economics, subjects are viewed as optimal decision makers who maximize their overall reward income. This framework has been widely influential, but requires a complete knowledge of the reward contingencies associated…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exposure to and recall of violence reduce short-term memory and cognitive control [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Previous research has investigated the effects of violence and warfare on individuals' well-being, mental health, and individual prosociality and risk aversion. This study establishes the short- and long-term effects of exposure to violence on short-term memory and aspects of cognitive control. Short-term memory is the ability to store information. Cognitive…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dehumanization increases instrumental violence, but not moral violence [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Across five experiments, we show that dehumanization—the act of perceiving victims as not completely human—increases instrumental, but not moral, violence. In attitude surveys, ascribing reduced capacities for cognitive, experiential, and emotional states to victims predicted support for practices where victims are harmed to achieve instrumental goals, including sweatshop labor, animal…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Implications of life-history strategies for obesity [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and obesity is well documented. In the current research, a life history theory (LHT) framework provided an explanation for this association. Derived from evolutionary behavioral science, LHT emphasizes how variability in exposure to unpredictability during childhood gives rise to individual differences in a…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Buying time promotes happiness [Social Sciences]Around the world, increases in wealth have produced an unintended consequence: a rising sense of time scarcity. We provide evidence that using money to buy time can provide a buffer against this time famine, thereby promoting happiness. Using large, diverse samples from the United States, Canada, Denmark, and The Netherlands…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Large numbers of explanatory variables, a semi-descriptive analysis [Statistics]Data with a relatively small number of study individuals and a very large number of potential explanatory features arise particularly, but by no means only, in genomics. A powerful method of analysis, the lasso [Tibshirani R (1996) J Roy Stat Soc B 58:267–288], takes account of an assumed sparsity of…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: Climate change complicates fisheries modeling and management [Sustainability Science]Denmark, Ireland, Norway, and multiple other nations didn’t see the fish war coming. In 2011, in the waters and fjords of east Greenland, fishermen began spotting a blue-green iridescent fish. It was mackerel, a species that had never before been caught so far north. By 2014, the fish was one…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rainforest metropolis casts 1,000-km defaunation shadow [Sustainability Science]Tropical rainforest regions are urbanizing rapidly, yet the role of emerging metropolises in driving wildlife overharvesting in forests and inland waters is unknown. We present evidence of a large defaunation shadow around a rainforest metropolis. Using interviews with 392 rural fishers, we show that fishing has severely depleted a large-bodied…
11d Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An invasive foundation species enhances multifunctionality in a coastal ecosystem [Sustainability Science]While invasive species often threaten biodiversity and human well-being, their potential to enhance functioning by offsetting the loss of native habitat has rarely been considered. We manipulated the abundance of the nonnative, habitat-forming seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla in large plots (25 m2) on southeastern US intertidal landscapes to assess impacts on…
11d Popular Science
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Add Greenland to the growing list of countries on fire Environment Reminder, this isn't normal In what is continuing to be an unusual wild fire year, a large conflagration is currently burning Greenland.
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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Elon Musk Is Building His Own Hyperloop
11d Live Science
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Resisting Junk Food Could Be Easier When You Buy Groceries OnlineFor people who just can't seem to pass up the candy in a supermarket checkout line, grocery shopping online may be helpful, reducing these impulse purchases, a new study suggests
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Extreme heat linked to climate change may adversely affect pregnancyA systematic review links extreme heat exposure to changes in gestation length, birth weight, stillbirth and neonatal stress.
11d Science | The Guardian
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A danger to public health? Uproar as scientist urges us to eat more salt Exclusive : In his new book, James DiNicolantonio claims salt could make us healthier. But experts have condemned the advice as potentially dangerous Public health experts in the UK have spoken out against a new book that claims many of us should be eating more salt, not less – claiming the advice could endanger people’s health. New York scientist James DiNicolantonio says in his book The Salt Fi
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Icy treat for panda stars' birthday in Dutch zooTwo multi-layered "cakes" made from ice, vegetable juice and fruit greeted a pair of giant pandas at a Dutch zoo Tuesday for their first birthday party since arriving from China.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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State wouldn't break even on Foxconn incentives for 25 yearsIt would take at least 25 years for Wisconsin taxpayers to break even on Gov. Scott Walker's incentives to lure Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn to the state, according to a fiscal analysis released Tuesday.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Extreme melt season leads to decade-long ecosystem changes in Antarctica's Dry ValleysAn abnormal season of intense glacial melt in 2002 triggered multiple distinct changes in the physical and biological characteristics of Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys over the ensuing decade, new research funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) shows.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Distributed wind power keeps spinning, growingAmerica's use of distributed wind — which is wind power generated near where it will be used — continues to grow, according to the 2016 Distributed Wind Market Report.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Human gut microbe may lead to treatment for multiple sclerosisMayo Clinic researchers, along with colleagues at the University of Iowa, report that a human gut microbe discovered at Mayo Clinic may help treat autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. The findings appear in Cell Reports.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA sees Tropical Depression Noru fading over JapanNASA Infrared imagery showed warming cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression Noru as it continued weakening over Japan.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Machine learning could be key to producing stronger, less corrosive metalsResearchers have studied grain boundaries for decades and gained some insight into the types of properties grain boundaries produce, but no one has been able to nail down a universal system to predict if a certain configuration of atoms at grain boundaries will make a material stronger or more pliable. An interdisciplinary team of BYU researchers have cracked the code by juicing a computer with an
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Scientists restore youthful plasticity to the brains of adult miceLike the rest of the body, the brain loses flexibility with age, impacting the ability to learn, remember, and adapt. Now, scientists at University of Utah Health report they can rejuvenate the plasticity of the mouse brain, specifically in the visual cortex. Published today in PNAS, the study shows that manipulating a single gene triggers the shift, revealing it as a target for new treatments to
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Annual wind report confirms tech advancements, improved performance, low wind pricesWind energy pricing for land-based, utility-scale projects remains attractive to utility and commercial purchasers, according to an annual report released by the US Department of Energy and prepared by Berkeley Lab. Prices offered by newly built wind projects in the United States are averaging around 2¢/kWh, driven lower by technology advancements and cost reductions.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blocking enzyme linked to Alzheimer's may reverse memory lossMIT researchers have now shown that they can reverse memory loss in mice by interfering with the enzyme that forms the blockade. The enzyme, known as HDAC2, turns genes off by condensing them so tightly that they can't be expressed.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Hormone shows promise as cognition enhancerIn a study that augurs well for the therapeutic potential of klotho – a life-extending protein hormone that a minority of people naturally produce at high levels – scientists at UC San Francisco have found that administering a fragment of the klotho protein to young, aging or impaired mice rapidly improves their cognitive and physical performance.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Longevity hormone klotho boosts memory and protects against brain aging in miceA single injection of a fragment of the longevity hormone klotho into both young and old mice improved spatial and working memory and strengthened connections between neurons in the hippocampus rapidly, and these cognitive benefits lasted for several weeks, according to a study published in Cell Reports. Short-term treatment with the klotho fragment countered deficits in mice with diseased brains.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA sees Tropical Depression Noru fading over JapanNASA Infrared imagery showed warming cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression Noru as it continued weakening over Japan.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Annual wind report confirms tech advancements, improved performance, low wind pricesWind energy pricing for land-based, utility-scale projects remains attractive to utility and commercial purchasers, according to an annual report released by the U.S. Department of Energy and prepared by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Prices offered by newly built wind projects in the United States are averaging around 2¢/kWh, driven lower by technology advancements and
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers develop method that could produce stronger, more pliable metalsIt may not be as catchy as chains and weak links, but physicists and engineers know "a material is only as strong as its weakest grain boundary."
11d The Atlantic
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How North Korea Cheats Sanctions In July 2013, U.S. law-enforcement was tipped off about a North Korean vessel that was making its first visit to the Americas in four years. Authorities were told the Chong Chon Gang, which was supposed to be carrying sugar from Cuba to North Korea, was hiding drugs or weapons in its cargo. U.S. officials informed their Panamanian counterparts, who intercepted the vessel, finally managing to seiz
11d Ars Technica
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Trump’s space leader says SpaceX is outstanding, but… Enlarge / Scott Pace, right, and Elon Musk, left, testify before Congress in 2014. (credit: George Washington University) Scott Pace, a well-known academic figure in the aerospace community, was named executive secretary of the National Space Council in July. As such, he was the first key appointee of the Trump administration on space policy in regard to the future of the military, civil, and com
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Dino hips discovery unravels species riddleNew research from University of Alberta paleontologists shows one of North America's most broadly identified dinosaur species, Troodon formosus, is no longer a valid classification, naming two others in its stead. The discovery by graduate student Aaron van der Reest leaves North America's paleontology community in upheaval.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Relieving antibiotic resistance: Researchers take steps toward new treatment for E. coliBy understanding the functional differences between proteins expressed by two E. coli strains, researchers at Kansas State University are exploring new opportunities to inhibit their impacts to human health.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New scanning process allows unprecedented look inside live insectsUntil now, insects have been too wriggly to make good subjects for scientists wanting to understand more about insect innards.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Single cell RNA-seq will provide key insight on how different types of taste cells functionA significant technological advance from the Monell Center now allows scientists to identify the complete set of genes in any type of taste receptor cell. The technology provides taste researchers with a treasure trove of information that will help identify precisely how each type of taste receptor cell carries out its specific function.
11d New Scientist – News
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Nuclear reactors on rockets may fuel future crewed trips to MarsNASA’s push to develop a rocket engine powered by a nuclear reactor could create a faster, lighter spaceship and cut the trip to Mars down to four months
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA measures Tropical Storm Franklin's soaking rains from spaceTropical Storm Franklin was generating heavy rain when NASA's GPM satellite observed the rainfall from space. That rainfall is expected to soak Mexico as Franklin continues to move over the Yucatan Peninsula on August 8, 2017.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Where there's a willUC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Paolo Luzzatto-Fegiz was frustrated. Once again, the delicate tip of the instrument he was using to measure water density — a conductivity probe — had broken, rendering the setup useless and his work in temporary limbo.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Laser mapping project shows effects of physical changes in Antarctica's Dry ValleysResearchers funded by the National Science Foundation have publicly released high-resolution maps of Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys, a globally unique polar desert.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New scanning process allows unprecedented look inside live insectsConventional insect scanning usually requires killing the insect. A new collaborative process developed at Western University in London, Canada, shows live insects can be scanned if they're anesthetized temporarily with carbon dioxide.
11d Ars Technica
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Toshiba Portégé x30 review: What can work laptops learn from consumer devices? Valentina Palladino Despite turmoil surrounding its chip business—and the decision to stop selling consumer laptops—Toshiba hasn't stopped making portable computers. The company's Portégé and Tecra laptop families are built for businesses and employees, so they may not be as flashy as consumer devices, but they're still important. Work-issued laptops are the primary PCs for many people. At a glan
11d The Atlantic
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The Most Common Error in Media Coverage of the Google Memo This week, headlines across a diverse array of media outlets proclaimed that at least one Google employee was so antagonistic to women that he circulated a 10-page “anti-diversity screed.” That is how Gizmodo characterized the now infamous internal memo when publishing it Saturday . Similar language was used in headlines at Fox News , CNN , ABC News , the BBC , NBC News , Time , Slate , Engadget
11d Popular Science
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Tools and techniques: How to make a BLT from scratch Gadgets From yeast and pig to bread and bacon. Want to learn how to make a B.L.T. from scratch? Read on.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Stress heightens fear of threats from the pastRecognizing threats is an essential function of the human mind — think 'fight or flight' — one that is aided by past negative experiences. But when older memories are coupled with stress, individuals are likely to perceive danger in harmless circumstances, according to a new paper.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Study links unhealthy segregated neighborhoods to childhood asthmaResearchers have had trouble explaining why black children are much more likely than other children to suffer from asthma. A new study strongly suggests that much of the answer lies in persistent residential segregation, which traps minority children in unhealthy, polluted neighborhoods.
11d Ingeniøren
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VIDEO: Elektromagnetisk katapult sender fly af sted fra hangarskibDet nyudviklede amerikanske Emals-system reducerer belastningen på flyskrogene, da den lineære induktionsmotor giver en meget jævnere acceleration.
11d New Scientist – News
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Mars’s surface hosts millions of towering dust devils every dayThe Red Planet has 10 times as many dust devils as we thought, which stir up dust that warms the planet and could be dangerous for future Mars explorers
11d Gizmodo
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Anker Battery Packs, Barska Safes, $29 Home Security Camera, and the Rest of Tuesday's Best Deals Your favorite battery packs , a huge deal on Barska safes , and a $15 Mohu TV antenna lead off Tuesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker PowerCore Speed 10000 , $30 | Anker PowerCore Speed 20000 , $42 Anker’s PowerCore battery packs have long been reader favorites , and you can choose from two capacities of t
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How a chemo drug can help cancer spread from the breast to the lungsThe very same treatment that thwarts breast cancer has a dark side – it can fuel the spread of the disease to the lungs. Researchers found clues to why it happens, opening up the possibility of interfering with the medication’s downsides while preserving its cancer-fighting properties in breast tissue.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Marine reserves a solution to bycatch problem in oceansCommercial fishermen may be able to catch more of the profitable fish they want with marine reserves than without them, according to a study.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Individuals with bipolar disorder need workplace supportPeople with bipolar disorder often find themselves unemployed due to exclusion, stigma and stereotypes directed at them at work, a new study found.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify recommendations in new effort to improve surgical patients' recoveryCollaborators in a new nationwide program for hospitals designed to improve the recovery of surgical patients have identified their first set of evidence-based recommendations: a care plan for colon and rectal surgical procedures. This review of the best available scientific evidence for optimal care before, during, and after colorectal operations is published online as an 'article in press' on th
11d The Atlantic
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The Ben & Jerry’s of Medieval Times Profits and public-mindedness are often at odds. A business’s aim is to make money, and most of the time, concerns about social good are secondary at best, frequently touted for public-relations purposes. One exception is benefit corporations, companies that explicitly set out to do right by their workers, society, and the environment. The nomenclature is relatively new—the first companies to be
11d cognitive science
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A paper in Psychological Science analyzed writing by people who were nearing death and found that what they wrote was more positive than you might expect. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
11d Gizmodo
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Canadians Are Now the First to Eat Genetically Modified Salmon A genetically modified AquaAdvantage salmon seen behind a standard Atlantic salmon of the same age. (Image: AquaBounty Technologies) A US company has sold nearly five tons of genetically-engineered Atlantic salmon fillets in Canada, marking the world’s first sale of GM fish for human consumption. Skeptics of the futuristic food are crying foul, citing ecological and health concerns, but governmen
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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Why Are Safety Drivers in Autonomous Cars Dressing Up as Car Seats?
11d The Scientist RSS
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The Sleeping Brain Can LearnHumans can remember new sensory information presented during REM sleep, but this ability is suppressed during deep, slow-wave slumber.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One step closer in explaining MS relapse during upper respiratory infectionFor most of us, the flu is just the flu. We suffer through it for several days, and eventually bounce back. But for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological diseases, the flu can trigger a cascade of immune responses that result in a full-blown relapse of the disease. In a recent study, Illinois researchers shed light on what may be happening in the brains of MS patients during
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Relieving antibiotic resistance: Researchers take steps toward new treatment for E. coliBy understanding the functional differences between proteins expressed by two E. coli strains, researchers at Kansas State University are exploring new opportunities to inhibit their impacts to human health.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Dino hips discovery unravels species riddleNew research from University of Alberta paleontologists shows one of North America's most broadly identified dinosaur species, Troodon formosus, is no longer a valid classification, naming two others in its stead. The discovery by graduate student Aaron van der Reest leaves North America's paleontology community in upheaval.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Are learning and unlearning bedfellows?We know that sleep helps us integrate knowledge acquired during the day. But can we learn new things while sleeping? By exposing subjects to repeated auditory stimuli, a team of researchers has just demonstrated that the brain is capable of learning such sound patterns during certain sleep stages — though they may be forgotten during deep sleep.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Researchers discover potentially harmful nanoparticles produced through burning coalEnvironmental scientists led by the Virginia Tech College of Science have discovered that the burning of coal produces incredibly small airborne particles of a highly unusual form of titanium oxide with the potential to be toxic to humans.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Racial differences for trends in colorectal cancer mortality ratesColorectal cancer mortality rates have decreased since 1970 in black individuals 20 to 54 years of age, but have increased in white individuals since 1995 among those ages 30 to 39 years and since 2005 among those 40 to 54 years of age following decades of decline, according to a study published by JAMA.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Music therapy for children with autism does not improve symptomsAmong children with autism spectrum disorder, improvisational music therapy resulted in no significant difference in symptom severity compared to children who received enhanced standard care alone, according to a study published by JAMA.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Colorectal cancer death rates rising in people under 55A new report finds that colorectal cancer mortality rates have increased in adults under 55 since the mid-2000s after falling for decades.
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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The Vegetarian Burger That Bleeds Raises FDA Concern
11d Live Science
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Eclipse Superstitions Are a Thing of the Past, and the PresentAncient stories and superstitions about eclipses can be found in every corner of the globe, but modern skywatchers aren't immune to misinformation about these celestial events.
11d Futurity.org
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Does seeing violence on the news make us care more? Editors in television newsrooms should include video of violent events in stories that they believe to be newsworthy, say researchers. “If you’ve made the decision that people need to know about this, then why pull back and not show them why they should care?” “Showing graphic content and providing a more accurate and complete representation of severe events can motivate people to care more about
11d Ingeniøren
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Skodløsning kan give bedre asfaltCigaretskod er ikke bare ubrugeligt affald. Australske forskere har udviklet en løsning, hvor cigaretskod kan gøre asfaltbeton bedre.
11d Feed: All Latest
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Andrew Ng’s Next Project Takes Aim at the Deep Learning Skills GapArtificial intelligence expert Andrew Ng has a new online course to teach deep learning skills to coders
11d Latest Headlines | Science News
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These record-breaking tube worms can survive for centuriesDeep-sea tube worms can live decades longer than their shallow-water counterparts.
11d Big Think
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Study Finds Women’s Brains Are Far More Active Than Men’s A new study of 46,034 brain scans shows women’s brains are more active than men’s. Read More
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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Andrew Ng’s Next Trick: Training a Million AI ExpertsMillions of people should master deep learning, says a leading AI researcher and educator.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers discover potentially harmful nanoparticles produced through burning coalEnvironmental scientists led by the Virginia Tech College of Science have discovered that the burning of coal produces incredibly small particles of a highly unusual form of titanium oxide.
11d NYT > Science
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Chasing Shadows for a Glimpse of a Tiny World Beyond PlutoFrom just five blinks of starlight, scientists now know more about the next destination of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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A taste cell encyclopediaA significant technological advance from the Monell Center now allows scientists to identify the complete set of genes in any type of taste receptor cell. The technology provides taste researchers with a treasure trove of information that will help identify precisely how each type of taste receptor cell carries out its specific function.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA measures Tropical Storm Franklin's soaking rains from spaceTropical Storm Franklin was generating heavy rain when NASA's GPM satellite observed the rainfall from space. That rainfall is expected to soak Mexico as Franklin continues to move over the Yucatan Peninsula on Aug. 8, 2017.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Playing with your brainHuman-computer interactions, such as playing video games, can have a negative impact on the brain, says a new Canadian study published in Molecular Psychiatry. For over 10 years, scientists have told us that action video game players exhibit better visual attention, motor control abilities and short-term memory. But, could these benefits come at a cost?
11d Ars Technica
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New icons are YouTube’s latest way to alert creators of video demonetization Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) After the ad-pocolypse earlier this year, YouTube put many new systems in place for advertisers to better control which videos their ads appear over on the platform. The company also clarified what it means to be "advertiser-friendly" on YouTube, as well as what kinds of hate-speech would be ineligible for monetization. However, many creators have expressed f
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Four new fruit fly species from the Himalaya and information about their flower visitationThe first record of flower visitation in a group of fruit flies from Himalayan India and a total of four new species are described in the open access journal ZooKeys. In their paper, scientists also revise the descriptions of all representatives of this genus (Lordiphosa) in India.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA studies tethered CubeSat mission to study lunar swirlsA novel mission concept involving two CubeSats connected by a thin, miles-long tether could help scientists understand how the moon got its mysterious "tattoos"—swirling patterns of light and dark found at more than 100 locations across the lunar surface.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Dopaminergic neurons derived from iPSCs in non-human primate modelResearchers have demonstrated the ability to generate dopaminergic neurons in the laboratory from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblast cells of adult marmoset monkeys. This new study, documenting the iPSCs' pluripotent properties and the potential for using this animal model to develop regenerative medicine approaches for dopamine-related disorders such as Parkinson's dis
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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UCI celestial census indicates that black holes pervade the universeAfter conducting a cosmic inventory of sorts to calculate and categorize stellar-remnant black holes, astronomers from the University of California, Irvine have concluded that there are probably tens of millions of the enigmatic, dark objects in the Milky Way – far more than expected.
11d TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How your brain decides what is beautiful | Anjan ChatterjeeAnjan Chatterjee uses tools from evolutionary psychology and cognitive neuroscience to study one of nature's most captivating concepts: beauty. Learn more about the science behind why certain configurations of line, color and form excite us in this fascinating, deep look inside your brain.
11d Futurity.org
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‘Tough love’ makes puppies better guide dogs Like human “helicopter” parents, doting dog moms seem to handicap their puppies, research shows. This reduces the puppies’ likelihood of successfully completing a training program to become guide dogs. The research took place at The Seeing Eye, an organization in Morristown, New Jersey, that breeds, raises, and trains dogs to guide blind people. The findings appear in the Proceedings of the Natio
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Video: How superhydrophobic materials stay totally dryRaincoats, car windshields, waterproof phones: They all use a little chemistry to stay dry. Inspired by nature, chemists use extremely water-fearing, or superhydrophobic, coatings to repel water from surfaces to keep them dry.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Local collaboration key to protecting pollinators while managing ticks, mosquitoesManaging mosquito and tick populations and protecting the health of pollinators are growing concerns on a global scale, but success in both requires teamwork on the local level.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Asian hornet to colonize UK within two decades without actionThe yellow legged or Asian hornet – a voracious predator of honey bees and other beneficial insects – could rapidly colonise the UK unless its spread is combatted, according to new research by the Universities of Warwick and Newcastle, working with the National Bee Unit.
11d Scientific American Content: Global

Norovirus Strikes Athletes at World Athletics Championships in the U.K.Competitors from several countries staying at a London hotel became ill this week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Futurity.org
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‘Grounding’ protects preemies from electrical fields A technique called “electrical grounding” may reduce preterm infants’ electromagnetic exposure while in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and improve their health outcomes, research shows. “Anything we might do to improve the babies’ resilience would be good.” Equipment in the NICU produces low-frequency electromagnetic fields that can have subtle yet measurable effects on the autonomic ner
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clinical trial shows ready-to-use cells are safe and effective to treat viral infectionsA phase II clinical trial shows that patients who received a hematopoietic stem cell transplant and developed a viral infection could be helped by receiving immune cells specialized in eliminating that particular virus.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Like father like son? How we balance work and family life may be learned from our parentsThe extent to which we prioritise work versus family life may be shaped by our childhood experiences in the family home, according to a study co-authored by Dr Ioana Lupu from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Smoking is on the rise among pregnant women with depressionSmoking is increasing among pregnant women with depression in the United States. Smoking rates for pregnant women with depression climbed 2.5 percent from 2002 to 2014, in contrast to a decrease among other groups. More than one-third of pregnant women with depression smoke cigarettes compared to one out of 10 pregnant women without depression.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Four new fruit fly species from the Himalaya and information about their flower visitationThe first record of flower visitation in a group of fruit flies from Himalayan India, as well as a total of four new species are described in the open access journal ZooKeys. Scientists have observed two of them on flowers of spiked ginger lily and angel's trumpet at Nainital and Darjeeling, India. Another revised species is noted to have a distinct sex comb — a male-specific morphological struct
11d Gizmodo
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RIP Chantek, the Signing Orangutan Who Was Just Like Us Image: AP There is no permanent good in this world. One minute, everything seems fine. The next minute, the forces of darkness steal away Chantek, the beloved, 39-year-old signing orangutan. Zoo Atlanta Reports: The Zoo Atlanta family is saddened to announce the passing of Chantek, a 39-year-old male orangutan, on August 7, 2017. Although his cause of death is not yet known, the Zoo’s Animal Care
11d The Atlantic
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The Countries Closing Ranks on Al Jazeera It hasn’t been any easy summer for Al Jazeera. Since the onset of the months-long diplomatic crisis between Qatar and a Saudi-led coalition of Gulf Arab states, the pan-Arab broadcaster has been on the defensive, deflecting accusations by Qatar’s detractors in the Gulf that the Doha-based news network is guilty of inciting violence. Those accusations, followed by Gulf countries’ demanding , among
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Bush and Obama's gifts to Trump: More war-making powersThanks to the military interventions by the George W. Bush and Barack Obama administrations, the former presidents have effectively expanded executive authority for Donald Trump to go to war, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Violent news videos can be a moral motivator, says researcherViolent news events present editors with a troubling journalistic decision: How much of the violence, if any, should the audience see as part of the story?
11d Gizmodo
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Apple iPhone 8 Rumor Roundup: Everything We Think We Know Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo With a new iPhone due out later this fall, the Apple rumor mill is hitting peak froth. Not only does 2017 mark the 10th anniversary of the iPhone , but after the iPhone 7 didn’t deliver as much of an improvement over the iPhone 6s as people expected, there’s a lot riding on Apple’s upcoming crop of handsets. So to give you the best idea of what Apple might actually annou
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New theory on the origin of dark matterOnly a small part of the universe consists of visible matter. By far the largest part is invisible and consists of dark matter and dark energy. Very little is known about dark energy, but there are many theories and experiments on the existence of dark matter designed to find these as yet unknown particles. Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have now come up with a
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Bank of England ledgers reveal failure of World War One loan schemeThe British government's initial efforts to pay for World War One through loans from the public was a spectacular failure, according to a new study using restricted Bank of England ledgers. The research reveals that the War Loan scheme failed to such an extent that the Bank of England had to secretly fund half the shortfall.
11d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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Commit to talks on patient data and public health Gene-edited embryos are exciting, but the truly urgent conversations concern genomic medicine, says Vivienne Parry. Nature 548 137 doi: 10.1038/548137a
11d Gizmodo
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Protect Your Valuables (Or Find New Ones) With Amazon's One-Day Barska Sale Barska Gold Box Jewelry? Documents? Weapons? You can keep them all safe with today’s Barska Gold Box . Inside, you’ll find deals on six different safes with various locking mechanisms to protect your valuables, and your peace of mind. The sale also includes a metal detector, binoculars, and a door handle, if you’re in the market.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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'Ego-dissolving' psychedelic drugs could assist with mental healthThe altered state of consciousness and temporary lack of ego that results from using psychedelic drugs could help some mental health patients recover from their symptoms, according to academics at the University of Adelaide.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dopaminergic neurons derived from iPSCs in non-human primate modelResearchers have demonstrated the ability to generate dopaminergic neurons in the laboratory from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblast cells of adult marmoset monkeys.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Newly discovered pathway for pain processing could lead to new treatmentsThe discovery of a new biological pathway involved in pain processing offers hope of using existing cancer drugs to replace the use of opioids in chronic pain treatment, according to scientists at McGill University.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Online team-based game helps patients with diabetes lower blood glucoseResearchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System have found that an online, team-based game designed to teach patients about diabetes self-management had a sustained and meaningful impact on a key measure of diabetes control.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Local collaboration key to protecting pollinators while managing ticks, mosquitoesManaging mosquito and tick populations and protecting the health of pollinators are growing concerns on a global scale, but success in both requires teamwork on the local level. A coalition of entomologists and other scientists specializing in both disease-vector management and pollinator protection suggest professionals in these disciplines must work closely together in their local communities to
11d Ars Technica
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Intel 18-core Core i9-7980XE launches September 25 for $2,000 Enlarge Intel's monstrous 18-core, 36-thread Core i9-7980XE CPU launches September 25 for a whopping $2,000, Intel announced today. It will be joined by the $1,700 16C/32T i9-7960X and the $1,400 14C/28T i9-7940X, while the 12C/12T i9-7920X launches a month earlier on August 28 for $1,200. UK prices are TBC, but the top-end chip will likely start at around £1,900, and then work its way down from
11d The Atlantic
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The JCC Bomb-Threat Suspect Had a Client A federal court has unsealed new documents in the case against an Israeli teenager, Michael Kadar, who has been accused of making at least 245 threatening calls to Jewish Community Centers and schools around the United States. According to the documents, Kadar advertised a “School Email Bomb Threat Service” on AlphaBay, an online marketplace for illicit goods and services that was shut down by th
11d Popular Science
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How not burn down the forest while you’re watching the eclipse Science Heavy crowds and dry conditions could present a real threat to our wildlands. As eclipse watchers head to wild lands to watch the moon block the sun, land managers worry that carelessness will spark wild fires.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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High quality early intervention for children with autism quickly results in costs savingsThe costs associated with the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), one evidence-based treatment for young children with autism, were fully offset after only two years following intervention due to reductions in children's use of other services, new research shows.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Cash incentives, talk can encourage primary care visits by people with new health coverageIn a randomized controlled trial, researchers studied low-income adults newly covered by a primary care program to determine if a cash incentive could encourage them to make an initial visit to a primary care provider. Among four total participant groups, three were given a baseline survey by telephone and then either $50, $25 or $0 to visit their provider within six months. A control group receiv
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Black holes pervade the universe, celestial census indicatesAfter conducting a cosmic inventory of sorts to calculate and categorize stellar-remnant black holes, astronomers have concluded that there are probably tens of millions of the enigmatic, dark objects in the Milky Way — far more than expected.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Mutation in prostate tumors shown to change epigenetic identity, the make-up of DNAProstate cancer researchers have mapped the impact of an acquired mutation that alters epigenetic identity, the make-up of DNA, in about 50 percent of patient tumor samples. The discovery also identifies a new opportunity for targeted therapy.
11d Feed: All Latest
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Warrantless US Spying Is Set to Expire Soon. Let It DieOpinion: It's time to let the sun set on warrantless surveillance.
11d Gizmodo
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Man Develops Rare Neurological Disorder From Denture Paste Image: Science Museum, London. Wellcome Images . In a bizarre case from the UK, a 62-year-old man developed a severe neurological disorder, and doctors learned it probably had something to with his dentures. Or at least, with the stuff keeping them in place. Published on Monday in the online journal BMJ Case Reports , the man had described pain and numbness in his legs that had grown worse over s
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers and global fishing companies form coalition for sustainable seasThe initiative marks the first time that companies from Asia, Europe and the US have joined forces to work on a clear agenda and commitment for change, and illustrate how sustainability scientists can actively engage as change makers.
11d Futurity.org
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Race and body shape give clues to heart disease risk A woman’s race and where she gains weight in middle age could give her doctor valuable clues to her risk of developing higher volumes of heart fat—a potential risk factor for heart disease. A new study in Menopause shows that black women who put on fat around their midsection during midlife are more likely to accumulate fat around their hearts—while white women’s risk of fatty hearts is higher wh
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Highly skilled workers more likely to have control over their working dayPeople in high-skilled jobs and supervisory roles are more likely to enjoy control over their working hours, new research from a University of Kent expert in work-life balance shows.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NI former-paramilitaries can help deter future generationsFormer paramilitaries in Northern Ireland still hold powerful political convictions, but most have accepted the peace process and many are determined to use their experiences to demythologise the past and deter young people from embracing violence.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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No longer water under the bridge, statistics yields new data on sea levelsWhile the scientific community has long warned about rising sea levels and their destructive impact on life, property and economies of some of the United States' most populous cities, researchers have developed a new, statistical method that more precisely calculates the rate of sea level rise, showing it's not only increasing, but accelerating. The research, methodology and current findings was p
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Bush and Obama's gifts to Trump: More war-making powersThanks to the military interventions by the George W. Bush and Barack Obama administrations, the former presidents have effectively expanded executive authority for Donald Trump to go to war, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Violent news videos can be a moral motivator, says UB researcherViolent news events present editors with a troubling journalistic decision: how much of the violence, if any, should the audience see as part of the story?Matthew Grizzard, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Communication, says his latest research suggests editors should include violent video in those stories they consider to be genuinely newsworthy.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Regular energy drink use linked to later drug use among young adultsCould young adults who regularly consume highly caffeinated energy drinks be at risk for future substance use? In a study of young adults ages 21-25, led by the University of Maryland School of Public Health, researchers found evidence that individuals who regularly consumed highly caffeinated energy drinks, and sustained that consumption over time, were more likely to use cocaine, nonmedically us
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How superhydrophobic materials stay totally dry (video)Raincoats, car windshields, waterproof phones: They all use a little chemistry to stay dry. Inspired by nature, chemists use extremely water-fearing, or superhydrophobic, coatings to repel water from surfaces to keep them dry. Watch as the Reactions team uses a high-speed camera and some brave volunteers to bring the science of staying dry to life: https://youtu.be/YR4uCvy7wOA.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Asian hornet to colonize UK within 2 decades without actionThe yellow legged or Asian hornet — a voracious predator of honey bees and other beneficial insects — could rapidly colonize the UK unless its spread is combated, according to new research by the universities of Warwick and Newcastle, working with the National Bee Unit.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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UCI celestial census indicates that black holes pervade the universeAfter conducting a cosmic inventory of sorts to calculate and categorize stellar-remnant black holes, astronomers from the University of California, Irvine have concluded that there are probably tens of millions of the enigmatic, dark objects in the Milky Way — far more than expected.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New theory on the origin of dark matterScientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have come up with a new theory on how dark matter may have been formed shortly after the origin of the universe. This new model proposes an alternative to the WIMP paradigm that is the subject of various experiments in current research.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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No longer water under the bridge, statistics yields new data on sea levelsWhile the scientific community has long warned about rising sea levels and their destructive impact on some of the United States' most populous cities, researchers have developed a new, statistical method that more precisely calculates the rate of sea level rise, showing it's not only increasing, but accelerating.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research reveals failure of World War One loan schemeThe British government's initial efforts to pay for World War One through loans from the public was a spectacular failure, according to a new study using restricted Bank of England ledgers. The research reveals that the War Loan scheme failed to such an extent that the Bank of England had to secretly fund half the shortfall.
11d The Atlantic
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Trump Is Losing His Battle With the Republican Party When President Trump decided to throw his weight behind a plan to slash legal immigration last week, the way many people heard about it was through a pair of dramatic exchanges between reporters and Stephen Miller, a White House senior adviser who is among the hardest of hardliners on immigration in the administration. That made the initiative seem the latest example of how Trump has brought forw
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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Uncovering the Secrets of a Trustworthy FaceExplaining our sense of who is reliable with the power of expectations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Choice of cool roofing materials can potentially impact region's air pollutionWidespread installation of certain 'cool roof' materials in the region could slightly increase ozone and fine particulate pollution levels, scientists suggest after a groundbreaking study.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New antibiotic class found effective against gonorrhea in the laboratoryClosthioamide, discovered in 2010, might eventually offer an alternative for current drugs that are becoming less effective against gonorrhoea, report investigators.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Extreme melt season leads to decade-long ecosystem changes in Antarctic polar desertAn abnormal season of intense glacial melt in 2002 triggered multiple distinct changes in the physical and biological characteristics of Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys over the ensuing decade, report investigators.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Drought-affected trees die from hydraulic failure and carbon starvationDrought-caused tree deaths are produced by a combination of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation, shows new research. The finding, based on a meta-analysis by 62 scientists from across the world, will improve predictive models of how trees die in response to heat, drought, and other climate stresses.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How pronouns can be used to build confidence in stressful situationsBefore any potentially stressful event, people often engage in self-talk, an internal dialogue meant to moderate anxiety. This kind of self-reflection is common, according a psychologist whose new study suggests that taking a 'distanced perspective,' or seeing ourselves as though we were an outside observer, leads to a more confident and positive response to upcoming stressors than seeing the expe
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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IBM's Watson can improve cancer treatment through better gene targetingIBM's Watson beat real-life contestants on Jeopardy. Now researchers are hoping this icon of artificial intelligence will help people with cancer win as well by providing a rapid, comprehensive report of the genetic mutations at the root of their specific disease and the therapies that target them.
11d Ingeniøren
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Opfinder af ‘best practice’ indenfor passwords fortryder sine råd I stedet for at konstruere passwords, som er relativt nemme for menneskehjerner at huske, er de nødt til at være obskure, for at hackere ikke bryder dem relativt nemt. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/opfinder-best-practice-indenfor-passwords-fortryder-sine-raad-1078915 Version2
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Independent pharmacies and online coupons help patients save money on drugsAfter finding that prices for some common antibiotics can vary by up to $100 in one metropolitan area, experts suggest that patients could save money by shopping for their drugs online or at independent pharmacies. However, few Americans actively comparison shop for health care, according to a separate study.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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MRI reveals striking brain differences in people with genetic autismResearchers using MRI have identified structural abnormalities in the brains of people with one of the most common genetic causes of autism, according to a new study, the first major study of its kind.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How to trick your heart into thinking you exerciseResearchers have discovered that a protein called cardiotrophin 1 (CT1) can trick the heart into growing in a healthy way and pumping more blood, just as it does in response to exercise and pregnancy. They also show that CT1 can repair heart damage and improve blood flow in animal models of heart failure.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientist finds alcohol-free solution worksAntiseptic solutions are routinely applied to clean the skin prior to surgery. They kill or prevent the growth of microorganisms and prevent wound infections. One of the most common antiseptic solutions is chlorhexidine, which can be dissolved in water or alcohol before being applied to the skin. Now a researcher is reporting that a new discovery will make life easier for surgery patients and thei
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Court appearance rescheduled in cybersecurity caseA Tuesday arraignment has been postponed for a British cybersecurity researcher who was arrested last week in Las Vegas on charges that, years before he won acclaim for helping to stop a worldwide ransomware attack, he created and distributed a malware program to pilfer banking passwords from unsuspecting computer users.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Sleep makes it possible for babies to associate words with content — and not with noiseFor babies every moment is a new experience — until the infant brain organises the flood of stimulations. It has to save new information in its long-term memory, aggregate similar experiences and categorise them. Therefore, one thing seems to be crucial: sufficient sleep. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have now discovered that babies can even associ
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New battery is activated by your spitResearchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs): a battery activated by spit that can be used in extreme conditions where normal batteries don't function.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NI former-paramilitaries can help deter future generationsResearchers at the University of Huddersfield look at the important role former-paramilitaries can play in de-mythologizing the Troubles in Northern Ireland and deterring young people from embracing violence.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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CCP program in Nigeria increases modern contraceptive use, study suggestsOver a four-year period, new research suggests, a program led by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) in six large Nigerian cities was associated with a 10 percentage- point increase in the use of modern contraceptive methods and a similar increase in the desire of women to have fewer children.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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You are how you play: Some video games are better for your brain than othersRegularly playing action video games reduces the grey matter in a person's brain, particularly in the hippocampus region that is involved in spatial learning, navigation and memory. Players who do not use spatial memory strategies through a first-person shooting game, but spontaneously rely on response strategies to find their way around the game are even more affected. These are the findings of r
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Drug hope for acute myeloid leukemiaA new drug that strips cancer cells of their 'immortality' could help to treat patients suffering from one of the most aggressive forms of leukemia.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Multi-nutrient rice against malnutritionETH researchers have developed a new rice variety that not only has increased levels of the micronutrients iron and zinc in the grains, but also produces beta-carotene as a precursor of vitamin A. This could help to reduce micronutrient malnutrition, or 'hidden hunger,' which is widespread in developing countries.
11d Ingeniøren
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Toyota og Mazda indgår aftale om udvikling af elbilerTeknologi til brug i el- og hybridbiler skal udveksles mellem de to japanske bilproducenter Toyota og Mazda. Aftalen, der netop er blevet offentliggjort, indeholder også en ny fabrik i USA og køb af hinandens aktier.
11d The Atlantic
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The Atlantic’s September Issue: Kurt Andersen on “How America Lost Its Mind” Washington, D.C. (August 8, 2017)—Long before alternative facts, the upheavals of the 1960s started loosening the country’s grip on reality. And it’s that tumultuous era—when anything and everything became believable—that explains the rise of Donald Trump. This is How America Went Haywire . As Kurt Andersen argues in the cover story of The Atlantic ’s new September issue, the country has mutated
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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Government Report Tells Trump: Human Activity Is Already Warming America
11d Gizmodo
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Men Have Always Used 'Science' to Explain Why They're Better Than Women Photo: Getty On Saturday, Gizmodo published a 10-page-long screed written by Google software engineer James Damore blasting the company’s diversity policies. In the now-viral document entitled “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber,” Damore asserts that women are biologically ill-equipped to handle the rigors of the tech industry. The encouraging news is that Damore has now been fired from Google, ac
11d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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Home-grown scientists step up to save Africa’s primates Scientific network aims to train a generation of African leaders in primate research. Nature 548 144 doi: 10.1038/548144a
11d Dagens Medicin

10 gode råd til at overleve SundhedsplatformenDer er en vej gennem Sundhedsplatformens åndløse mørke. Men det kræver nogle særlige greb, som kommer her:
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Anger mounts in Hong Kong over massive palm oil spillResidents in Hong Kong desperately tried to clear the coastline of greasy lumps of palm oil Tuesday as it continues to wash ashore after a huge spillage at sea.
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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New Government Report Tells Trump: Human Activity Is Already Warming America
11d Viden
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Faktatjek: Kan du skrue op for sexlysten med et østersgilde?Mange fødevarer får jævnligt skyld for at øge, eller nedsætte, sexlysten. Men kan du egentlig spise dig til en større sexlyst?
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Activists call for whale refuges, but can they stay afloat?A Hawaii marine park's purchase of Kina, a 40-year-old false killer whale long used in echolocation research, has reignited a debate about captive marine mammals and the places that care for them.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sage grouse conservation changes praised, provoke alarmPresident Donald Trump's administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the West.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists investigating properties of hybrid systems consisting of carbon nanostructures and a dyeResearchers around the world are looking at how they can manipulate the properties of carbon nanostructures to customise them for specific purposes; the idea is to make the promising mini-format materials commercially viable. A team at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has now managed to selectively influence the properties of hybrid systems consisting of carbon nanostructure
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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Federal Climate Report Contradicts Trump Administration StanceSome scientists worry the White House could bury the report of dire consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d The Scientist RSS
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USDA Emails: Dont Use Climate ChangeThe agency denies instructing staff to avoid particular terms.
11d The Scientist RSS
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Image of the Day: Un-break My HeartA failing heart is easily distinguished from a healthy one by numerous tell-tale signs, including its slender, stretched-out walls, increased size, and pooled blood clots.
11d Futurity.org
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Ads about ‘home’ can capitalize on anxiety New research suggests that certain people with symptoms of Adult Separation Anxiety Disorder (ASAD) may be more vulnerable to advertising that features imagery related to the concept of “home.” “Featuring the concept of home as an advertising theme leads to more favorability…” “Importantly, our research suggests a vulnerability to persuasion among those with adult separation anxiety disorder symp
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Protein critical to early stages of cellular HIV infection identifiedA Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) -led research team identified a protein, MELK, required for the HIV-1 virus to efficiently infect its target cells. MELK, produced by the cell, is necessary for removal of the protein coat around the HIV-1 virus, which is essential for the infection process. The team further revealed that MELK modifies the protein coat at a specific location to promote
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Controlled manipulationResearchers around the world are looking at how they can manipulate the properties of carbon nanostructures to customise them for specific purposes; the idea is to make the promising mini-format materials commercially viable. A team at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has now managed to selectively influence the properties of hybrid systems consisting of carbon nanostructure
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Highly skilled workers more likely to have control over their working dayPeople in high-skilled jobs and supervisory roles are more likely to enjoy control over their working hours, new research from a University of Kent expert in work-life balance shows.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mainz-based researchers stabilized gold in very rare oxidation state +IIA team of chemists led by Professor Katja Heinze at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry of JGU has been able to isolate and analyze gold in the very rare oxidation state +II. This provides the missing links in the homologous series of the coinage metal ions copper(+II), silver(+II), gold(+II), and in the 'relativistic' triad of platinum(+II), gold(+II), and mercury(+II).
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Development of molecular container with caps that can regulate uptake/release of objectsWe designed a host-guest system using a non-equilibrium kinetically trapped state for on-demand and time-programmable control of molecular functions, and synthesized a macrocyclic metallohost that has anion caps at both sides of the cation-binding site. The anion caps effectively inhibit the guest uptake/release so that we can easily make a non-equilibrium kinetically trapped state. Guest exchange
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Swedish researchers and global fishing companies form coalition for sustainable seasA new article in the scientific journal PNAS describes how researchers from Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University convened the CEOs of several of the world's largest seafood companies to form a new global coalition aiming to end unsustainable practices such as overfishing, modern slavery and destructive impacts on habitats and marine species.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Biological bypass shows promise in coronary artery diseaseA new gene therapy that targets the heart and requires only one treatment session has been found safe for patients with coronary artery disease, according to a successful trial carried out in Finland. Enhancing circulation in the oxygen-deficient heart muscle, the effects were visible even one year after the treatment.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Warm periods in the 20th century are not unprecedented during the last 2,000 yearsCAS scientists collected a large number of proxies and reconstructed a 2,000-year temperature series in China with a 10-year resolution, enabling them to quantitatively reveal the characteristics of temperature change in China over a common era.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Prostate cancer cells become 'shapeshifters' to spread to distant organsJohns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report they have discovered a biochemical process that gives prostate cancer cells the almost unnatural ability to change their shape, squeeze into other organs and take root in other parts of the body. The scientists say their cell culture and mouse studies of the process, which involves a cancer-related protein called AIM1, suggest potential ways to
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New microscope technique reveals internal structure of live embryosA new way to produce 3-D images of live embryos in cattle has now been developed, report scientists, adding that the technique could help determine embryo viability before in vitro fertilization in humans.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study shows seaweed succumbs to virusesScientists are warning the UK kelp biofuel industry to beware of viruses. Whilst known to infect certain types of seaweed, a new study published in the ISME Journal is the first to describe viruses in kelps, which are important both ecologically and commercially.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Multi-nutrient rice against malnutritionETH researchers have developed a new rice variety that not only has increased levels of the micronutrients iron and zinc in the grains, but also produces beta-carotene as a precursor of vitamin A. This could help to reduce micronutrient malnutrition, or "hidden hunger," which is widespread in developing countries.
11d Gizmodo
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A Tattoo Artist Inked 19 Different People to Create This Bart Simpson Flipbook GIF Getting a tattoo is (mostly) a lifelong commitment. So what’s more impressive than this Bart Simpson kickflip animation is that tattoo artist Phil Berge somehow convinced 19 different people that The Simpsons was still cool and relevant enough to get random frames of this flipbook inked on various body parts. Given the long-running animated series has been creating original and unusual versio
11d Gizmodo
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Could Cable's Outfit Tease the Appearance of Another Major Mutant in Deadpool 2? The live-action Lion King taps some Marvel Cinematic Universe stars for key roles. Jodie Whittaker talks about the reaction to her Doctor Who casting. The Avatar sequels are going to resurrect a dead character from the first movie. Plus, new clips from Killjoys and Dark Matter and new Thor: Ragnarok pictures. To me, my Spoilers! Deadpool 2 CBR notes a recent set photo of Cable’s stunt double depi
11d Feed: All Latest
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Disney’s ‘Magic Bench’ Fixes AR’s Biggest Blind SpotForget the clunky headset. All this brain-bending experience asks of you is that you take a seat.
11d Feed: All Latest
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*The Long Dark* Review: a Game Tailored for the Age of Climate AnxietyOut on PC and consoles, Hinterland Games' chilly survival adventure is about understanding nature—and being unable to escape it.
11d Futurity.org
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Teen crime may come from culture, not their brains Though it has been suggested that spikes in crime rates for teens and young adults in the United States are a result of teens being biologically predisposed to risky, law-breaking behavior, a new study indicates that culture may play a role in shaping the criminal behavior of teenagers. In a study of age and crime statistics in Taiwan, the researchers say that the Asian country’s youth crime patt
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Divalent gold complex isolated for the first time in a pure formAccording to textbook knowledge, the usual oxidation states of gold in compounds are +I and +III. The divalent form (+II), on the other hand, prefers to form polynuclear compounds or simply undergoes transformation into the mono- and trivalent forms. However, the elements next to gold in the periodic table are quite different in this respect. The ions of the coinage metals, copper(+II) and silver(
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Algal biofuel production is neither environmentally nor commercially sustainableModern biofuels have been touted as a greener alternative to petrol and diesel since the early 1900s. It seems like a good idea on paper, and they do work – but their use and production doesn't come without problems.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Hacking cybersecurity to anticipate attacksImagine two groups at war. One defends every attack as it comes. The other anticipates threats before they happen. Which is more likely to win?
11d Popular Science
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A key government report on climate change is out. Here's what you need to know Environment The New York Times published a draft of the report on Monday night. A draft report shows just how dire our climate situation has become.
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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Volcanoes May Have Triggered the Last Unexplained Mass ExtinctionVolcanic eruptions have now been tied to all five major mass extinctions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Dagens Medicin

Bech: Jeg lover, at jeg ikke vil skære i det faglige Mickael Bech er ny chef for Kora-/SFI-fusionen Vive med en bunden opgave om at spare 10 mio. kr. om året. Det kommer dog ikke til at gå ud over det faglige arbejde, lover Mickael Bech, der dog advarer om, at det vil tage tid, før alt er på plads.
11d Dagens Medicin

Lavt niveau af apolipoprotein i blodet har sammenhæng med demensDansk studie kan vise vej til udvikling af ny medicin mod demens.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Two studies suggest trouble ahead for paywall journals(Phys.org)—Two independent studies looking at two aspects of paywalls versus free access to research papers suggest that trouble may lie ahead for traditional journals that continue to expect payment for access to peer-reviewed research papers. In the first study, a small team of researchers from the U.S. and Germany looked at the number of freely available papers on the internet using a web exten
11d The Atlantic
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A Burdensome Regulation Screening Truck Drivers for a Sleep Disorder How asleep should truck drivers be on the job? Many people say, “not asleep at all. Wait, why is that even a question?” Over the past several years, this has become a question of health policy that has morphed into a question about the role of government. A string of high-profile incidents involving somnolent truck drivers and railroad engineers have called attention to an emerging sleep disorder
11d The Atlantic
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The Cultural Factors Driving America's Departure From Reality Kurt Andersen’s cover story “ How America Lost Its Mind ” argues that “being American means we can believe anything we want.” This is due to a combination of the new-age mentality born out of the 1960s that encouraged Americans to find their own truth and the internet age, which has allowed us to create communities that reinforce our beliefs. According to Andersen, the perfect manifestation of Am
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Fitness technology increases satisfaction, lowers perceived exertion in new exercisersA new study published in the Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise journal found that adding visual effects to a structured workout creates an 'immersive' fitness experience that increases satisfaction and lowers the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) for new exercisers.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A surprising new role for baker's yeastBaker's yeast is best known for its role in baking and brewing beer. Thanks to work done in a collaboration between scientists from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science and colleagues at the University of Toronto in Canada and the University of Minnesota in the US, we now know that this humble organism can be used in leading edge drug discovery.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Lizard venom may contain clues to treating blood clotsVarious types of lizard venom are being studied as possible treatments for blood clotting diseases that lead to millions of cases of stroke, heart attack, and deep-vein thrombosis annually. University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences expert Associate Professor Bryan Fry said, while snake venom research has been extensive, lizard venom research was still in its infancy.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Independent pharmacies and online coupons help patients save money on drugsAfter finding that prices for some common antibiotics can vary by up to $100 in one metropolitan area, University of Southern California experts suggest that patients could save money by shopping for their drugs online or at independent pharmacies. However, few Americans actively comparison shop for health care, according to a separate study by USC and Harvard Medical School researchers.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Can a Zika outbreak be sustained sexually?Unlike other mosquito-borne outbreaks, Zika doubles as a sexually transmitted infection, with men retaining the virus 10 times longer in their semen than women do in their vaginal fluids. According to research initiated at the Santa Fe Institute, populations least likely to get tested for Zika could sustain a silent outbreak.
11d Viden
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Lækket amerikansk klimarapport varsler store konsekvenser af klimaforandringerNew York Times har bragt et udkast til en klimarapport, der stik modsat Trump varsler store konsekvenser af klimaforandringerne.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Folktale diffusion traced using genomic data(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from several European countries has conducted a study involving tracing the spread of common folktales throughout history in Eurasia. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes using genome data to trace two common means of folktale distribution.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cities need more than air conditioning to get through heat wavesIn May of this year, a hot spell broiled Boston. In June, extreme temperatures grounded Phoenix's planes. Last week, Seattle suffered under record temperatures.
11d The Atlantic
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Where Is The Atlantic Taking You? After almost 160 years, we’re running our first-ever Instagram contest. The September 2017 issue will be in mailboxes and on newsstands within the next week, and we want to see where you’re reading your Atlantic magazine. It’s easy to enter: Snap a picture of you (and your friends! Family! Pets! Get as creative as you’d like with it) reading your copy of the September issue, and share it on Insta
11d Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Malariaparasitter udspioneret ved -196 CelsiusVed at kombinere to avancerede mikroskopteknikker er det lykkedes et internationalt forskerhold under…
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Gender quotas can work but it depends on how employees feel about themIf you think your boss is in her position only because of a gender quota and not because of merit, it could affect the work you do for her.
11d Futurity.org
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Despite warnings, Obamacare hasn’t hurt job market The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, is not having a negative impact on the American job market, two economists argue in a new working paper. As the debate over the law boiled over in Washington, DC this summer, the working paper threw cold water on a claim made by several of the law’s critics: that it was killing American jobs. That argument was founded on early projections made by
11d Dagens Medicin

Lungelægen Irène Frachon blev helt i fransk medicinskandale I 33 år fik ca. fem millioner franske patienter medicinen Mediator. En ihærdig og modig lungelæge, Irène Frachon, blev afgørende for, at medicinen blev forbudt i 2009. Danske Sidse Babett Knudsen spiller i den franske film ’Kvinden fra Brest’, som går i landets biografer, hovedrollen som Irène Frachon.
11d Ars Technica
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Fortnite poisons a potentially great game with agonizing F2P limits Enlarge / At its best, Fortnite looks (and feels) like this nicely staged promo pic of in-game action. However, so many free-to-play annoyances drag this "build a base, blast some zombies" potential to the unseemly depths. (credit: Epic Games) Fortnite comes very close to standing out from the crowded online-shooter fray. Some video games let you hunker down with friends and shoot a zillion oncom
11d Gizmodo
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Anker's Reader-Favorite PowerCore Battery Packs Are Back On Sale Anker PowerCore Speed 10000 , $30 | Anker PowerCore Speed 20000 , $42 Anker’s PowerCore battery packs have long been reader favorites , and you can choose from two capacities of the PowerCore Speed on sale today. Both feature Quick Charge 3.0 for your compatible Android devices, but of course, any of their ports will charge basically any USB-powered device. Unlike most Anker deals, these don’t re
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Database of inbred mouse proteins responsible for strain discrepancies created(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Belgium has developed a bioinformatics tool that allows for comparing protein-coding genes of 36 inbred mouse strains to the C57BL/6J strain. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Steven Timmermans, Marc Van Montagu and Claude Libert describe the tool, the database they created using it
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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This is how regional rail can help ease our big cities' commuter crushIn Sydney and Melbourne, the squeeze is on. Population is booming; house prices are still rising; roads and trains are congested. Australian governments generally have ignored the benefits of relating metropolitan and regional planning.
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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Are We All Racists Deep Inside?Private thoughts and public acts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers find that teamwork helps jellies jet around the oceanScientists now know why jellyfish-like salps swimming together move better than a single salp pulsing solo. That information, says UO marine biologist Kelly Sutherland, could guide the development of jet-propelled underwater vehicles.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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MPFI researchers make significant advance in understanding calcium channel functionA new study conducted by researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience uncovers critical aspects of calcium channel function. Young and his team developed a technique to simultaneously probe both the structure and function of calcium channels with unrivaled accuracy. For the first time, the researchers could monitor the calcium channel impact on calcium signals in a presynaptic
11d Live Science
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World's Fastest-Swirling Vortex Simulates the Big BangPhysicists have created the fastest-swirling vortex in the universe from a primordial soup of fundamental particles that re-creates the Big Bang.
11d Live Science
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Is Big Pharma Hindering Treatment of the Opioid Epidemic? (Op-Ed)The number of people dying from opioid overdose continues to rise, in part because of cheap street drugs. Yet the price of a drug used to treat addiction is out of reach for many.
11d New Scientist – News
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Largest ever wildfire in Greenland seen burning from spaceThe blaze is the biggest ever detected by satellites – and a recent increase in fires in the region could well be a result of the rapid warming in the Arctic
11d New Scientist – News
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Genetically engineered salmon goes on sale for the first timeAfter 25 years of development, the first genetically modified animal intended for human consumption has been sold on the open market in Canada
11d Feed: All Latest
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Here’s Proof That Commuter Bikes Don’t Have to SuckNew York company Priority loads its bikes up with features while keeping costs down.
11d Ingeniøren
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Teknisk uheld: Norges første elfærge ramt af hundredvis af aflysningerElfærgen mellem de to norske byer Lavik og Oppedal har alene i 2016 haft 300 aflysninger på grund af tekniske problemer. Myndighederne mener, det er for dårligt, men rederiet siger, at færgen er underdimensioneret.
11d Live Science
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Even Atheists Judge AtheistsPeople believe that those who commit immoral acts are likely to be atheists.
11d The Atlantic
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How Uber Is Building Uber for Trucking As Uber battles taxis and other ride-hailing apps in cities across the world, the company is beginning to move quickly into a much larger transportation market: trucking. This spring, Uber unveiled Uber Freight, a brokerage service connecting shippers and truckers through a new app. Conceptually, “Uber for trucking” seems like a logical extension of the passenger transport business. But the logis
11d The Atlantic
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Annie Dillard's Classic Essay: 'Total Eclipse' Ever since it was first published in 1982, readers—including this one—have thrilled to “Total Eclipse,” Annie Dillard’s masterpiece of literary nonfiction, which describes her personal experience of a solar eclipse in Washington State. It first appeared in Dillard’s landmark collection, Teaching a Stone to Talk , and was recently republished in The Abundance , a new anthology of her work. The Atl
11d Ars Technica
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Ars Asks: A defiant in-depth defense against dastardly drones Enlarge / Aurich tells me he didn't purposefully make the drone look like it has a shocked face, but I can't un-see it. (credit: Aurich / Thinkstock ) We've asked twice about which IT nightmares are most likely to keep you up at night , and now we're going to finish off our round of surveys with what will be the last one for a while: we want to know what you think about drones . And not just gene
11d Science | The Guardian
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Some still attack Darwin and evolution. How can science fight back? | Jules HowardAN Wilson’s ‘exposé’ is the latest in a long line of attempts to undermine evolutionary biology. Now scientists must decide how best to counter them I can save you the effort of reading AN Wilson’s “exposé” on Darwin , which did the rounds over the weekend, characterising the famous scientist as a fraud, a thief, a liar, a racist and a rouser of nazism. Instead, head over to Netflix and watch the
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Successful synthesis of a new insulin analogueA group of researchers has developed synthetic insulin analogues selenoinsulin (Se-Ins) through the replacement of the interchain disulfide in bovine pancreatic insulin (BPIns) with a diselenide bridge.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Climate change may confuse plant dormancy cyclesPerennial plants in the Midwest are well attuned to their surroundings. They hunker down all winter in a dormant state, just waiting for a sign that it's safe to unfurl their first tender leaves or flower buds. For many plants, the cue is a sustained warming trend, but day length also factors into the dormancy equation.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Spinning diamonds for quantum precisionWe live in a noisy world. Interference from light, vibrations, electromagnetic radiation and sound can be annoying; it messes with our sleep and can interfere with our electrical equipment.
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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No Endor in Sight: Habitable Exomoons May Be RareThe possible discovery of a giant extrasolar moon suggests our own may be an anomaly — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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This enzyme enabled life to conquer a hostile earthComputers are simulating the ancestral versions of the most common protein on Earth, giving scientists an unparalleled look at early life's development of harnessing energy from the Sun and production of oxygen.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cultural engagement lowers reoffending rateAccess to cultural programs for Indigenous prisoners decreases their chance of reoffending, a study by Swinburne researchers has found.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Wild bees thrive after severe forest firesEarly results from a two-year study in southern Oregon suggest that moderate and severe forest fires create conditions that lead to greater abundance and diversity of wild bees.
11d Live Science
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Shot in the Dark: College Students Don't Know How Strong Their Drinks AreWASHINGTON — Do you know how much alcohol is in your drink? If you're making a judgment based on taste and smell alone, you may miss the mark, a new study from England finds.
11d Live Science
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Picture of Mental Health? What Your Instagram Photos Reveal About YouWhether you like posting black-and-white photos or prefer adding filters that make colors pop, your Instagram account may provide clues about your mental health, a new study finds.
11d Live Science
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Origami Organs: This 'Tissue Paper' Could Help Regenerate a Heart or UterusScientists have created paper-like biomaterials from organs such as the ovaries, uterus, heart, liver and muscle that are thin and flexible enough to fold into origami birds and other structures.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Scientists prevent neurodegeneration-associated protein clumping in lab studyBy artificially exposing FUS proteins to the natural process of phosphorylation, researchers were able to prevent them from forming the harmful clumps associated with ALS and frontotemporal dementia.
11d Ars Technica
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How one hot sauce seller hauled Uber into small-claims court and won $4,000 Enlarge / Dane Wilcox and his sister selling FYM hot sauce. (credit: Dan Wilcox ) Dane Wilcox had come to Boston for two reasons: hot sauce and Dota 2 . Getting into a months-long courtroom fight with the world's largest startup was never in the plan. The former IT consultant had become a hot-sauce entrepreneur in 2014, after a surprisingly successful Kickstarter campaign to launch his brand, "FY
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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Wildfire Burns across (Formerly) Icy GreenlandGrasses and low vegetation on the defrosting, drying tundra are igniting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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A Century of Global Warming, in Just 35 SecondsA new animation, the "Temperature Circle," shows every nation on the planet is now in the red — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Feed: All Latest
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Elon Musk Is Building a Hyperloop, and It's Great News for YouMusk's Boring Company could accelerate progress for everyone building the transportation future.
11d Feed: All Latest
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USDA Clamps Down on Staffers Using the Term 'Climate Change'The Trump administration has had a stark impact on the language used by some federal employees around climate change.
11d Feed: All Latest
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Finally: New Augmented Reality App Mirage Injects the Internet Into Real LifeMirage doesn't just uncover secret messages—it lets the internet ooze out of your phone and into your surroundings.
11d Feed: All Latest
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It's Past Time for You To Ditch That Scientific CalculatorAnything that overpriced, underpowered graphing calculator can do, Python can do better.
11d Latest Headlines | Science News
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How spiders mastered spin controlScientists reveal a new twist on the unusual properties of spider silk.
11d The Atlantic
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Chickenhawk in Chief Yesterday via Twitter . Those who were around during the Vietnam war have exhausted every possible argument about who did what, and why, and when, and with what justification. Those who were not around must no doubt have had their fill—though for them and everyone else I highly recommend the new 10-part, 18-hour series on the Vietnam war by the filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, which will air
11d The Atlantic
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Eight Things Paul Ryan Has Learned About Governing Back in the more innocent political days of January, Paul Ryan cast an eye out over the promised land of Republican-controlled Washington and thought: Now is the time to put forth my sweeping 200-day agenda! Before the exodus of August recess, declared the speaker, his team would achieve amazing things for America: overhauling the tax code, funding a border wall, rolling back regulation on busine
11d The Atlantic
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Why Men Are the New College Minority Jessica Smith raised an arm and pointed across the lobby of the university student center like an ornithologist who had just spied a rare breed in the underbrush. “There’s one,” she said. It was, in fact, an unusual bird that Smith had spotted, especially on this campus: masculum collegium discipulus . A male college student. More From The Hechinger Report Rising popularity of dual-language educa
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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The Thorny Question of Whether Humans Can Observe Single PhotonsThe controversy over whether the human eye can detect single photons has profound significance for the way we will develop future sensors and related technologies.
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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Go Ahead and Touch the ArtMost works are created with the assumption that people will see it—but these are designed to be perceived with the hands — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Laser mapping project shows effects of physical changes in Antarctica's Dry ValleysResearchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) have publicly released high-resolution maps of Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys, a globally unique polar desert.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cooking up new ways to clean up our planetIn a win-win for a cleaner planet, scientists have devised a way to use waste cooking oil and sulphur to extract the neurotoxin mercury from the environment.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rare audio of indigenous languages saved by invention 100 years laterOptical scan technology is helping researchers at the University of California (UC), Berkeley, preserve audio of 78 indigenous California languages, most of which were recorded more than a century ago. The recordings are on approximately 2,700 wax cylinders that are now barely audible due to issues such as mold. These are the only known sound recordings for several of the languages, and in many ot
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Unprecedented Antarctic expedition maps sea ice to solve climate change mysteryBrutally windy. Unfathomably cold. Disturbingly isolated.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sweet! Sugar-coated probe yields better acid testA new type of nontoxic fluorescent probe could make it much easier to detect low pH in living cells.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Lizard venom may contain clues to treating blood clotsVarious types of lizard venom are being studied as possible treatments for blood clotting diseases that lead to millions of cases of stroke, heart attack, and deep-vein thrombosis annually.
11d cognitive science
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Applications of Cognitive technologies – submitted by /u/getengati [link] [comments]
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Image: Prometheus and the Ghostly F RingThe thin sliver of Saturn's moon Prometheus lurks near ghostly structures in Saturn's narrow F ring in this view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Many of the narrow ring's faint and wispy features result from its gravitational interactions with Prometheus (86 kilometers, or 53 miles across).
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Can poor air quality mask global warming's effects?During the 20th century, the average temperature of the continental United States rose by almost 1 degree Fahrenheit (0.5 degree Celsius)—everywhere, that is, except in the Southeast. There, until the 1980s, the temperature actually decreased slightly. Climate scientists dubbed this peculiar phenomenon the "warming hole," and it was the cause of much speculation. But beginning in the 1990s, temper
11d Gizmodo
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Alt-Right Activists Call for Google Boycott After Employee Is Fired for Anti-Diversity Paper Google fired a software engineer yesterday in response to public outrage over the man’s 10-page screed against women being represented proportionally in tech companies . But the firing has become a call-to-arms for alt-right voices on the internet who are crowdfunding money for the engineer, James Damore, and are now calling for a boycott of Google. The calls for a boycott have gained steam on Tw
11d Scientific American Content: Global
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Exploring the Mysterious Life of One of Earth's First Giant OrganismsStrange creatures known as “rangeomorphs” could help paleontologists understand the origins of animal life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Public opinion unlikely to curb a U.S. president's use of nuclear weapons in war, scholar findsA new Stanford study suggests that American public opinion on nuclear weapons usage has not fundamentally changed since 1945, and many people would support the use of such weapons to kill millions of civilians if the U.S. found itself in a similar wartime situation.
11d Ingeniøren
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Her er flyet, Københavns Politi bruger til at overvåge byenFlyet, som politiet har lånt af Hjemmeværnet, er godt udstyret til at overvåge København med både sensorer, kameraer og live-forbindelse til jorden.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Educational app released ahead of highly anticipated solar eclipseThousands of years ago, human beings reacted to solar eclipses with dismay, flooding the streets with pots and pans to scare away whatever had blotted out the sun with a cacophony of banging and shouting.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study tests the complexity of important plant hormonesA Purdue University study confirms complex associations among plant hormones and their signaling pathways that are key to controlling plant architecture.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Early modern humans consumed more plants than Neanderthals but ate very little fishSenckenberg scientists have studied the diet of anatomically modern humans. With their recent study, published today in the journal Scientific Reports, they were able to refute the theory that the diet of early representatives of Homo sapiens was more flexible than that of Neanderthals. Just like the Neanderthals, our ancestors had mainly mammoth and plants on their plates – the researchers were u
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Maize from El Gigante Rock Shelter shows early transition to staple cropMid-summer corn on the cob is everywhere, but where did it all come from and how did it get to be the big, sweet, yellow ears we eat today? Some of the answers come from carbon dating ancient maize and other organic material from the El Gigante rock shelter in Honduras, according to a team of anthropologists who show that 4,300 years ago maize was sufficiently domesticated to serve as a staple cro
11d Ingeniøren

HBO hackerne forlanger nu en løsesum Der har været stilhed siden hackere i sidste uge skaffede sig adgang til HBO's interne servere. Men nu har de forlangt en løsesum af ukendt størrelse. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/hbo-hackerne-forlanger-nu-loesesum-1078913 Version2
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New solid lubricant shown to reduce friction and wear on steel surfacesResearchers have created a new type of non-liquid lubricant that has been shown to reduce friction and wear significantly under the extreme conditions found in various applications, from air compressors to missile systems.
11d The Atlantic
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The Joke Has Died With Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later Part of the pleasure of watching Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp , the 2015 prequel series to David Wain’s cult comedy film, was the sheer absurdity of its existence. A parody of the endless march of revivals and off-brand sequels thrown at audiences, the show took the cast of comic actors who played a bunch of teenagers in 2001 (when they were already too old for the part), brought th
11d The Atlantic
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The Identity Crisis of an American Abroad A “twenty-something life crisis,” and a writing fellowship, sent the journalist Suzy Hansen from New York to Istanbul in 2007. There she got swept up in a bigger crisis, one likely to sound familiar these days. It “was about my American identity,” she writes. “Confusion over the meaning of one’s country, and over that country’s place in the world, for anyone, but especially for Americans, might b
11d The Atlantic
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How to Cut in Line Waiting in line is a scourge of modernity. According to David Andrews’s book, Why Does the Other Line Always Move Faster? , it wasn’t common until the Industrial Revolution synchronized workers’ schedules, causing lines that gobbled up lunch hours and evenings. Given that Americans are estimated to collectively waste tens of billions of hours a year in lines, it’s no wonder that some people try t
11d The Atlantic
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What Was the Most Important Letter in History? Clayborne Carson, founding director, the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter From Birmingham Jail” was little-noticed in April 1963, when his colleagues in the civil-rights movement stitched it together from the fragments he’d drafted in his cell. Major civil-rights legislation was not then on President John F. Kennedy’s agenda. Yet the lette
11d The Atlantic
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Earthworm They face in opposite directions to reproduce. What a miner, pistoning in slow motion through the underworld of the earth, engineering vents, channels, water flow, converting death and dearth, day in, night out. Each eyeless body digesting the soil, nursing birth. Cut in two, they double, breathe via marly skin, a must for farm and garden: alfalfa, spuds, spinach, carrots, cabbage, barley, wasabi
11d The Atlantic

The Conversation Telling Lola’s Story “ Lola’s Story ” (June), by the Filipino American journalist Alex Tizon, quickly became the most-read story on TheAtlantic.com and garnered many emotional responses from people around the United States and around the world, particularly in the Philippines. Tizon, who died suddenly just a few weeks before the story’s publication, wrote about Eudocia Tomas Pulido, the woman he
11d The Atlantic
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Why Liberalism Disappoints In the summer of 1917, Walter Lippmann strutted into Washington as it prepared for war. Both he and his young country were ready to prove their worth as superpowers. He was 27 and newly married, recruited to whisper into the ear of Newton Baker, the secretary of war. Lippmann’s reputation already prefigured the heights to which it would ultimately ascend. None other than Teddy Roosevelt had anoin
11d The Atlantic
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When Silicon Valley Took Over Journalism C hris Hughes was a mythical savior—boyishly innocent, fantastically rich, intellectually curious, unexpectedly humble, and proudly idealistic. My entire career at the New Republic had been spent dreaming of such a benefactor. For years, my colleagues and I had sputtered our way through the internet era, drifting from one ownership group to the next, each eager to save the magazine and its histor
11d The Atlantic
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John le Carré Goes Back Into the Cold John le Carré’s triumph (and consequent burden) is that he created characters and language so evocative of the spy world that they became more real in readers’ minds than real people or events. This happens occasionally with books or movies: Our images of the old South are inseparable from the way it was portrayed in Gone With the Wind . It’s said that even real-life members of the Mafia learn ho
11d The Atlantic
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Are Index Funds Evil? If you’re like me, you’ve cheered the decades-long rise of index funds—investment vehicles that seem (these days) to be a rare case of financial innovation that actually helps regular people. By trying merely to match the market, not beat it—investing passively in stocks that mimic a published market index, like the S&P 500—they’re able to offer both low fees and peace of mind for people not incl
11d The Atlantic
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How Women Lived Under Soviet Rule B efore stepping onto the stage, Svetlana Alexievich left me with her grayish-beige leather coat, as unfashionable as the rest of her. We had met by chance in March at a literary festival in Austria where the 2015 Nobel Prize winner in literature—a stocky woman in her late 60s, barely 5 feet tall—was being honored. “Hold it for me,” she said, and there was something touchingly Soviet in the gestu
11d The Atlantic
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Big in Venezuela: Bitcoin Mining I n Venezuela, home to some of the worst hyperinflation since the Weimar Republic, a Big Mac costs about half a month’s wages. Or rather, it did, until a bread shortage forced the burger off the menu. The annual inflation rate is expected to hit 1,600 percent. Life resembles an old newsreel: long lines, empty shelves, cashiers weighing stacks of bills. To survive, thousands of Venezuelans have ta
11d Science | The Guardian
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The sturgeon full moon in partial eclipse – in pictures August’s full moon, known as the sturgeon moon, featured a partial eclipse as it was slightly covered by the Earth’s shadow Continue reading…
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Optimizing e-mobility use for everyday lifePeople choose different transportation methods for work commutes, leisure activities and running errands. Each activity in daily life might require a different form of mobility, and sometimes it makes sense to link some appointments. In the future, the optimum solution could be suggested by a mobility app. A prototype of an electronic assistant for mobility customers and other tools for providers
11d NYT > Science
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Impossible Burger’s ‘Secret Sauce’ Highlights Challenges of Food TechThe start-up is finding out what happens when a fast-moving venture capital business runs into the staid world of government regulation.
11d NYT > Science
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Why Do Bees Buzz?Jim Gorman, science reporter for The New York Times, finds out why bumblebees make all that racket.
11d Ingeniøren
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Grøn vaskemaskine bruger vand som ballast i stedet for betonI stedet for at tynge vaskemaskiner ned med beton har britiske forskere udviklet en beholder, der kan fyldes med vand hjemme hos slutbrugeren, så maskinerne bliver mere miljøvenlige at producere og transportere.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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High-resolution optical coherence tomography without particle acceleratorA visit to the optometrist often involves optical coherence tomography. This imaging process uses infrared radiation to penetrate the layers of the retina and examine it more closely in three dimensions without having to touch the eye at all. This allows eye specialists to diagnose diseases such as glaucoma without any physical intervention. However, this method would have even greater potential f
11d Ingeniøren
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Sikkerhedsforsker frigiver database med 320 millioner kodeord, du ikke skal bruge Sikkerhedseksperten bag ‘Have I been pwned’ vil gøre det muligt for organisationer, at forbyde brug af kodeord, der har tidligere er blevet lækket. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sikkerhedsforsker-frigiver-database-med-320-millioner-kodeord-du-ikke-skal-bruge-1078891 Version2
11d Viden
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Testosteron giver kvinder større sexlystIfølge dansk forskning er det mandlige kønshormon afgørende for, hvor stor sexlyst både mænd og kvinder har.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New microscope technique reveals internal structure of live embryosUniversity of Illinois researchers have developed a way to produce 3-D images of live embryos in cattle that could help determine embryo viability before in vitro fertilization in humans.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Amniotic sac in a dish: Stem cells form structures that may aid of infertility researchThe first few weeks after sperm meets egg still hold many mysteries. Among them: what causes the process to fail, leading to many cases of infertility. But scientists haven't had a good way to explore the biology behind this phenomenon. Now, a new achievement using human stem cells could give researchers a chance to see what they couldn't before, while avoiding ethical issues associated with study
11d Science | The Guardian
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The Trump administration's solution to climate change: ban the term | Bill McKibben The US Department of Agriculture has forbidden the use of the words ‘climate change’. This say-no-evil policy is doomed to fail In a bold new strategy unveiled on Monday in the Guardian, the US Department of Agriculture – guardians of the planet’s richest farmlands – has decided to combat the threat of global warming by forbidding the use of the words . Under guidance from the agency’s director o
11d Science : NPR
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A Chip That Reprograms Cells Helps Healing, At Least In Mice This device shoots new genetic code into cells to make them change their purpose. Researchers say the chip could someday be used to treat injuries in humans. But they've got a long, long way to go. (Image credit: Wexner Medical Center/The Ohio State University )
11d Science : NPR
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Go See It, Eclipse Chasers Urge. 'Your First Time Is Always Special' A small number of passionate "shadow lovers" roam the world to be at exactly the right place when the moon blots out the sun. One man has seen 33 — and calls each "one of the top events of my life." (Image credit: Courtesy of Fred Espenak)
11d Ars Technica
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Uber’s ex-CEO: Given reason for alleged Waymo data heist is “f***ing dumb” Enlarge / Travis Kalanick, co-founder of Uber, seen here in December 2016. (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images News) In the high-profile Waymo v. Uber trade secrets lawsuit, the barbs are flying at a nonstop pace. Last Friday, the deposition of Travis Kalanick, who was CEO of Uber until June 2017, was made available for the first time as part of the court record. During the hours of his July 27 tes
11d The Atlantic
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The Trump Show Never Ends HUNTINGTON, W.V.—Every day brings new drama, but the Trump Show’s themes remain the same. He’s come to tell his people that everyone else is wrong and they are right. “The change you voted for is happening every single day,” he proclaims, underscoring each syllable with a raised hand, as the crowd bursts into cheers. Behind him, two signs hang in the rafters of this small arena: PROMISES MADE, re
11d The Atlantic
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Does the U.S. Military Need a Space Corps? The U.S. military hasn’t added a new uniformed service in 70 years, when the Air Force was created in the aftermath of World War II. If Congress gets its way, that will soon change. In a bipartisan vote last month, the House of Representatives approved legislation that would direct the Defense Department to build a new “space corps” within the Air Force. Its backers blame the Pentagon for failing
11d The Atlantic
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When Britain and France Almost Merged Into One Country On June 16, 1940, with Nazi Germany on the brink of crushing France, British prime minister Winston Churchill and French undersecretary of defense Charles de Gaulle met for lunch at the Carlton Club in London. These two great symbols of patriotism and national independence made an incredible agreement: Britain and France should be united into a single country called the “Franco-British Union.” Th
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Amniotic sac in a dish: Stem cells form structures that may aid of infertility researchThe first few weeks after sperm meets egg still hold many mysteries. Among them: what causes the process to fail, leading to many cases of infertility.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New microscope technique reveals internal structure of live embryosUniversity of Illinois researchers have developed a way to produce 3-D images of live embryos in cattle that could help determine embryo viability before in vitro fertilization in humans.
11d BBC News – Science & Environment
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RSPB hails natterjack toad 'baby boom' at Lodge reserveThousands of the "rare" tadpoles have been spotted at a reserve despite adverse breeding conditions.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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How to trick your heart into thinking you exerciseResearchers have discovered that a protein called cardiotrophin 1 (CT1) can trick the heart into growing in a healthy way and pumping more blood, just as it does in response to exercise and pregnancy. They also show that CT1 can repair heart damage and improve blood flow in animal models of heart failure.
11d Ingeniøren
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Sverige går stik imod Danmark og siger nej til bi-dræbende pesticidSverige har længe forbudt neonikotinoider ud fra et forsigtighedsprincip. Danmark politiserer ved at fortolke forskningen, som om bierne ikke tager skade af brugen herhjemme, mener svensk afdelingschef.
11d BBC News – Science & Environment
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Chantek, the orangutan who used sign language, dies at 39Chantek could also clean his room, make and use tools and learn the route to a restaurant.
11d Dagens Medicin

Forskere opdager, hvorfor skoldkoppevirus er livsfarligt for nogleDanske forskere har været med til at lokalisere en immundefekt, som gør, at nogle mennesker bliver alvorligt syge af skoldkoppevirus. Opdagelsen af genmutationen kan hjælpe til bedre forebyggelse og behandling af sygdommen og bidrager med fundamental ny viden om immunsystemet.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Hackers demand millions in ransom for stolen HBO dataA group of hackers posted a fresh cache of stolen HBO files online Monday, and demanded a multimillion-dollar ransom from the network to prevent the release of entire television series and other sensitive proprietary files.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cougar makes rare successful crossing of LA-area freewayResearchers recently documented a rare case of a cougar from the Santa Monica Mountains successfully crossing U.S. Highway 101 and moving into a range less hemmed in by Southern California sprawl, the National Park Service said Monday.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Snyder: 'Strong possibility' for Foxconn to come to MichiganGov. Rick Snyder is optimistic that Taiwanese electronics manufacturer Foxconn Technology Group will open a facility in Michigan, but said what exactly it is has not been determined and it could be a few months before any potential deal takes shape.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Google fires defender of tech gender gap: US mediaGoogle on Monday fired the author of an internal memo defending the gender-gap in Silicon Valley tech jobs as a matter of biology, according to media reports.
11d Science-Based Medicine
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Doc Doc Zeus: A Glimpse Behind the Scenes of Medical BoardsA novel about a doctor who raped a minor and is being investigated by his state medical board provides behind-the-scene insights into the workings of medical boards. It helps explain why these boards are so often ineffective, why medical malfeasance so often leads to a token disciplinary action rather than to loss of license.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Government report sees drastic climate change impact in US: NYTAverage US temperatures have risen dramatically and fast, with recent decades the warmest of the past 1,500 years, according to a draft federal government report cited by The New York Times on Tuesday.
11d Dagens Medicin

Ny vicedirektør til Psykiatrien i Region Sjælland Siden 1. maj har Psykiatrien i Region Sjælland manglet en vicedirektør, og nu er der sat navn på.
11d Science | The Guardian
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Rise of the racist robots – how AI is learning all our worst impulses There is a saying in computer science: garbage in, garbage out. When we feed machines data that reflects our prejudices, they mimic them – from antisemitic chatbots to racially biased software. Does a horrifying future await people forced to live at the mercy of algorithms? In May last year, a stunning report claimed that a computer program used by a US court for risk assessment was biased agains
11d BBC News – Science & Environment
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Rare pine marten captured on camera in North YorkshireThe first record of a pine marten living in Yorkshire for about 35 years
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

JCU scientist finds alcohol-free solution worksA James Cook University scientist has made a discovery that will make life easier for surgery patients and their surgeon.
11d Ingeniøren
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Dobbelt så dyrt forsinket it-system er klar – men send lige 26 millioner mere Projektet er nu blevet mere end dobbelt så dyrt som det oprindeligt var tiltænkt. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/problemfyldt-it-system-domstole-lige-inden-lancering-send-26-millioner-mere-1078908 Version2
11d Science | The Guardian
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‘Alarming’ rise in early deaths of young adults in the north of England – study Finding highlights the need for increased investment in the north, warn experts, as research into mortality rate reveals the widening north-south divide More young adults are dying before their time in the north of England than the south – and the gap is widening, a study has revealed. Researchers say that since 1965, about 1.2 million more people have died before the age of 75 in the north of En
11d Science | The Guardian
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Brexit relocation of EU medicines regulator 'will hit UK researchers hard' Amsterdam says in its bid to house the EMA that two of Britain’s top research agencies would lose much of their business Two of the UK’s foremost research organisations will lose much of their business to Amsterdam if the city is successful in securing the relocation of the EU’s medicines regulator, the Netherlands’ formal bid for the prized agency claims. Amsterdam, which has been tipped as an e
11d Gizmodo
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Someone Leaked a Major Federal Climate Change Report Before Trump and Pruitt Can Cook the Books On Monday, the New York Times published a leaked copy of the special science section of the draft 2018 National Climate Assessment, which federal climate researchers had completed but feared Donald Trump’s administration and new Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt were plotting to smother in its crib . The draft report reflects federal scientists’ continued and unshaken belief huma
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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High quality early intervention for children with autism quickly results in costs savingsA recent study by Penn Medicine researchers published online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry found that the costs associated with the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), one evidence-based treatment for young children with autism, were fully offset after only two years following intervention due to reductions in children's use of other services.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New noninvasive method of intracranial pressure monitoringGerman researchers report preliminary findings that show a noninvasive method of monitoring intracranial pressure (ICP) that could rival the gold standards of invasive intraventricular and intraparenchymal monitoring. The device uses advanced signal analysis algorithms to evaluate properties of acoustic signals that pass through the brain in order to determine ICP values.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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MRI reveals striking brain differences in people with genetic autismIn the first major study of its kind, researchers using MRI have identified structural abnormalities in the brains of people with one of the most common genetic causes of autism, according to a new study.
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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Inside the Fall, and Rebirth, of a Bill Gates–Backed Battery StartupA China Titans affiliate bought the bankrupt storage startup Aquion and plans to sell its batteries directly to big grid operators.
11d Ingeniøren
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Fanget i en løgn? Sådan fikser du skaden Jobfinder lægger fokus på løgne på arbejdspladsen. Hvordan slipper du uden om en fyring, hvis du bliver taget i at lyve af arbejdsgiver? Læs fem muligheder her. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/chefen-fanger-dig-loegn-saadan-redder-du-situationen-9384 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
11d Ingeniøren
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Forbrænding af affald bremser fossilfri varme i AalborgI to år har et grønt råd undersøgt, hvordan Nordjyllandsværket kan blive fossilfrit. Det har vist sig overraskende svært, så længe affaldsforbrænding bidrager til varmeproduktionen.
11d Gizmodo
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Here Are at Least 196 ISPs Which Put Caps on Their Customers' Data Use Photo: AP Last month, internet service provider Cox began charging residential customers in Arizona, Louisiana, Nevada, and Oklahoma an extra $10 for every 50 gigabytes of data they use over 1 terabyte in a month, bringing the total number of states it charges caps for to 16. Cox’s moved matched other leaders in the industry aggressively implementing capped service, like its competitors Comcast a
11d Ars Technica
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Google fires engineer who “crossed the line” with diversity memo Google CEO Sundar Pichai. (credit: Sam Churchill ) Google has fired James Damore, an engineer who wrote a controversial essay arguing that the company has gone overboard in its attempts to promote diversity. Damore confirmed the firing in an e-mail to Bloomberg. “At Google, we’re regularly told that implicit (unconscious) and explicit biases are holding women back in tech and leadership,” Damore
11d Gizmodo
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Google Reportedly Fires Author of Anti-Diversity Screed Google CEO Sundar Pichai (Image: Getty) James Damore, the Google software engineer who authored a 10-page anti-diversity manifesto , has been fired, Bloomberg reports. A statement from Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Monday evening, obtained by Recode , notes that “portions of the memo violate our Code of Conduct and cross the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace.” Advertisem
11d Feed: All Latest
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That Google 'Anti-Diversity' Memo Really Put Executives in a BindThe memo challenges company's training on unconscious bias.
11d NYT > Science
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Scientists Fear Trump Will Dismiss Blunt Climate ReportThe report directly contradicts Trump administration claims about global warming and concludes that temperatures have risen rapidly since 1980.
11d New Scientist – News
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People in north England are 20 per cent more likely to die youngAn analysis of five decades of death data has revealed that people in northern England are less likely to live to the age of 75 than people in the south
11d Live Science
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Horror at the Beach: 'Sea Fleas' Dine on Aussie Teen's LegsTiny marine creatures — each measuring a fraction of an inch in length — gnawed a teenager's legs bloody during a seaside dip in Melbourne, Australia.
11d Gizmodo
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HBO Hackers Leak Senior Executive's Emails, Demand Undisclosed Amount of Money as Ransom HBO CEO Richard Plepler. Photo: AP The hackers behind a massive intrusion into HBO systems have released a month’s worth of a senior HBO executive’s emails, dumping a “publicly accessible link to a cache of internal documents” which also included the script to yet another upcoming episode of Game of Thrones , Hollywood Reporter wrote Monday. The Reporter said evidence of the materials arrived via
11d Science : NPR
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Federal Report Calls For $275 Million To Stop Asian Carp The invasive species have been caught mere miles from Lake Michigan. Scientists fear if they invade the lake, they could spread throughout the Great Lakes. (Image credit: John Flesher/AP)
11d Feed: All Latest
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HBO Hackers Drop Ransom Note and More Game of Thrones SpoilersThe hackers plaguing the premium TV network have revealed their motive—and more Game of Thrones spoilers.
11d The Atlantic
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Why Do Trump's Supporters Allow Him to Insult Their Intelligence? President Trump regularly pushes incorrect information to the millions of people who follow him on Twitter. At times, his untruths are extremely easy to disapprove, as if Trump regards his supporters as easily manipulated idiots, even as his falling approval ratings suggest that more and more Americans are abandoning him every month. Look at what he said Monday afternoon: The Fake News Media will
11d Ars Technica
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“Driverless van” is just a VT researcher in a really good driver’s seat costume Enlarge / The “driverless car” in question looked similar to this one—it was a 2017 Ford Transit Connect. (credit: Ford ) The video opens with a guy rapping on the window of a van. "Brother, who are you?" the person holding the camera says. "What are you doing? I'm with the news, dude." You can see hands holding the steering wheel from the bottom, but the man inside the Ford van, dressed in a ful
11d Gizmodo
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Mount Almost Any TV To the Wall For $14 AmazonBasics Tilting TV Wall Mount , $14 If you’ve been meaning to wall-mount your TV, this highly-rated AmazonBasics mount will only set you back $14 today, an all-time low. This particular model doesn’t articulate left and right, but it can hold TVs anywhere from 37" to 80", so it should work with basically any home theater.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How an unlikely cellular 'antenna' can impair brain developmentAn antenna-like structure on cells, once considered a useless vestige, can cause defects in the brain's wiring similar to what's seen in autism, schizophrenia, and other disorders. In the lab, scientists prevented defects by restoring signaling though these structures called primary cilia.
11d Ars Technica
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Straightening dental wire twists intestines of a woman—a decade later Enlarge / The CT scan reveals the wire (small white line in center) that was causing the woman’s abdominal pain. (credit: BMJ Case Reports ) Years after straightening teeth, the thin metal wires from orthodontic braces can end up twisting intestines, according to a report published Monday in BMJ Case Reports. Australian doctors found a seven-centimeter bit of dental brace wire in the bowels of an
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists probe the conditions of stellar interiors to measure nuclear reactionsMost of the nuclear reactions that drive the nucleosynthesis of the elements in our universe occur in very extreme stellar plasma conditions. This intense environment found in the deep interiors of stars has made it nearly impossible for scientists to perform nuclear measurements in these conditions — until now.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Fat rats show why breast cancer may be more aggressive in patients with obesityIn an animal model of obesity and breast cancer, tumor cells in obese animals but not lean animals had especially sensitive androgen receptors, allowing these cells to magnify growth signals from the hormone testosterone.
11d BBC News – Science & Environment
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'Dodgy' greenhouse gas data threatens Paris accordThere are huge uncertainties in greenhouse gas totals due to inaccurate data, the BBC finds.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New biomarker found for group of rare metabolic diseasesA newly discovered biomarker associated with a rare metabolic disorder may facilitate better diagnosis and identification of new drugs for clinical trials for the disease. Development of treatments for the neurological symptoms of mucopolysaccharidoses, a family of rare genetic disorders, have been hindered by the lack of objective measures of the extent of central nervous system damage in patient
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The good, the bad and the algaeA new study is testing whether one of California’s largest and most polluted lakes can transform into one of its most productive and profitable. Southern California’s 350-square-mile Salton Sea has well-documented problems related to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural runoff. The research team intends to harness algae’s penchant for prolific growth to clean up these pollu
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Molecule in human saliva has potential for wound healingA new study delves into the mystifying fact that wounds in your mouth heal faster and more efficiently than wounds elsewhere.
11d Popular Science
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This woman swallowed her braces 10 years ago and didn’t know it Health Here's how it came back to bite her When she was a teenager, a woman in Australia accidentally swallowed a piece of her braces wire. A decade later, it sent her to the emergency room.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New look at archaic DNA rewrites human evolution storyA new method for analyzing DNA sequence data has been developed to reconstruct early history of archaic human populations, revealing an evolutionary story that contradicts conventional wisdom about modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans. They found that Neanderthal-Denisovan lineage nearly went extinct after separating from modern humans. Just 300 generations later, Neanderthals and Denisovans
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Largest-ever study of pets and kids' health finds no linkA large body of research has reported an association between the pet ownership and better health among children. But a new study that is the largest-ever to explore the issue contradicts the common thinking. Researchers did find that children from pet-owning families tended to have better general health, but those differences disappeared when factors such as family income and family housing were c
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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In utero exposure to diesel exhaust could be linked to adult heart failureGestational exposure to airborne particles derived from diesel exhaust can modify DNA in utero and alter the expression of genes that potentially increase susceptibility to adult heart failure, suggests a study in mice.
11d Feed: All Latest
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Army Bans DJI Drones, Citing Security ConcernsOne of the most popular drone brands is too big a security risk for the Army, at least for now.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

North-South health divide bigger than everDying early (under age 75) is 20% more likely in northern compared with southern England according to research led by The University of Manchester.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Man loses feeling in legs after long-term denture fixative useA 62-year-old man lost the feeling in both his legs after the regular long term use of a denture fixative containing zinc, reveal doctors writing in the online journal BMJ Case Reports.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Dental brace wire found in woman's bowel after 10 yearsA dental brace wire was found in a woman's bowel after 10 years. It was only discovered after she was admitted to hospital following two days of worsening stomach pain, explain doctors in the online journal BMJ Case Reports.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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'Alarming growth' in North-South divide early deaths among young in EnglandThere's been an 'alarming growth' in the number of early deaths among 25- to 44-year-olds in the North of England since the mid-1990s–long before the recession of 2008-09 — compounding the country's long established 'North-South' divide, reveals research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
11d The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Daily: Unintended Consequences What We’re Following Immigration Nation: The Trump administration is proposing changes to the 1965 Immigration Act that critics say could make the country less diverse, but the history of that legislation illustrates how hard it is to predict the results of immigration policy. The president also wants to hire 500 new Border Patrol agents next year, but—as the comedian John Oliver pointed out in a
11d Live Science
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You Thought Your Braces Hurt? This Woman's Dental Wire Tore Through Her GutA woman in Australia had a dental wire in her digestive system for 10 years before doctors discovered it tearing through her abdomen.
11d Gizmodo
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The FDA Is Cracking Down on the Doctor Marketing 3-Parent Babies John Zhang with the first baby born through an IVF technique that uses the DNA of three people. The baby was born in April 2016. Image: New Hope Fertility Clinic John Zhang, a New York fertility doctor, wanted to push the boundaries of science and fertility by giving women at risk of passing on serious genetic conditions a chance at healthy kids through an IVF technique that uses the DNA of three
11d Gizmodo
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Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: Carolina Panthers | The Muse Ingrid Goes West Is the Batshit Infl Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: Carolina Panthers | The Muse Ingrid Goes West Is the Batshit Influencer Comedy We Needed | The Root Hey, Jeff Sessions: Remember When 6,000 White Americans Went on Strike to Keep 8 Black People From Getting Promoted? | Splinter The Army Is Refusing to Remove Confederate Names From an NYC Base for Disturbing Reasons |
11d New Scientist – News
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Tackling resistant malaria may fuel antimicrobial resistanceDiagnostic testing is helping to fight the rise of drug-resistant malaria with an unfortunate side effect – it’s making more people take unnecessary antibiotics
11d Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
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Looks Like These Street Outlaws Have A New Recruit For The Small Tire List Street Outlaws: New Orleans | Mondays at 9/8c Scott Taylor finds a driver for his small-tire car Tin Man in time for Race Night. Full episodes streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-new-orleans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://tw
11d The Scientist RSS
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FDA Chastises Doctor for Promoting 3-Parent IVFThe illegal in vitro fertilization technique helps couples eliminate mitochondrial defects in embryos by combining genes from three people: a mother, father, and a donor egg.
11d Gizmodo
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US Military Can Now Blast Wayward Hobby Drones Out of the Sky Photo: Getty Drone enthusiasts take heed: If you don’t want to see your precious drone blasted into a million pieces, keep clear of US military installations. The Pentagon has approved a new policy that authorizes military bases to shoot down private and commercial drones encroaching on its airspace. Advertisement First to report the news, the Military Times says the policy was sent out to US arm
11d The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Out of the Office Today in 5 Lines President Trump is in Bedminster, New Jersey, where he’s on a working vacation. Trump reiterated on Twitter that his stay is “not a vacation,” and that he’s “working hard.” North Korea threatened a “thousands-fold” revenge against the United States, after the United Nations imposed new sanctions on Pyongyang for its missile and nuclear tests. The city of Chicago filed a lawsuit a
11d Ars Technica
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National Ignition Facility recreates the interior of heavy stars Enlarge (credit: Lawrence Livermore National Lab ) In a lot of ways, stars are our model for creating nuclear fusion here on Earth, with fusion power often promoted as "harnessing the power of the Sun." For all that, however, we have some surprising gaps in our understanding of what's going on inside stars. That's partly because we must infer what's going on there based on the elements and partic
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Drone testing finds some elevated pollutants at Army plantResearchers who flew a drone over the open burning of hazardous waste at an Army ammunition plant in Virginia found arsenic, lead and other pollutants at higher-than-expected levels, according to a draft report obtained by The Associated Press.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New CubeSat propulsion system uses water as propellantA new type of micropropulsion system for miniature satellites called CubeSats uses an innovative design of tiny nozzles that release precise bursts of water vapor to maneuver the spacecraft.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Limiting access to fast-food restaurants unlikely to reduce obesityLiving near fast-food restaurants and supermarkets has little impact on an individual's body mass index, according to new research. The researchers used results from the largest national study ever conducted of the connection between residential environments and BMI.
11d Gizmodo
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The Future of Driverless Cars Is a Guy in a Car Seat Costume GIF Image: Twitter/ Adam Tuss Late last week, Washington, DC-area news outlets began reporting that a self-driving car was being tested on public roads in Arlington, Virginia. The reality, however, was much more low-tech. ARLNow.com first broke the news with a video and report of a driverless car driving through the Clarendon neighborhood . DCist shared the video in a since-updated article origin
11d New Scientist – News
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Viking hordes dined on frozen Norwegian cod shipped to GermanyDNA from ancient cod bones shows Vikings freeze-dried Arctic cod for serving up on European menus 300 years earlier than we thought
11d New Scientist – News
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Over-mothered puppies more likely to fail guide dog trainingPuppies receiving the most care from their mothers grow into adult dogs that lack the impulse control and problem solving ability of a successful guide dog
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New technique to suppress sound waves from disorder to improve optical fiber communicationEnergy loss due to scattering from material defects is known to set limits on the performance of nearly all technologies that we employ for communications, timing, and navigation. In micro-mechanical gyroscopes and accelerometers, such as those commonly found in cellphones today, microstructural disorder impacts measurement drift and overall accuracy of the sensor, analogous to how a dirty violin
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Maize from El Gigante Rock Shelter shows early transition to staple cropMid-summer corn on the cob is everywhere, but where did it all come from and how did it get to be the big, sweet, yellow ears we eat today? Some of the answers come from carbon dating ancient maize and other organic material from the El Gigante rock shelter in Honduras, according to a team of anthropologists who show that 4,300 years ago maize was sufficiently domesticated to serve as a staple cro
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New biomarker found for group of rare metabolic diseasesA newly discovered biomarker associated with a rare metabolic disorder may facilitate better diagnosis and identification of new drugs for clinical trials for the disease. Development of treatments for the neurological symptoms of mucopolysaccharidoses, a family of rare genetic disorders, have been hindered by the lack of objective measures of the extent of central nervous system damage in patient
11d Gizmodo
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USDA Administrators Advise Staff to Avoid 'Climate Change' and Other Accurate Terms Photo: Getty According to emails obtained by The Guardian , staff at the USDA have been informed that they should change their language when referring to climate change. Specifically, the staff at the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) were told to avoid using the phrase “climate change,” and were instructed to alter various phrases that acknowledge the effects of man-made climate chan
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New technique to suppress sound waves from disorder to improve optical fiber communicationNew research has revealed a new technique by which scattering of sound waves from disorder in a material can be suppressed on demand. All of this, can be simply achieved by illuminating with the appropriate color of laser light. The result could have a wide-ranging impact on sensors and communication systems.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New AI algorithm monitors sleep with radio wavesResearchers have devised a new way to monitor sleep without any kind of sensors attached to the body. Their sensor uses low-power radio waves that detect small changes in body movement caused by the patient's breathing and pulse, then translates those measurements into sleep stages: light, deep, or rapid eye movement (REM).
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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First human application of novel PET tracer for prostate cancerResearchers have demonstrated the potential of a new PET tracer, Carbon-11 labeled sarcosine (11C-sarcosine), for imaging prostate cancer, and set the stage for its possible use in monitoring other cancers.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Women have more active brains than menIn the largest functional brain imaging study to date, researchers compared 46,034 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies provided by nine clinics, quantifying differences between the brains of men and women.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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MRI contrast agents accumulate in the brainExperts have provided new guidance in the use of contrast agents during MRI scans. Emerging research suggests gadolinium-based contrast agents, injected in a patient's veins to brighten tissues in MRI images, accumulate in the brain. More than 300 million doses of such drugs have been administered since their introduction in 1987.
11d Big Think
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Game of Thrones Episode 4: Debt, Destruction, and Dragons Spoiler alert! Read More
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Essential genes for cancer immunotherapy identifiedA new study identifies genes that are necessary in cancer cells for immunotherapy to work, addressing the problem of why some tumors don't respond to immunotherapy or respond initially but then stop as tumor cells develop resistance to immunotherapy.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Bilingual babies listen to languageScientists report that bilingual infants as young as 20 months of age efficiently and accurately process two languages.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Media portrayals of pregnant women, new moms unrealisticMedia portrayals of pregnant, postpartum women unrealistic, women said in a new study. Exposure to unrealistic images and messages fostered a host of negative emotions, such as self-consciousness about their bodies and feelings of depression, frustration and hopelessness when they were unable to lose weight as rapidly after childbirth as celebrities purportedly do.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists improve forecast of increasing hazard on Ecuadorian volcanoResearchers have shown an increasing volcanic danger on Cotopaxi in Ecuador using a powerful technique known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR).
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Single strep bacteria protein sets off white blood cell's early warning systemGroup A Streptococcusbacteria — the cause of strep throat and flesh-eating infections — have been well studied for nearly a century. But researchers recently made a surprising discovery: strep's M protein alone wipes out macrophages, but not other types of immune cells. The macrophages' self-sacrifice serves as an early warning of infection to the rest of the immune system.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Opto-mechanical technique circumvents mechanical losses using the action of lightA research collaboration between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the University of Maryland has revealed a new technique by which scattering of sound waves from disorder in a material can be suppressed on demand. All of this, can be simply achieved by illuminating with the appropriate color of laser light. The result, which is
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Cash incentives, talk can encourage primary care visits by people with new health coverageIn a randomized controlled trial, researchers studied low-income adults newly covered by a primary care program to determine if a cash incentive could encourage them to make an initial visit to a primary care provider. Among four total participant groups, three were given a baseline survey by telephone and then either $50, $25 or $0 to visit their provider within six months. A control group receiv
11d Science : NPR
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Syrian Refugee And German Scientist Make An Unlikely Team In Leipzig, Germany, two scientists from very different backgrounds are working on a unique research project. (Image credit: Erik Nelson Rodriguez for NPR )
11d Popular Science
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New Horizons will soon solve a mystery about an object a billion miles past Pluto Space Two for the price of one. In less than two years, the New Horizons space probe is going to go whizzing by an object a billion miles further away from us than Pluto.
11d Gizmodo
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LG, This Is a Pretty Stupid Way to Leak Your Next Flagship Phone Image: RandyArzarga on Hitrecord.com Hey you out there. Did you know LG is planning on announcing a new flagship phone later this fall? No? Well apparently neither did a few users on Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s collaborative video site HitRecord, when they started posting videos showing off the rumored LG V30. While the videos have since been pulled from HitRecord, we managed to grab a few screenshots
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists tally the environmental impact of feeding meat to our cats and dogs. It's hugeYou've heard about the carbon footprint, but what about the carbon paw-print? According to a new study, U.S. cats' and dogs' eating patterns have as big an effect as driving 13.6 million cars for a year.
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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FDA Cracks Down on Pioneering Doctor Who Created a Three-Parent BabyThe agency is taking a hard line on a controversial fertility technique that involves genetically modifying embryos.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA and Norway to develop Arctic laser-ranging stationNASA and the Norwegian Mapping Authority are partnering to develop a state-of-the-art satellite laser ranging station 650 miles from the North Pole that will produce high-precision locations of orbiting satellites, help track changes in the ice sheets and improve the efficiency of marine transportation and agriculture.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Limiting access to fast-food restaurants unlikely to reduce obesityLiving near fast-food restaurants and supermarkets has little impact on an individual's body mass index, according to new Indiana University research. The researchers, including Coady Wing from IU's School of Public and Environmental Affairs, used results from the largest national study ever conducted of the connection between residential environments and BMI.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Medicaid coverage brings more silence to the hearing impairedMedicaid does not cover hearing aids in nearly half the country. Coverage greatly varies in the states where hearing health benefits are available. About 25% are required to have at least 'moderate' hearing loss, which is the inability to hear regular conversation.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Staff at Safety-Net Medical Clinics report increasing dissatisfaction with workplaceSome studies have raised concern about burnout among health care workers as they grapple with changes such electronic medical records and medical homes. A new study finds that physicians, nurses and other staff members at medical clinics that care for people from lower-income communities are increasingly dissatisfied with their jobs, adding to evidence that the health care workforce is under stres
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Medicaid expansion under ACA can reduce government costs for Supplemental Security IncomeExpanded Medicaid eligibility under one part of the Affordable Care Act results in a cost savings for the federal government, according to new Indiana University research. The finding is significant because it indicates that an effort by Congress to save money by trimming Medicaid spending may actually drive up costs in another part of the budget.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A hard bargainAmericans extol price shopping for health care as a prudent idea, yet few actually do it even when given the means to, according to the findings of two separate studies led by investigators at Harvard Medical School.
11d Ingeniøren

Undersøgelse: To ud af tre under 30 år streamer ulovligt Dansk Erhverv kritiserer danskernes download af film, musik og spil. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/undersoegelse-to-ud-tre-under-30-aar-streamer-ulovligt-1078896 Version2
11d Ingeniøren

E-sportskonkurrence præsenter historisk præmiepulje på 144 millioner kroner Der er stadig større interesse for E-sport events og med interessen kommer der også flere penge til miljøet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/e-sportskonkurrence-praesenter-historisk-praemiepulje-paa-144-millioner-kroner-1078897 Version2
11d Science : NPR
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'A Beautiful Spectacle': Geographer Makes Case To Witness Solar Eclipse A total solar eclipse is the most beautiful natural spectacle Michael Zeiler has ever seen. The geographer tells NPR's Ari Shapiro that once one witnesses a total eclipse, they'll be hooked for life.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists probe the conditions of stellar interiors to measure nuclear reactionsMost of the nuclear reactions that drive the nucleosynthesis of the elements in our universe occur in very extreme stellar plasma conditions. This intense environment found in the deep interiors of stars has made it nearly impossible for scientists to perform nuclear measurements in these conditions – until now.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sale of genetically modified salmon in Canada alarms environmentalistsEnvironmentalists charged Monday that genetically modified salmon are being marketed in Canada without warning labels and called on supermarkets to withdraw them from sale.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New CubeSat propulsion system uses water as propellantA new type of micropropulsion system for miniature satellites called CubeSats uses an innovative design of tiny nozzles that release precise bursts of water vapor to maneuver the spacecraft.
11d The Atlantic
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Do You Hold the Oldest Atlantic Subscription? This November marks 160 years since The Atlantic ’s first issue went to press. We hope you’ll celebrate with us—and in turn, we want to celebrate you, the readers who have stuck with us through the decades. Did you follow our coverage of the space race , the civil rights movement , the Watergate scandal ? Did you read James Fallows’s essay on living with a computer in print, before you began to u
11d The Atlantic
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The Early Deaths of Appalachians At the Reger Funeral Home and Chapel in Huntington, West Virginia, owner Patrick Reger says he increasingly sees 50-somethings dying of diseases—like cirrhosis of the liver or lung cancer—that used to mostly kill 80-somethings. There seems to be an uptick young people drinking heavily and using drugs . “There’s just a lack of employment for people,” he said. “That’s where you find the problems wi
11d Big Think
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Do We Worship Celebrities Like Religious Figures? In his book, The Attention Merchants, Tim Wu claims we now worship celebrities like deities. This can lead to all sorts of problems. Read More
11d NYT > Science
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Essay: With Snowflakes and Unicorns, Marina Ratner and Maryam Mirzakhani Explored a Universe in MotionThe legacies and achievements of two great mathematicians will dazzle and intrigue scholars for decades.
11d cognitive science
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The Key to Mental and Cognitive Health Is This Diet: Dr. Drew Ramsey submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Successful guide dogs have 'tough love' moms, study findsMuch has been written on the pitfalls of being a helicopter parent, one who insulates children from adversity rather than encouraging their independence.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Justice Dept. tries to shore up forensic science, testimonyThe Justice Department is trying to shore up faltering confidence in forensic science and how its experts describe their findings in court, a push that comes months after similar efforts dating to the Obama administration were suspended.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists probe the conditions of stellar interiors to measure nuclear reactionsMost of the nuclear reactions that drive the nucleosynthesis of the elements in our universe occur in very extreme stellar plasma conditions. This intense environment found in the deep interiors of stars has made it nearly impossible for scientists to perform nuclear measurements in these conditions — until now.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New CubeSat propulsion system uses water as propellantA new type of micropropulsion system for miniature satellites called CubeSats uses an innovative design of tiny nozzles that release precise bursts of water vapor to maneuver the spacecraft.
11d Gizmodo
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Save $10 On TP-Link's Alexa-Connected Smart Bulbs, No Hub Required TP-Link Multicolor Smart Bulb , $40 TP-Link has been quietly assembling an impressive coterie of smart home gadgets for awhile now, but their Philips Hue competitor might be their most impressive gadget yet. While the TP-Link smart bulb lacks IFTTT support and Hue’s massive ecosystem of apps, you can still control it via the Kasa app, or with an Amazon Echo. And unlike Hue, you don’t need a hub t
11d The Scientist RSS
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A Database of Genetic Differences Among Lab MiceResearchers have catalogued mutations in the coding regions of 36 of the most important mouse strains.
11d Science : NPR
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Coddled Puppies Make Poor Guide Dogs, Study Suggests New research suggests that when puppies have more attentive, active mothers, they're more likely to fail guide-dog training. (Image credit: Westend61/Getty Images)
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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UK cyber-researcher still held in Las Vegas in malware caseAn official says a British cybersecurity researcher remains jailed in Nevada, a day before he's due to face charges in federal court in Milwaukee that he created and distributed malicious software designed to steal banking passwords.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Some land conservation measures unpopular among property ownersWhile popular with conservation groups, coastal easements that prevent development in order to protect marshland from changes brought about by climate change and rising sea levels are not favored by property owners, according to a new study by the University of Connecticut and Virginia Tech.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers study synthetic protein cagesA multidisciplinary team of mathematicians, theoretical physicists, chemists and biochemists from the University of Bristol came together to study the self-assembly of protein building into protein cages with possible applications in nanotechnology and synthetic biology.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Bilingual babies listen to languageIn a new study, an international team of researchers, including those from Princeton University, report that bilingual infants as young as 20 months of age efficiently and accurately process two languages.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Media portrayals of pregnant women, new moms unrealistic, study saysMedia portrayals of pregnant, postpartum women unrealistic, women said in a new study by University of Illinois researcher Toni Liechty. Exposure to unrealistic images and messages fostered a host of negative emotions, such as self-consciousness about their bodies and feelings of depression, frustration and hopelessness when they were unable to lose weight as rapidly after childbirth as celebritie
11d Feed: All Latest
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Taking Kia's Stinger GT to Germany's Nürburgring Nordschleife [Test Drive]The Korean company's grand touring car is a challenge to stalwarts BMW, Audi, and Mercedes.
11d Feed: All Latest
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Pick Better Guide Dogs By Watching Hours of Cute Puppy VideosResearchers are looking for ways to predict which young dogs will make the cut—by watching hours and hours of guide dog puppy bowl.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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'Yeah, if you could win spreadsheet title, that'd be great'John Dumoulin has never really set foot in an office. He works part time at Chick-fil-a.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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DNA from Viking cod bones suggests 1,000-year history of European fish tradeNew research using DNA from the fish bone remains of Viking-era meals reveals that north Norwegians have been transporting — and possibly trading — Arctic cod into mainland Europe for a millennium.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Stem cell discovery refreshes the heartSome people are better than others at recovering from a wounded heart, according to a new study.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Record for fastest light pulse setA research team has demonstrated a 53-attosecond X-ray flash, opening the door to shoot slow-motion video of electrons and atoms in living cells.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New look at archaic DNA rewrites human evolution storyHundreds of thousands of years ago, the ancestors of modern humans diverged from an archaic lineage that gave rise to Neanderthals and Denisovans. Yet the evolutionary relationships between these groups remain unclear.
11d Ars Technica
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“Podcasting patent” is totally dead, appeals court rules Enlarge (credit: Casey Fiesler ) A federal appeals court has upheld a legal process that invalidated the so-called “podcasting patent.” That process was held by a company called Personal Audio, which had threatened numerous podcasts with lawsuits in recent years. On Monday, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed the April 2015 inter partes review (IPR) ruling —a process that all
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Algae blooms irk Canaries beachgoersMicroalgae blooms proliferating in hot weather in Spain's Canary Islands are irritating beachgoers, who should avoid direct contact with them, local authorities said Monday.
11d New on MIT Technology Review
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The 5 Smartest Companies Analyzing Your DNAThese companies are leading the charge in consumer and medical genetics.
11d Ars Technica
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Faraday Future raises $14m, leases old factory for future electric car line Enlarge / Faraday Future’s rendering of the refurbished Hanford factory. (credit: Faraday Future ) Faraday Future announced on Monday that it has signed a lease on a turn-key manufacturing facility in Hanford, California, south of Fresno. The company has been hyping its plans to build a luxury electric vehicle called the FF 91 that would compete with high-end Teslas, but it has struggled with fun
11d NYT > Science
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Researchers Track an Unlikely Culprit in Weight GainMouse studies suggest that F.S.H., a reproductive hormone, may be responsible for redistributing fat to the abdomen in menopausal women.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Google CEO slams memo on gender as employee reportedly firedA memo written by a male engineer at Google about gender differences sparked a quick rebuttal from Google after it circulated widely online.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The good, the bad and the algae: Salton Sea-grown algae as new fuel source and pollution solutionSandia National Laboratories is testing whether one of California's largest and most polluted lakes can transform into one of its most productive and profitable. Southern California's 350-square-mile Salton Sea has well-documented problems related to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural runoff. Algae thrives on these elements—a fact that causes environmental problems but co
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Successful guide dogs have 'tough love' moms, study findsMuch has been written on the pitfalls of being a helicopter parent, one who insulates children from adversity rather than encouraging their independence. A new study seems to back up this finding — in dogs.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Texting while parenting: Mobile program improves safety of sleeping infantsMother's latest little helper is already in her pocket: A new educational intervention delivered in the form of texts and emails has been found to increase adherence to safe sleep practices for infants, concluded researchers at the Yale, University of Virginia, and Boston University schools of medicine in a joint study published July 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study of protein cages strengthens Bristol's position at forefront of synthetic biologyA multidisciplinary team of mathematicians, theoretical physicists, chemists and biochemists from the University of Bristol came together to study the self-assembly of protein building into protein cages with possible applications in nanotechnology and synthetic biology.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Marine reserves a solution to bycatch problem in oceansCommercial fishermen may be able to catch more of the profitable fish they want with marine reserves than without them, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stress heightens fear of threats from the pastRecognizing threats is an essential function of the human mind — think 'fight or flight' — one that is aided by past negative experiences. But when older memories are coupled with stress, individuals are likely to perceive danger in harmless circumstances, according to a paper published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds that choice of cool roofing materials can potentially impact region's air pollutionIn a groundbreaking study released today, scientists at the South Coast Air Quality Management District and the University of Southern California have found that widespread installation of certain 'cool roof' materials in the region could slightly increase ozone and fine particulate pollution levels.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How a chemo drug can help cancer spread from the breast to the lungsThe very same treatment that thwarts breast cancer has a dark side — it can fuel the spread of the disease to the lungs. Researchers at The Ohio State University studied the cascade of events that lead to metastatic cancer and found clues to why it happens, opening up the possibility of one day interfering with the medication's downsides while preserving its cancer-fighting properties in breast t
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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DNA from Viking cod bones suggests 1,000-year history of European fish tradeNew research using DNA from the fish bone remains of Viking-era meals reveals that north Norwegians have been transporting — and possibly trading — Arctic cod into mainland Europe for a millennium.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tiny molecule has big effect on brain's ability to learnPrenatal brain development is a crucial period, and as new research has found, even small alterations to the way brain cells develop can have significant effects later in life. In a study involving researchers from the Queensland Brain Institute, scientists have shed light on the role that small molecules called microRNAs play in early brain development. The research found a close link between ear
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Printable tool enables sensitive diagnostic testingBiomedical engineers at Duke University have created a portable diagnostic tool that can detect telltale markers of disease as accurately as the most sensitive tests on the market, while cutting the wait time for results from hours or even days to 15 minutes. By creating a sensitive, easy-to-use 'lab on a chip,' the researchers plan to bring rapid diagnostic testing to areas that lack access to st
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New look at archaic DNA rewrites human evolution storyA U-led team developed a method for analyzing DNA sequence data to reconstruct early history of archaic human populations, revealing an evolutionary story that contradicts conventional wisdom about modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans. They found that Neanderthal-Denisovan lineage nearly went extinct after separating from modern humans. Just 300 generations later, Neanderthals and Denisovans
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Successful guide dogs have 'tough love' moms, Penn study findsA new study from the University of Pennsylvania shows the pitfalls of helicopter parenting — in dogs. Researchers showed that doting mothers seem to handicap their puppies, in this case reducing the likelihood of successfully completing a training program to become guide dogs.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Some land conservation measures unpopular among property ownersWhile popular with conservation groups, coastal easements that prevent development in order to protect marshland from changes brought about by climate change and rising sea levels are not favored by property owners. The findings, based on the results of surveys conducted in 2015 of 1,002 owners of Connecticut coastal properties, suggest that relying on education about sea level rise and the ecosys
11d Science : NPR
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Scientists Prepare For 'The Most Beautiful Thing You Can See In The Sky' You'd think that after hundreds of years of watching total solar eclipses, scientists would know all they'd need to about that particular phenomenon. You'd be wrong. (Image credit: Eric Adams/AP)
11d Ars Technica
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Mozilla’s new file-transfer service isn’t perfect, but it’s drop-dead easy Enlarge (credit: Mozilla ) Mozilla is testing a new service that makes it dead simple and quick for people to semi-securely share files with anyone on the Internet. Send , as the service is called, allows senders to encrypt any 1-gigabyte or less file and upload it to a Mozilla server. The service then creates a link with a long, complex string of letters in it that's required to download and dec
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists improve forecast of increasing hazard on Ecuadorian volcanoResearchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and the Instituto Geofisico—Escuela Politecnica Nacional (IGEPN) of Ecuador, showed an increasing volcanic danger on Cotopaxi in Ecuador using a powerful technique known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR).
11d Latest Headlines | Science News
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Nostalgic Voyager documentary relives first exploration of the solar systemA new TV documentary is a tender tribute to Voyagers 1 and 2, which launched 40 years ago and were the first spacecraft to visit the outer solar system.
11d Gizmodo
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This Isn't a Horror Movie: Scientists Are Turning Organs Into Paper Cranes The new guy at work invites you over to his house. You feel uneasy. Sure, he’s a hard worker, a fast typer, and his intense focus quickly made him an indispensable coworker. But his scarred face seems to betray some violent past. His measured speech seems manufactured. Still, you can’t remember the last new friend you made, you’ve got nothing to do, and so you accept the invite. He greets you in
11d Ars Technica
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1,000-year-old German dinner reveals long-distance Viking trade routes Enlarge / A Viking merchant ship carries trade goods far from home, including a special freeze-dried cod called stockfish. (credit: Wikimedia) More than a millennium ago, people in the Viking Age city of Haithabu dined on a dish of freeze-dried cod and tossed the bones aside. It was a relatively unremarkable meal, except for one thing. The DNA in those bones was preserved into the present day, an
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA tracking Tropical Storm FranklinTropical Storm Franklin formed in the Caribbean Sea late on August 6. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the Atlantic Ocean basin's seventh tropical depression as it organized. NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided an image the next day that showed the storm approaching landfall.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Marine reserves a solution to bycatch problem in oceansCommercial fishermen may be able to catch more of the profitable fish they want with marine reserves than without them, according to a study in the journal PNAS led by the University of California, Davis. Using marine reserves as a management tool could also help the recently rebounded West Coast groundfish fishery sustain itself, the study notes.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study finds that choice of cool roofing materials can potentially impact region's air pollutionIn a groundbreaking study released today, scientists at the South Coast Air Quality Management District and the University of Southern California have found that widespread installation of certain "cool roof" materials in the region could slightly increase ozone and fine particulate pollution levels.
11d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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DNA from Viking cod bones suggests 1,000-year history of European fish tradeNorway is famed for its cod. Catches from the Arctic stock that spawns each year off its northern coast are exported across Europe for staple dishes from British fish and chips to Spanish bacalao stew.
11d Live Science
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Funny Guy Gets the Girl? How Humor Makes You More AttractiveA sense of humor could help you snag a date, a new study suggests.
11d Futurity.org
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‘Origami organs’ could regenerate tissue A new kind of bioactive “tissue paper” is made of materials derived from organs that are thin and flexible enough to fold into an origami bird. The technology could potentially be used to support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing. “It’s versatile and surgically friendly.” The tissue papers are made from structural proteins excreted by cells that give organs
11d Ars Technica
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Spelunky creator finally returns with a new game—er, 50 of them Enlarge / Of all the games hinted at here, I'm probably most excited for the cyber-golfer one. (credit: Derek Yu ) Derek Yu, the creator of the video game Spelunky , has lain incredibly low since his title transformed the "randomly generated" gaming genre in 2008 (and again with an "HD" version in 2012). Would his long-awaited return also involve randomly generated dungeons or some other procedur
11d Science | The Guardian
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Silicon Valley’s weapon of choice against women: shoddy science | Angela SainiSupport for the anonymous Google ‘manifesto’ on gender difference is reminiscent of the thinking behind the eugenics era • Angela Saini is the author of Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong Sexism has long been recognised as a problem in Silicon Valley. But a lengthy memo written by a Google software engineer, and leaked online, has laid bare the ugly underbelly of how some in this male-dominated
11d Ars Technica
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Radio navigation set to make global return as GPS backup, because cyber Enlarge / This is the way we used to find our way around. (credit: National Air and Space Museum ) Way back in the 1980s, when I was a young naval officer, the Global Positioning System was still in its experimental stage. If you were in the middle of the ocean on a cloudy night, there was pretty much only one reliable way to know where you were: Loran-C, the hyperbolic low-frequency radio naviga
11d Feed: All Latest
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'Game of Thrones' Recap Season 7 Episode 4: The Kids Are All RightThe surviving Starks are back together for the first time in years—and they've all become more of themselves, not less.
11d Feed: All Latest
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A Total Solar Eclipse Feels Really Really WeirdDuring the minutes during which the sun is completely blocked, observers experience the exquisitely odd and wondrous sensation of solar emissions, both visible and invisible, vanishing right in the middle of the day.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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USC Stem Cell discovery refreshes the heartSome people are better than others at recovering from a wounded heart, according to a new USC Stem Cell study published in Nature Genetics.
11d The Atlantic
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What's New About the Latest UN Sanctions Against North Korea? Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the UN, has described the latest UN sanctions on North Korea as “the most stringent set of sanctions on any country in a generation.” But even that won’t necessarily mean that the measure, which was approved unanimously Saturday by the Security Council, can either impede Pyongyang’s missile and nuclear programs or compel it to return to negotiations. North Kore
11d New Scientist – News
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Self-propelling droplets creep towards heat to cool microchipsFor the first time, scientists have simulated the reverse of the common effect where cold water runs away from heat, and the result could keep electronics cool
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Automated measure of nighttime oxygen levels could speed diagnosis of sleep apneaComputer analysis of oxygen levels in the blood during sleep could — by itself — provide an easy, relatively inexpensive and sufficiently reliable way to determine which children who snore habitually could benefit from a diagnosis and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. This approach was most accurate for children with severe apnea.
11d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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From greenhouse gas to 3-D surface-microporous grapheneTiny dents in the surface of graphene greatly enhances its potential as a supercapacitor. Even better, it can be made from carbon dioxide in a novel approach. The process uses a heat-releasing reaction to dig micropores into 3-D graphene and could be a useful supercapacitor material.
11d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists improve forecast of increasing hazard on Ecuadorian volcanoResearchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and the Instituto Geofisico–Escuela Politecnica Nacional (IGEPN) of Ecuador, showed an increasing volcanic danger on Cotopaxi in Ecuador using a powerful technique known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR).
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Primary prevention could reduce heart disease among type 2 diabetes patientsIn a Journal of the American College of Cardiology state of the art review published today, researchers from the division of cardiology and the Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease at the New York University Medical Center in New York City, examine evidence and guidelines for the prevention of heart disease in Type 2 Diabetes patients.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Safety-net and non-safety-net hospitals deliver similar PCI outcomesPatients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at safety-net hospitals experienced similar outcomes as patients treated at non-safety-net hospitals, according to research published today in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.
12d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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Half of papers searched for online are free to read Large study of open research analysed reader data from Unpaywall tool, which finds freely available versions of articles. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22418
12d Ars Technica
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Data cap analysis found almost 200 ISPs imposing data limits in the US Data cap cash. (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images ) A company that tracks ISPs and data caps in the US has identified 196 home Internet providers that impose monthly caps on Internet users. Not all of them are enforced, but customers of many ISPs must pay overage fees when they use too much data. BroadbandNow, a broadband provider search site that gets referral fees from some ISPs, has more th
12d The Atlantic
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Trump's 'Adhocracy' Could Leave the World in Disarray “This is going to be a much messier world that the next president is going to have to deal with,” says Council on Foreign Relations President, Richard Haass . President Trump has introduced a large degree of unpredictability in American foreign policy through an undisciplined decision-making process and little regard to international institutions. Interviewed at the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival, Haa
12d Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
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Here's An Unusual Way To Meet Your Survival Partner: In A Life Raft Out To Sea #NakedAndAfraid | Thursdays at 9p A master diver and former Navy Seal are dropped off in the ocean, miles from land. Beneath the sea, predators like the 25 foot tiger shark await. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebo
12d Science : NPR
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Can Buddhist Practices Help Us Overcome The Biological Pull Of Dissatisfaction? Science journalist and author Robert Wright says that Buddhist enlightenment might help counteract our natural tendency towards unhappiness. His new book is Why Buddhism is True. (Image credit: Veronica Grech/Getty Images)
12d Gizmodo
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Upgrade To an Office-Friendly, Backlit Mechanical Keyboard For As Little As $25 Velocifire Tenkeyless Mechanical Keyboard , $25 with code 43NROQKN | Full-Width , $34 with code 43NROQKN You’ve probably heard a lot of fuss about mechanical keyboards lately, and if not, you’ve at least heard the clicking. If you’re curious to try one yourself without dropping a bunch of money, you can get a tenkeyless Velocifire model for $25 , or a full-width keyboard for $9 more today . The k
12d The Scientist RSS
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Scientists to Protest Across IndiaInspired by April's March for Science, Wednesday's demonstrators will demand increased funding and a more pro-science attitude from the government.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new view for protein turnover in the brainScientists at UC San Diego have provided the first evidence that lysosomes, specialized structures found in nearly every cell in your body, can travel to distant parts of neurons to branch-like areas known as dendrites. Lysosomes help keep balance in the brain by removing material that is no longer needed, a key function that could be associated with disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA tracking Tropical Storm FranklinTropical Storm Franklin formed in the Caribbean Sea late on August 6. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the Atlantic Ocean basin's seventh tropical depression as it organized. NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided an image the next day that showed the storm approaching landfall.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New UMMS study shows how to account for social disparities in health care costsIn a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, Arlene Ash, PhD, recommends allocating some health insurance dollars for patients in vulnerable communities and for those subject to social risks, in addition to their medical issues.
12d The Atlantic
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There Is Nothing New Under the Sun, Martin Shkreli Edition Martin Shkreli could not be more of this moment. He livestreams freewheeling monologues on YouTube to anyone who will watch. He’s been suspended from Twitter . His hiking , overnight, of the price of a lifesaving drug in 2015 from $13.50 to $750 so perfectly embodied Americans’ current complaints about health care that he was denounced by both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Last Friday, Shkrel
12d The Atlantic
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Upgrading the Power Grid in Remote Tibet In Tibet’s Hengduan Mountains, workers are hauling thousands of parts over challenging terrain by mule and by hand to build huge transmission towers for the Tibet Electric Power Networking Project. The complex power transmission project is designed to join and upgrade Tibet’s current disconnected and underpowered power transmission systems. The project is due to be completed in 2018.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Biodiversity negates carbon storage in seagrasses, new study findsSeagrass meadows are great absorbers of carbon dioxide from the air. But the algae, animals, corals and plants that live among them release large amounts of carbon dioxide, according to newly released research. The scientists are now identifying seagrass locations with fewer emitters to target for conservation.
12d Science : NPR
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What Bloodied This Teen's Feet? Tiny Marine Flesh Eaters Had Scientists Stumped After a 30-minute soak, Sam Kanizay left the water bleeding profusely. Exactly what attacked him puzzled experts, though — that is, until his father tracked down some of the little creatures. (Image credit: Jarrod Kanizay via AP)
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New antibiotic class found effective against gonorrhea in the laboratoryClosthioamide, discovered in 2010, might eventually offer an alternative for current drugs that are becoming less effective against gonorrhoea.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Brain lays foundation for reason in childhoodStructural connections between frontal and parietal areas in children's brains can predict their ability to reason later in life, reports new research published in The Journal of Neuroscience.
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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U.S. Coal Production Shoots Up, Despite a Dwindling Domestic Market
12d Feed: All Latest
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The Apple ARKit Proves the Future of Augmented Reality Will Be on Your PhoneApple's ARKit draws interest in the mundane—fitting furniture in a room, a digital tape measure.
12d Gizmodo
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You Don't Need Desktop Apps Anymore Image: Screenshot Fire up your Start menu or Dock and think carefully for a moment: Out of all your aging desktop apps, how many do you really rely on these days—or even better, how many of them don’t already have very capable web app alternatives you could use instead? Unless you’re a film editor or a graphic designer, it’s probably time to let those old-fashioned, clunky desktop apps go. When C
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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EU demands Polish 'reassurance' over ancient forestTop European Union officials have written to Poland's right-wing government seeking "reassurance" it will obey a ban on logging in Europe's last primeval woodland, sources said on Monday.
12d Science | The Guardian
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New class of antibiotic raises hopes for urgently-needed gonorrhoea drug With the sexually transmitted disease fast becoming drug resistant, successful lab tests of closthioamide show potential as an effective new treatment A new class of antibiotic has been found to work in the lab against the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhoea, which can cause infertility and damage to babies and is fast becoming resistant to all existing drugs. Although it is early days, bec
12d Gizmodo
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The Most Realistic Robo-Lincoln Yet Proves the Future Is Going to Be Weird as Hell GIF Image: YouTube/ Garner Holt Productions Honest Abe is lying about being human. The people who handle Walt Disney World’s Animatronics have built an all new, slightly frightening Lincoln that makes the perfect facial expressions for reacting to the upcoming talking Trump in the Hall of Presidents. Garner Holt Productions [GHP] has built thousands of animatronic figures for theme parks over the
12d Futurity.org
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Sensor warns about drug safety earlier in testing Researchers have developed a new method for evaluating drug safety that can detect stress on cells at earlier stages than current methods, which mostly rely on detecting cell death. The new method uses a fluorescent sensor that is turned on in a cell when misfolded proteins begin to aggregate—an early sign of cellular stress. The method can be adapted to detect protein aggregates caused by other
12d Latest Headlines | Science News
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To combat cholera in Yemen, one scientist goes back to basicsAs the cholera epidemic rages on in war-torn Yemen, basic hygiene is the first line of defense.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Automated measure of nighttime oxygen levels could speed diagnosis of sleep apneaComputer analysis of oxygen levels in the blood during sleep could — by itself — provide an easy, relatively inexpensive and sufficiently reliable way to determine which children who snore habitually could benefit from a diagnosis and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. This approach was most accurate for children with severe apnea.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Physician implicit racial bias does not impact their clinical decision makingA doctor's racial preference does not necessarily mean he or she will order more or fewer diagnostic tests or treatments based on race.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hospital admissions for older adults increased for weeks after natural disasterOlder adults may still be checking into hospitals for weeks after a natural disaster, past the the expected three days of anticipated injuries and health issues, a new University of Michigan study shows.
12d Popular Science
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Ditch your phone’s default apps for these superior replacements DIY Upgrade your mobile experience. Your phone comes with default apps—but these aren't always the best options on the market. Here are some alternatives to the apps provided by Apple and Google.
12d Ingeniøren
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Raketmadsen efter raketstrid: Vi bruger området i ØstersøenCS opgiver raketopsendelse samme dag som Raket-Madsens Rumlaboratorium, fordi det ’forplumrer’ historien om CS. Dermed mener Peter Madsen, at han råder over to hele weekender.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sunshield layers fully integrated on NASA's James Webb Space TelescopeThe five sunshield layers responsible for protecting the optics and instruments of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope are now fully installed.
12d NYT > Science
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Q&A: No Need to Smell Fear: Dogs Have Other Reasons to BiteDespite conventional wisdom, no one knows if dogs can smell fear. But humans give them plenty of other reasons to attack.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Invisibility cloak takes one step closer to revealing itselfTwo research teams have made structures that could help conceal objects from daylight – taking the next step towards making the visible, invisible. Recent progress draws on advances in so-called metamaterials, which are microscopic structures that bend light in unnatural directions.
12d Gizmodo
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Cool Guy Elon Musk Casually Drops Animation of World's Most Powerful Rocket Image: Still via Elon Musk/Instagram The rollout for SpaceX’s most powerful rocket, the Falcon Heavy, has been handled with a nearly concerning level of nonchalantness. On July 27th, Elon Musk announced on Twitter that its maiden voyage will be sometime this November. Now, the SpaceX founder and self-proclaimed Boring Person has released an animation showing the rocket launch on his Instagram. Th
12d Gizmodo
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Some Uber Drivers Are Changing Rider Ratings in Retaliation for Bad Reviews [Updated] You might want to think twice before giving a driver a low rating. It could inspire them to change your rating to a one-star. Uber provides information to drivers so they can get a better sense of how riders are rating them. The company doesn’t provide specifics, but it seems to be just enough data to make some drivers try to determine who rated them poorly. Last week, an Uber driver posted on th
12d Gizmodo
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Adequate Man You Are Cheesing Your Cheeseburgers All Wrong And I Can’t Stand It Anymore | Jezebel An Adequate Man You Are Cheesing Your Cheeseburgers All Wrong And I Can’t Stand It Anymore | Jezebel Anna Faris and Chris Pratt Announce Their Separation | The Root Steph Curry Is Petty As… | Splinter Trump Refuses to Take a Vacation From Awful Tweets |
12d Live Science
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South Asia May Become Too Hot for Humans to Survive by 2100By the end of this century, temperatures in South Asia — a region where about one-fifth of the world's population lives — could become too hot and humid for people to survive, according to a new study.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Breakthrough device heals organs with a single touchResearchers have developed a device that can switch cell function to rescue failing body functions with a single touch. The technology, known as Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), injects genetic code into skin cells, turning those skin cells into other types of cells required for treating diseased conditions.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Midlife cardiovascular risk factors may increase chances of dementiaA large, long-term study suggests that middle aged Americans who have vascular health risk factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and smoking, have a greater chance of suffering from dementia later in life.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Water filtration system in West Virginia among the eliteA raft of garbage covers a swath of the Monongahela River in northern West Virginia, a dozen miles upstream from the drinking water intake for 100,000 people.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease in aged chimpanzee brainsThe brains of aged chimpanzees, our closest living relatives, show pathology similar to the human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, according to a new, multi-institution research study.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New AI algorithm monitors sleep with radio wavesResearchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to monitor sleep without any kind of sensors attached to the body. Their sensor uses low-power radio waves that detect small changes in body movement caused by the patient's breathing and pulse, then translates those measurements into sleep stages: light, deep, or rapid eye movement (REM).
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Fat rats show why breast cancer may be more aggressive in patients with obesityIn an animal model of obesity and breast cancer, tumor cells in obese animals but not lean animals had especially sensitive androgen receptors, allowing these cells to magnify growth signals from the hormone testosterone.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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The sun's core makes a complete rotation in one weekResearchers have determined that the sun's core makes a complete rotation once per week. Using the GOLF instrument, orbiting around the sun on board the SOHO space observatory, to measure solar oscillations, they developed a novel approach that enabled them to unambiguously detect gravity oscillation modes within our star. This work, which will certainly stimulate a new era of research into the ph
12d Futurity.org
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Do crops sometimes make deforestation worth it? In some places, the benefits of deforestation outweigh the costs, according to a new analysis of the trade-offs between the benefits provided by tropical forests and their conversion to agricultural land. “A better understanding of the distribution of benefits and costs will also help in better selection of areas to focus conservation efforts…” The research team examined deforestation activities
12d BBC News – Science & Environment
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New grass snake identified in the UKThere are now four species of wild snake native to the UK, not three as scientists first thought.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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MRI contrast agents accumulate in the brainThe International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) has provided new guidance in the use of contrast agents during MRI scans. Emerging research suggests gadolinium-based contrast agents, injected in a patient's veins to brighten tissues in MRI images, accumulate in the brain. More than 300 million doses of such drugs have been administered since their introduction in 1987.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA Spots extra-Tropical Depression Nalgae near Kuril IslandsOn August 7, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image of extra-tropical storm Nalgae near the Kuril Islands north of Japan.
12d Big Think
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A Bizarre Peace Proposal: Slice Europe Up Like a Pie All 24 cantons would meet at St Stephen's cathedral in Vienna Read More
12d cognitive science
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How sugar affects the brain? submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
12d Inside Science
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Moving to a City Saves Lives (But Maybe Not Your Own) Moving to a City Saves Lives (But Maybe Not Your Own) Mass migration to Chinese cities has likely decreased the total number of premature deaths caused by air pollution. Shanghai_Skyscape.jpg Shanghai buildings through the haze, July 2005 Image credits: Peter Morgan/CC BY 2.0 Earth Monday, August 7, 2017 – 11:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Ever since Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping ki
12d Gizmodo
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Senior US Official Claimed the FCC Got 'Hacked' After Security Professionals Found No Proof Photo: Getty A senior US official has admitted to being the source behind a claim that the FCC was “hacked” in 2014 during the net neutrality debate. Internally, however, the agency’s security team had assessed there was no evidence of a malicious intrusion. Dr. David Bray, who was the FCC’s chief information officer until last month, spoke privately with a reporter at Motherboard roughly a week
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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From greenhouse gas to 3-D surface-microporous grapheneTiny dents in the surface of graphene greatly enhances its potential as a supercapacitor. Even better, it can be made from carbon dioxide in a novel approach developed by researchers from Michigan Technological University and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The process uses a heat-releasing reaction to dig micropores into 3-D graphene and could be a useful supercapacitor material.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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What's killing trees during droughts? Scientists have new answersAs the number of droughts increases globally, scientists are working to develop predictions of how future parched conditions will affect plants, especially trees.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Researchers set record for fastest light pulseA research team from the University of Central Florida led by Professor Zenghu Chang demonstrated a 53-attosecond X-ray flash, opening the door to shoot slow-motion video of electrons and atoms in living cells.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA Spots extra-Tropical Depression Nalgae near Kuril IslandsOn August 7, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image of extra-tropical storm Nalgae near the Kuril Islands north of Japan.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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How an unlikely cellular 'antenna' can impair brain developmentAn antenna-like structure on cells, once considered a useless vestige, can cause defects in the brain's wiring similar to what's seen in autism, schizophrenia, and other disorders. In the lab, UNC scientists prevented defects by restoring signaling though these structures called primary cilia.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA instrument key to understanding solar powered planet arrives at Kennedy Space CenterA new instrument that will monitor our planet's biggest power source, the Sun, arrived at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It has a targeted November 2017 launch on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket to the International Space Station. The Total Solar and Spectral Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1) instrument was built by the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) for NA
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers set record for fastest light pulseA research team at the University of Central Florida has demonstrated the fastest light pulse ever developed, a 53-attosecond X-ray flash.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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5 critically endangered white lions born in Czech zooFor the critically endangered white lion, the quintuplets recently born in a Czech zoo are a vital contribution for survival, and a joy and responsibility for keepers.
12d The Atlantic
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How the White House's Immigration Reforms Might Backfire Trump adviser Stephen Miller says the new White House plan to amend U.S. immigration law, introduced by Senators Tom Cotton and David Perdue, is “the largest proposed reform to our immigration policy in half a century.” The White House wants to revisit the 1965 Immigration Act , which opened America’s doors wide to immigrants of color and produced the most sweeping demographic transformation of t
12d The Atlantic
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Writing in Someone Else’s World My first book was not what I dreamed it would be. I started writing professionally when I was in my late 20s, and while I worked my way up from a freelance music journalist to being an editor at The A.V. Club , the non-satirical wing of The Onion , I had one goal: to use all that experience as a springboard toward becoming an author. I had it all mapped out: After years of sacrifice and honing my
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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China Will Experiment with Using Blockchain to Collect Taxes
12d Science | The Guardian
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Nanochip could heal injuries or regrow organs with one touch, say researchers A tiny device that sits on the skin and uses an electric field to reprogramme cells could be a breakthrough in the way we treat injured or ageing tissue A novel device that reprogrammes skin cells could represent a breakthrough in repairing injured or ageing tissue, researchers say. The new technique, called tissue nanotransfection, is based on a tiny device that sits on the surface of the skin o
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA sees Typhoon Noru over southern JapanTyphoon Noru was moving over Honshu, Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on August 7. Noru made landfall in the central prefecture of Wakayama early in the day.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA tests autopilot sensors during simulationsInside a large, black-walled facility outside Denver, NASA's Satellite Servicing Projects Division (SSPD) team successfully completed the latest testing of three rendezvous and proximity operations sensors used for satellite servicing applicatons and beyond. These sensors are needed for autonomous rendezvous of spacecraft, which is a vital technology for robotically servicing a satellite.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Netflix acquires comic book creator MillarworldNetflix announced Monday it was acquiring comic book publisher Millarworld, creator of popular series including "Kick-Ass" and "Kingsman."
12d Ars Technica
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Apple opens new Instagram account, populates it with photos from #ShotoniPhone Enlarge (credit: Instagram, Apple) Apple isn't the most social tech company in the sense that it doesn't use Facebook, Twitter, or other social media much. But that's changing, at least a bit, with the launch of @Apple on Instagram . The company recently created this new account on the Facebook-owned photo sharing app, and it appears to be a way for Apple to show off iPhone photography for now. T
12d Gizmodo
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NYC Mayor Ingenuously Proposes Taxing Rich To Fix Subway System Photo: AP New York City’s mayor, Bill de Blasio, is expected to announce on Monday a tax on the wealthiest residents in the city to pay for much-needed improvements for the city’s deteriorating subway system, according to multiple reports. And unless you’re a millionaire who thrives on the misery of the poor or whose life would be debilitated from—maybe!—having one less extreme fine dining experi
12d Gizmodo
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Here's Your First Look at Deadpool 2's Cable Image: Marvel Comics/20th Century Fox Last week , we got an excellent look at Zazie Beetz in action as Deadpool 2 's probability-altering mutant mercenary Domino. Now, after months of teasing, we finally have a look at the movie’s other mutant addition: Deadpool’s long-time comrade and time-traveling maniac Cable. As he did with last week’s reveal, Ryan Reynolds posted the teaser image to Twitter
12d Live Science
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Woman, Scientist … Activist: Female Researchers Take Charge (Op-Ed)As women, and as scientists, we are here to stand up for public truth-telling and the value of the lives of all women — and all marginalized people.
12d Popular Science
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Last week in tech: Sorry in advance for getting ‘Despacito’ stuck in your head Technology All the important tech stuff you missed last week. Hard gadget news can be sparse in these deep summer days, but there's still lots going on. Read on.
12d The Atlantic
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Game of Thrones: Dragons Are the Nuclear Option This post contains spoilers through the most recent episode of Game of Thrones , “The Spoils of War.” It’s no secret that dragons have a deeper meaning on Game of Thrones . George R.R. Martin has specifically referred to them as “the nuclear deterrent.” Timothy Westmyer, a former research and program assistant at George Washington University, has argued in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists th
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Small streams have a big influence on our livesSmall streams make up 70%-80% of the total channel length of river networks, and they strongly influence downstream portions these networks. The role small streams ? known as headstreams ? play in retaining or transmitting sediment and nutrients, providing habitat and refuge for diverse aquatic and riparian organisms, creating migration corridors, and governing connectivity at the watershed-scale
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dozens of new genes that create T cell-resistant cancer discovered with 2CT CRISPR screenInnovative large-scale gene editing study provides new insights into why immunotherapy fails in majority of cancer patients.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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First human application of novel PET tracer for prostate cancerIn the featured translational article in the August issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers at the University of Michigan demonstrate the potential of a new PET tracer, Carbon-11 labeled sarcosine (11C-sarcosine), for imaging prostate cancer, and set the stage for its possible use in monitoring other cancers.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Individuals with bipolar disorder need workplace supportPeople with bipolar disorder often find themselves unemployed due to exclusion, stigma and stereotypes directed at them at work, a new study found.
12d New Scientist – News
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New sky survey shows that dark energy may one day tear us apartThe best cosmic map yet of the universe’s make-up finds 24 per cent less dark matter than we thought and could call for a rewrite of physics
12d New Scientist – News
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You could finally control your Facebook data if UK law is passedData protection overhaul means you can soon ask companies to delete your entire social media history or personal information – and breaches of the new law will carry heftier fines
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New paper lays out framework for understanding 'institutional corruption'In many ways, the polarizing 2016 U.S. elections inflamed public concern regarding the power of wealth over politics and policy, providing raw and emotional examples of "institutional corruption"—a term that broadly refers to legal, systemic corruption rather than illegal, quid pro quo corruption.
12d Gizmodo
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Today's Best Deals: Anker SoundCore, Dash Egg Cooker, Back to School Backpacks, and More Your favorite Bluetooth speaker , Amazon’s top-selling egg cooker , and a bunch of High Sierra backpacks lead off Monday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker SoundCore , $27 Anker’s SoundCore blew away the competition to take the title of your favorite affordable Bluetooth speaker, and today, you can pick one up
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Benefits of advanced wood-burning stoves greater than thoughtAdvanced wood-burning stoves designed for use in the developing world can reduce air pollution more than anticipated, because gaseous emissions from traditional wood stoves form more particulate matter in the atmosphere than researchers previously thought.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Researchers crack the 'Karakoram anomaly': Why glaciers near K2 are growing in sizeResearchers identify 'Karakoram vortex' and explain why glaciers near K2 are growing in size.
12d The Scientist RSS
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The Cancer Genes Needed for Immunotherapy ResponseUsing a large CRISPR-based screen, researchers find possible genetic culprits for patients not having success with immune checkpoint inhibitors.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Benefits of advanced wood-burning stoves greater than thoughtA recent study from North Carolina State University finds that advanced wood-burning stoves designed for use in the developing world can reduce air pollution more than anticipated, because gaseous emissions from traditional wood stoves form more particulate matter in the atmosphere than researchers previously thought.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Atheists thought immoral, even by fellow atheists: studyA unusual social study has revealed that atheists are more easily suspected of vile deeds than Christians, Muslims, Hindus or Buddhists—strikingly, even by fellow atheists, researchers said Monday.
12d Ars Technica
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Australian teen chewed and bloodied after bizarre ocean feeding frenzy An example of a lysianassid amphipod. (credit: Hans Hillewaert ) After an intense football match Saturday in Australia, 16-year-old Sam Kanizay dipped his legs into the chilly waters off Melbourne’s coast, hoping to soothe his sore muscles. Half an hour later he stepped out, bleeding profusely from countless tiny bites. The gory and bizarre situation is now making international headlines. The ima
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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MRI contrast agents accumulate in the brainThe International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) has provided new guidance in the use of contrast agents during MRI scans. Emerging research suggests gadolinium-based contrast agents, injected in a patient's veins to brighten tissues in MRI images, accumulate in the brain. More than 300 million doses of such drugs have been administered since their introduction in 1987.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Largest-ever study of pets and kids' health finds no linkA large body of research has reported an association between the pet ownership and better health among children. But a new study that is the largest-ever to explore the issue contradicts the common thinking. Researchers did find that children from pet-owning families tended to have better general health, but those differences disappeared when factors such as family income and family housing were c
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Overweight children and adults get significantly healthier and quickly with less sugarReducing fructose, particularly high-fructose corn syrup, in our diet for just nine days can show significantly improved measures of health.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA sees Typhoon Noru over southern JapanTyphoon Noru was moving over Honshu, Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on August 7. Noru made landfall in the central prefecture of Wakayama early in the day.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Mental illness, suicide and violence creating lost generation in the Middle EastThere has been a sharp increase in non-communicable diseases and mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Depression and anxiety disorders were the most common mental conditions, according to a study led by Ali Mokdad of the University of Washington in the US.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Women have more active brains than menIn the largest functional brain imaging study to date, the Amen Clinics (Newport Beach, CA) compared 46,034 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies provided by nine clinics, quantifying differences between the brains of men and women. The study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers crack the 'Karakoram anomaly'A summer 'vortex' of cold air over the Karakoram mountain range is causing the glaciers in the region to grow in spite of global warming, scientists have shown.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Small streams have a big influence on our livesSmall streams make up 70-80 percent of the total channel length of river networks, and they strongly influence downstream portions these networks. The role small streams — known as headstreams — play in retaining or transmitting sediment and nutrients, providing habitat and refuge for diverse aquatic and riparian organisms, creating migration corridors, and governing connectivity at the watershe
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The ocean's fastest shark is being threatened by over fishingStudy using satellite-tagged shortfin mako sharks shows mortality rates have been dramatically underestimated.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Like a game of 'spot the difference' for disease-prone versus healthy peopleA specific kind of natural nanoparticles, called low-density lipoproteins (LDL), are fascinating scientists because their modification plays a key role in people affected by high cholesterol and atherosclerosis. LDL from healthy people behaved differently when subjected to high pressure compared to LDL affected by the common diseases studied, according to new research.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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MRSA survival chances predicted by DNA sequencing the superbugSequencing the DNA of the MRSA superbug can accurately identify patients most at risk of death and could help medics develop new treatments as we move towards personalised medicine, say scientists.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Understanding how persuasion works can make consumers more savvyWhen someone offers a free sample, it's not really free. It comes with the implied expectation that if a person accepts it, he or she will feel obligated to return the favor and eventually pay for the full product. That's just one of the many insights psychology has uncovered about the subtle mechanics of persuasion and how people can recognize and respond to attempts to influence their behavior.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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By the end of the century extreme weather events may affect two in three Europeans every yearBy 2100, two in three people living in Europe may be affected by weather-related disasters, according to a new study which sheds light on the expected burden of climate change on societies across Europe. The projected increases were calculated on the assumption of there being no reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and no improvements to policies helping to reduce the impact of extreme weather ev
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The ocean's fastest shark is being threatened by over fishingMore bad news for sharks.
12d The Atlantic
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How to Mentor From Miles Away When people think of mentorship, they probably imagine talking about career advancement over coffee, or meeting over lunch to chat about how a new job is going. But how central should physical meetups be to professional guidance when so much communication is digital? In 2011, Keshia Ashe and Tiffany St. Bernard, who both work in the biomedical-engineering field, co-founded ManyMentors, an “e-ment
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study examines social connections and impacts of financial fraudThe infamous Bernie Madoff financial fraud scandal between 1980 and 2008 influenced far more than the 10,000 directly affected investors who lost billions.
12d Gizmodo
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Netflix Buys Millarworld, Mark Millar's Creator-Owned Publishing House Image: Jupiter’s Legacy, art by Frank Quitely The stable of characters thought up by the writer who co-created Wanted, Kingsmen , and Kick-Ass has been bought by one of the biggest players in filmed entertainment. Announced today via press release, Netflix’s purchase of Millarworld makes the streaming service the exclusive home of the British creator’s yet-to-be-optioned properties. Here’s the re
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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The First-Ever Brain-Controlled VR Game Gives You the Power of Telekinesis
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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When Is a Hacker Not a Criminal?
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Increased brain acidity in psychiatric disordersDecreased brain pH in the patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder has been considered to be the result of secondary factors associated with the diseases, such as medication and agonal state. However, the researchers of the present study suggest that decreased brain pH is a primary feature of the diseases themselves, based on the current findings from systematic investigation using five an
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Astronauts to bring asteroid back into lunar orbitFuture space exploration aims to fly further from Earth than ever before. New research examines the robotic phase of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). In addition to taking manned spaceflights deeper into space than ever before, the proposed mission would also bring some benefit for planetary science.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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97 percent of insurance denials in pediatric proton patients overturned on appealInsurance companies end up covering proton therapy treatment for pediatric cancer patients in 97 percent of the cases they originally deny once those decisions are appealed. Researchers analyzed five years of coverage decisions at Penn's Roberts Proton Therapy Center. They discovered that roughly one in 10 pediatric cancer patients are initially denied coverage for the cutting edge and costly trea
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Anti-inflammatory, anti-stress drugs taken before surgery may reduce metastatic recurrenceA new study finds that a specific drug regimen administered prior to and after surgery significantly reduces the risk of post-surgical cancer recurrence.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Pro-vaccine messages can boost belief in MMR myths, study showsCurrent strategies for correcting misinformation about the dangers of vaccinations have the opposite effect and reinforce ill-founded beliefs, a study suggests.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Optical coherence tomography with XUV radiation at laboratory scaleFor the first time, physicists used extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) for this process, which was generated in their own laboratory, and they were thus able to perform the first XUV coherence tomography at laboratory scale. This radiation has a wavelength of between 20 and 40 nanometers – from which it is therefore just a small step to the X-ray range.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Pharmacy service could save NHS £517.6m, finds studyA scheme launched by the Department of Health in 2011 to help patients stick to their drug regimens has been so successful, that in its first five years, it will save NHS England £517.6m in the long-term, a team of health economists has found.
12d Futurity.org
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Highway fences can harm tortoises they were built to save Desert tortoises can overheat as they look for a way around roadside fencing meant to keep them safe from cars, a new study suggests. The Mojave Desert tortoise—a threatened species and icon of California’s southern deserts—is facing intense pressure as its habitat is eyed for solar and wind energy development. “Where tortoises and roads meet, it is inevitable that tortoises will lose.” Their los
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Small streams have a big influence on our livesSmall streams make up 70-80 percent of the total channel length of river networks, and they strongly influence downstream portions these networks. The role small streams — known as headstreams — play in retaining or transmitting sediment and nutrients, providing habitat and refuge for diverse aquatic and riparian organisms, creating migration corridors, and governing connectivity at the watershe
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Researchers crack the 'Karakoram anomaly'Researchers identify 'Karakoram vortex' and explain why glaciers near K2 are growing in size.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Benefits of advanced wood-burning stoves greater than thoughtAdvanced wood-burning stoves designed for use in the developing world can reduce air pollution more than anticipated, because gaseous emissions from traditional wood stoves form more particulate matter in the atmosphere than researchers previously thought.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
The ocean's fastest shark is being threatened by overfishingA study using satellite-tagged shortfin mako sharks shows mortality rates have been dramatically underestimated.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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MRSA survival chances predicted by DNA sequencing the superbugSequencing the DNA of the MRSA superbug can accurately identify patients most at risk of death and could help medics develop new treatments as we move towards personalised medicine, say scientists publishing in the journal Nature Microbiology.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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UB research shows how pronouns can be used to build confidence in stressful situationsBefore any potentially stressful event, people often engage in self-talk, an internal dialogue meant to moderate anxiety. This kind of self-reflection is common, according to Mark Seery, a UB psychologist whose new study suggests that taking a 'distanced perspective,' or seeing ourselves as though we were an outside observer, leads to a more confident and positive response to upcoming stressors th
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Like a game of 'spot the difference' for disease-prone versus healthy peopleA specific kind of natural nanoparticles, called low-density lipoproteins (LDL), are fascinating scientists because their modification plays a key role in people affected by high cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Judith Peters from the University Grenoble Alpes and Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France and colleagues recently published the results of their study in _EPJ E, showing that the LDL
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Low Medicaid rates limit beneficiaries' access to assisted living facilitiesA new study by RTI International found that low Medicaid payment rates for services in assisted living and similar settings discourage residential care providers from serving Medicaid beneficiaries, which limits their access to community-based residential care.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Study links unhealthy segregated neighborhoods to childhood asthmaResearchers have had trouble explaining why black children are much more likely than other children to suffer from asthma. A new study by Princeton University strongly suggests that much of the answer lies in persistent residential segregation, which traps minority children in unhealthy, polluted neighborhoods.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New paper lays out framework for understanding 'institutional corruption'A new research paper shows how legal, systemic corruption takes many forms and raises many pertinent questions, not the least of which is what can be done about it.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Drought-affected trees die from hydraulic failure and carbon starvationDrought-caused tree deaths are produced by a combination of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation says new research published today in Nature Ecology and Evolution. The finding, based on a meta-analysis by 62 scientists from across the world, will improve predictive models of how trees die in response to heat, drought, and other climate stresses.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Midlife cardiovascular risk factors may increase chances of dementiaA large, long-term study suggests that middle aged Americans who have vascular health risk factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and smoking, have a greater chance of suffering from dementia later in life. The study, published in JAMA Neurology, was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Extreme melt season leads to decade-long ecosystem changes in Antarctic polar desertAn abnormal season of intense glacial melt in 2002 triggered multiple distinct changes in the physical and biological characteristics of Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys over the ensuing decade.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Single strep bacteria protein sets off white blood cell's early warning systemGroup A Streptococcusbacteria — the cause of strep throat and flesh-eating infections — have been well studied for nearly a century. But researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences recently made a surprising discovery: strep's M protein alone wipes out macrophages, but not other types of immune cells. The macropha
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NCI study identifies essential genes for cancer immunotherapyA new study identifies genes that are necessary in cancer cells for immunotherapy to work, addressing the problem of why some tumors don't respond to immunotherapy or respond initially but then stop as tumor cells develop resistance to immunotherapy.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Breakthrough device heals organs with a single touchResearchers have developed a device that can switch cell function to rescue failing body functions with a single touch. The technology, known as Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), injects genetic code into skin cells, turning those skin cells into other types of cells required for treating diseased conditions.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mutation in prostate tumors shown to change epigenetic identity, the make-up of DNAProstate cancer researchers have mapped the impact of an acquired mutation that alters epigenetic identity, the make-up of DNA, in about 50 percent of patient tumor samples. The discovery also identifies a new opportunity for targeted therapy.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Big data yields surprising connections between diseasesUsing health insurance claims data from more than 480,000 people in nearly 130,000 families, researchers at the University of Chicago have created a new classification of common diseases based on how often they occur among genetically-related individuals.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Modern domestic dog has a single geographic originBy analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team led by Krishna R. Veeramah, Ph.D., of Stony Brook University in the USA has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The study also suggests that all contemporary dogs have a common origin and emerged through a single domestication process of wolves 20,000 to 40,000 y
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Astronauts to bring asteroid back into lunar orbitFuture space exploration aims to fly further from Earth than ever before. Now, Italian Space Agency scientists have expressed an interest in contributing to the development of robotic technologies to bring an asteroid from beyond lunar orbit back into closer reach in order to better study it. In a paper published in EPJ Plus, Marco Tantardini and Enrico Flamini from the Italian Space Agency (ASI)
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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SoftBank adding technology ambitions, with ARM, roboticsPhoto ops of SoftBank Chief Executive Masayoshi Son sometimes show him chatting happily with his company's humanoid robot, the childlike Pepper, or grinning as President Donald Trump heaps praise on him for creating American jobs.
12d NYT > Science
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The Serial Killer Test: Biases Against Atheists Emerge in StudyMost people around the world, whether religious or not, presume that serial killers are more likely to be atheists than believers in any god, a new study suggests.
12d Futurity.org
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Mommy-shaming isn’t just a problem for celebrities Regular moms, not just famous ones, report “mommy-shaming” about how they raise their children. Actress Reese Witherspoon was once food-shamed for feeding her toddler cinnamon buns for breakfast. Critics were quick to judge model Coco Rocha for giving her baby formula. And a frenzy ensued when former pop star Jessica Simpson posted a photo of her five-year-old daughter in a mermaid costume some f
12d Live Science
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What Is Science?Science is a systematic and logical approach to discovering how things in the universe work.
12d Scientific American Content: Global
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First Genetically Engineered Salmon Sold in CanadaUS firm AquaBounty Technologies says that its transgenic fish has hit the market after a 25-year wait — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study examines social connections and impacts of financial fraudA new study from UT Dallas shows the ripple effects of the loss of trust in the investment advisory industry induced by the Bernie Madoff fraud.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study shows supplementation of capsicum extract helps increase metabolic rateNewly published study shows supplementation of capsicum extract helps increase metabolic rate.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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IBM's Watson can improve cancer treatment through better gene targetingIBM's Watson beat real-life contestants on Jeopardy. Now researchers are hoping this icon of artificial intelligence will help people with cancer win as well by providing a rapid, comprehensive report of the genetic mutations at the root of their specific disease and the therapies that target them.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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You are what your grandmother ate: Intergenerational impacts of prenatal nourishmentA study published online in The FASEB Journal shows that parents' own prenatal environment has a detectable impact on their children's weight.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Machines just revealed the evolution of languageMachine learning scientists at Disney Research have developed a new innovative model that uncovers how the meanings of words change over time. Dr. Robert Bamler and Dr. Stephan Mandt developed the dynamic word embeddings model by integrating neural networks and statistics used in rocket control systems. The result is a complex machine learning algorithm that automatically detects semantic change t
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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In utero exposure to diesel exhaust could be linked to adult heart failureAccording to a study published online in The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org), involving mice, gestational exposure to airborne particles derived from diesel exhaust can modify DNA in utero and alter the expression of genes that potentially increase susceptibility to adult heart failure.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antiulcer drugs do not increase risk of Alzheimer's diseaseThe use of proton pump inhibitors does not increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. Proton pump inhibitors are a type of antiulcer drug that is commonly used among older persons.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Molecule in human saliva has potential for wound healingA study published online in The FASEB Journal delves into the mystifying fact that wounds in your mouth heal faster and more efficiently than wounds elsewhere.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Increased brain acidity in psychiatric disordersDecreased brain pH in the patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder has been considered to be the result of secondary factors associated with the diseases, such as medication and agonal state. However, the researchers of the present study suggest that decreased brain pH is a primary feature of the diseases themselves, based on the current findings from systematic investigation using five an
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Modern domestic dog has a single geographic originBy analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The study also suggests that all contemporary dogs have a common origin and emerged through a single domestication process of wolves 20,000 to 40,000 years ago.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Astronauts to bring asteroid back into lunar orbitIn a paper published in EPJ Plus, Marco Tantardini and Enrico Flamini from the Italian Space Agency (ASI) make the case for taking part in the robotic phase of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). In addition to taking manned spaceflights deeper into space than ever before, the proposed mission would also bring some benefit for planetary science.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

97 percent of insurance denials in pediatric proton patients overturned on appealInsurance companies end up covering proton therapy treatment for pediatric cancer patients in 97 percent of the cases they originally deny once those decisions are appealed. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania analyzed five years of coverage decisions at Penn's Roberts Proton Therapy Center. They discovered that roughly one in 10 pediatric cancer pati
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Drought-affected trees die from hydraulic failure and carbon starvationThe report finds that hydraulic failure, which is the inability of a plant to move water from roots to leaves to be almost universally present when trees died, while carbon starvation was a contributing factor roughly half of the time.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Japanese scientists create ice cream that doesn't meltA team of Japanese scientists has developed a way to make and sell a type of ice cream that does not melt, capitalizing on a discovery made accidentally by a chef. Most ice cream starts melting just moments after it is scooped from a container and placed into a bowl or on a cone. Because of this, people have taken to eating it quickly. But now that may change, as a team in Japan has found a way to
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Judge: IBM owes Indiana $78M for failed welfare automationIBM owes Indiana $78 million in damages stemming from the company's failed effort to automate much of the state's welfare services, a judge has ruled in a long-running dispute.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Extreme melt season leads to decade-long ecosystem changes in Antarctic polar desertAn abnormal season of intense glacial melt in 2002 triggered multiple distinct changes in the physical and biological characteristics of Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys over the ensuing decade, new research led by the University of Colorado Boulder shows.
12d Gizmodo
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People Everywhere Think Atheists Are Bad, Says New Study Evidence that atheists are not smarter (Image: Eli Christman ) Religion has played an important part in countless wars , conflicts , terrorist attacks , murders , and genocides , yet people seem to associate it with morality. In fact, these same people—even other atheists—seem to think atheists are the immoral ones. A new study from an international team of scientists tried to add some data to th
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Neurobiology: Lessons by postLearning involves constant restructuring of nerve-cell connections. This requires specialized transport systems to ensure that these specific synapses can structurally and functionally be modified. One such delivery mechanism has now been characterized.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Afforestation with non-native trees alters island soilsA healthy global debate has occurred concerning the benefits of using non-native trees for restoring some aspects of ecosystem function in degraded habitats. In many cases, the stresses associated with establishing seedlings disallow most native tree species from becoming successfully established in harsh planting sites. The tolerant non-native trees enable successes that would otherwise be unachi
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Role for lysosome transport in Alzheimer's disease progression revealedResearchers have discovered that defects in the transport of lysosomes within neurons promote the buildup of protein aggregates in the brains of mice with Alzheimer's disease. The study suggests that developing ways to restore lysosome transport could represent a new therapeutic approach to treating the neurodegenerative disorder.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Complex causes of Maldives floodingThe causes of coastal flooding in the Maldives are more complex than previously thought, according to a new study. Researchers examined wave and sea level data around historic flood events and found that multiple factors contribute to flooding in the Indian Ocean island chain, which has an average land elevation of just one meter.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New OCT technique provides better 3-D imaging of the cellular structure of the eyeOptical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution live imaging technique that can be used for early detection of retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration , diabetes-related conditions, glaucoma or vascular occlusions, for example. However, in order to obtain cellular resolution of the retina and hence even better results, it has so far been necessary to use expensive adapti
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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9-year-old wants to be NASA's 'planetary protection officer'A 9-year-old New Jersey boy who described himself as a "Guardian of the Galaxy" is hoping to add the real-life NASA title "Planetary Protection Officer" to his resume.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Latest research suggests cybercriminals are not as anonymous as we thinkUnderstanding a cybercriminal's backstory – where they live, what they do and who they know, is key to cracking cybercrime, new research suggests.
12d Quanta Magazine
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Joe Polchinski’s Restless Pursuit of Quantum Gravity Joe Polchinski, who won the 2017 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics “for transformative advances in quantum field theory, string theory and quantum gravity,” can’t sit still. “I am fidgety,” he told Quanta in an email. “I will calculate in my chair for a while, then switch to the blackboard, then go for a walk inside the building.” Then he’ll find somewhere quiet to sit among the “many exc
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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First Evidence That Social Bots Play a Major Role in Spreading Fake NewsAutomated accounts are being programmed to spread fake news, according to the first systematic study of the way online misinformation spreads
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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The First-Ever Brain-Controlled VR Game Looks Real Fun
12d Science | The Guardian
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Making old bones: Joint Mitnor cave reopens with replica fossils Experts use 3D printing to restore mound of fossilised remains in Devon quarry plundered by thieves in 2015 Future archaeologists may be seriously puzzled by Joint Mitnor, a cave in a Devon quarry. They will find a mound of fossil bones of animals, which about 120,000 years ago were unfortunate enough to fall through a sinkhole into the limestone cavern. Among bison and hippo bones they will find
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Electric car startup Faraday Future signs factory dealElectric car startup Faraday Future said Monday it had signed a lease for a new assembly plant in California and reaffirmed its intention to start deliveries in 2018.
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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The First-Ever Brain-Controlled VR Game Sounds Real Fun
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Manipulating brain network to change cognitive functions: New breakthrough in neuroscienceWhen an electric circuit breaks down, we can repair it by restoring connections in the circuit. Is it possible to restore the connections in our brain? And by doing so, is it possible to restore declining cognitive functions? Numerous regions of the brain are connected together and constitute a huge network. Researchers have developed a learning method to change cognitive function by manipulating
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Early term babies are at greater risk for diabetes and obesity-related diseasesEarly term deliveries impact babies' long-term health with increased risk of diabetes and obesity-related illnesses as well as a shortened life span, according to a new study.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New approach makes it easier to find novel drugsScientists have created a new way of screening compounds that is more sensitive than existing methods, opening up the possibility of finding new drugs for many diseases.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Compound derived from marijuana interacts with antiepileptic drugsNew research suggests that an investigational neurological treatment derived from cannabis may alter the blood levels of commonly used antiepileptic drugs.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Teen brains may not be as hard-wired for crime as previously thoughtSpikes in crime rates for teens and young adults suggest that biology may primarily drive risk-taking and law breaking, but a criminologists studying crime statistics in other countries indicate that culture may also play a role in shaping teen criminal behavior.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Greater access to higher education could have reversed EU referendum resultNew research suggests that greater access to higher education can influence political outcomes.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Gold specks raise hopes for better cancer treatmentsA tiny medical device containing gold specks could boost the effects of cancer medication and reduce its harm, research suggests.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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More accurate estimates of state opioid and heroin fatalitiesA new study presents a correction procedure to refine data reporting opioid and heroin deaths per US state, which results in significant shifts in state-by-state mortality rates. This truer picture helps to remove an important barrier to formulating effective policies to address this serious drug epidemic.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Cybercrime: Latest research suggests cybercriminals are not as anonymous as we thinkUnderstanding a cybercriminal's backstory – where they live, what they do and who they know, is key to cracking cybercrime, new research suggests.Online crime is of course online, but there is also a surprisingly strong offline and local dimension. Cybercriminals are often seen as faceless, international, computer masterminds, who are almost impossible to identify or understand as a result. But, a
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Neurobiology: Lessons by postLearning involves constant restructuring of nerve-cell connections. This requires specialized transport systems to ensure that these specific synapses can structurally and functionally be modified. One such delivery mechanism has now been characterized.
12d TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How AI can enhance our memory, work and social lives | Tom GruberHow smart can our machines make us? Tom Gruber, co-creator of Siri, wants to make "humanistic AI" that augments and collaborates with us instead of competing with (or replacing) us. He shares his vision for a future where AI helps us achieve superhuman performance in perception, creativity and cognitive function — from turbocharging our design skills to helping us remember everything we've ever r
12d Big Think
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Embryonic Human DNA Has Just Been Successfully Repaired in the U.S. U.S. scientists have successfully repaired DNA in a human embryo for the first time. Read More
12d The Atlantic
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Confirmed: Night Lights Drive Pollinators Away From Plants It’s hard enough to grab an insect during the day, so try doing it in the dark, while wearing night-vision goggles. These eyepieces offer little in the way of depth perception, and “catching insects without that is not easy,” says Eva Knop from the University of Bern. Nevertheless, she and her colleagues persisted, and became better with practice. Over several summer nights, they would head out i
12d The Atlantic
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To Stop Global Warming, Should Humanity Dim the Sky? Late last month, about 100 researchers from around the world gathered at Logan International Airport in Boston. A fleet of buses appeared to whisk them to a remote and luxurious ski resort in northeastern Maine. They met to talk, drink, and cogitate off the record for five days about a messy solution to one of the world’s most challenging problems. They had gathered to discuss how to provide huma
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Afforestation with non-native trees alters island soilsA healthy global debate has occurred concerning the benefits of using non-native trees for restoring some aspects of ecosystem function in degraded habitats. In many cases, the stresses associated with establishing seedlings disallow most native tree species from becoming successfully established in harsh planting sites. The tolerant non-native trees enable successes that would otherwise be unachi
12d Ars Technica
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Android 8.0’s “streaming OS updates” will work even if your phone is full Enlarge We've probably all had this happen at one point or another: it's time for an OS update, and your phone wants to download a ~1GB brick of an update file. On Android, normally this gets downloaded to the user storage partition and flashed to the system partition. But wait—if your phone is full of pictures, or videos, or apps, there may not be enough space to store the update file. In such c
12d Scientific American Content: Global
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Obama's Science Experts Operate Unofficial Shadow NetworkWith Trump in the White House, former staffers continue to press their positions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12d Live Science
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NASA's Total Solar Eclipse Maps Show Best Viewing Spots (Photos)On Aug. 21, 2017, a once-in-a-lifetime celestial event will give Earthlings across the United States a dazzling sight (through protective eye gear, of course). Check out where the path of totality will be.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pharmacy service could save NHS £517.6m, finds studyA scheme launched by the Department of Health in 2011 to help patients stick to their drug regimens has been so successful, that in its first five years, it will save NHS England £517.6m in the long-term, a team of health economists has found.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nanocrystalline LEDs: Red, green, yellow, blue …The color of the light emitted by an LED can be tuned by altering the size of their semiconductor crystals. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now found a clever and economical way of doing just that, which lends itself to industrial-scale production.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

High resolution without particle acceleratorFor the first time, Jena University physicists used extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) for this process, which was generated in their own laboratory, and they were thus able to perform the first XUV coherence tomography at laboratory scale. This radiation has a wavelength of between 20 and 40 nanometres – from which it is therefore just a small step to the X-ray range.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Success in enhancing performance of the cryogenic adsorption pump used in the divertorAt the National Institutes of Natural Sciences National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), we have succeeded in enhancing the high-performance of the cryogenic adsorption pump used for the evacuation of the Large Helical Device's (LHD) divertor1). It became possible by the selection of appropriate carbon (charcoal) and the development of methods that do not require the organic adhesion. Due to t
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Mental illness, suicide, creating 'lost generation' in Middle EastSuicide, homicide, and sexual assault are increasing much faster in the Eastern Mediterranean Region than any other region in the world, according to a new scientific study.These violent acts accounted for 1.4 million deaths in 2015 in the region, on top of the deaths from wars, which added another 144,000.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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SwRI-built CYGNSS satellites gathering unprecedented hurricane dataNASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is peering down through clouds to get an unprecedented view of this year's hurricane activity. Already this season, five tropical storms have formed over the Atlantic Ocean, and the Pacific Ocean has had 20 tropical storms, five hurricanes, and two typhoons.
12d Gizmodo
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Your Favorite Affordable Bluetooth Speaker Is Back Under $30, Complete with a 24 Hour Battery Anker SoundCore , $27 Anker’s SoundCore blew away the competition to take the title of your favorite affordable Bluetooth speaker, and today, you can pick one up for $27 with code UVQH8VHF. That’s a couple bucks more than it was on Prime Day, but otherwise one of the best prices we’ve seen. In addition to solid sound quality and impressive Bluetooth range, the standout feature here is the SoundCo
12d Gizmodo
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The Mask Is Still a Blast Image: Dark Horse Entertainment You remember the tag lines, even if you think you don’t. “Ooooooh, somebody stop me!” Or perhaps, “SSSSSSSSSMOKIN’!” Or even, “Hold on, Sugar! Daddy’s got a sweet tooth tonight!” Okay, maybe not that last one, but if you’ve got the time to rewatch The Mask, do it. It’s dated. It’s goofy. And boy, is it fun. I was barely an adolescent, when The Mask hit theaters in
12d Ingeniøren
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Ekspertgruppe leder efter årsag til vindmøllebrandEn ekspertgruppe har nu indledt jagten på årsagen til fredagens spektakulære brand i en MHI Vestas havmølleprototype på teststationen i Østerild. Ifølge selskabet kan man ikke sige, hvornår man har et resultat klar – og imens florerer spekulationerne i branchen.
12d Ars Technica
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The Voyagers have reached an anniversary worth celebrating Tangled Bank Studios Humans have launched some momentous missions of discovery into the universe. Yuri Gagarin reached orbit. The Apollo astronauts walked across the Moon. The Viking probes landed on Mars. But never before had a spacecraft visited four worlds in a single, grand tour as the two Voyager probes did in the 1970s and 1980s with Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. And the story behin
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Tesla raising cash in push to get Model 3 to massesTesla is raising $1.5 billion as it ramps up production of the Model 3 sedan, its first mass market electric car.
12d Ars Technica
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There’s a new Rick and Morty meme generator, and it’s both amazing and bleak Enlarge (credit: Masters of All Science) Rick and Morty has delivered quotable one-liners since its very first episode. With the show recently starting its third season , it's hard to keep track of the hilariously dark wisdom-drops that come out of each character's mouth. That's where a new online tool comes in: " Master of All Science " is a quote index that lets you search for any Rick and Mort
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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Google Is Embroiled in an Internal Diversity Row
12d Gizmodo
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When Will Humanity Finally Die Out? GIF Illustration: Angelica Alzona/Gizmodo Homo sapiens have been around for at least a hundred thousand years, and civilization for maybe a few thousand. These timescales are far longer than your minuscule lifespan, but given our 13 billion-year-old galaxy, they’re shorter than a cosmic heartbeat. And unlike galaxies that require a major wallop to tear apart, humans are fragile things susceptible
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Greater access to higher education could have reversed EU referendum resultGreater access to Higher Education could have reversed the result of the 2016 EU referendum, according to new research from the University of Leicester.
12d Ars Technica
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Post-Axanar, CBS unveils first official fan filmmaking initiative in Trek history James Cawley talks with Trekzone about a new Fan Film Academy blessed by CBS. After pushing a nearly year-and-a-half copyright battle with fan filmmakers toward a settlement earlier this year, CBS and Star Trek New Voyages Producer James Cawley announced the creation of a Star Trek Film Academy equipped to train interested creators and produce future fan films. “Learn the art of Star Trek filmmak
12d Futurity.org
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Personality affects how these smart spiders hunt Researchers have discovered that spiders’ personalities play a role in both their decision-making and hunting styles. Researchers conducted two studies using Portia labiate , a type of jumping spider. The biology and behavior of these spiders are well-studied, says Li Daiqin, an associate professor in the biological sciences department at the National University of Singapore. The Portia labiata s
12d Dagens Medicin

DF klar med plan for at nedlægge regionerneStaten skal styre sundhedsvæsenet, og hovedansvaret for, hvad der foregår, skal ligge hos sundhedsministeren. Det foreslår DF i nyt udspil til en sundhedsreform. Der mangler dokumentation, siger Danske Regioner.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Pro-vaccine messages can boost belief in MMR myths, study showsCurrent strategies for correcting misinformation about the dangers of vaccinations have the opposite effect and reinforce ill-founded beliefs, a study suggests.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Lifestyle-modification programs for weight management in Arab states lack in effectivenessThe aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of the lifestyle-modification programs for weight management delivered in Arabic-speaking countries.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Afforestation with non-native trees alters island soilsThe influence of non-native trees on soil chemistry considered.
12d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds
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First genetically engineered salmon sold in Canada US firm AquaBounty Technologies says that its transgenic fish has hit the market after a 25-year wait. Nature 548 148 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22116
12d Gizmodo
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Watch ATLAS the Robot Autonomously Fall Off a Stage GIF Gif source: YouTube / NeAr Gaming ATLAS is an incredible machine. There’s no way around that. First unveiled in 2013, the humanoid robot can now walk around autonomously , move boxes around , and implicitly threaten to destroy humanity . This level of sophistication is exactly why it’s so damn funny when ATLAS fucks up . Boston Dynamics, the company that builds this incredible robot, recently
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Nanocrystalline LEDs: Red, green, yellow, blue …The color of the light emitted by an LED can be tuned by altering the size of their semiconductor crystals. Researchers have now found a clever and economical way of doing just that, which lends itself to industrial-scale production.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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A new snake in Europe: The Barred Grass Snake is described as a separate speciesScientists identified a new species of snake in Europe. Based on more than 1,600 snakes, the researchers were able to show that the “Barred Grass Snake,” whose range includes Western Germany, France, Great Britain, Switzerland and Italy constitutes a distinct species. In their study the team examined two contact zones – in the Rhine region and in eastern Germany – where different genetic lineages
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Antiulcer drugs do not increase risk of Alzheimer’s diseaseThe use of proton pump inhibitors does not increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a recent study. Proton pump inhibitors are a type of antiulcer drug that is commonly used among older people.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Brain lays foundation for reason in childhoodStructural connections between frontal and parietal areas in children's brains can predict their ability to reason later in life, reports new research.
12d The Scientist RSS
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The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A PrimerResearchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes-and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.
12d Viden
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Grønlands grå og beskidte indlandsis smelter hurtigereHvis al isen smelter, stiger verdenshavene med op til 7,4 meter, og vi kan vinke farvel til bl.a. Bangladesh, New York og Sønderjylland.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Bacterial plasmids readily pick up new genes and spread them to new speciesNew research from the University of Sheffield has found that bacterial plasmids readily pick up new genes and spread them to new species – something which is an increasing concern for transfer of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Anti-inflammatory, anti-stress drugs taken before surgery may reduce metastatic recurrenceA new Tel Aviv University study finds that a specific drug regimen administered prior to and after surgery significantly reduces the risk of post-surgical cancer recurrence.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

MOF keeps humidity in the Goldilocks zoneDual-functioning MOF material autonomously ensures indoor humidity is just right.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Herbal medicine shows potential to treat cancerHerbal remedy plants native to Saudi Arabia are shown to have potential as treatments for cancer.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

$820 million wasted in failing to attempt Type 2 diabetes prevention effortsLifestyle intervention is the best approach in preventing Type 2 diabetes. However, most patients don't follow through in having a balanced diet and exercise. Prescribing metformin can save $820 million annually in healthcare costs and reduce the number of Type 2 diabetes patients by 20%.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Green living—encouraging investors to go retroMaking our homes greener and more energy efficient is crucial if Europe is to realise its environmental targets and ambitions. But securing financial fuel to retrofit existing properties is tough, with investors often wanting to inject their cash into projects that deliver relatively quick returns
12d The Atlantic
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John Oliver Skewers Trump’s Plan for a Border Patrol Hiring Blitz The comedian John Oliver lampooned President Donald Trump’s plan to spend $314 million to recruit, hire, and train 500 new Border Patrol agents and 1,000 new Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers in 2018. “These new personnel would improve the integrity of the immigration system by adding capacity” to stop people from entering the United States illegally, and to remove those who have alrea
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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'Origami organs' can potentially regenerate tissuesScientists and engineers have invented a range of bioactive 'tissue papers' made of materials derived from organs that are thin and flexible enough to even fold into an origami bird. The new biomaterials can potentially be used to support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Higher opioid use among cancer survivorsA new study found that opioid prescription use is more common in cancer survivors than in individuals without a history of cancer.
12d Gizmodo
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On Game of Thrones, Daenerys Unleashed Hell and It Was Glorious All images: HBO. Where to even begin? “The Spoils of Conquest” was the reason we watch Game of Thrones , one of those episodes that starts entertaining and ends with an epic spectacle it’s hard to believe you’re actually seeing. And all it took was Daenerys tossing clever men’s clever plans in the garbage, and then setting a record number of actors on fire . I suppose I should say this: The episo
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study highlights complex causes of Maldives floodingThe causes of coastal flooding in the Maldives are more complex than previously thought, according to a new study from the University of Southampton.
12d Futurity.org
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Site aims to correct how you view the Middle Ages The Middle Ages produced a staggering wealth of literary works in dozens of languages that spanned nearly 1,000 years. But no English translation has been available until now. The Global Medieval Sourcebook (GMS) is an online, interactive, and open source collection of medieval texts and their translations. It primarily features shorter pieces—and offers non-experts a gateway into the literature
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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'Origami organs' can potentially regenerate tissuesNorthwestern Medicine scientists and engineers have invented a range of bioactive 'tissue papers' made of materials derived from organs that are thin and flexible enough to even fold into an origami bird. The new biomaterials can potentially be used to support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists reveal role for lysosome transport in Alzheimer's disease progressionResearchers from Yale University School of Medicine have discovered that defects in the transport of lysosomes within neurons promote the buildup of protein aggregates in the brains of mice with Alzheimer's disease. The study, which will be published Aug. 7 in The Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that developing ways to restore lysosome transport could represent a new therapeutic approach to trea
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Inspecting matter using terahertz lightIn materials research, chemistry, biology, and medicine, chemical bonds, and especially their dynamic behavior, determine the properties of a system. These can be examined very closely using terahertz radiation and short pulses. KIT's FLUTE accelerator will be used for the development of new accelerator technologies for compact and powerful terahertz sources that are supposed to serve as efficient
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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UK plans to strengthen online 'right to be forgotten'Britain plans to strengthen the online "right to be forgotten" with a law making social media companies delete personal information on request.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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France, UK among 4 countries urged to check eggsThe European Union has notified food safety authorities in Britain, France, Sweden and Switzerland as a precautionary measure that some eggs contaminated with an insecticide might have entered their territory.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers identify transport mechanism for synaptic junction reinforcementLearning involves constant restructuring of nerve-cell connections. This requires specialized transport systems to ensure that these specific synapses can structurally and functionally be modified. One such delivery mechanism has now been characterized.
12d New on MIT Technology Review
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When Is a Hacker Not a Hacker?
12d Feed: All Latest
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Microsoft Chatbot Trolls Shoppers for Online SexProgram creates fake ads, send warning to those who respond: "You may be contacted by law enforcement."
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The barred grass snake is described as a separate speciesTogether with an international team, Senckenberg scientists identified a new species of snake in Europe. Based on more than 1,600 snakes, the researchers were able to show that the barred grass snake, whose range includes Western Germany, France, Great Britain, Switzerland and Italy constitutes a distinct species. In their study, published today in the journal Scientific Reports, the team examined
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New approach makes it easier to find novel drugsScientists have created a new way of screening compounds that is more sensitive than existing methods, opening up the possibility of finding new drugs for many diseases.
12d Scientific American Content: Global
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Uninhabited Island Reveals Scope of the World's Plastic ProblemHenderson Island is covered in nearly 18 metric tons of trash — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Massive multiple star system found by astronomersA group of astronomers led by Javier Lorenzo of the University of Alicante, Spain, has discovered that the binary star system HD 64315 is more complex than previously thought. The new study reveals that HD 64315 contains at least two binary systems composed of massive stars. The findings appeared online on Aug. 2 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Musk says maiden Falcon Heavy rocket to launch in November, acknowledges high riskBefore the year is out, the long awaited debut launch of the triple barreled Falcon Heavy rocket may at last be in sight says SpaceX CEO and founder Elon Musk, as he forthrightly acknowledges it comes with high risk and released a stunning launch and landing animation earlier today, Aug. 4.
12d Gizmodo
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More Details On a New Star Wars Planet In The Last Jedi The live action Aladdin movie has found its villain. Noomi Rapace’s clone thriller Seven Sisters gets a new name. Familiar faces are confirmed to return for Arrow and The X-Files . Plus, footage from Orphan Black ’s final episode. Spoilers now! Star Wars: The Last Jedi The inadvertent early display of an upcoming toy from the movie—depicting a Canto Bight “police speeder”—confirms that Canto Bigh
12d Gizmodo
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Four Incredible Eclipses History Never Forgot Illustration by Angelica Alzona/Gizmodo As everyone is undoubtedly aware by this point, on August 21st, folks across the country will be able to see a total solar eclipse—the first one visible coast-to-coast in nearly a century . The whole shebang will last about two minutes and 40 seconds at its longest , which is cool but kind of meh in the grand scope of solar eclipses throughout history. In 2
12d Ingeniøren
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Ekstremt vejr kan koste 152.000 europæere livet årligt i 2100Ny rapport forudser, at varmebølger bliver den værste klimarelaterede dræber i fremtiden.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Why your tuna could have 36 times more chemicals than othersResearchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego found levels of persistent organic pollutants as much as 36 times higher in the muscle tissue of yellowfin tuna caught in the more industrialized areas of the northeast Pacific Ocean and northeast Atlantic Ocean than in tuna caught in pristine waters of the West Pacific Ocean.
12d BBC News – Science & Environment
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Emojis help software spot emotion and sarcasmThe algorithm learned to recognise sarcasm, allowing it to spot hate speech faster than humans.
12d The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Molecular CoalitionCancer-fighting microRNAs joined together with folate prefer to enter folate receptor-expressing tumor cells over normal cells in mice.
12d The Scientist RSS
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Open Access On the Rise: StudyThe Scientist sat down with one of the authors of a recent analysis that quantifies the increasing incursion of open-access content into the world of scholarly publishing.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Metal cloud to protect fusion reactor wallsA thin vapour cloud in front of a liquid metal may be the solution to protecting the reactor walls of future fusion power plants to the extreme heat fluxes encountered. In Nature Communications, PhD candidate Stein van Eden and colleagues at DIFFER and Ghent University presents measurements of a vapour cloud catching and redistributing the energy from the incoming plasma in the reactor. The work i
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UM postdoc fellow takes advantage of cold snap to study natural selection in lizardsThe study found a cold snap caused significant increases in cold tolerance at the southern range of green anole lizards.
12d Futurity.org
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Working class voters ditched party loyalty in 2016 New research suggests that, on the cusp of the 2016 presidential election, many working class voters who once considered themselves staunch Democrats moved away from the party toward independent affiliation, opening the door for a nontraditional Republican candidate. The report documents a decades-long shift away from traditional party affiliation within the working class. “We found substantial c
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers find novel technique for tuning the color of LED light emissionThe color of the light emitted by an LED can be tuned by altering the size of their semiconductor crystals. LMU researchers have now found a clever and economical way of doing just that, which lends itself to industrial-scale production.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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"Monkey wrench" molecule jams tuberculosis proteinTuberculosis has now surpassed HIV worldwide as the leading cause of death due to infectious disease. The bacteria that causes this disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is quickly developing resistance to currently available antibiotics, increasing the urgency for discovery of new drugs.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Abandoned agricultural lands can play important role in restoring tropical rainforestsAbandoned oil palm plantations can regenerate forest canopy to levels often found in primary forest, providing a means to protect important wildlife habitats that are under threat from forest decline.
12d Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Microbot origami can capture, transport single cellsResearchers have developed a way to assemble and pre-program tiny structures made from microscopic cubes — 'microbot origami' — to change their shape when actuated by a magnetic field and then, using the magnetic energy from their environment, perform a variety of tasks — including capturing and transporting single cells.
12d Scientific American Content: Global
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Meet Neo, a Spectacular New Fossil of Homo nalediA remarkably complete skeleton and, at last, an age for mysterious Homo naledi — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Parents have more conflicts with their in-laws than do childless couplesIntergenerational relations include various forms of help and support, but also introduce tensions and conflicts. Although relations with in-laws are the subject of many anecdotes and proverbs across cultures, they remain little studied in contemporary societies. A new study investigates how being a parent is associated with conflicts between family generations. The research is part of the Generat
12d The Atlantic
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Advice for Eclipse Newbies Like most people in the United States, at least, I’ve never witnessed a total solar eclipse. I’m really looking forward to it , as are tens of thousands of other Americans who live in the eclipse’s promised “path of totality” or are planning to travel there. But aside from traffic and crowds, what should they expect? What do you bring to an eclipse? We asked readers and eclipse experts to share s
12d New Scientist – News
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Watching others wash their hands may relieve OCD symptomsSimply watching other people do compulsive actions can provide some relief to people who have obsessive compulsive disorder, which could lead to new treatments
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Poor households are locked out of green energy unless governments helpA report released this week by the Australian Council of Social Service has pointed out that many vulnerable households cannot access rooftop solar and efficient appliances, describing the issue as a serious problem.
12d Gizmodo
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President Trump Is Tweeting Like a Spoiled Brat Again (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) Remember last week when President Trump’s tweets started to look semi-normal, emphasizing what he saw as the positive things that had happened on his watch ? We regret to inform you that the president is back on his bullshit. In hindsight, it seems foolish that we thought it would go any other way. President Trump has never been able to maintain a modicum of decency fo
12d Feed: All Latest
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Taking the Perfect Instagram Photo Has Never Been Easier, Thanks to Google's New AlgorithmSnap a photo and the neural network can identify exactly how to make it look better in under 20 milliseconds.
12d Futurity.org
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Way more rush hour pollution gets into cars than we thought Researchers measuring the exposure to pollution inside cars during rush hour commutes have found that the levels of some harmful particulate matter are twice as high as previously believed. Most traffic pollution sensors are placed on the ground alongside the road and take continuous samples for a 24-hour period. Exhaust composition, however, changes rapidly enough for drivers to experience diffe
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Synthetic Genomics unveils digital-to-biological converter using digital DNA to print biologicsA team of researchers at Synthetic Genomics (SG) has unveiled a machine they call a digital-to-biological converter—it sends digitized information describing DNA, RNA or a protein to a device that prints out synthesized versions of the original material. The team has published a paper describing their creation in the journal Nature Biotechnology.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Reengineering elevators could transform 21st-century citiesIn the 160 or so years since the first skyscrapers were built, technological innovations of many kinds have allowed us to build them to reach astonishing heights. Today there is a 1,000-meter (167-story) building under construction in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Even taller buildings are possible with today's structural technology.
12d Scientific American Content: Global
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New Nanowire Is World's Worst Electrical ConductorBut being bad is good for tiny circuits that start and stop current — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Towards environmentally friendly production of active pharmaceutical ingredients with a flow reactorMostly, the chemical industry still follows very extensive procedures when producing active pharmaceutical ingredients and other complex substances. Often, each intermediate has to be produced in a separate fashion within large reactor vessels. Chemists at Bielefeld University are working on an alternative together with international project partners: the flow method. This combines the production
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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MOF keeps humidity in the Goldilocks zoneA novel porous material can soak up excessive humidity in a room only to release it again when the humidity falls. Now KAUST researchers have devised a metal-organic framework (MOF) material that monitors its own properties.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Heat waves threaten city dwellers, especially minorities and the poorLast week's record-setting heat in the Pacific Northwest and current triple-digit temperatures in Arizona are the latest reminders that climate change is heating up the Earth. This trend is a serious threat to cities, which are warming at higher rates than other parts of the planet.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New Horizons' next target just got a lot more interestingCould the next flyby target for NASA's New Horizons spacecraft actually be two targets?
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Don't listen to the rich—inequality is bad for everyoneA world where a few people have most of the wealth motivates others who are poor to strive to earn more. And when they do, they'll invest in businesses and other areas of the economy. That's the argument for inequality. But it's wrong.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Living blanket, water diviner, wild pet: a cultural history of the dingoIn traditional Aboriginal society, women travelled with canine companions draped around their waists like garments of clothing. Dingoes played an important role in the protection and mobility of the women and children, and are believed to have greatly extended women's contribution to the traditional economy and food supply.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Greater access to higher education could have reversed EU referendum resultUniversity of Leicester research suggests that greater access to higher education can influence political outcomes.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Spectacular images thanks to an efficient algorithmFilming of spectacular action scenes is expensive and the creative possibilities are often limited. An ETH doctoral student has developed an algorithm that allows drones to implement the desired picture compositions independently.
12d The Atlantic
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The 'Trump Effect' on Canada's Classrooms Standing at the front of her classroom this past February, the public high-school English teacher Jana Rohrer wrote the words “American Flag” on the board and asked her ninth-grade students to tell her what came to their minds. Over the past six years Rohrer has used the exercise as part of a lesson to help explain symbolism in Harper Lee’s classic To Kill a Mockingbird . And over the past six ye
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers describe protein previously unknown in biologyUniversity of Georgia researchers have discovered a new way that iron is stored in microorganisms, a finding that provides new insights into the fundamental nature of how biological systems work. The research was recently published in the journal Nature Communications.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Opinion: The use of sonic 'anti-loitering' devices is breaching teenagers' human rightsHow would you feel if your right to freedom of movement was infringed because other people your age were involved in criminal activity? You would be outraged, and rightly so. Yet this is the reality facing teenagers and young people as Scottish railway network ScotRail introduces the Mosquito anti-loitering device at two of their stations.
12d New Scientist – News
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First implants derived from stem cells to ‘cure’ type 1 diabetesTwo people have been given implants of cells derived from embryonic stem cells that may be able to release insulin when needed to manage blood sugar levels
12d Latest Headlines | Science News
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Sacrificed dog remains feed tales of Bronze Age ‘wolf-men’ warriorsCanine remnants of a possible Bronze Age ceremony inspire debate.
12d Feed: All Latest
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Google's Health Spinoff Verily Joins the Fight Against PTSDThe Aurora project will follow 5,000 people to see if they develop the disorder after trauma, and why—using big data
12d Feed: All Latest
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From French Montana to Katy Perry, the Meme-First Reality of Today's Music Promotion GameFrench Montana's latest single is just the latest in a long line of songs that rode an Instagram dance challenge to the top.
12d Feed: All Latest
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Veritas Genetics Scoops Up an AI Company to Sort Out Its *DNA*Sorting all the world's genetic data is a perfect task for AI—and personal genetics companies are catching on.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Getting birds to look where they're goingJohn Swaddle believes he can save a lot of birds just by getting them to look up.
12d Scientific American Content: Global
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New Hope for Children Who Nearly DrownThough the brain damage can be severe, a recent study shows that areas involved in language, emotion and memory are evidently spared — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12d Live Science
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Is Brain Damage an Inevitable Result of Playing Football?A recent study that showed that 110 of 111 brains of deceased NFL players had a serious brain disease raised concerns once again about concussions. But there's a lot we still need to know.
12d Live Science
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Desert Fossils Reveal 540-Million-Year-Old Jellyfish 'Graveyard'On a long-gone seashore in what is now Death Valley, ancient, sticky sand retained impressions of the oldest known example of a jellyfish stranding.
12d Live Science
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Friends with an Ex? Check Your Motives First, Science SaysStaying friends with an ex is a "very pervasive phenomenon," says one psychologist. But these friendships aren't always successful.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA develops solar eclipse Braille bookOn Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be in the path of a solar eclipse, which occurs when the sunlight reaching Earth is blocked by the moon.
12d Scientific American Content: Global
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Drug-Carrying "Nanoswimmers" Could Slither Past the Brain's Cellular DefensesA transport vehicle the size of a virus may ferry chemotherapies and other molecular cargo through the imposing blood–brain barrier — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Image: NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory watches a sunspotOn July 5, 2017, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory watched an active region—an area of intense and complex magnetic fields—rotate into view on the Sun. The satellite continued to track the region as it grew and eventually rotated across the Sun and out of view on July 17.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists closer to explaining why matter persists over antimatterNew results show a difference in the way neutrinos and antineutrinos behave, which could help explain why there is so much matter in the universe.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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4-D camera could improve robot vision, virtual reality and self-driving carsEngineers at Stanford University and the University of California San Diego have developed a camera that generates four-dimensional images and can capture 138 degrees of information. The new camera—the first-ever single-lens, wide field of view, light field camera—could generate information-rich images and video frames that will enable robots to better navigate the world and understand certain asp
12d Dagens Medicin

Ny mand i spidsen for Nyt OUH 15. august tiltræder Torben Hedegaard Jensen som ny direktør på OUH Odense Universitetshospital – Svendborg Sygehus. Han afløser Peter Fosgrau.
12d Dagens Medicin

Skadestuerne med den korteste ventetid og højeste humør Hundredevis af læger landet over har assisteret på sommerens festivaler. Vi har besøgt nogle af dem.
12d Dagens Medicin
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Klinisk biokemi – et ligegyldigt speciale?Klinisk biokemi er blevet undervurderet i forbindelse med Sundhedsplatformen, og problemerne har hobet sig op. Læren er, at også mindre synlige specialer skal inddrages fra begyndelsen, ellers kan det gå helt galt.
12d Dagens Medicin

Mickael Bech er ny direktør for Vive Regeringen har udpeget Mickael Bech fra Kora som direktør for det nye forsknings- og analysecenter Vive, der er blevet skabt ved sammenlægningen af Kora og SFI.
12d Dagens Medicin

To nye vicedirektører til Amager og Hvidovre Hospital Tidligere hospitalsdirektør for Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital og centerdirektør fra Rigshospitalet er begge begyndt som vicedirektører på Amager og Hvidovre Hospital.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Bioengineers developing better models of the bone, muscles and nervesAt this moment, computer-generated skeletons are competing in a virtual race, running, hopping and jumping as far as they can before collapsing in an electronic heap. Meanwhile, in the real world, their coaches – teams of machine learning and artificial intelligence enthusiasts – are competing to see who can best train their skeletons to mimic those complex human movements. Perhaps the coaches are
12d New Scientist – News
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Internet giants need to be reined in for the public goodSelf-regulation doesn't work for information monopolies like Facebook. Should we treat them as if they were utility companies to protect ourselves?
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Location of WWII internment camp linked to long-term economic inequalityJapan's attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 drew the United States into World War II and spawned a massive wave of shock and fear across the country. It also prompted the U.S. government to round up and send more than 100,000 Japanese-Americans to internment camps.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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An artificial eclipse for imaging extrasolar planetsIn our hunt for Earth-like planets and extraterrestrial life, we've found thousands of exoplanets orbiting stars other than our sun. The caveat is that most of these planets have been detected using indirect methods. Similar to how a person can't look at anything too close to the sun, current telescopes can't observe potential Earth-like planets because they are too close to the stars they orbit,
12d Ars Technica
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FTC must scrutinize Hotspot Shield over alleged traffic interception, group says Enlarge (credit: Carlos Riquelme ) A privacy advocacy group has filed a formal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, alleging that Hotspot Shield , a popular free VPN service, collects numerous pieces of data and intercepts traffic in contrast to the company's claim that it provides "complete anonymity." In its 14-page filing , which was submitted Monday morning, the Center for Democracy a
12d Ingeniøren
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Techtopia #12: Mød IBM’s gale videnskabsmandPodcast: John Cohn er chef for Internet of Things i IBM’s nye globale hovedkvarter, der ligger i München, fordi byen er centrum for Industri 4.0. Han er stolt af at være nørd med stort N, og han beskriver centret som et hus bygget op omkring de to hurtigste elevatorer i Europa.
12d NYT > Science
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For Parents of Children Like Charlie Gard, Learning to ‘Redefine Hope’The death of a British baby evoked painful memories in other parents of incurably ill children.
12d NYT > Science
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Weaning Itself From Elephant Ivory, China Turns to MammothsPromoters of ivory from the extinct animals say it’s an ethical alternative. Others fear it may give cover to the black-market elephant ivory trade.
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Graphene electronic tattoos can be applied to the skin with waterResearchers have designed a graphene-based tattoo that can be directly laminated onto the skin with water, similar to a temporary tattoo. But instead of featuring artistic or colorful designs, the new tattoo is nearly transparent. Its main attraction is that graphene's unique electronic properties enable the tattoo to function as a wearable electronic device, with potential applications including
12d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Magnetic fields in massive star formation coresStudies of molecular clouds have revealed that star formation usually occurs in a two-step process. First, supersonic flows compress the clouds into dense filaments light-years long, after which gravity collapses the densest material in the filament into cores. In this scenario, massive cores (each more than about 20 solar masses) preferentially form at intersections where filaments cross, produci
12d Ingeniøren
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Kritiske fejl fundet i mange strålingsmålereSoftwaren, der bruges til at måle stråling omkring os, er fyldt med sikkerhedshuller, der tillader it-kriminelle at overtage enheden eller at give målerne forkert data.
12d Ingeniøren

Disney sagsøges for at høste børns oplysninger uden om forældrene Disney har indhentet personlige oplysninger om de børn, som bruger deres app. Dette er ifølge et nyt søgsmål sket helt uden forældrenes viden. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/disney-sagsoeges-at-hoeste-boerns-oplysninger-udenom-foraeldrene-1078881 Version2
12d Ingeniøren
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England vil stramme it-sikkerhed i netopkoblede biler På nuværende tidspunkt er det for nemt at tilgå information, stjæle eller overtage kontrollen i internetopkoblede biler. Derfor er der nye retningslinjer for producenter af internetopkoblede biler på vej fra den engelske regering. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/england-vil-stramme-it-sikkerhed-netopkoblede-biler-1078883 Emner Intelligent trafikstyring Version2
12d Ingeniøren
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Solceller giver tysk elbil 30 gratis kilometer pr. dagSolcellerne på den nye bil Sion fra tyske Sono Motors er så effektive, at de ifølge producenten kan give op til 30 km ekstra i batteriet pr. dag.
12d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New approach makes it easier to find novel drugsScientists have created a new way of screening compounds that is more sensitive than existing methods, opening up the possibility of finding new drugs for many diseases.
12d Science : NPR
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Issues Threatening Seabirds Could Extend To The Lobster Industry Researchers off the coast of New Hampshire are spending the summer studying baby seabirds called terns. They say the chicks are in trouble and it's an indication local lobstermen could be too.
12d Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Rodforskning åbner op for nye muligheder i landbrugetOmfattende rodforskning – et hidtil overset område – sætter fokus på, hvordan planterne…
12d Science : NPR
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Flattening The 'Mummy Tummy' With 1 Exercise, 10 Minutes A Day The technical term is diastasis recti and it affects many new moms. The growing fetus pushes apart the abdominal muscles and the separation often stays open. But science suggests this fix can work. (Image credit: Talia Herman for NPR)
12d Ingeniøren
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Rumleriller på vejen giver op til 60 procent færre ulykkerNorsk vejvæsen reducerer både ulykker og udgifter med riller, der vækker chaufføren.
12d

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Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

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