Search Posts

Nyheder2017oktober31

The Atlantic
400+
Donald Trump Is Incredibly Lucky to Have This Economy Donald Trump’s administration is besieged by investigations, his executive orders are stymied by the courts, and his legislation is blocked up in Congress. But as the political news cycle oscillates between chaos and calamity, the financial news cycle is so relentlessly positive it makes this afflicted presidency seem downright charmed. Just about anywhere you look, economic indicators are bright
19h The Atlantic
1K
Senator to Donald Trump: Americans Deserve to Know the Costs of a North Korea Conflict This morning, Tammy Duckworth, a Democratic senator from Illinois, wrote Donald Trump to demand an accounting of what the president and his advisers mean when they talk, with growing urgency these days, of “military options” against North Korea and its nuclear-weapons program. “We must never allow the consequences of war to be hidden from Americans,” she asserts in a letter obtained exclusively b
19h The Atlantic
2K
The Atlantic Made $0.004 From Russian Ads Ahead of this week’s Senate Intelligence Committee hearings, Facebook informed The Atlantic that we, like them, profited from Russian electoral mischief. Of the 3,000 advertisements that Facebook has so far attached to the Kremlin, seven of them were farmed out to multiple independent publishers. And of those, four ads ran on TheAtlantic.com. “Facebook informed us today that The Atlantic was one
19h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Babies can use context to look for thingsIn a new study, infants as young as 6 months old demonstrated that they can rapidly integrate learning, memory and attention to improve their search for faces in a simple scene.
20h New on MIT Technology Review
2K
Google Researchers Have a New Alternative to Traditional Neural Networks
20h The Atlantic
500+
I Used to Run the Immigration Service—and Trump’s Refugee Policy Is Baseless When President Trump signed the first travel ban in January, he inched closer toward fulfilling his campaign pledge to institute “extreme vetting” of refugees seeking to enter the United States. Last month, he delivered on that promise, announcing new security procedures that will make it much harder for refugees from selected countries to be admitted to the country. The travel ban provided the g
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Zebra 'poo science' improves conservation effortsHow can Zebra poo tell us what an animal's response to climate change and habitat destruction will be? That is what scientists from The University of Manchester and Chester Zoo have been investigating in South Africa. Together the team have been using 'poo science' to understand how challenges or 'stressors', such as the destruction and breakup of habitats, impact on populations of South Africa's
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gold nanoantennas help in creation of more powerful nanoelectronicsIn the tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy study physicists from Tomsk Polytechnic University first showed the built-in strain that arises when 2-D materials interact with other nanostructures and might improve properties of advanced nanoelectronics.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Treatment for dogs alleviates fear of noisy fireworksWith Bonfire Night approaching, many dogs suffer anxiety and fear from the loud bangs and explosions of firework displays. A study published by Veterinary Record shows how a medicinal treatment can help alleviate common fear behaviours, such as trembling and whining.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Brain tumour's 'addiction' to common amino acid could be its weaknessStarving a childhood brain tumour of the amino acid glutamine could improve the effect of chemotherapy, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and funded by Children with Cancer UK and the Medical Research Council.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News
15
Riding the bike to work is just as effective as leisure time exerciseA new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen shows that inactive, overweight people can lose fat mass just as effectively by riding the bike to work than by exercising in their leisure time. It is a time-effective solution if you want to be physically active, but lead a busy everyday life, the researchers say.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Topical gel made from oral blood pressure drugs shown effective in healing chronic woundsAn international team of researchers led by Johns Hopkins has shown that a topical gel made from a class of common blood pressure pills that block inflammation pathways speeds the healing of chronic skin wounds in mice and pigs.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

It is time for a concerted European approach to defeat cancerESMO President, Fortunato Ciardiello, has contributed an editorial on the priorities for future cancer research, to The Lancet Oncology with Josep Tabernero, ESMO President-Elect as co-author. The review refers to the publication on Future Cancer Research Priorities in the USA and to the American Cancer Moonshot Task Force, and highlights the urgent need for a similar integrated approach within th
20h Ars Technica
100+
What it’s like to live in Phoenix? “Waymo units all over the damn place” Enlarge For most Americans, a self-driving car is a rare sight. Things are different in the Phoenix area. "I live in Chandler. You see Waymo units all over the damn place," one Redditor wrote . Waymo, Alphabet's self-driving car company, is running trials of a self-driving taxi service in the Phoenix suburb. Cars from Uber are also ubiquitous in the region, residents told Ars, and other companies
20h Futurity.org
5
Gas ‘monster’ challenges how planets form A newly-discovered gas giant is the largest planet ever discovered when compared to the size of its companion star. The existence of NGTS-1b, located about 600 light years away from Earth, challenges theories of planet formation which hold that a planet of this size—about the same as Jupiter— couldn’t be formed by a small star only half the size of the sun. According to these theories, small star
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
82
Early humans and dawn of human information sharingResearchers are challenging a widely accepted notion, first advanced by paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey, that a 2-million-year-old rock represents the dawn of human ancestors sharing information with each other.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Revolutionizing nuclear waste reprocessing and saving moneySeeking a better way to capture radioactive iodides in spent nuclear reactor fuel, scientists have developed an extremely efficient 'molecular trap' that can be recycled and reused.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Plastic nanoparticles inspired by nature could improve cancer drug deliveryScientists have developed a way to control the shape of polymer molecules so they self-assemble into non-spherical nanoparticles — an advance that could improve the delivery of toxic drugs to tumors. Very little in nature is perfectly spherical, but it has proved very difficult for scientists to synthesize particles that are not round until now.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
75
How songbirds learn a new songAs scientists have now shown, songbirds are minimalists when it comes to learning a new song. The birds' learning strategy resembles the methods used by computer scientists for document comparison.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Ensuring the survival of elephants in Laos: A matter of economicsAsian elephant populations in Laos, which are under a process of commodification, have dropped by half in the last 30 years. According to researchers, the dynamics of elephant populations depend heavily on the socioeconomic practices of the country and elephant owners. The setting-up of a 'maternity leave' system to compensate owners for their losses of income during breeding period would contribu
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Could the Neolithic Revolution offer evidence of best ways to adapt to climate change?The behavior of the human population during the last intense period of global warming might offer an insight into how best to adapt to the current challenges posed by climate change, a study suggests.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Solving of a decade long mystery could help in fight against TBResearch has identified two key proteins that allow mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), to 'lay low' within cells designed to destroy them. It is hoped this discovery will aid in the designing of new antibiotics that could help target mycobacteria, particularly during their latent phase.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Your bones affect your appetite — and your metabolism!A new discovery sheds light on osteocalcin, a hormone produced by our bones that affects how we metabolize sugar and fat.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
US at 'lowest point we can remember,' survey findsNearly two-thirds of Americans (63 percent) say the future of the nation is a very or somewhat significant source of stress, slightly more than perennial stressors like money (62 percent) and work (61 percent), according to a new report by the American Psychological Association.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Newest dark matter map hints at where astrophysics must go for breakthroughsThree astrophysicists — Scott Dodelson, Risa Wechsler and George Efstathiou — recently participated in a roundtable discussion, hosted by The Kavli Foundation, about new data from the Dark Energy Survey and its implications for understanding the universe's history.
20h Futurity.org
4
At 6 months, babies use context to spot faces quickly At just six months old, babies can already learn, remember, and use contextual cues in a scene to help them find faces and other objects of visual interest, a new study suggests. “It was pretty surprising to find that six-month-olds were capable of this memory-guided attention,” says lead author Kristen Tummeltshammer, a postdoctoral scholar at Brown University. “We didn’t expect them to be so su
20h Futurity.org
7
Scientists need help: Capture mosquito buzz on your phone Researchers are looking for citizen scientists to contribute to Abuzz , a monitoring platform designed to produce the most detailed global map of mosquito distribution. Almost anyone from around the world can take part in the work—all you need is a cellphone to record and submit the buzz of a mosquito. More than mere pests, mosquitoes can carry deadly diseases, including malaria, yellow fever, de
20h Popular Science
35
How to switch phones without losing anything DIY Ditch your old device but keep your data. When you're ready to upgrade your phone to a new model, you'll need to do a little housekeeping to make sure all your personal information goes with you.
20h Gizmodo
12
The Root Disgusting University of Hartford Freshman who Rubbed Used Tampons on Black Roommate’s Bag, The Root Disgusting University of Hartford Freshman who Rubbed Used Tampons on Black Roommate’s Bag, Contaminated Her Living Space, Arrested | Jezebel Justin Bieber Reportedly Thrilled That Selena Gomez Is Single Cause He Wants to Be Her Boyfriend Again | Deadspin Get Ready For A Night Of Weird Bullpens | Splinter Trump Immediately Begins Trying to Exploit New York Terror Attack for Political Gai
20h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
22
Feral animals pose major threat to Outback, climate change study findsA study of changing rainfall and bushfire patterns over 22 years has found – in addition to a likely decrease in cover of the dominant plant spinifex – feral animals pose a major threat to seed-eating rodents.
20h Feed: All Latest
300+
'Wolfenstein II' Review: Elevating Nazi-Killing to High ArtThe second game in the Nazi-shooting revival series is as angry as it is campy—which is both its greatest strength and its greatest weakness.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Feral animals pose major threat to Outback, climate change study findsA study of changing rainfall and wildfire patterns over 22 years in Australia's Simpson Desert has found – in addition to a likely climate-induced decrease in cover of the dominant plant spinifex – introduced cats and foxes pose a major threat to seed-eating rodents. The paper, "Desert mammal populations are limited by introduced predators rather than future climate change", was set to be availabl
20h Ingeniøren
39
Vejdirektoratet overtager statens byggerier efter byggeskandaleDirektøren for Bygningsstyrelsen er blevet fyret, og Vejdirektoratet udpeget til at overtage styringen af de statslige anlægsprojekter efter omkostningerne for Niels Bohr Bygningen eksploderede.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
The fingerprints of coastal carbon sinksA new study highlights a technique that could be used to accurately measure levels of soil carbon in coastal carbon sinks, such as mangrove forests.
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
SourceData is making data discoverableSourceData from EMBO is an award-winning open platform that allows researchers and publishers to share figures and their underlying data in a machine-readable, searchable format, making research papers discoverable based on their data content. SourceData offers a novel method to describe research data and a suite of tools to generate, validate and use this information, providing scientists with an
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Empowered employees are more proactive … even when they don't trust their leaderNew research confirms that employees with empowering leaders are more proactive — and, for the first time, shows that this effect occurs by increasing employee confidence to undertake tasks beyond the job description. The researchers elaborate a model that explains why, and when, empowering leadership can promote proactivity in the workplace, and provide suggestions for managers and organizations
20h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
90
Long-term use of drugs to curb acid reflux linked to doubling in stomach cancer riskThe long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), a class of drugs commonly used to treat acid reflux, is linked to a more than doubling in the risk of developing stomach cancer, finds research.
20h Scientific American Content: Global
400+
Revisiting "Gattaca" in the Era of TrumpWhat would it mean to embrace new gene-editing technologies such as CRISPR–Cas9 at the very moment white supremacy is, once again, on the rise? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h Gizmodo
19
Amazon's Running One of the Best Dyson Discounts We've Ever Seen, Today Only Refurb Dyson Ball , $150 Dyson vacuums dominated the nominations in our Kinja Co-Op for best vacuum, but they can be prohibitively expensive. Today though, refurbs of the popular Dyson Ball are down to $150 on Amazon , the best price we’ve seen by $50! The Dyson Ball includes a brush that automatically adjusts when you move from carpets to hard floors, a long extension hose, and yes, it rests on
20h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
The fingerprints of coastal carbon sinksDid you know carbon comes in blue? Blue carbon refers to the carbon in oceans and coastal areas. These ecosystems are excellent carbon sinks – they can efficiently absorb and store carbon from the atmosphere.
20h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
SourceData is making data discoverableSourceData from EMBO is an award-winning open platform that allows researchers and publishers to share figures and their underlying data in a machine-readable, searchable format, making research papers discoverable based on their data content. As highlighted in today's paper in Nature Methods, SourceData offers a novel method to describe research data and a suite of tools to generate, validate and
20h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
New SOFT e-textiles could offer advanced protection for soldiers and emergency personnelNew technology that harnesses electronic signals in a smart fabric could lead to advanced hazardous-material gear that protects against toxic chemicals, according to research from Dartmouth College.
20h The Scientist RSS
7
Opinion: How to Define Cell TypeAdvances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Physicists: The wave properties of particles can manifest in collisionsPhysicists has shown that it is possible to observe the wave properties of massive particles at room temperature, in practically any modern physics laboratory, because it is only necessary to focus the beam of particles well.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News
10
Dissecting effects of 1960s anti-poverty programs on present USStanford postdoctoral scholar Claire Dunning traces the history and effects of New Careers, a 1960s federal anti-poverty program. While it helped expand the nonprofit sector, it also perpetuated inequality in urban areas.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News
24
Strength exercise as vital as aerobic new research findsPush ups and sit ups could add years to your life according to a new study of over 80,000 adults led by the University of Sydney.
20h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Diagnostic revolution targets tuberculosis, other deadly diseasesIn a series of new studies, Tony Hu, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, describes the development of several new methods for TB diagnosis that improve the speed, accuracy, and cost of TB detection. They should also dramatically improve TB treatment.
20h Futurity.org
18
Tofu byproduct gets better flavor and fiber Food scientists have given a soybean byproduct called okara a nutritional and flavor makeover with enzymes and beneficial microbes. Okara is the soybean residue leftover after the production of soymilk and tofu. Singapore alone produces about 10,000 tonnes of okara annually. Okara spoils easily, has an unpleasant smell, and is not palatable, so most soy food producers usually dispose of it. With
20h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1K
Physicists make rapid progress in bounding the speed of gravity(Phys.org)—Recent gravitational wave detections have allowed physicists to confirm with greater and greater precision what Einstein predicted over 100 years ago in the theory of general relativity: that gravity does not act instantaneously as Newton thought, but instead propagates at the speed of light.
21h BBC News – Science & Environment
100+
Stranded elephant rescued from well in Sri LankaWildlife officials rushed to help when the elephant was found trapped.
21h Ingeniøren
68
Nordmænd bygger restaurant under vandet40 norske firmaer har været inde over projekt med at bygge verdens største undersøiske restaurant. Her er fem af deres største udfordringer indtil videre.
21h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Aliens may be more like us than we thinkFor the first time, researchers show how evolutionary theory can be used to support alien predictions and better understand their behavior. They show that aliens are potentially shaped by the same processes and mechanisms that shaped humans, such as natural selection. The theory supports the argument that foreign life forms undergo natural selection, and are like us, evolving to be fitter and stro
21h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
New blood test developed to diagnose ovarian cancerInvestigators are leveraging the power of artificial intelligence to develop a new technique to detect ovarian cancer early and accurately. The team has identified a network of circulating microRNAs — small, non-coding pieces of genetic material — that are associated with risk of ovarian cancer and can be detected from a blood sample.
21h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Why do some head knocks cause more damage than others?Veteran sailors know that rogue waves can rise suddenly in mid-ocean to capsize even the largest vessels. Now it appears that a similar phenomenon called shear shock wave occurs in the concussed brain. It may help explain why some head knocks cause so much more harm than others.
21h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
28
Spider silk could be used to power microphones in hearing aids, cell phonesWould you want a spider web inside your ear? Probably not. But if you're able to put aside the creepy factor, new research shows that fine fibers like spider silk actually improve the quality of microphones for hearing aids.
21h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
3
New treatment shows promise for patients with rare dermatologic diseaseA new treatment for a rare and often incurable condition called dermatomyositis (DM) reduced the severity of the disease in patients whose DM was resistant to other therapies. As part of a randomized, double-blind study, 22 patients were given either a drug called anabasum or a placebo. The 11 patients who got the drug improved during the trial, with less severe skin disease and better patient-rep
21h Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Western diet linked to vascular damage, prediabetesCould short-term exposure to the average American diet increase one's risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease? According to a recent study, researchers provide compelling evidence to support this hypothesis.
21h Futurity.org
1
Predicting human survival on Earth requires oceans When scientists consider “planetary boundaries,” which describe the conditions within which humanity can continue to thrive, they tend to disregard oceans. And that’s a big problem, a new paper argues. The oceans are an integral part of life on Earth. They cover two-thirds of the planet and supply half of our air. They absorb vast amounts of heat produced by climate change and provide enormous va
21h Dagens Medicin

En stærk kampagne er personlig, men får den effektHashtagget #DetKuHaVæretMig er en effektiv måde at sætte fokus på en problemstilling. Men om det øgede fokus skaber reel forandring, afhænger af, om etablerede organisationer eller politikere går videre med dagsordenen, vurderer ekspert.
21h EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
New SOFT e-textiles could offer advanced protection for soldiers and emergency personnelNew technology from Dartmouth College harnesses electronic signals in a smart fabric to detect, capture, concentrate and filter toxic chemicals.
21h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The fingerprints of coastal carbon sinksA new study highlights a technique that could be used to accurately measure levels of soil carbon in coastal carbon sinks, such as mangrove forests.
21h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

SourceData is making data discoverableSourceData from EMBO is an award-winning open platform that allows researchers and publishers to share figures and their underlying data in a machine-readable, searchable format, making research papers discoverable based on their data content. As highlighted in today's paper in Nature Methods (Liechti et al., 2017), SourceData offers a novel method to describe research data and a suite of tools to
21h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

TAVR cost-effective compared with SAVR in intermediate risk patients with aortic stenosisAnalysis of the PARTNER 2A trial and the SAPIEN-3 Intermediate Risk registry found transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to be highly cost-effective compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in intermediate surgical risk patients with aortic stenosis.
21h EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Results from the ABSORB IV trial reported at TCT 2017Thirty-day results from ABSORB IV, the largest randomized everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) trial to date, found BVS to be noninferior to a cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stent (CoCr-EES) for target lesion failure (TLF).
21h Ars Technica
1K
Breitbart, other conservative outlets escalate anti-SpaceX campaign Enlarge / SpaceX has launched 16 rockets this year, including two national security missions for the US military. (credit: SpaceX) The articles began appearing in late August, mostly in conservative publications such as Town Hall, Breitbart, and the Daily Caller and have since continued to trickle out through October. All of the dozen or so Web commentaries, variously styled as op-eds or contribu
21h Feed: All Latest
100+
Why Taika Waititi Directed 'Thor: Ragnarok' in a Mo-Cap OnesieBecause he also plays Korg, the stone-man gladiatorial fighter, in his new Marvel movie the director had to work in a slightly awkward outfit.
21h Gizmodo
100+
New Ant-Man and the Wasp Set Pictures Give Us a First Look at an Iconic Comics Character Mark Ruffalo talks about Hulk’s new friendships in Avengers: Infinity War . Luke Skywalker wields an important artifact in a new The Last Jedi poster. The Flash is casting a few more comic book bad guys this season. Plus, a special guest star for The X-Files , Good Omens casts some Horsemen, and new Star Wars Rebels footage. Spoilers now! Ant-Man and The Wasp Just Jared has the first set pictures
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
New report calls for energy regulation reshape to benefit consumersThe energy market needs to be better regulated to provide consumers with improved options for managing their electricity, according to a new report.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Octopuses stranded on Welsh beach – here are the scientific theories whyA beach in Wales recently faced an eight-armed invasion. Over 20 octopuses were reportedly seen crawling up New Quay beach on the west coast of the country, with many later being found dead after failing to make it back to the sea.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Why tax cuts make us less happyRepublicans recently announced their tax plan and are hoping to turn it into law before Thanksgiving. While details are in flux, it would likely eliminate the estate tax, lower the top marginal rate and slash corporate rates, producing, in sum, what the president has dubbed a "gigantic" tax cut.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
NASA estimates the global reach of atmospheric riversA recent study by NASA and several partners has estimated, for the first time, the global impact of atmospheric rivers on floods and droughts, as well as the number of people affected by these atmospheric phenomena.
21h Latest Headlines | Science News
200+
Defining ‘species’ is a fuzzy artHere's why scientists still don't agree on what a species is.
21h Blog » Languages » English
8
Featured Eyewirer: Yeexzyz A behind the scenes look at the Eyewire community. Meet the Eyewirers who are mapping the brain. Today’s featured player is @Yeexzyz. Introduce yourself! Hi everybody! My name is MG, but you may know me better as Yeexzyz (pronounced YEEK-ZEES). I am currently an eighth grade student living in a small town in New Jersey. I actually have several learning disabilities, with ADHD and mild autism bein
21h Scientific American Content: Global
1K
School Immunization Laws Are Making Kindergarteners SaferSchool immunization laws are working — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h Science-Based Medicine
200+
ASEA – Still Selling Snake OilASEAs marketing practices, in my opinion, are clearly deceptive. They use a lot of pseudoscientific claims representing the epitome of supplement industry misdirection and obfuscation. They use science as a marketing tool, not as a method for legitimately advancing our knowledge or answering questions about the efficacy of specific interventions.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Engineers turn to the sea to reduce the environmental cost of energy productionEngineers from Trinity are turning to the sea in an attempt to reduce the environmental cost of energy production. As the global population booms we will need to solve a perplexing equation that requires outputs to soar while dampening the effect our actions have on the environment.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
New zooming technique reveals cell electric circuit for first timeCell biologists have used a new super-resolution microscopy technique to be able to observe molecular-level reactions for the first time.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
England was 'divided along educational lines' at Brexit vote, research saysPeople who voted for Brexit were more likely to live in areas where the overall level of education was lower, according to a major new study.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
One-step 3-D printing of catalystsThe U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a 3-D printing process that creates a chemically active catalytic object in a single step, opening the door to more efficient ways to produce catalysts for complex chemical reactions in a wide scope of industries.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
New text-to-speech tool for DIY voiceovers—from soft, sad and sultry to scaryThe animation world is rich in lovable and memorable characters, each with its own unique voice and personality—and animators, writers, and designers keep coming up with even more new games, film ideas, villains, and heroes. Creating voiceovers for these characters is a time-consuming and expensive process that often involves holding auditions for voice actors, and studio time to record.
21h Ars Technica
82
New science fiction and fantasy books to help you escape this holiday season Enlarge / Cover detail from New York 2140, by Kim Stanley Robinson. (credit: Illustration by Stephan Martiniere) It is the dreaded season of airport delays, family "fun," and long weekends spent in delightful locations with no cellular reception. That means it's book reading time! Whether you want to fire up your brain or just need to escape, we've got a handful of new releases from 2017 in scien
21h Gizmodo
400+
Sony's Robotic Dog Aibo Is Back From the Dead GIF All images: Sony First released back in 1999, Sony’s robotic dog Aibo was so lifelike and animated that devoted owners are still doing everything they can to keep their aging pets alive , after Sony discontinued repair service on earlier models. But 18 years later, it might finally be time for them to say goodbye now that Sony has finally announced a new and improved version of the robo-pup.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
Kepler data reveals existence of 20 promising exoplanets 'hiding in plain sight'(Phys.org)—A large international team of researchers working with data sent back from NASA's Kepler space telescope has found evidence of 20 previously unknown, promising exoplanets. In their paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, the team describes the exoplanets and highlights the ones that appear to be the most likely to fit into the Goldilocks category.
21h Dagens Medicin

Vejle stikker af fra andre sygehuse i behandling af knoglemarvskræft Region Syddanmark og Vejle Sygehus har i særlig høj grad forbedret overlevelsen for patienter med knoglemarvskræft, viser ny årsrapport.
21h Dagens Medicin

Nye lægemidler og tidlig diagnostik løfter overlevelsen ved knoglemarvskræft Patienter med myelomatose har opnået markante forbedringer i overlevelsen, viser ny årsrapport.
21h The Scientist RSS
1
Image of the Day: Fish Eye LensResearchers develop a new method to highlight specific cells that reside in the lens of a zebrafish.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Behind the puppy-dog eyesEye contact between dingoes and humans reveals clues of the domestication process.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
​The business of babies and big dataIt's bad enough we give away data about ourselves, but when did we start giving it away for babies too?
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Why do shark bites seem to be more deadly in Australia than elsewhere?The first thing to say about shark attack deaths is that they are very rare, with only about two per year in Australia. But still, every year without fail, people die from shark bites, both here and around the world.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Is there too much emphasis on STEM fields at universities?The perception abounds around the world that science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM subjects, matter more economically and academically than the humanities and social sciences.
21h NYT > Science
200+
An Alaska Senator Wants to Fight Climate Change and Drill for Oil, TooSenator Lisa Murkowski’s views will take center stage this week in a hearing on opening an Arctic wildlife area to oil drilling.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Challenging the notion that religion fosters violenceIs religion violent? It's a common question that arises when discussing religion, politics and world crises, particularly apparent terrorist attacks of the type that played out in New York City on Tuesday.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
Chimpanzees shown spontaneously 'taking turns' to solve number puzzleA new study from Kyoto and Oxford universities and Indianapolis Zoo has shown chimpanzees spontaneously taking turns to complete a number sequencing task.
21h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
65
Researchers report a new and better kind of invisible ink(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Jinan University, both in China, has developed a new type of invisible ink. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes how the ink is made and used, and what they are doing to make it safer.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
Can virtual nature and poo transplants solve city dwellers' health problems?Nature is good for your health. Perhaps predictably, the world of technology is now offering technical solutions that seek to replace the need for authentic nature experiences. But can innovations like poo transplants and virtual nature capture the deeper well-being that a connection to nature can deliver?
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
By 2100, climate change could alter key microbial interactions in the oceanThe ocean is rapidly absorbing carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere by the burning of fossil fuel and other human activities, resulting in warmer and more acidic waters. According to a new study, these conditions can also change the behavior of tiny marine organisms essential to ocean health.
22h Futurity.org
9
‘Smart fabric’ could store passcodes or I.D. in clothes A new kind of “smart fabric” can store data without any on-board electronics or sensors. The fabric could be used in clothing and accessories that can store a passcode to open the door to your apartment or identification information to get you through the front door at the office. “This is a completely electronic-free design, which means you can iron the smart fabric or put it in the washer and d
22h EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Empowered employees are more proactive — even when they don't trust their leaderNew research confirms that employees with empowering leaders are more proactive — and, for the first time, shows that this effect occurs by increasing employee confidence to undertake tasks beyond the job description. The researchers elaborate a model that explains why, and when, empowering leadership can promote proactivity in the workplace, and provide suggestions for managers and organizations
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
How multiple star systems evolveSirius is not a single star at all, but a binary system of two stars. Polaris, the north star, is actually a system of three stars. And Castor, in the constellation of Gemini, actually consists of a whopping six stars. Current models show stars forming by the fragmentation of massive interstellar gas clouds, spinning themselves by gravity into stardom, in isolation and unaffected by nearby stars.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Novel tools to analyse radiation near black holesWith the current state of scientific knowledge and equipment, understanding astrophysical black holes invariably requires detailed studies of the observable elements surrounding them. The STRONGGRAVITY project has developed novel analytical tools to do just that, with a focus on radiation.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A new breathing monitor signals the coming generation of pervasive healthcarePervasive healthcare is an approach which addresses the challenge of straining health services with evidence-based, preventative strategies. The increased accessibility of personal monitoring devices is helping breathe life into efforts.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Modifying the internal structure of 2-D hybrid perovskite materials causes them to emit white lightChanging how we light our homes and offices could save energy, but new lighting technology requires new materials with the right properties. Materials called hybrid perovskites could be vital in making change possible. Scientists discovered that changing the length of small spacer ions located between the perovskite's internal layers manipulates the structure, distorting the layers to look like co
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Synthetic sex in yeast promises safer medicines for peopleOur old friend Saccharomyces cerevisiae – the yeast that's helped people bake bread and brew beer for millennia – has just had its sex life upgraded.
22h Popular Science
100+
Why sugar-laden Raisin Bran is considered ‘heart healthy,’ but soy is not Health The FDA might downgrade its heart healthy claim on soy protein, but that doesn't mean it's bad for you. The FDA might change it's heart healthy claim on soy protein, which would mark the first time that the organization has ever reversed its stance on a health claim.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
New analysis says more jobs safer from automation than previously believedWe all want to know how many jobs will be threatened by the rise of robots and technology. You might feel vulnerable if your job is one that could be affected.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
A system that identifies malicious patterns in network trafficThe majority of cyber-security solutions that stand between us and increasingly sophisticated malware, target only specific attacks or subsets of attacks, meaning that users may have to buy and install many different products to protect themselves. Now, A*STAR researchers have developed a system that instead gathers evidence across a wide stream of internet traffic, and identifies links and correl
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Researchers uncover how a microtubule-related gene affects neural developmentThe mechanism linking cortical developmental disorders with a gene related to key structural components of cells known as microtubules has been uncovered by A*STAR scientists. The discovery improves our understanding of the pathology of the disorders and expands the range of genes known to be involved in neurodevelopment.
22h New Scientist – News
200+
Cake-cutting game theory trick could stop gerrymanderingThe “I-Cut-You-Choose” method results in provably fair slices of cake. The same game theory approach can produce fairer voting districts in US states, too
22h New Scientist – News
500+
Australia to cut cervical cancer risk with less regular testsFrom 1 December, instead of the 2-yearly Pap smear – also known as a Pap test or smear test – Australian women will have a 5-yearly human papillomavirus (HPV) test instead
22h Feed: All Latest
76
Review: Timbuk2 Lug KnapsackFancy zippers and webbing don’t add up to a great bag.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Rapid, on-chip analysis of synthetic, animal, or human skinWhen smokers slap on a nicotine patch, they rely on the controlled transfer of drugs through the skin to help them break their addiction. A*STAR researchers have developed a technology that can facilitate transdermal drug delivery by improving testing of skin permeation.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
3-D printed sports shoes are more about your wallet than your feetThe race is on to bring 3-D printed footwear to market. Adidas, Nike and Under Armour are some of the big names that have been working on delivering bespoke shoes to their customers.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
69
Researchers find protein that could help fight antibiotic resistanceArtificial hip implants, knee implants and catheters are susceptible to infections: bacteria that flow through the blood system can collect on these foreign surfaces and hunker down to proliferate.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Smartphones and the internet cited as primary sources of news consumption in Arab worldDigital news consumption is high and growing in the Middle East, with more than half of the Arab nationals choosing the internet as their main source of news and more than two-thirds relying on their smartphones for news updates.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Making your water safer with UV lightIn Natalie Hull's hometown in rural Kentucky, well water was contaminated by heavy metals from mining, and sewage from pipes emptied into a creek that ran near her house.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Image: Learning to spacewalk before heading to spaceUsing a system similar to an overhead bridge crane, Canadian Space Agency astronaut Jeremy Hansen is suspended over a mock-up of the International Space Station during a microgravity simulation in the Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) at NASA's Johnson Space Center on Oct 24, 2017.
22h Live Science
83
Robot Cracks Those Curvy Captchas in MinutesIn just minutes, an artificially intelligent machine cracked those jumbled text sequences called captchas that are used to distinguish human web users from spam-spreading robots. So much for that.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
The ghost forests of the East CoastYou've heard of haunted houses for Halloween—but what about ghost forests?
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Empowered employees are more proactive—even when they don't trust their leaderNew research confirms that employees with empowering leaders are more proactive and, for the first time, shows that this effect occurs by increasing "role breadth self-efficacy"—defined as the confidence to do a variety of tasks beyond the job description. The research further shows that when subordinates trust the leader's competency, the leader's power sharing behavior increases the subordinates
22h Ingeniøren
2
Software skal overvåge gymnasieelever til eksamen Efter undervisningsministeren i sidste uge trak forslaget om at kræve adgang til elevers browserhistorik tilbage, er der nu stillet et nyt forslag, hvor man vil bruge software til at overvåge elevernes færden under eksaminer. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/elever-skal-ikke-laengere-vise-deres-browserhistorik-nu-skal-software-overvaage Version2
22h Ingeniøren
42
Professor forklarer Banedanmarks signal-suppedas: »If you are in trouble, then double«Adfærdspsykologien gør, at ordsproget for store projekter som signalprogrammet for let bliver: 'If you are in trouble, then double'. Det burde snarere lyde: 'If you are in shit, then quit.'
22h cognitive science
2
Biggest Miner Tracking Trucker Brain Waves In Technology Race: "Truck drivers employed by the world's biggest mining company are wearing baseball caps and hard helmets with sensors mounted inside to track their brain waves so they can get early warnings of fatigue and cut accidents." submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
22h Scientific American Content: Global
500+
The Unforgiving Math That Stops EpidemicsNot getting a flu shot could endanger more than just one’s own health, herd immunity calculations show — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
How land use decisions affect crop productivityFarmers tend to grow crops on land with optimal water and nutrient availability conditions. When these conditions become less than optimal, farmers might shift planting dates, switch to or develop a different crop variety, or even look for new places to grow, therefore changing crop spatial distribution patterns. A study by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National L
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
ROSINA spectral measurements bring comet's chemistry to lifeLaunched March 2004 and following a 10-year journey across the solar system, the European Space Agency's Rosetta probe made history in 2014. It became the first spacecraft to orbit the nucleus of a comet—a frozen remnant of the pristine material from which the solar system formed—and later land on its surface. The Rosetta mission ended in 2016 with the probe's dive into the comet, called Comet 67P
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Research provides unique insight into extinction dynamics in Late TriassicOne of the most exciting discoveries that paleontologists can make is finding the causal relationship between the extinction of ancient creatures and the environmental conditions that led to that extinction. A team of scientists and students at the University of Rhode Island is inching closer to revealing how a group of animals from the Late Triassic went extinct, thanks to the precise dating of f
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Amorphous metallic glass for high-sensitivity MEMS microphonesAdvanced microphones using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are capable of supporting new user interactions with "smart" devices, like chatting with Apple's Siri, or Amazon's Alexa. The key to achieving the high sensitivity desired for these microphones, you might be surprised to learn, is tied to the "admittance" or "compliance" of its membrane components.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Vacuum technology makes gravitational waves detectableYou probably didn't notice the gravitational wave that propagated through the Earth in the early morning of Jan. 4, 2017, but thanks to a sophisticated use of vacuum technology, a pair of extremely sensitive laser interferometers, one in Washington State and the other in Louisiana, detected the faint rumble from two colliding black holes some 3 billion light-years away.
22h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Researchers demonstrate a technique to fabricate safer and more compact batteriesThe lithium-ion batteries that commonly power mobile phones and laptops are ubiquitous and efficient. But they can occasionally explode—as evidenced in the batteries used by Samsung's Galaxy Note 7, which the company recalled last year.
22h Ingeniøren
2
Flere penge til energiforskning – men ikke alle er gladeDansk forskning i energiteknologi stiger en anelse til næste år, men ligger stadig langt fra niveauet fra 2010 til 2013. Aktørerne er nogenlunde tilfredse.
23h Ingeniøren
64
Vejledning og kode til 1813's telefonsvarer lå frit tilgængeligt En vejledning med kode, som handler om at administrere akuttelefonen 1813, har ligget frit tilgængelig hos Region Hovedstaden. Vejledningen har dog ifølge regionen ikke kunnet anvendes. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/vejledning-med-kodeord-aabent-region-h-system-aendring-telefonsvarebesked-paa-akuttelefonen Version2
23h Viden
17
Køb astronauternes originale fotos fra månenDer er auktion over sjældne og originale NASA-fotos, som er taget af amerikanske astronauter fra 1961-1972.
23h EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Babies can use context to look for things, study demonstratesIn a new study, infants as young as 6 months old demonstrated that they can rapidly integrate learning, memory and attention to improve their search for faces in a simple scene.
23h Live Science
500+
Mysterious Walking Octopuses Appear on Welsh BeachNo one knows why these octopuses were on dry land.
23h Feed: All Latest
200+
Who’s Ready to Put Their Kid on a Self-Driving School Bus?A provocative design concept from the studio Teague asks questions about burgeoning tech.
23h Feed: All Latest
1K
Google’s Artificial-Intelligence Wizard Unveils a New Twist on Neural NetworksGoogle's Geoff Hinton helped catalyze the current AI boom and says he knows how to make machines smarter at understanding the world.
23h Scientific American Content: Global
200+
Are Scientists Doing Too Much Research?It sounds almost absurd, but that could be one factor behind the so-called “reproducibility crisis” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h Ingeniøren

Mange firmaer søger maskin- og produktionsingeniører På dagens liste finder du jobopslag for ingeniører, it-folk og naturvidenskabelige kandidater inden for maskin og produktion. Der er behov for både fagfolk, ledere, specialister og konsulenter – endda enkelte praktikanter og studentermedhjælpere. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/mange-firmaer-soeger-maskin-produktionsingenioerer-10871 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
23h Ingeniøren
15
Overraskende studie: Østersøen har samme mængde mikroplast som for 30 år sidenØstersøens indhold af mikroplast er ikke steget de seneste 30 år, selvom vores forbrug af plast er blevet større. En ny undersøgelse peger på, at mikroplasten overvejende stammer fra tekstiler.
23h Feed: All Latest
100+
The Last of the Old-School Tech ReviewersRemembering Lance Braithwaite's career in an industry that barely remembers him.
23h Live Science
100+
Jurassic 'Mega-Carnivore' Dinosaur Was 4 Times the Size of a LionAbout 200 million years ago, a giant meat-eating dinosaur — one so large it was about twice as long as a giraffe is tall — left behind three-toed footprints as it trekked across the muddy ground, according to a new study.
23h Live Science
100+
Why Humans Hate the Scent of Blood (But Wolves Love It)A certain molecule in mammal blood provokes extreme reactions in different species, driving bloodlust in wolves and triggering aversion in humans.
23h Feed: All Latest
100+
Why Artificial Intelligence Is Still Waiting For Its Ethics TransplantAs artificial intelligence reshapes law enforcement, healthcare, education and more, tech firms need to widen their data lens.
23h Feed: All Latest
69
The DC Hearings are Big Tech's Big Chance to Change—AgainIt's Facebook, Twitter, and Google testifying this week, but all of the industry is in the docket.
23h Scientific American Content: Global
200+
Could Genetic Engineering Save the Galápagos?In the Galápagos, invasive species are driving native animals to extinction. Some conservationists are asking whether genetic manipulation is the solution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h Science | The Guardian
300+
'We can't compete': why universities are losing their best AI scientists A handful of companies are luring away top researchers, but academics say they are killing the geese that lay the golden eggs It was the case of the missing PhD student. As another academic year got under way at Imperial College London, a senior professor was bemused at the absence of one of her students. He had worked in her lab for three years and had one more left to complete his studies. But
23h Science | The Guardian
500+
Ernst Haeckel: the art of evolution – in pictures The influential evolutionary scientist, who coined such terms as ‘stem cell’ and ‘ecology’, was also a virtuoso illustrator. The editor of a new book celebrating this work introduces some highlights Continue reading…
23h Science | The Guardian
500+
Artificial intelligence risks GM-style public backlash, experts warn Researchers say social, ethical and political concerns are mounting and greater oversight is urgently needed The emerging field of artificial intelligence (AI) risks provoking a public backlash as it increasingly falls into private hands, threatens people’s jobs, and operates without effective oversight or regulatory control, leading experts in the technology warn. At the start of a new Guardian
23h Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Europe finding common cause over conspiracy theoriesWith conspiracy theories moving from the fringes of society to inspiring political rhetoric and policy making, COST is helping a network of academics to study this fascinating subject in greater depth than ever before.
1d New Scientist – News

First results from young blood Alzheimer’s trial are criticisedThe results from the first trial of young blood as a treatment for Alzheimer’s have been announced, but how the study was done is coming under criticism
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Penn engineers develop filters that use nanoparticles to prevent slime build-upResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science have a new way of making membranes that allows them to add in a host of new abilities via functional nanoparticles that adhere to the surface of the mesh. They tested this method by adding antifouling particle that could prevent biofilm build-up.
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Solving of a decade long mystery could help in fight against TBResearch carried out by the University of Sussex and the Polish Academy of Sciences has identified two key proteins that allow mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), to 'lay low' within cells designed to destroy them. It is hoped this discovery will aid in the designing of new antibiotics that could help target mycobacteria, particularly during their latent phase.
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ensuring the survival of elephants in Laos: A matter of economicsAsian elephant populations in Laos, which are under a process of commodification, have dropped by half in the last 30 years. According to researchers from CNRS and Beauval Nature, the dynamics of elephant populations depend heavily on the socioeconomic practices of the country and elephant owners. The setting-up of a 'maternity leave' system to compensate owners for their losses of income during b
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How songbirds learn a new songAs scientists from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have now shown, songbirds are minimalists when it comes to learning a new song. The birds' learning strategy resembles the methods used by computer scientists for document comparison.
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
Plastic nanoparticles inspired by nature could improve cancer drug deliveryUNSW Sydney scientists have developed a way to control the shape of polymer molecules so they self-assemble into non-spherical nanoparticles — an advance that could improve the delivery of toxic drugs to tumors. Very little in nature is perfectly spherical, but it has proved very difficult for scientists to synthesize particles that are not round until now.
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Breast cancer researchers track changes in normal mammary duct cells leading to diseaseBreast cancer researchers have mapped early genetic alterations in normal-looking cells at various distances from primary tumors to show how changes along the lining of mammary ducts can lead to disease.
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Gut microbiome may make chemo drug toxic to patientsAlbert Einstein College of Medicine researchers report that the composition of people's gut bacteria may explain why some of them suffer life-threatening reactions after taking a key drug for treating metastatic colorectal cancer. The findings, described online today in npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, a Nature research journal, could help predict which patients will suffer side effects and prevent c
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
19
Discarded cigarette butts—the next high-performing hydrogen storage material?Discarded cigarette butts are a major waste disposal and environmental pollution hazard. But chemists at the University of Nottingham have discovered that cigarette butt-derived carbons have ultra-high surface area and unprecedented hydrogen storage capacity.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
18
One-third of all shark species in fin trade are endangeredNearly one-third of the shark species in the global fin trade are at risk of extinction, according to a new study led by FIU marine scientist Demian Chapman.
1d Dagens Medicin

13 nye regionsklinikker er åbnet i 2017 Siden januar i år er 13 regionsklinikker og udbudsklinikker åbnet. I samme periode har 11 læger valgt at eje mere end en klinik.
1d Dagens Medicin

1813 under kritik: Indlagde ikke spæd dreng med meningitis1813-læge vurderede i januar, at en 15 dage gammel dreng med feber ikke skulle tilses. Drengen viste sig senere at have meningitis, og forløbet bliver nu stærkt kritiseret af eksperter.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
DESHIMA sees first light—a step closer to mapping the most distant star systemsDESHIMA is a completely new type of astronomical instrument with which researchers hope to construct a 3-D map of the early universe. In early October, Dutch and Japanese researchers installed the DESHIMA measurement instrument under the ASTE telescope in Chile. Last week, DESHIMA achieved first light.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Fabricating shape-shifting objects with hobbyist 3-D printersResearchers at TU Delft have combined origami techniques and 3-D printing to create flat structures that can fold themselves into 3-D structures like tulips. The structures self-fold according to a pre-planned sequence, with some parts folding sooner than others. Usually, expensive printers and special materials are needed to fabricate such objects. But the TU Delft scientists have created a new t
1d Feed: All Latest
300+
This AR Headset Won't Replace My Monitor, But It's a Promising StartThe Meta 2 isn't ready for everyday office work yet—but when it works, it's still a remarkable gadget.
1d Feed: All Latest
300+
Storm Chasers, Megacomputers, and the Quest to Understand Extreme WeatherIn season battered by hurricanes like Harvey and Maria, scientists are racing to figure out why superstorms are likely to develop with greater frequency and intensity.
1d Feed: All Latest
500+
North Korea's Plenty Scary Without an Overhyped EMP ThreatWhile an electromagnetic pulse attack could cause plenty of trouble, don't expect one to come from North Korea.
1d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds

University systems allow sexual harassers to thrive It's time for academic institutions to take responsibility for protecting students and staff, says Laurel Issen. Nature 551 7 doi: 10.1038/551007a
1d Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Cykling til arbejde ligeså godt som fysisk træning i fritidenInaktive overvægtige kan tabe fedtmasse ligeså effektivt ved at tage cyklen på arbejde…
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
55
Plastic nanoparticles inspired by nature could improve cancer drug deliveryUNSW Sydney scientists have developed a way to control the shape of polymer molecules so they self-assemble into non-spherical nanoparticles – an advance that could improve the delivery of toxic drugs to tumours.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Ensuring the survival of elephants in Laos: A matter of economicsAsian elephant populations in Laos, which are under a process of commodification, have dropped by half in the last 30 years. According to researchers from CNRS and the French Beauval Nature association for conservation and research, the dynamics of elephant populations depend heavily on the socio-economic practices of the country and elephant owners. The setting-up of a "maternity-leave" system to
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
How songbirds learn a new songFor a songbird, learning a new song is akin to a child learning a new language. Zebra finches approach this challenge step by step, and even make a detour in the process – by taking song syllables that they already know and adapting them to the syllables that they have to learn. During this learning phase, the syllable sequence often gets mixed up. The birds then arrange the newly-learned syllable
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Engineers develop filters that use nanoparticles to prevent slime build-upFiltration membranes are, at their core, sponge-like materials that have micro- or nanoscopically small pores. Unwanted chemicals, bacteria and even viruses are physically blocked by the maze of mesh, but liquids like water can make it through.
1d The Atlantic
4K
Why Liberty University Kicked an Anti-Trump Christian Author Off Campus Jonathan Martin, a prominent anti-Trump Christian author, was escorted off the grounds of Liberty University by campus police officers Monday night. He was told to never return or he would be arrested for trespassing. Liberty has been known for its conservative politics since it was founded in the 1970s by Jerry Falwell Sr., a prominent figure on the religious right. Its current president, Jerry
1d The Atlantic
100+
The Essential Questions the GOP Tax Bill Will Finally Answer Republicans have been talking about their desire to cut taxes for so long it’s easy to forget they haven’t actually released legislation to do so. That will likely change on Thursday, when House leaders plan to unveil a bill they’ve long promised would be the most far-reaching overhaul of the U.S. tax code in more than 30 years. The big reveal was initially pegged for Wednesday but was pushed bac
1d The Atlantic
100+
What Would Martin Do? “Be respectful; keep the anger in check; make sure the police can see your hands.” It’s a checklist that many black parents impart to their sons long before these teenagers know they’ll need the advice. The limitations of this counsel become painfully apparent early in Nic Stone’s timely debut novel, Dear Martin. Doing all his mother told him doesn’t keep 17-year-old Justyce McAllister from being
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Researchers study organic matter processes in rice fieldsA soil scientist from RUDN University reports that plant root secretions affect microorganisms and biochemical processes in paddy soils such as rice fields. Rice field soils play a very important role in the agriculture of Southeast Asia, since they cover > 160 Mio ha and are used to produce food for a quarter of world population. The results of the study were published in the European Journal of
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Springer Nature blocks access to articles in ChinaAcademic publisher Springer Nature says it has blocked access to articles within China to comply with demands from the Chinese government.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Law outlawing use of VPNs comes into effect in RussiaA law banning the use of virtual private networks, or VPNs, and other internet proxy services has come into effect in Russia.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Gov't won't pursue talking car mandateThe Trump administration has quietly set aside plans to require new cars to be able to wirelessly talk to each other, auto industry officials said, jeopardizing one of the most promising technologies for preventing traffic deaths.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Postal Service eyes next-day Sunday delivery for holidaysAs consumers demand ever-quicker and convenient package delivery, the U.S. Postal Service wants to boost its business this holiday season by offering what few e-commerce retailers can provide: cheap next-day service with packages delivered Sundays to your home.
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Teen childbirth linked to increased risk for heart diseaseWomen who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. Unlike previous studies, among women who had children the overall number of births was unrelated to greater cardiovascular risk.
1d NatureNews – Most recent articles – nature.com science feeds

Plans to promote German research excellence come under fire Critics say selection process for high-stakes funding programme is flawed. Nature 551 15 doi: 10.1038/551015a
1d Ingeniøren
9
Natron fjerner pesticider fra æblerHusholdningsmiddel overgår amerikansk standardbehandling til vask af sprøjtet frugt.
1d The Atlantic
1K
A Former CIA Director Describes the Dangers of 'Trump Unleashed' You sense that the stakes are high, and the circumstances exceptional, when the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency issues the kind of rebuke of a sitting president that John Brennan did on Friday, in an interview with The Atlantic . “There’s never been a previous president, at least in my lifetime and experience, who had the impulsivity that Mr. Trump exhibits,” said Brennan, who
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Could the Neolithic Revolution offer evidence of best ways to adapt to climate change?Human behaviour during the last intense period of global warming might offer an insight into how best to adapt to current climate change, a study suggests.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
400+
Marine scientists discover kleptopredation—a new way of catching preyWhen it comes to feeding time sea slugs are the pirates of the underwater world – attacking prey that have just eaten in order to plunder their target's meal, new research has found.
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Could the Neolithic Revolution offer evidence of best ways to adapt to climate change?The behavior of the human population during the last intense period of global warming might offer an insight into how best to adapt to the current challenges posed by climate change, a study led by the University of Plymouth suggests.
1d EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Marine scientists discover kleptopredation — a new way of catching preyWhen it comes to feeding time sea slugs are the pirates of the underwater world — attacking prey that have just eaten in order to plunder their target's meal, new research has found. University of Portsmouth scientists are the first to have observed this cunning and brutal feeding strategy in the natural world and have named the behavior kleptopredation.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Mummies' tummies to reveal digestive evolutionMummified bodies from Egypt and the Canary Islands are having their digestive tracts tested and compared to living people in order to reveal how the bacteria in our guts has changed over the centuries and how it varies between people with different diets.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Mate tea made saferSouth America's answer to the Brits' builder's brew, their choice pick-me-up is said to have the kick of coffee, the health perks of tea and the delight of chocolate.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
China's answer to Kindle raises $1.1 bn for Hong Kong listingChinese internet giant Tencent's e-book arm has raised US$1.1 billion for a Hong Kong listing next week, reports said Wednesday.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Sony revives robot pet dogJapanese electronics giant Sony is marking the year of the dog by bringing back to life its robot canine—packed with artificial intelligence and internet capability.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Scientists mine 'star scar' to unlock space secretsSince early September, the denizens of this normally hushed burg in central France have been serenaded by an industrial drill poking holes around town and pulling up cylinders of rock.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Malaysia probes leak of 46 mn phone users' dataMalaysia is investigating an attempt to sell details of more than 46 million mobile phone subscribers that were leaked online in a massive data breach, a minister said Wednesday.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
In Portugal, corks still top screwcapsIn this natural forest northeast of Portugal's capital, centuries-old cork oak trees are bathed in sunlight, their thick grayish bark standing out among the greenery.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Mammoth projects to make Norway's fish farms eco-friendly"We could produce five times as much fish by 2050": in a posh hotel in the Norwegian town of Trondheim, a fishing industry representative winds up his presentation on Norway's sky-high fish farming goals.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Technology seeks to preserve fading skill: Braille literacyFor nearly a century, the National Braille Press has churned out millions of pages of Braille books and magazines a year, providing a window on the world for generations of blind people.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
53
Researchers look for dawn of human information sharingEvery day, information washes over the world like so much weather. From casual conversations, tweets, texts, emails, advertisements and news stories, humanity processes countless discrete pieces of socially transmitted information.
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Penguins' calls are influenced by their habitatBirds use vocalizations to attract mates, defend territories, and recognize fellow members of their species. But while we know a lot about how variations in vocalizations play out between populations of songbirds, it's far less clear how this variation affects birds such as penguins in which calls are inherited. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances examines differences in the calls of
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Scientists develop groundnut resistant to aflatoxinScientists at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, in St. Louis, MO and their collaborators at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) in Hyderabad, India, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Louisiana State University have made a significant research breakthrough by suppressing the aflatoxin-producing fungus in groundnut. The discovery ha
1d Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1K
Aliens may be more like us than we thinkHollywood films and science fiction literature fuel the belief that aliens are other-worldly, monster-like beings, who are very different to humans. But new research suggests that we could have more in common with our extra-terrestrial neighbours, than initially thought.
1d Viden
200+
Peanut-vaccine kan minimere allergikeres risiko for at døEt peanut-kys kunne før slå Christoffer ihjel. Nu redder forsøgsvaccine ham.
1d Science | The Guardian
100+
The UK has the most regionally unbalanced economy in Europe. Time for change To reinvigorate our economy and end the productivity crisis, our industrial strategy needs direction – and a rethink on the role science and technology can play For a long time, industrial strategy was something that belonged in the 1970s, along with British Leyland and cars with square steering wheels. But after the decade of stagnation that followed the 2007 financial crisis, the idea that our
1d Ingeniøren
64
Instruks med kode til ændring af 1813s telefonsvarerbesked lå frit i Region H-system En vejledning med kode, som handler om at administrere akuttelefonen 1813, har ligget frit tilgængelig hos Region Hovedstaden. Vejledningen har dog ifølge regionen ikke kunnet anvendes. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/vejledning-med-kodeord-aabent-region-h-system-aendring-telefonsvarebesked-paa-akuttelefonen Version2
1d Science | The Guardian
500+
Drug giants threaten NHS with legal action over cheaper drug that could save £84m a year Using cheaper version of drug effective against blindness is preferable to cost-cutting measures such as rationing, say NHS commissioners Two multinational drug companies are threatening legal action to prevent patients being offered a cheap version of an effective drug against blindness which could save the NHS millions of pounds. Twelve NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in the north-east
1d Gizmodo
33
Wrap Up Your Halloween by Reading This Twitter Bot's Weird Reddit-Generated Horror Stories Photo: Getty Images This year’s Tuesday-night Halloween means that most of the nation’s serial killers, monsters, and various stabby creatures have to turn in early for a bright and early hump day. But in lieu of being chased around by a low-budget demon, it’s not too late to wrap up your night by dimming the lights and reading some tales from a machine designed to creep you out. MIT Media Lab re
1d The Scientist RSS
5
To Each His OwnEvery human brain is far more unique, adaptable, and vulnerable than ever suspected.
1d The Scientist RSS

Ten-Minute SabbaticalTake a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
1d The Scientist RSS

Lessons in Memory from a ChampA four-time winner of the USA Memory Championship is helping scientists understand how the brain works.
1d The Scientist RSS
1
An Eye Scan for Alzheimers Disease?Researchers aim for a routine screen to detect the neurodegenerative disease-decades before symptoms appear.
1d The Scientist RSS

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in AsiaThese insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.
1d The Scientist RSS
1
These Flies Hijack Frogs Love CallsThe phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.
1d The Scientist RSS

Fast-Tracking Sexual MaturationThe brains and bodies of young female rats can be accelerated into puberty by the presence of an older male or by stimulation of the genitals.
1d The Scientist RSS

Implanted Magnetic Probes Measure Brain ActivityMicrometer-size magnetrodes detect activity-generated magnetic fields within living brains.
1d The Scientist RSS

Presynaptic Neurons Fine-Tune Dopamine SignalingVesicles load more of the neurotransmitter in response to neuronal activity, researchers find.
1d The Scientist RSS

Neural Reward System Activity Varies Throughout the DayThe human brain is more responsive to rewards received in the morning or evening than in the afternoon, researchers find.
1d The Scientist RSS
1
Stronger Neural Connections May Trump Genetic Risk for Bipolar DisorderHealthy siblings of people with the condition harbor more cohesive connections within certain brain networks.
1d The Scientist RSS

Flickers of HopeLi-Huei Tsai began her career in cancer biology, then took a fearless leap into neuroscience, making singular breakthroughs along the way.
1d The Scientist RSS

Kyle Smith Shines a Light on AddictionThe Dartmouth College professor uses optogenetics to probe the neurological routes of habitual behavior.
1d

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image