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Nyheder2017januar21

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Popular Science
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Tech can make your conversations with kids way more effectiveTechnology Research points to the importance of early language exposure for brain development, andnew tools can help parents improve their children’s future language skills.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New genetic engineering technique could help design, study biological systemsA new technique will help biologists tinker with genes, whether the goal is to turn cells into tiny factories churning out medicines, modify crops to grow with limited water or study the effects of a gene on human health. Thetechnique allows scientists to precisely regulate how much protein is produced from a particular gene. The process is simple yet innovative and, so far, works in everything f

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Study of round worm that returns to life after freezingThe first molecular study of an organism able to survive intracellular freezing (freezing within its cells) is published in a new paper that represents a milestone in scientists’ understanding of an extraordinary adaptation.

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Ingeniøren
Raket-Madsen om menneskecentrifuge: Et skridt nærmere opsendelse af menneskerMed en raketmotor i ryggen og fæstnet til en roterende bom skal Peter Madsen snart udsættes for en kraftpåvirkning på 4 g.
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Ingeniøren
Hør Peter Madsen fortælle om sin raketcentrifugeRaketbyggeren Peter Madsen er i gang med at bygge en raketmotordrevet centrifuge, som han til marts vil sætte sig op i for at teste, hvordan g-påvirkninger føles på hans egen krop.

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WIRED48
Why Women (and Men) Are Marching Today, According to Twitter Data An analysis of tweets based on 40 march-related keywords and hashtags reveals the topics marchers are prioritizing.

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WIRED33
11 Outrageously Fancy Cars You Can Buy This Weekend Fire up your private jet and hustle down to Arizona.

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WIRED35
Space Photos of the Week: A Pulsar Spins Right Round, Baby, Right Round Space photos of the week, January 15—21, 2017.

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WIRED41
Security News This Week: Unmasking the Master of That Web-Crippling Botnet Each weekend we round up the news stories that we didn't break or cover in depth but that still deserve your attention.
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WIRED45
How Use Social Media at a Protest Without Big Brother Snooping Your Facebook and Twitter posts could be fueling government surveillance. That doesn't mean you should stop sharing, just try to be smart

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Ingeniøren
Derfor er brændeovnene i skudlinjenMens fagfolk samler flere og flere facts omkring brændeovnes udledning af fine partikler, er politikerne så småt begyndt at forholde sig til problemet.

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Viden12
Stem på hvor Jupiter-sonde skal pege kameraet henHvad skal NASAs Juno-sonde tage billeder af ved næste passage af Jupiter? Det kan du være med til at bestemme.

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BBC News – Science & Environment100+
Roger Harrabin: World v Trump on climate deal?As the new president settles in, much of the world reaffirms its commitment to the Paris agreement.

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Ingeniøren
Ny metode sparer tid og armering i betonbygningerLynhurtige computere har gjort det muligt at gøre brug af beregningsmetode, der kan halvere armeringsforbruget i betonbyggeri og speede projekteringen op.

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WIRED500+
Twitter Insists It Isn’t Making Everyone Follow @POTUS CEO Jack Dorsey says it's a technical glitch and they're working on it. Really.

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Blog » Languages » English7
Eyewire Release Report 1/20/2017 As detailed here , every few Fridays we’re sharing which bug fixes and tiny features our developers have released into the wild. Apart from bigger changes that have received their own posts, here are the releases on Eyewire since the last report. A fix for a bug that was causing players to receive abnormally (incorrectly) low points on all their cubes. A fix for a bug that had caused Explore Mode

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WIRED500+
Trump Names Former Climate Scientist Erik Noble to NASA Advisory Role Is this good news or bad? Unclear.

Scientific American Content: Global
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Women's March on Washington Protestors Say Science Is a Driving ForceMarchers worry that the president's rhetoric and nominee choices threaten research, the scientific method and reproductive rights

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Scientific American Content: Global
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2 Bipartisan Paths Forward on Energy and Climate PolicyDespite the rancor of the U.S. presidential election and transition, supporting nuclear power and streamlining transmission line and pipeline construction could provide a bipartisan path forward on…

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Scientific American Content: Global
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Pesticide Additive Could Be One Culprit in Bee DeathsA common pesticide additive, known as an 'inert' ingredient, could be one of the causes of the die-offs beekeepers have observed in their hives. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Ingeniøren

Analyse: Nu skal metroen stoppe sit italienske mareridtEt slagsmål med entreprenøren Salini truer med at forsinke og fordyre metrocityringen, som for alt i verden skal undgå en åben krig.

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Viden
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Myrer navigerer ved hjælp af solen og visuelle minderInsekterne kan holde deres kurs mod myretuen uanset, hvilken vej deres hoved vender. Nu ved forskerne, hvordan myrerne gør. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL

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Scientific American Content: Global
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Are Probiotic Foods a Waste of Time?Are you stocking the pond but starving the fish? When it comes to a healthy gut, prebiotics may be way more important than probiotics. —

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Seoul virus outbreak associated with home-based rat-breeding facilitiesExperts from CDC are working with the Illinois Department of Health and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services to investigate cases of Seoul virus infections among eight people who worked at several rat-breeding facilities in the two states. Seoul virus is not commonly found in the United States, though there have been several reported outbreaks in wild rats. This is the first known outbreak

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritisUsing a novel approach for imaging the movement of immune cells in living animals, researchers have identified what appear to be the initial steps leading to joint inflammation in a model of inflammatory arthritis.

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Researchers unlock mechanism of drug resistance in aggressive breast cancerScientists report findings of how triple negative breast cancer cells are able to bypass treatment with trametinib, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug that belongs to a class of commonly used anti-cancer drugs called kinase inhibitors. The researchers also reported findings from laboratory models of breast cancer testing a potential treatment approach that could prevent the onset of

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New 'smart needle' to make brain surgery saferA new high-tech medical device to make brain surgery safer has now been developed.

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WIRED
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BrainDead Is the Perfect Show to Watch This Inauguration Weekend CBS's screwball comedy just feels right.

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Number of women who take maternity leave has stalledThe number of U.S. women taking maternity leave has not changed in 22 years despite factors that suggest it should be increasing, a new study found. During the same time, the number of fathers taking paternity leave more than tripled.

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Pancreatic tumors rely on signals from surrounding cellsScientists have found that targeting the interaction between a pancreatic tumor and its microenvironment could weaken cancer.

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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System links data scattered across files, for easy queryingSystem finds and links related data scattered across digital files, for easy querying and filtering.

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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Project aims to grow a 'city of trees'A project aims to plant three million trees – one for every man, woman and child – in Greater Manchester over the next 25 years.

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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Think binge drinking is safer for your liver than regular heavy drinking? Think againAlcoholic liver disease (ALD) occurs on a spectrum of severity. The majority of people who drink excessively develop a fatty liver, which though often symptom free, can progress to a state of inflammation, fibrosis, and cell death that can be fatal. Little is known about liver disruption that may occur in problem drinkers who are not alcohol dependent. To help understand the development of ALD, th

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Scientific American Content: Global
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Coping with the Winter Blues

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