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Nyheder2018august02


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New Scientist – News
1K
Modified mosquitoes wipe out whole city’s dengue for the first time
Anti-dengue mosquitoes have eliminated the virus from Townsville, Australia – the first successful large-scale use of modified mosquitoes to wipe out disease
1h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Why weight loss produces remission of type 2 diabetes in some patients
A clinical trial recently showed that nearly half of individuals with type 2 diabetes achieved remission to a non-diabetic state after a weight-loss intervention delivered within six years of diagnosis. Now a new study eveals that this successful response to weight loss is associated with the early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells.
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Futurity.org
4
Quantum version of ‘Maxwell’s Demon’ reveals weird catch
It is possible to use information to extract energy, or work, at the quantum level, according to a new study. Thermodynamics is one of the most human of scientific enterprises, says Kater Murch, associate professor of physics at Washington University in St. Louis. “It has to do with our fascination of fire and our laziness,” he says. “How can we get fire”—or heat—”to do work for us?” Now, Murch a
5h

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Snart fortæller Facebook og Instagram dig, hvor meget tid de stjæler
Snart tilføjer sociale medier som Facebook og Instagram funktioner, så du bedre kan få styr på dit forbrug af de tidsrøvende apps.
15min

Science | The Guardian
7
Air pollution linked to changes in heart structure
Study shows correlation between levels of exposure to fine particulate matter and chamber enlargement seen in early stages of heart failure Air pollution is linked to changes in the structure of the heart of the sort seen in early stages of heart failure, say researchers. The finding could help explain the increased number of deaths seen in areas with high levels of dirty air. For example, a repo
32min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
The new tree of life of freshwater macroinvertebrates in the European continent
A study from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio-UB) analysed how water macroinvertebrate species, such as beetles, mosquitos and dragonflies, evolved and diversified since their beginnings. With the analysis of the ecological features of about 6,600 European species, researchers rebuilt the functional space they occupy.
36min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Transgender individuals likely have higher risk for heart disease
Transgender individuals may be at higher risk for heart disease, according to a review article published by Michael S. Irwig, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, in Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders.
36min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
New UK research links even low levels of air pollution with serious changes in the heart
Research from the UK has found that people exposed to even low levels of air pollution have heart remodelling, similar to that seen in the early stages of heart failure.
36min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Housing for health
In a novel approach to improving outcomes for children, a pediatric hospital worked with community partners to address neighborhood effect syndrome as a target for pediatric health care — treating the neighborhood as a patient.
36min

The Atlantic
Macron Wants to Stop the Brexit Contagion From Spreading
Few places in Europe can match the beauty of the Côte d’Azur’s le Fort de Brégançon, the French president’s summer retreat. With its rocky shore, lined with coves and pine trees, it’s a Mediterranean paradise. But it may well be on this idyllic coast where Theresa May’s hopes for a soft Brexit and the future of her premiership run aground. Today, Emmanuel Macron, the president of France, will mee
36min

New Scientist – News
3
Did ancient Mayan civilisation collapse because of a sudden drought?
We have the best evidence yet that there was a prolonged drought at the time of the demise of the classic Mayan civilisation – and could explain why it collapsed
1h

New Scientist – News
37
How many people did Hurricane Maria really kill in Puerto Rico?
The official death toll for Hurricane Maria, which devastated Puerto Rico, is 64 people. A new analysis of death records finds that 1139 excess deaths occurred in the months after the storm
1h

New Scientist – News
83
Mystery of Welsh bodies buried at Stonehenge as first stones arrived
A new analysis of the cremated remains at Stonehenge suggest that some of the bodies buried there came from hundreds of kilometres away in Wales
1h

New Scientist – News
100+
Dark matter might be harder to detect because it’s not from our galaxy
Two thirds of the dark matter in the area near the sun was sucked up when the Milky Way devoured another galaxy, and that might make it harder for us to detect
1h

New Scientist – News
200+
Google Glass app uses emojis to help children with autism read faces
Many children with autism find it hard to decipher other people’s facial expressions. An interactive system that uses Google Glass may help
1h

New Scientist – News
500+
Bio-engineered lungs are the first successful organs made in the lab
Pigs have been able to breathe using lungs made in the lab. This is the most successful complex organ to be bioengineered yet – but there’s one big step left
1h

Scientific American Content: Global
7
Birds Learn Safety From Other Kinds of Birds
Birds become good at avoiding danger by eavesdropping on the alarm calls of other birds—and the learning occurs without even seeing their peers or predators. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Radar better than weather balloon for measuring boundary layer
Improving forecasting for a host of severe weather events may be possible thanks to a more comprehensive method for measuring the Earth's boundary layer depth.
4h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
The US has experienced a spike in violent and unintentional injuries
The US has experienced a disturbing increase in violent and unintentional injuries over the last few years, reversing positive gains made in the 1980s and 1990s, according to a new study.
4h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Need help with your math homework? Ask these worms
Animals often rely on their sense of smell to locate food. It's a law of nature: the first one to reach a food source has a better chance of surviving than those who do not. But how exactly does their brain translate scent and then navigate towards it?
4h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
1
Disease is threatening the most plentiful starfish in Antarctica
A study led by experts from the University of Barcelona's Faculty of Biology and Institute for Research on Biodiversity (IRBio) have identified a disease that is affecting the starfish Odontaster validus, one of the most common species on the Antarctic sea floor.
4h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
1
Genomic study ties insect evolution to the ability to detect airborne odors
A new study reveals that all insects use specialized odorant receptors that enable them to detect and pursue mates, identify enemies, find food and — unfortunately for humans — spread disease. This puts to rest a recent hypothesis that only some insects evolved the ability to detect airborne odors as an adaptation to flight, the researchers said.
4h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Plants can tell the time using sugars
A new study has found that plants adjust their daily circadian rhythm to the cycle of day and night by measuring the amount of sugars in their cells.
5h

Futurity.org
2
HPV poses extra risk to people with this skin disease
Researchers have traced the molecular mechanisms that make people with a rare skin disease vulnerable to a type of human papilloma virus. You’re probably infected with one or more subtypes of HPV—and, as alarming as that may sound, odds are you will never show any symptoms. The beta subtype of the virus, ß-HPV, is widespread in the general population and the least pathogenic; in fact, most carrie
5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Simple factors that can avoid harmful side effects in type 2 diabetes
Clinicians can match people with type 2 diabetes to the right drug for them to improve control of blood sugar and help avoid damaging side-effects, simply by factoring in simple characteristics such as sex and BMI into prescribing decisions, new research has shown.
5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
World experts target guidance on managing dementia symptoms
The research, published in International Psychogeriatrics and led by the University of Michigan, the University of Exeter and John Hopkins University, gives the most specific and targeted treatment for psychosis and agitation. Both symptoms are common in dementia and have a significant impact on individuals, families and carers.
5h

Futurity.org
1
How researchers can better serve the Deaf community
New research aims to tackle a significant problem: low levels of health literacy within the Deaf community. The collaboration includes Tim Riker, a lecturer of American Sign Language at Brown University’s Center for Language Studies, clinicians and researchers, and group of Deaf community advisors who advise on how best to meet the needs of their peers. “The objective is to understand the social,
5h

Big Think
The case for why 3D-printed guns are protected by the First Amendment
Other forms of expression—nude dancing, flag burning, donating to political campaigns—are protected by the First Amendment. Why not computer code? Read More
5h

Futurity.org
1
Which dialects matter? Depends on what our parents think
The most accurate predictor of a student’s beliefs about what dialects of English are valuable isn’t race or class but the language choices of his or her parents, according to a new study. In the United States alone, there are more than eight different cultural dialects of the English language. How a person speaks and understands language can have a significant impact on how they learn English in
5h

Futurity.org
1
Late night electricity use predicts morning traffic jams
To predict when rush hour traffic is likely to grind to a halt, a new study suggests it may be more effective to examine how people use electricity during the night, instead of travel-time data. By analyzing household electricity use in Austin, Texas, researchers were able to predict when morning traffic would jam some segments of the city’s highways. Predicting when traffic congestion will start
5h

Popular Science
7
Self-driving car companies are racking up simulated miles. Here’s why.
Technology With virtual rides, researchers can run thousands of scenarios at once and take advantage of sped up 'sim time.' What is a simulated mile, and what does it mean to have a million of them under your belt?
5h

The Atlantic
23
SpaceX Pulls Ahead of Boeing in the Race to Fly American Astronauts
On Friday morning, NASA will show off four of its veteran astronauts at an event at Johnson Space Center in Houston: two U.S. Air Force colonels, one U.S. Marine colonel, and one U.S. Navy captain. They all have advanced science and engineering degrees. They’ve been working for NASA since 2000 or earlier. They’ve flown to the International Space Station. And, NASA will declare proudly, they’re re
5h

Futurity.org
1
Super thin solar cell beats today’s best competition
A prototype semiconductor thin-film has performed even better than today’s best solar cell materials at emitting light, researchers report. Solar cells are devices that absorb photons from sunlight and convert their energy to move electrons—enabling the production of clean energy and providing a dependable route to help combat climate change. But most solar cells used widely today are thick, frag
6h

Futurity.org
1
New way to test UTIs reveals lots more info
A new method for testing urinary tract infections yields more information than what conventional methods can offer, researchers report. As reported in Nature Communications , researchers analyzed pieces of DNA, called cell-free DNA, isolated from the urine of kidney transplant patients and discovered that it provides valuable information about the bacterial and viral composition found in a patien
6h

The Atlantic
6
The Atlantic Daily: Are You a Reader?
What We’re Following After Disaster: Almost a full year after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, a new analysis of the death toll estimates that more than 1,100 people died in the aftermath of the storm —and there’s still more research to be done before an official count is reached. The city of Mosul, Iraq, was liberated from the Islamic State a year ago, but amid the rebuilding, some residents
6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
The Lancet: Support from people with lived experience reduces readmission to mental health crisis units
Peer-reviewed / Randomised Controlled Trial / PeopleWith expertise rooted in personal experience, people who have had mental health problems could offer support, encouragement and a model for recovery, helping reduce readmission rates.
6h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Newly characterized molecule offers possibilities for novel Alzheimer's treatments
A study by researchers investigated lesser-known molecules involved in tauopathies like Alzheimer's. They focused on microRNAs (miRNAs), gene expression regulators that bind to and destroy protein-encoding messenger RNAs. They discovered that some of these miRNAs showed neuroprotective effects; their supplementation therefore holds potential as a treatment for tauopathies.
6h

The Atlantic
400+
The Hunger for a Bold Socialism
“Socialism is having a moment in the sun,” claims a new article in the leftist magazine Jacobin . “It's a chance to push a bold, transformative vision of what a society for the many rather than the few can look like.” The article’s authors, the college professors Mathieu Desan and Michael A. McCarthy, are sympathetic to Democratic congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s expressed belie
6h

Popular Science
18
18 water-themed books to dive into this month
Entertainment Consider this your end-of-summer reading list. Dive right in—there’s an ocean of books just waiting for you to explore.
6h

Feed: All Latest
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You Won't Miss Brookstone, But You Should
Brookstone has declared bankruptcy, and will shutter its 101 retail locations in malls across the United States.
6h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
How do you assess pain in children who can't express themselves?
Pain is a frequent problem for children with complex medical conditions — but many of them are unable to communicate their pain verbally. For these children, nurses face a challenging task in assessing and determining the cause of pain.
6h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
EPA watchdog probing air-quality results issued after Harvey
An internal watchdog at the Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday it will review whether federal and state officials kept the public appropriately informed last year about potential air quality threats after Hurricane Harvey ravaged southeastern Texas.
7h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Conservation groups sue Oregon to help protect tiny seabird
Conservation groups sued the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Commission on Thursday for failing to strengthen protections for the marbled murrelet, tiny seabirds that venture inland to raise their young and depend on old-growth forests for nesting.
7h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
USGA launches eSport virtual US Amateur using Pebble Beach
The first Virtual US Amateur competition on the eSports World Golf Tour was launched Thursday by the US Golf Association using iconic Pebble Beach as the venue.
7h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
States vow to continue fight against Trump's car fuel rules
State prosecutors who pre-emptively sued months ago to block anticipated efforts by the Environmental Protection Agency to weaken car fuel-efficiency standards blasted the Trump administration Thursday for doing so and vowed to continue their fight in the courts.
7h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Nanotube 'rebar' makes graphene twice as tough
Rice University researchers have found that fracture-resistant "rebar graphene" is more than twice as tough as pristine graphene.
7h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Teaching old tech new tricks
Using century-old minerals processing methods, chemical engineering students have found a solution to a looming 21st-century problem: how to economically recycle lithium ion batteries.
7h

Big Think
Remote control of the brain is coming: how will we use it?
The latest advances in genetics and neuroscience suggest that mind control may soon be a reality. But how will we use this power once we get it? Read More
7h

The Atlantic
2
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Paper Chase
Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines At a White House press conference, national-security officials warned that Russia is still targeting U.S. elections. Pope Francis made opposition to the death penalty an official teaching of the Catholic Church. The National Archives told Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley th
7h

Live Science
14
This Man Won The Top Prize in Mathematics — Then Someone Immediately Stole It
Caucher Birkar, a mathematician at the University of Cambridge, won the 14-carat gold Fields Medal, math's version of the Nobel Prize. Then someone stole it.
7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Blocking digestive hormone may prevent diet-induced pancreatic cancer
A high-fat diet may promote the growth of pancreatic cancer independent of obesity because of the interaction between dietary fat and cholecystokinin (CCK), a digestive hormone. In addition, blocking CCK may help prevent the spread of pancreatic tumors to other areas of the body (metastases). The new findings are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Gastrointestinal and
7h

New on MIT Technology Review
300+
Ontario is axing its test of universal basic income
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7h

NeuWrite San Diego
Snake Eyes: The Fear That Built Your Brain
Indiana Jones is a quintessential American hero, his fedora, satchel, and whip instantly recognizable around the world. He lives a double life, a scholarly professor of anthropology in public and a globetrotting treasure hunter in private. He defeats the Nazis and always gets the girl, displaying daring and fearlessness, with one notable exception. He has […]
7h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Fecal deposits reveal the fruit fly's pheromone flag
Fruit flies have a rich language of smell messages that they exchange, but now their secret is out. In a new study, scientists were able to tap into the communications among freely interacting flies using a bioluminescent technology to monitor their brain activity. They discovered that males signal their presence by placing droppings that act as a calling card for flies to find each other and even
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Microbes go dark to stay warm in cooler climates
Microorganisms in colder climates darken themselves to capture more heat from the sun and improve their ability to survive, according to a new study.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
New stem cell model can be used to test treatments for a rare nervous system disorder
A new stem cell model has been developed to assess possible treatments for a rare nervous system disorder that is in the same disease group as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Hearing class
New study finds that the class of neurons responsible for transmitting information from the inner ear to the brain is composed of three molecularly distinct subtypes. One of these subtypes is selectively lost in the inner ears of aging mice, and this molecular diversity does not emerge properly in a deaf-mouse model.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
Mapping blue carbon in mangroves worldwide
Mangroves are tropical forests that thrive in salt water and found in a variety of coastal settings worldwide. Mangroves store greater amounts of carbon than any other terrestrial ecosystem, which helps reduce carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. When carbon is stored in the ocean or coastal ecosystems, it is called blue carbon. However, a more precise estimate of how much blue c
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Study elucidates epigenetic mechanisms behind autoimmune diseases
Researchers have used an editing tool to investigate a gene that plays a key role in eliminating autoaggressive cells and controlling the development of diseases such as type 1 diabetes. In tests with mice, the disrupting of medullary thymic epithelial cells gene impaired the processing of mRNA involved in their adhesion to autoaggressive T lymphocytes.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Some corals might adapt to climate changes
New research shows that not all corals respond the same to changes in climate. The study looked at the sensitivity of two types of corals found in Florida and the Caribbean and found that one of them – -mountainous star coral — possesses an adaptation that allows it to survive under high temperatures and acidity conditions.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
3
Wearable devices: Useful medical insights or just more data?
Despite the popularity of wearable devices to track and measure health and sports performance, a new review highlights how surprisingly little we know we know about how well these sensors and machines work — let alone whether they deliver useful information.
8h

Science | The Guardian
17
Pollutionwatch: city sparrows' decline linked to car exhausts
RSPB found urban sparrow colonies waning at fastest rate where traffic-borne nitrogen dioxide was worst The cheeky house sparrow is the archetypal city bird. You can find them around the world, but they are in serious decline in cities in Italy, Canada, India and the UK. London’s house sparrow population fell by 60% between 1994 and 2006. Scientists from the Royal Society for the Protection of Bi
8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Big-data study pinpoints more than 150 genes associated with atrial fibrillation
Drawing on genomic data from more than one million individuals, researchers from the University of Michigan have led a large collaborative effort to discover as-yet unknown genetic risk factors for atrial fibrillation: An irregular, often rapid heart rate affecting millions of Americans and more than 30 million people worldwide.
8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Old mining techniques make a new way to recycle lithium batteries
Using 100-year-old minerals processing methods, chemical engineering students have found a solution to a looming 21st-century problem: how to economically recycle lithium ion batteries.
8h

Live Science
65
Canadian Geese Have a Bizarre, Death-Defying Strategy For Surviving Hailstorms (Video)
A video surfaced recently of a group of Canadian geese staring into the sky during a hailstorm. An expert told Live Science why they (and other birds) do this.
8h

The Atlantic
100+
The British Trial That Became a Free-Speech Crusade for the Right
His fans see him as a poster boy for freedom of speech, and his detractors as a far-right agitator. But on Wednesday, Tommy Robinson and his supporters prevailed when a British court let him out of jail, where he’d landed after livestreaming from outside of a criminal trial in violation of court-ordered media restrictions on reporting on the case. That case, which dealt with child sex abuse by me
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
New light shed on relationship between calorie-burning fat and muscle function
Endocrinologists have shown for the first time that brown fat can exert control over skeletal muscle function.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Field test for dog Leishmania exposure evaluated
Dogs infected with Leishmania infantum, a parasite transmitted by the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus, are at risk for spreading leishmaniasis infections to humans. A new test provides an easier-than-ever way to test dogs for exposure to P. perniciosus sand flies, and could be used in monitoring the effectiveness of sand fly control efforts.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Fairy-wrens learn alarm calls of other species just by listening
Birds often eavesdrop on the alarm calls of other species, making it possible for them to take advantage of many eyes looking out for danger. Now, researchers have found that fairy-wrens can learn those unfamiliar calls — which they liken to a foreign language — even without ever seeing the bird that made the call or the predator that provoked it.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Cellular communication system in mice helps control female fertility
Researchers have discovered that two genes work together to construct a cellular communication system in the ovaries of mice to maintain healthy eggs.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Psychologists find that acting is the key to remembering tasks
Researchers have found that alternative enactment techniques — such as acting — can improve patients' perspective memory. Academics involved in the study claim the new method is particularly beneficial for people with mild cognitive impairment (which could suggest early stages of Alzheimer's disease) and can provide a cost-effective alternative that can support independent living.
8h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
Smoking can affect breastfeeding habits
Researchers have determined that new mothers exposed to cigarette smoke in their homes, stop breastfeeding sooner than women not exposed to second-hand smoke.
8h

Live Science
100+
The Bermuda Triangle: A Breeding Ground for Rogue Waves or a Pit of Human Mistakes?
The risks of the Bermuda Triangle are the risks of the ocean, scientists say
8h

Blog » Languages » English
2
Monthly Stats for Eyewire: July 2018
July was epic! The points rained from Eyewire Cup bonuses, a ton of players graduated to higher ranks, and we finished 76 cells, including two gigantic marathon cells (in 18 hours 35 minutes and 11 hours 55 minutes respectively). Phew! After all that, we can only wonder what wonders August may bring. Check out the stats below! New Scouts: strangerxtheminute Fourleaf37 joy050530 sjapelson usagidar
8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
New research shows Juvenile diversion programs work, also curb reoffending tendencies
Juveniles who complete diversion programs for their crimes are less likely to continue their criminal activity as adults, according to new research from Case Western Reserve University.
8h

New on MIT Technology Review
53
This new blockchain-based betting platform could cause Napster-sized legal headaches
Augur lets people bet on events and pays whoever gets it right—so of course they’re wagering on the deaths of Donald Trump and Jeff Bezos.
8h

The Atlantic
98
The Poetry of America’s Most Dangerous City
Society begs us to pull up our bootstraps and fly to Venus / But when you keep us padlocked to trenches / It ain’t easy to show our genius. That’s Kondwani Fidel, a celebrated spoken-word poet from Baltimore, rapping about his experience growing up in America’s most dangerous city. According to a USA Today analysis of crime conducted this year, Baltimore has the highest per capita murder rate in
8h

New on MIT Technology Review
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Tesla is making its own AI chips
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9h

New on MIT Technology Review
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Apple is America’s first trillion-dollar company, thanks in large part to China
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9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Drugs for heart failure are still under-prescribed, years after initial study
A new study found that many people with heart failure do not receive the medications recommended for them under guidelines set by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association and Heart Failure Society of America.
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Study challenges evolution of FOXP2 as human-specific language gene
FOXP2, a gene implicated in affecting speech and language, is held up as a textbook example of positive selection on a human-specific trait. But in a new paper, researchers challenge this finding. Their analysis of genetic data from a diverse sample of modern people and Neanderthals saw no evidence for recent, human-specific selection of FOXP2 and revises the history of how we think humans acquire
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Alcohol increases tuberculosis-related deaths in young mice
Alcohol increases the mortality of young but not old mice infected with the tuberculosis-causing bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this effect is mediated by the production of a protein called interferon-alpha.
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Genome regulation of cell type cataloged in mouse at single-cell level
Scientists have completed a major effort to map the regulatory landscape of the mouse genome at a single-cell resolution. Despite the species difference, this mouse cell atlas is helping implicate which cell types underlie specific human diseases. The atlas data could also advance the understanding of developmental pathways and the formation of cell lineages. Related atlases have already been comp
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Google Glass helps kids with autism read facial expressions, study finds
Children with autism were able to improve their social skills by using a smartphone app paired with Google Glass to help them understand the emotions conveyed in people's facial expressions, according to a pilot study.
9h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
36
Study sheds light on stem cell proliferation that may one day boost crop yields
A Purdue University study has uncovered mechanisms that lead to stem cell formation and maintenance in plants. The findings may one day allow scientists to manipulate stem cell production to increase biomass that can be used for biofuels or grain yield in plants like corn and soybeans.
9h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
If intelligent aliens exist, why haven't we seen them?
Thousands of planets have been discovered in the last few decades, although astronomers tell us there are probably billions. In such a large and diverse set of solar systems, it seems impossible that humans could be the only intelligent life.
9h

Popular Science
12
For young football players, too much water can be just as bad as not enough
Health Overhydration presents a real health hazard Football players absolutely need water, but they should be warned not to overdo it.
9h

Live Science
42
Earth's Soil Is Hyperventilating Thanks To Climate Change
There's twice as much C02 trapped in Earth's soil as in the atmosphere, and it's escaping.
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
How plant-rotting bacteria steal iron to survive
In a new study, researchers identify important new insights into a survival mechanism of the bacteria that cause rotting in certain plants, including some highly invasive weeds. The study demonstrates for the first time exactly how the bacterium Pectobacterium obtains the iron vital to its survival and replication: by pirating it from iron-bearing proteins in the host plants.
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
When the seed becomes a plant, it has 48 hours to survive
When a seed germinates, it only has two days to turn into a seedling capable of photosynthesis, before having exhausted its reserves. In a new study, researchers reveal the underlying mechanism of this process.
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
35
How to make the gene-editing tool CRISPR work even better
Scientists have found conclusive evidence that Cas9, the most popular enzyme currently used in CRISPR gene editing, is less effective and precise than one of the lesser-used CRISPR proteins, Cas12a. Because Cas9 is more likely to edit the wrong part of a plant's or animal's genome, disrupting healthy functions, the scientists make the case that switching to Cas12a would lead to safer and more effe
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
The end-Cretaceous extinction unleashed modern shark diversity
A study that examined the shape of hundreds of fossilized shark teeth suggests that modern shark biodiversity was triggered by the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event, about 66 million years ago.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Mysterious DNA modification important for fly brain
Scientists have identified a function for a mysterious DNA modification in fruit flies' brain development, which may provide hints to its role in humans.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Map of a billion brain links reveals clues about how we think
Scientists have created an elaborate map of more than a billion brain cell connections, helping to shed light on how memories are formed and recalled.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Death toll from Hurricane Maria estimated to be larger than previously thought
The number of people who died as a result of Hurricane Maria — which hit Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017 — may be as high as 1,139, surpassing the official death count of 64, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
32
pH imbalance in brain cells may contribute to Alzheimer's disease
Scientists say they have found new evidence in lab-grown mouse brain cells, called astrocytes, that one root of Alzheimer's disease may be a simple imbalance in acid-alkaline — or pH — chemistry inside endosomes, the nutrient and chemical cargo shuttles in cells.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Maternal dengue immunity protects against fetal damage in mice following Zika infection
A mother's prior dengue immunity protects her unborn baby from devastating brain effects associated with Zika virus infection, a new study suggests. These findings could guide development of more effective flavivirus vaccines and hint at what types of immune responses are maximally protective against fetal brain damage after Zika invasion.
9h

Big Think
New study links depression to a single molecule
Acetyl-L-carnitine has long been recognized as important for metabolism of fatty acids in mitochondria. Its newly discovered link to depression could one day change the lives of millions. Read More
9h

Big Think
LeBron James' public school is the education model America needs
Charter schools and the privatization of education have an adversary in Akron. And in the NBA. Read More
9h

Big Think
QAnon, a bizarre online conspiracy theory, disturbingly spreads to real life
An online conspiracy theory about President Donald Trump is now affecting people and politics in real life. Read More
9h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
47
The fading ghost of a long-dead star
Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of one of the larger supernova remnants in the Milky Way galaxy in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
9h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Ex-Tesla worker accused of hacking seeks $1M in counterclaim
A former Tesla Inc. employee at the electric car maker's battery plant in Nevada is seeking at least $1 million in defamation damages after it accused him of hacking into computers and stealing confidential information leaked to the media.
9h

BBC News – Science & Environment
83
Small height evolved twice on 'Hobbit' island of Flores
A new study has shown that small height evolved twice in humans on the Indonesian island of Flores.
9h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
100+
Novel PET imaging method could track and guide therapy for type 1 diabetes
Researchers have discovered a new nuclear medicine test that could improve care of patients with type 1 diabetes. The new positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method could measure beta-cell mass, which would greatly enhance the ability to monitor and guide diabetes therapies. This study is reported in the featured article of the month in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's August issue.
9h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Insulin resistance under-diagnosed in non-diabetics with Parkinson's disease
Almost two-thirds of non-diabetic patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may be insulin resistant, despite having normal blood sugar, report scientists in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. Their findings suggest that insulin resistance in PD is a common and largely undetected problem, especially in patients who are overweight.
9h

Popular Science
55
Shooting portraits on photo paper is a mixture of chemistry and a dying art
DIY This complicated chemical process is a far cry from smartphone photography. This old technique produces unique, one-of-a-kind prints with no negative.
9h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
A material already known for its unique behavior is found to carry current in a way never before observed
Scientists at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have discovered a behavior in materials called cuprates that suggests they carry current in a way entirely different from conventional metals such as copper.
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
'Strange metals' just got stranger
Scientists have discovered a behavior in materials called cuprates that suggests they carry current in a way entirely different from conventional metals such as copper. The research adds new meaning to the materials' moniker, "strange metals."
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Severity of drought during the Maya collapse
The severity of drought conditions during the demise of the Maya civilization about 1,000 years ago has been quantified, representing another piece of evidence that could be used to solve the longstanding mystery of what caused the downfall of one of the ancient world's great civilizations.
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
New method refines cell sample analysis
Innovation in the field of biomedicine: Researchers have developed a novel method which increases more than tenfold the number of proteins that can be visualized per sample, making it possible to generate a comprehensive map of cellular organization across the various cellular states. This highly sophisticated and refined view can be used to advance precision medicine and is already being applied
9h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
36
AI device identifies objects at the speed of light
Electrical and computer engineers have created a physical artificial neural network — a device modeled on how the human brain works — that can analyze large volumes of data and identify objects at the actual speed of light. The device was created using a 3D printer.
9h

The Atlantic
400+
A 400-Mile Ride to Mark 150 Years of the Fort Laramie Peace Treaty
Stephanie Keith, a photographer with Reuters, was recently invited by Lakota medicine man Ivan Lookinghorse to cover a 400-mile horse ride from Green Grass, South Dakota, to Fort Laramie, Wyoming, commemorating 150 years of the Fort Laramie peace treaty between the Sioux Nation and U.S. government. Keith said : “Under the treaty, the federal government recognized the Black Hills of the Dakota Ter
9h

Latest Headlines | Science News
61
Hurricane Maria’s death toll in Puerto Rico topped 1,100, a new study says
According to data from the Puerto Rico vital statistics system, Hurricane Maria killed an estimated 1,139 people.
10h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Modern Flores Island pygmies show no genetic link to extinct 'hobbits'
A modern pygmy population living on an Indonesian island near a cave with Homo floresiensis ('hobbit') fossils appears to have evolved short stature independently. H. floresiensis was significantly smaller than the modern Flores pygmies, standing about 3.5 feet tall (shorter than the average kindergartener), while modern pygmies average about 15 inches taller. Floresiensis also differed from H. sa
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
New light shed on relationship between calorie-burning fat and muscle function
Endocrinologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have shown for the first time that brown fat can exert control over skeletal muscle function.
10h

Popular Science
27
The latest climate assessment isn't surprising, but it still sucks
Environment If only we could just study for a better grade. This week, NOAA released the State of the Climate report for 2017. The results—while not surprising—are distressing.
10h

The Atlantic
67
How Family Reunification Actually Works at the Border
For Morgan Weibel, an immigration attorney and the executive director of the San Francisco branch of the nonprofit Tahirih Justice Center, which advocates for immigrant women and girls fleeing violence, last week was, in a word, “insane.” Slightly less insane, she clarifies, than the week prior—which she spent shuttling between the Port Isabel Detention Center in Los Fresnos, Texas, and the respi
10h

NYT > Science
200+
F.D.A. Did Not Intervene to Curb Risky Fentanyl Prescriptions
Powerful cancer pain drugs were given to patients with other conditions who cannot tolerate them. A program to curb the practice was run by companies that sell the drugs.
10h

NYT > Science
300+
Matter: Bodies Keep Shrinking on This Island, and Scientists Aren't Sure Why
The Indonesian island of Flores has given rise to smaller hominins, humans and even elephants.
10h

NYT > Science
54
Sweden’s Tallest Peak Shrinks in Record Heat
Soaring temperatures are melting snow and ice from Kebnekaise’s southern peak, making the northern part of the mountain Sweden’s highest point.
10h

The Scientist RSS
75
New Ebola Outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo
Four of six samples from the North Kivu province have tested positive for the virus.
10h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
32
A kernel of promise in popcorn-powered robots
Researchers have discovered how to power simple robots with a novel substance that, when heated, can expand more than 10 times in size, change its viscosity by a factor of 10 and transition from regular to highly irregular granules with surprising force. You can also eat it with a little butter and salt.
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
51
Supersolder exhibits unparalleled thermal properties
In electronics, solder is used to connect two parts together. As a bridge, one of its most important functions is to transfer heat away from critical electronic components and toward the heat sink, which uses air or water to safely dissipate heat. As technological advances allow for the creation of smaller and more powerful computers and electronics—and with temperatures in computer chips reaching
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Lung cancer screening guidelines inadequate for high-risk minorities
Data from a Chicago-based lung cancer screening program provides evidence that national lung cancer screening guidelines may be insufficient for individuals in underrepresented communities.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Researchers estimate higher death toll from Hurricane Maria than previously thought
The number of people who died as a result of Hurricane Maria — which hit Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017 — may be as high as 1,139, surpassing the official death count of 64, according to researchers.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
8
'Strange metals' just got stranger
Scientists at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have discovered a behavior in materials called cuprates that suggests they carry current in a way entirely different from conventional metals such as copper. The research, published today in the journal Science, adds new meaning to the materials' moniker, 'strange metals.'
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Radar better than weather balloon for measuring boundary layer
Improving forecasting for a host of severe weather events may be possible thanks to a more comprehensive method for measuring the Earth's boundary layer depth, developed by Penn State researchers.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
How plant-rotting bacteria steal iron to survive
In a new study, researchers identify important new insights into a survival mechanism of the bacteria that cause rotting in certain plants, including some highly invasive weeds. The study, publishing on Aug. 2 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, demonstrates for the first time exactly how the bacterium Pectobacterium obtains the iron vital to its survival and replication: by pirating it from
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
New method refines cell sample analysis
Innovation in the field of biomedicine: Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a novel method which increases more than tenfold the number of proteins that can be visualized per sample, making it possible to generate a comprehensive map of cellular organization across the various cellular states. This highly sophisticated and refined view can be used to advance precision medicine a
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Modern Flores Island pygmies show no genetic link to extinct 'hobbits'
A modern pygmy population living on an Indonesian island near a cave with Homo floresiensis ('hobbit') fossils appears to have evolved short stature independently, according to an international team of researchers. H. floresiensis was significantly smaller than the modern Flores pygmies, standing about 3.5 feet tall (shorter than the average kindergartener), while modern pygmies average about 15 i
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Scientists measure severity of drought during the Maya collapse
The severity of drought conditions during the demise of the Maya civilization about 1,000 years ago has been quantified, representing another piece of evidence that could be used to solve the longstanding mystery of what caused the downfall of one of the ancient world's great civilizations.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Scale-invariant resistivity in cuprates
A new intriguing property of cuprate superconductors has been identified, says a new study, which shows that in very high magnetic fields, the resistivity of a thin-film lanthanum-based cuprate scales linearly with the field.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
A short genetic history of the Flores Island pygmies
On the Indonesian island of Flores, populations of tiny humans arose twice, independently and separated by tens of thousands of years, according to new research.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Accepting responsibility for others separate leaders from followers
A willingness to shoulder responsibility on behalf of others is an important and common trait in all who choose to lead, a new study finds.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
The drought that collapsed classic Maya society
A period of severe drought near the end of the 1st millennium C.E. likely sealed the fate of Lowland Classic Maya society, and a new study shows just how dry it was as the populations of the Maya Lowlands began to evaporate.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
No evidence of 'hobbit' ancestry in genomes of Flores Island pygmies
Scientists sequenced the genomes of a pygmy population living near the cave in Indonesia where fossils were found of Homo floresiensis, a previously unknown, very small species of human nicknamed the hobbit. The analysis revealed evolutionary changes associated with diet and short stature in the pygmy population, but the researchers found no evidence of genetic elements that might have come from H
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Alcohol increases tuberculosis-related deaths in young mice
Alcohol increases the mortality of young but not old mice infected with the tuberculosis-causing bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and this effect is mediated by the production of a protein called interferon-alpha (IFN-α).
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Cellular communication system in mice helps control female fertility
In new research published Aug. 2 in the journal PLOS Genetics, UW-Madison researchers discovered that two genes work together to construct a cellular communication system in the ovaries of mice to maintain healthy eggs.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Field test for dog Leishmania exposure evaluated
Dogs infected with Leishmania infantum, a parasite transmitted by the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus, are at risk for spreading leishmaniasis infections to humans. A new test, described and evaluated this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, provides an easier-than-ever way to test dogs for exposure to P. perniciosus sand flies, and could be used in monitoring the effectiveness of sand fly
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Ebola outbreak has lasting impact on Liberian agriculture, food security
There is unequivocal evidence that disease epidemics adversely affect the livelihoods of individuals, households and communities in affected areas. The ebola outbreak in Liberia, researchers have now shown, had lasting impacts on crop production, income, and food security. The new results are published this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
10h

The Atlantic
4K
Trump’s Fuel-Efficiency Rollback Breaks With 50 Years of Precedent
Updated on August 2 at 4:02 p.m. ET The Trump administration proposed a major environmental rollback on Thursday, announcing that—starting in 2020—it will no longer require cars and trucks to become more fuel efficient every year. Under the new proposal, automakers would only have to produce cars that achieve a real-world average of about 29 miles a gallon from 2021 to 2025. This is a major chang
10h

The Atlantic
300+
Why Republicans Aren’t Planning for the Coming Mueller Report
Rumors continue to build in Washington that a report from Special Counsel Robert Mueller is set to drop soon. But on and off Capitol Hill, Republican lawmakers say there have been no formal discussions on how to respond—no matter what the report’s findings may be. “We’re aware that it might drop soon,” Representative Mark Walker, the chairman of the Republican Study Committee, told me this week,
10h

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
15
The Meg: Submersive VR Experience
The Meg: Submersive VR Experience puts viewers head-to-head with the largest prehistoric shark to ever exist. Diving in open water, the virtual reality experience gives viewers a visceral view of the ocean depths. An encounter with the Megalodon is inevitable as you see her lurking in the waters nearby… “The Meg” opens in theaters August 10. For a more immersive experience download and watch on t
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
How plant-rotting bacteria steal iron to survive
In a new study, researchers identify important new insights into a survival mechanism of the bacteria that cause rotting in certain plants, including some highly invasive weeds. The study, publishing on August 2 in the Open-Access journal PLOS Biology, demonstrates for the first time exactly how the bacterium Pectobacterium obtains the iron vital to its survival and replication: by pirating it fro
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Radar better than weather balloon for measuring boundary layer
Improving forecasting for a host of severe weather events may be possible thanks to a more comprehensive method for measuring the Earth's boundary layer depth, developed by Penn State researchers.
10h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
35
Astronomers blown away by historic stellar blast
Observations from the Gemini South and other telescopes in Chile played a critical role in understanding light echoes from a stellar eruption which occurred almost 200 years ago. Gemini spectroscopy shows that ejected material from the blast is the fastest ever seen from a star that remained intact.
10h

Latest Headlines | Science News
100+
Indonesia’s pygmies didn’t descend from hobbits, DNA analysis suggests
Short people living on the Indonesian island of Flores don’t appear to have DNA from controversial, small-bodied Stone Age hominids called hobbits.
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Trump administration seeks rollback of Obama-era fuel efficiency rules
US President Donald Trump's administration announced plans on Thursday to roll back Obama-era fuel efficiency standards, sparking a fight with California and other states that favor more aggressive environmental policies.
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Music streaming giant Deezer raises 160 million euros
Global music streaming platform Deezer said Thursday it had raised 160 million euros ($186 million) in fresh funds from investors, including the Saudi sovereign fund Kingdom Holding Company (KHC), and French telecoms giant Orange.
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
93
Modern Flores Island pygmies show no genetic link to extinct 'hobbits'
Two pygmy populations on the same tropical island. One went extinct tens of thousands of years ago; the other still lives there. Are they related?
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Scientists measure severity of drought during the Maya collapse
The severity of drought conditions during the demise of the Maya civilisation about one thousand years ago has been quantified, representing another piece of evidence that could be used to solve the longstanding mystery of what caused the downfall of one of the ancient world's great civilisations.
10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The US has experienced a spike in violent and unintentional injuries
The US has experienced a disturbing increase in violent and unintentional injuries over the last few years, reversing positive gains made in the 1980s and 1990s, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Denver Health Medical Center.
10h

Science : NPR
26
What Makes A Leader?
Leaders make decisions for a group in the same way they make choices for themselves, a study suggests. They don't change their decision-making behavior, even when the welfare of others is at stake. (Image credit: sorbetto/Getty Images)
10h

The Atlantic
74
Apple Is Worth One Trillion Dollars
Apple, a company founded 42 years ago in a Santa Clara Valley garage to make personal computers, is now worth $1 trillion. It becomes the first American company to achieve that feat. A trillion is an unimaginably big number no matter what you’re counting—but especially when it’s money. It’s the kind of number usually reserved for measures of aggregated national economic inputs and outputs. The 20
10h

The Scientist RSS
1
Serum Survey Reveals Protein Patterns of Ill Health
Analyses of blood from thousands of people show distinct protein profiles are linked to complex diseases of aging.
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
New Horizons team prepares for stellar occultation ahead of Ultima Thule flyby
Successfully observing an object from more than four billion miles away is difficult, yet NASA's New Horizons mission team is banking that they can do that—again.
10h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Thousands of firefighters struggle to contain giant blazes in California
Thousands of firefighters were struggling Thursday to contain two vast wildfires in California, one of which has become one of the most destructive blazes in the state's history.
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Chinese-American engineer charged with stealing GE technology
A Chinese-American engineer faces charges of stealing valuable technology from General Electric, sneaking it out hidden in a picture of the sunset to take to China, the US Justice Department said.
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Engine flaw delays Boeing test of crew capsule to 2019
An engine flaw discovered during a launchpad test of Boeing's Starliner spaceship, designed to carry humans to the International Space Station, has delayed its first crew test flight until next year.
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
71
Astronomers uncover new clues to the star that wouldn't die
What happens when a star behaves like it exploded, but it's still there?
11h

Science current issue
15
Computational and neurobiological foundations of leadership decisions
Leaders must take responsibility for others and thus affect the well-being of individuals, organizations, and nations. We identify the effects of responsibility on leaders’ choices at the behavioral and neurobiological levels and document the widespread existence of responsibility aversion, that is, a reduced willingness to make decisions if the welfare of others is at stake. In mechanistic terms
11h

Science current issue
Nudge, not sludge
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
News at a glance
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Researchers welcome Trump's pick to head science office
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
12
EU verdict on CRISPR crops dismays scientists
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
5
Did kindness prime our species for language?
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
'Ending AIDS movement falters worldwide
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
How islands shrink people
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
80
Staying slim during pregnancy carries a price
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
4
A place in the sun
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
A call for seagrass protection
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Liquid water on Mars
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Shouldering responsibility
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
2
Wheat–the cereal abandoned by GM
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Indigenous communities, groundwater opportunities
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Neurodiversity, in profile
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Poetic and polemic
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Brazil's protected areas under threat
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
British Columbia's wildlife model reform
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Canada begins a great ganja experiment
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Modulation without surgical intervention
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Probing new targets for movement disorders
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Submarine fiber optic earthquake detection
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Falling from a fall in rainfall
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Cranking up the field
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
The genetics of human short stature
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Hands-on biology education kits
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Fluctuating selection in nature
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Liquid water under Mars' southern ice cap
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
New life for lungs
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
It's all about your contacts
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Leadership and responsibility
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Making multiplexed subcellular protein maps
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Interchanging species of similar function
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
An expanding radio jet from a destroyed star
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
An epitaxial route to strain
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Enough but not too many stem cells
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
A channel for calcium
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Altering wheat for pathogen resistance
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Why seagrass meadows should be protected
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
An eye to evading the immune system
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
No gender differences in early math cognition
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Predicting esophageal cancer
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Transit time inside a mosquito
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Differences promote spreading
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Fruitfulness of forest drought
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Hauling away injured neurons
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Artificial {beta}-barrel pores
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
38
Emergent simplicity in microbial community assembly
A major unresolved question in microbiome research is whether the complex taxonomic architectures observed in surveys of natural communities can be explained and predicted by fundamental, quantitative principles. Bridging theory and experiment is hampered by the multiplicity of ecological processes that simultaneously affect community assembly in natural ecosystems. We addressed this challenge by
11h

Science current issue
Selective trade-offs maintain alleles underpinning complex trait variation in plants
To understand evolutionary factors that maintain complex trait variation, we sequenced genomes from a single population of the plant Mimulus guttatus , identifying hundreds of nucleotide variants associated with morphological and life history traits. Alleles that delayed flowering also increased size at reproduction, which suggests pervasive antagonistic pleiotropy in this annual plant. The "larg
11h

Science current issue
Scale-invariant magnetoresistance in a cuprate superconductor
The anomalous metallic state in the high-temperature superconducting cuprates is masked by superconductivity near a quantum critical point. Applying high magnetic fields to suppress superconductivity has enabled detailed studies of the normal state, yet the direct effect of strong magnetic fields on the metallic state is poorly understood. We report the high-field magnetoresistance of thin-film L
11h

Science current issue
A dust-enshrouded tidal disruption event with a resolved radio jet in a galaxy merger
Tidal disruption events (TDEs) are transient flares produced when a star is ripped apart by the gravitational field of a supermassive black hole (SMBH). We have observed a transient source in the western nucleus of the merging galaxy pair Arp 299 that radiated >1.5 x 10 52 erg at infrared and radio wavelengths but was not luminous at optical or x-ray wavelengths. We interpret this as a TDE with m
11h

Science current issue
Ultrastable laser interferometry for earthquake detection with terrestrial and submarine cables
Detecting ocean-floor seismic activity is crucial for our understanding of the interior structure and dynamic behavior of Earth. However, 70% of the planet’s surface is covered by water, and seismometer coverage is limited to a handful of permanent ocean bottom stations. We show that existing telecommunication optical fiber cables can detect seismic events when combined with state-of-the-art freq
11h

Science current issue
Radar evidence of subglacial liquid water on Mars
The presence of liquid water at the base of the martian polar caps has long been suspected but not observed. We surveyed the Planum Australe region using the MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding) instrument, a low-frequency radar on the Mars Express spacecraft. Radar profiles collected between May 2012 and December 2015 contain evidence of liquid water trapped below
11h

Science current issue
Giant polarization in super-tetragonal thin films through interphase strain
Strain engineering has emerged as a powerful tool to enhance the performance of known functional materials. Here we demonstrate a general and practical method to obtain super-tetragonality and giant polarization using interphase strain. We use this method to create an out-of-plane–to–in-plane lattice parameter ratio of 1.238 in epitaxial composite thin films of tetragonal lead titanate (PbTiO 3 )
11h

Science current issue
Quantification of drought during the collapse of the classic Maya civilization
The demise of Lowland Classic Maya civilization during the Terminal Classic Period (~800 to 1000 CE) is a well-cited example of how past climate may have affected ancient societies. Attempts to estimate the magnitude of hydrologic change, however, have met with equivocal success because of the qualitative and indirect nature of available climate proxy data. We reconstructed the past isotopic comp
11h

Science current issue
HAIRY MERISTEM with WUSCHEL confines CLAVATA3 expression to the outer apical meristem layers
The control of the location and activity of stem cells depends on spatial regulation of gene activities in the stem cell niche. Using computational and experimental approaches, we have tested and found support for a hypothesis for gene interactions that specify the Arabidopsis apical stem cell population. The hypothesis explains how the WUSCHEL gene product, synthesized basally in the meristem, i
11h

Science current issue
Cryo-EM structure of a mitochondrial calcium uniporter
Calcium transport plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial physiology and pathophysiology. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a calcium-selective ion channel that is the primary mediator for calcium uptake into the mitochondrial matrix. Here, we present the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the full-length MCU from Neurospora crassa to an overall resolution of ~3.7 angstr
11h

Science current issue
18
Evolutionary history and adaptation of a human pygmy population of Flores Island, Indonesia
Flores Island, Indonesia, was inhabited by the small-bodied hominin species Homo floresiensis , which has an unknown evolutionary relationship to modern humans. This island is also home to an extant human pygmy population. Here we describe genome-scale single-nucleotide polymorphism data and whole-genome sequences from a contemporary human pygmy population living on Flores near the cave where H.
11h

Science current issue
New Products
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11h

Science current issue
6
Paying it forward as a mentor
[no content]
11h

Science current issue
Here, there, and everywhere: The importance of ER membrane contact sites
Our textbook image of organelles has changed. Instead of revealing isolated cellular compartments, the picture now emerging shows organelles as largely interdependent structures that can communicate through membrane contact sites (MCSs). MCSs are sites where opposing organelles are tethered but do not fuse. MCSs provide a hybrid location where the tool kits of two different organelles can work to
11h

Science current issue
Multiplexed protein maps link subcellular organization to cellular states
Obtaining highly multiplexed protein measurements across multiple length scales has enormous potential for biomedicine. Here, we measured, by iterative indirect immunofluorescence imaging (4i), 40-plex protein readouts from biological samples at high-throughput from the millimeter to the nanometer scale. This approach simultaneously captures properties apparent at the population, cellular, and su
11h

Science current issue
Response to Comment on "Genomic signals of selection predict climate-driven population declines in a migratory bird"
Fitzpatrick et al . discuss issues that they had with analyses and interpretation in our recent manuscript on genomic correlates of climate in yellow warblers. We provide evidence that our findings would not change with different analysis and maintain that our study represents a promising direction for integrating the potential for climate adaptation as one of many tools in conservation managemen
11h

Science current issue
Erratum for the Report "Synapse-specific representation of the identity of overlapping memory engrams" by K. Abdou, M. Shehata, K. Choko, H. Nishizono, M. Matsuo, S. Muramatsu, K. Inokuchi
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11h

Big Think
Shows like ‘Keeping Up with the Kardashians’ may be turning viewers against welfare programs
A new study suggests that viewing materialistic media—even for a minute—can influence people to harbor stronger anti-welfare attitudes. Read More
11h

Big Think
The Bunkers, the Hensels, and the Conjoined States of America
If conjoined twins are forced to get along and share… so can a divided America. Read More
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
53
Financial fruit: Apple becomes 1st trillion-dollar company
Apple has become the world's first publicly traded company to be valued at $1 trillion, the financial fruit of stylish technology that has redefined what we expect from our gadgets.
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
NASA's Terra Satellite finds powerful storms in Hurricane Hector
NASA's Terra satellite analyzed Hurricane Hector in infrared light to find the strongest parts of the storm. Overnight from Aug. 1 to Aug. 2, Hector strengthened into a hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
11h

Scientific American Content: Global
43
Navigating a Sea of Superlatives in Pursuit of the Asian Carp
In the contentious discussions over what to do about Asian carp, facts and science are often distorted, or even completely ignored — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h

The Economist: The world this week
2
Business this week
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11h

The Economist: The world this week
17
KAL’s cartoon
[no content]
11h

The Economist: The world this week
5
Politics this week
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11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Preventing natural hazards from becoming societal disasters
The 2017 hurricane season was one of the worst on record. 17 named storm caused more than 100 direct fatalities, incurred $265 billion in damages and disrupted millions of lives.
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Cash transfers: New research finds combining demand and supply-side incentives improves longer-term
Conditional cash transfers are popular programs used to reduce poverty by making social assistance conditional for recipients, often requiring school attendance and participation in health services. Since the late 1990s, such programs have become popular among governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) across the world. Evaluations of the near-term effects of such programs have found st
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
New study shows some corals might adapt to climate changes
New research shows that not all corals respond the same to changes in climate. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led study looked at the sensitivity of two types of corals found in Florida and the Caribbean and found that one of them—mountainous star coral—possesses an adaptation that allows it to survive under high temperatures and acidity conditions
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Mapping blue carbon in mangroves worldwide
Mangroves are tropical forests that thrive in salt water and are found in a variety of coastal settings from deltas to estuaries to weathered reefs and limestone rocks worldwide. Mangroves can store greater amounts of carbon than any other terrestrial ecosystem, which helps reduce the amount of carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. When carbon is stored in the ocean or coastal eco
11h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Astronomers blown away by historic stellar blast
Observations from the Gemini South and other telescopes in Chile played a critical role in understanding light echoes from a stellar eruption which occurred almost 200 years ago. Gemini spectroscopy shows that ejected material from the blast is the fastest ever seen from a star that remained intact.
11h

Live Science
100+
A Woman Died from Dry Ice Fumes. Here's How It Can Happen
In a "horrific accident," a woman in Washington died from exposure to dry ice fumes, according to news reports.
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
A kernel of promise in popcorn-powered robots
Cornell researchers have discovered how to power simple robots with a novel substance that, when heated, can expand more than 10 times in size, change its viscosity by a factor of 10 and transition from regular to highly irregular granules with surprising force.
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
70
Astronomers blown away by historic stellar blast
Imagine traveling to the Moon in just 20 seconds! That's how fast material from a 170 year old stellar eruption sped away from the unstable, eruptive, and extremely massive star Eta Carinae.
11h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
21
Genome regulation of cell type cataloged in mouse at single-cell level
Scientists have completed a major effort to map the regulatory landscape of the mouse genome at a single-cell resolution.
11h

The Atlantic
100+
The Value of the ‘Female Gaze’ in Film
Not a word is spoken in the final sequence of Claire Denis’s 1999 film Beau Travail . A loose adaptation of Herman Melville’s novel Billy Budd set in the French Foreign Legion, the movie follows a group of soldiers in Djibouti, led by Chief Adjutant Galoup (Denis Lavant,) that is stirred into chaos by the new recruit Gilles Sentain (Grégoire Colin). Galoup’s jealousy of, and repressed desire for,
11h

Scientific American Content: Global
100+
Proposed Car Efficiency Rollback Will Not Halt Electric Vehicles
Falling battery prices and foreign demand will keep the market going — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h

BBC News – Science & Environment
29
Shark taken because it 'needed help'
The man who took a shark from an aquarium in Texas, US said he did it because 'it needed help'.
12h

BBC News – Science & Environment
50
A bird's eye view: Songbirds perceive colour like humans
Faced with a glorious spectrum of colour, songbirds, just like humans, look for the big picture.
12h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
NASA sees Tropical Depression Jongdari nearing China landfall
Tropical Depression Jongdari continued it crawl toward a landfall in China and NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the disorganized depression. Warnings are in effect in China as Jongdari approaches.
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Study reveals early warning signs of heart problems in patients with newly diagnosed lupus
Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in patients with lupus, a systemic autoimmune disease. In a new study in Arthritis & Rheumatology–a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology–imaging tests revealed signs of cardiac impairment in patients newly diagnosed with lupus, even before any symptoms of chest discomfort.
12h

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It's Never Too Late to Be a Reader Again
No matter how long the hiatus, you're just one book away from reconnecting with reading—and the key might just be a failure past.
12h

Scientific American Content: Global
12
Out with the Bad Science
NPR science journalist Richard Harris talks about his book Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope and Wastes Billions. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
New tool helps users decide which countries their Internet traffic transits
The Internet gives people worldwide access to applications and services, but in many cases, Internet traffic passes through a few dominant countries, according to new research from Princeton University.
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
15
UCLA-developed artificial intelligence device identifies objects at the speed of light
A team of UCLA electrical and computer engineers has created a physical artificial neural network — a device modeled on how the human brain works — that can analyze large volumes of data and identify objects at the actual speed of light. The device was created using a 3D printer at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering.
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
pH imbalance in brain cells may contribute to Alzheimer's disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have found new evidence in lab-grown mouse brain cells, called astrocytes, that one root of Alzheimer's disease may be a simple imbalance in acid-alkaline — or pH — chemistry inside endosomes, the nutrient and chemical cargo shuttles in cells.
12h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Why compostable plastics may be no better for the environment
As companies move to get rid of single-use plastic bags and bans on microbeads are coming into force, new biodegradable or compostable plastic products seem to offer an alternative. But they may be no better for the environment.
12h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Origin cells for deadly brain tumors identified
A new study identified where the mutation causing glioblastoma starts. According to the study, neural stem cells away from the tumor mass are the cells of origin that contain mutation drivers for glioblastoma, one of the most aggressive brain tumor. This breakthrough research gives insights for understanding why glioblastomas almost always grow back, even after surgery, and suggests novel ways to
12h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
The case for greater focus on mosquitoes, ticks in epidemiology
The textbook approach to managing disease outbreaks focuses on three factors — pathogen, host, and environment — but it leaves out one critical component in the case of afflictions such as Zika, malaria, and Lyme: the insect or arthropod responsible for transmission to humans. A new report proposes a new version of the classic 'epidemiologic triad' that better reflects the complexities of managi
12h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Is positive education another fad? Perhaps, but it's supported by good research
Positive education is a spin-off from positive psychology. Prominent psychologists such as Martin Seligman and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi were instrumental in its creation, initially in 2000.
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Thin films can enhance vorticity in the ocean
Scientists from the Higher School of Economics and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences have investigated how vortex flows penetrate the interior of a liquid. The authors of the article have shown that specific (thin liquid and insoluble) films on the surface of water enhance eddy currents. These currents are produced by the interacting surface waves directed
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
Moral decision making is rife with internal conflict, say developmental psychologists
A new in-depth study of moral reasoning challenges the popular notion that people are unable to think through difficult moral problems and rely primarily on automatic 'gut' reactions to make tough decisions.
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Need help with your math homework? Ask these worms
Animals often rely on their sense of smell to locate food. It's a law of nature: the first one to reach a food source has a better chance of surviving than those who do not. But how exactly does their brain translate scent and then navigate towards it?
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Obamacare relieved financial strain of those closest to the federal poverty line
While data shows that the Affordable Care Act helped people across the spectrum, a study shows that those around or below the federal poverty line benefitted most.
12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA sees Tropical Depression Jongdari nearing China landfall
Tropical Depression Jongdari continued it crawl toward a landfall in China and NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the disorganized depression. Warnings are in effect in China as Jongdari approaches.
12h

The Atlantic
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Researchers Are Still Counting the Dead From Hurricane Maria
The one-year anniversary of Hurricane Maria is next month. The island is still rebuilding, still preparing for a new hurricane season, still putting its power grid back together, and still dealing with the massive demographic, environmental, and political changes that have taken place as a result of last year’s disaster. And it’s still trying to figure out just who was lost in the catastrophe—the
12h

The Atlantic
11K
How History Classes Helped Create a 'Post-Truth' America
In 1995, the University of Vermont sociologist and historian James W. Loewen published a book that sought to debunk the myriad myths children were often taught about the United States’ past. Framed largely as a critique of the history education delivered in America’s classrooms but also serving as a history text itself, Lies My Teacher Told Me was the result of Loewen’s analysis of a dozen major
12h

Scientific American Content: Global
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I Divorced Science for a While, and Now We’re Getting Along Just Fine
The reflections that emerged from my time away work helped reshape my relationship to my profession as a scientist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h

Big Think
To land a job, you'll need confidence—and a little bit of fear
Losing your job doesn't have to mean losing your self-respect and self-image. In fact, a little moxie might go a long way. Read More
13h

BBC News – Science & Environment
100+
A sunrise from space
This photo time-lapse was taken from the International Space Station of a single orbital sunrise over Earth.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Clonal reproduction assured by sister chromosome pairing in dojo loach fish
Hokkaido University researchers have developed a technique that allows them to track chromosomes during egg production in dojo loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus. The study uncovered how female clones double their chromosomes twice to assure clonal reproduction.
13h

The Scientist RSS
BioIVT Acquires Optivia Biotechnology, Adding Transporter Assay Products and Services to its ADME-Tox Portfolio
BioIVT, a leading provider of research models and services for drug development, today announced that it has acquired Santa Clara, CA-based Optivia Biotechnology and its comprehensive portfolio of transporter assays, multi-transporter models, transporter systems biology, and molecular transport research solutions.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Obesity may also impact flu transmission, not just severity of illness
Obesity increases a person's risk for severe complications from influenza, including hospitalization and even death. It may also play a role in how flu spreads, according to a new study. The findings suggest that obese adults infected with flu shed the virus for a longer time than adults who are not obese, potentially increasing the opportunity for the infection to spread to others.
13h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Muscle 'switch' may control the benefits of exercise
Studying lab animals and humans, researchers discovered that a protein called JNK helps to drive response to exercise. If JNK is activated during exercise, the researchers say, that stimulates skeletal muscle growth. If it's not activated, muscles improve their adaptation for endurance and aerobic capacity.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
With fewer types of fish to catch, Maine fishermen may be losing their knowledge of the sea
Maine fishermen have a long history of being involved in fisheries management. Communication between harvesters and policymakers has been instrumental in the development of rules and regulations that have helped to sustain the region's coastal fisheries—from clams to alewives to lobsters.
13h

The Scientist RSS
BioIVT Acquires Optivia Biotechnology, Adding Transporter Assay Products and Services to its ADME-Tox Portfolio
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13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
NASA's Terra Satellite finds powerful storms in Hurricane Hector
NASA's Terra satellite analyzed Hurricane Hector in infrared light to find the strongest parts of the storm. Overnight from Aug. 1 to Aug. 2, Hector strengthened into a hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Wearable devices: Useful medical insights or just more data?
Despite the popularity of wearable devices to track and measure health and sports performance, a new review highlights how surprisingly little we know we know about how well these sensors and machines work — let alone whether they deliver useful information.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
6
A kernel of promise in popcorn-powered robots
Cornell University researchers have discovered how to power simple robots with a novel substance that, when heated, can expand more than 10 times in size, change its viscosity by a factor of 10 and transition from regular to highly irregular granules with surprising force. You can also eat it with a little butter and salt.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Psychologists find that acting is the key to remembering tasks
Researchers from the University of Chichester have found that alternative enactment techniques — such as acting — can improve patients' perspective memory. Academics involved in the study claim the new method is particularly beneficial for people with mild cognitive impairment (which could suggest early stages of Alzheimer's disease) and can provide a cost-effective alternative that can support
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Mapping blue carbon in mangroves worldwide
Mangroves are tropical forests that thrive in salt water and found in a variety of coastal settings worldwide. Mangroves store greater amounts of carbon than any other terrestrial ecosystem, which helps reduce carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. When carbon is stored in the ocean or coastal ecosystems, it is called blue carbon. However, a more precise estimate of how much blue c
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
New lung cell type discovered
In separate studies published online in Nature on Aug. 1, two independent research teams report the discovery of a new, rare type of cell in the human airway. These cells appear to be the primary source of activity of the CFTR gene, mutations to which cause cystic fibrosis, a multiorgan disease that affects more than 70,000 people worldwide.
13h

The Atlantic
1K
Social Movements Are Much More Partisan Than They Used to Be
The rock star Graham Nash had a thought while he watched the “March for Our Lives” gun-control protests led by the survivors of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, this spring. “We teach our children the best way we can,” he told me this week, “but we have to learn from our children, too, or else we are making a big mistake.” When he’d had much the same thought nearly a half-century ago, as
13h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
500+
Earthquakes can systematically trigger other ones on opposite side of Earth
New research shows that a big earthquake can not only cause other quakes, but large ones, and on the opposite side of the Earth.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
New publication about bees and their New England habitats available
Researchers in the Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station and their colleagues from neighboring institutions published a report called "Bees and Their Habitats in Four New England States" this summer.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Record Arctic heat drives reindeer into cool tunnels
Norwegian authorities have urged motorists to watch out for reindeer that are seeking refuge in tunnels to cool themselves amid extreme heat in the nation's far north.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Measuring climate impact of forests management—a groundbreaking approach
A JRC-led group of forestry research experts has developed a rigorous new fact-based carbon accounting system that reflects how forest management practices can help mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
41
Genomic study ties insect evolution to the ability to detect airborne odors
A new study reveals that all insects use specialized odorant receptors that enable them to detect and pursue mates, identify enemies, find food and—unfortunately for humans—spread disease. This puts to rest a recent hypothesis that only some insects evolved the ability to detect airborne odors as an adaptation to flight, the researchers said.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
UK higher education students feel less empowered than their Irish counterparts
Professor Rachel Brooks at the University of Surrey is leading on new research which looks at the differences between the political activity of English and Irish higher education (HE) students.
13h

Live Science
400+
New Stonehenge Mystery: Who Were These 10 'Outsiders' Buried at the Site?
Stonehenge's famous pillars came from a place far, far away. That much was known. But now, archaeologists have found another well-traveled feature at the monument: 10 ancient people buried there who definitely weren't locals.
13h

Popular Science
100+
What we know about the new head of the Office of Science and Technology Policy
Science Kelvin Droegemeier could be an huge boon to the scientific community. After a 19 month vacancy, President Trump has decided who he wants to lead the Office of Science and Technology Policy, according to the Washington Post. His pick is…
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Ancient Palmyra—a story of urban resilience
Zenobia was a famous warrior queen who dared to challenge the Roman Emperor and crippled the empire with an ambitious military expansion.
13h

The Atlantic
100+
Surviving in Syria’s ‘Forgotten Province’
S YRIA’S CIVIL WAR is entering a new phase, as the regime closes in on opposition-held areas. One region, Idlib, could be where the opposition makes its last stand. Some 3 million people—roughly half of them native residents and the other half displaced within the region or from other Syrian war zones—are stuck in Idlib and adjacent areas along with rebel fighters. A showdown will almost certainl
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Cash transfers :New research finds combining demand and supply-side incentives improves longer-term
Conditional cash transfers are popular programs used to reduce poverty by making social assistance conditional for recipients, often requiring school attendance and participation in health services. Since the late 1990s, such programs have become popular among governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) across the world. Evaluations of the near-term effects of such programs have found st
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Study elucidates epigenetic mechanisms behind autoimmune diseases
Brazilian researchers use an editing tool to investigate a gene that plays a key role in eliminating autoaggressive cells and controlling the development of diseases such as type 1 diabetes. In tests with mice, the disrupting of medullary thymic epithelial cells gene impaired the processing of mRNA involved in their adhesion to autoaggressive T lymphocytes.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
New study shows some corals might adapt to climate changes
New research shows that not all corals respond the same to changes in climate. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led study looked at the sensitivity of two types of corals found in Florida and the Caribbean and found that one of them – -mountainous star coral — possesses an adaptation that allows it to survive under high temperatures and acidity cond
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Routine screening of relatives of aortic disease patients could save lives
Research shows over 30 percent of relatives of patients with disease of the aorta could have underlying genetic predisposition to developing life-threatening condition.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
How do you assess pain in children who can't express themselves? New research identifies priorities in identifying pain in nonverbal children with medical complexity
Pain is a frequent problem for children with complex medical conditions — but many of them are unable to communicate their pain verbally. For these children, nurses face a challenging task in assessing and determining the cause of pain, according to a study in the August issue of the American Journal of Nursing. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
MGH team defines the mechanisms of action of key genetic abnormality in Ewing sarcoma
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has used epigenome editing tools to investigate how the genetic abnormality that drives Ewing sarcoma — the second most common bone cancer in children and young adults — unleashes tumor growth.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Newly characterized molecule offers possibilities for novel Alzheimer's treatments
A study by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), recently published in Acta Neuropathologica, investigated lesser-known molecules involved in tauopathies like Alzheimer's. They focused on microRNAs (miRNAs), gene expression regulators that bind to and destroy protein-encoding messenger RNAs. They discovered that some of these miRNAs showed neuroprotective effects; their supplementat
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Aortic atherosclerotic plaque inflammation may contribute to the progression of fatty liver disease to liver fibrosis
A new study sheds light on the long-term effects of highly inflamed plaques on the progression of liver fibrosis.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Genome regulation of cell type cataloged in mouse at single-cell level
Scientists have completed a major effort to map the regulatory landscape of the mouse genome at a single-cell resolution. Despite the species difference, this mouse cell atlas is helping implicate which cell types underlie specific human diseases. The atlas data could also advance the understanding of developmental pathways and the formation of cell lineages. Related atlases have already been comp
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Map of a billion brain links reveals clues about how we think
Scientists have created an elaborate map of more than a billion brain cell connections, helping to shed light on how memories are formed and recalled.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
A new reality for beauty standards: How selfies and filters affect body image
With the spread of photo-editing technology through applications like Snapchat and Facetune, the level of physical 'perfection' previously seen only on celebrity or beauty magazines is now all over social media. As these images become the norm, people's perceptions of beauty worldwide are changing, which can take a toll on a person's self-esteem and can trigger body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), argu
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Death toll from Hurricane Maria estimated to be larger than previously thought
The number of people who died as a result of Hurricane Maria — which hit Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017 — may be as high as 1,139, surpassing the official death count of 64, according to researchers.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
New analysis estimates much higher death toll from Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico
Due to differences in methods, there have been various estimates of the number of deaths in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria, which hit the island on Sept. 20, 2017. The official death toll has remained at 64 since December 2017.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Hearing class
New study finds that the class of neurons responsible for transmitting information from the inner ear to the brain is composed of three molecularly distinct subtypes. One of these subtypes is selectively lost in the inner ears of aging mice, and this molecular diversity does not emerge properly in a deaf-mouse model.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
New stem cell model can be used to test treatments for a rare nervous system disorder
A City of Hope researcher has developed a stem cell model to assess possible treatments for a rare nervous system disorder that is in the same disease group as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The finding takes Yanhong Shi, Ph.D., senior author of the study, and her colleagues one step closer to finding a way to slow or treat Alzheimer's disease and
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Mysterious DNA modification important for fly brain
Emory scientists have identified a function for a mysterious DNA modification in fruit flies' brain development, which may provide hints to its role in humans.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Microbes go dark to stay warm in cooler climates
Microorganisms in colder climates darken themselves to capture more heat from the sun and improve their ability to survive, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
The end-Cretaceous extinction unleashed modern shark diversity
A study that examined the shape of hundreds of fossilized shark teeth suggests that modern shark biodiversity was triggered by the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event, about 66 million years ago.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Plants can tell the time using sugars
A new study by an international team of scientists, including the University of Bristol, has discovered that plants adjust their daily circadian rhythm to the cycle of day and night by measuring the amount of sugars in their cells.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Why weight loss produces remission of type 2 diabetes in some patients
A clinical trial recently showed that nearly half of individuals with type 2 diabetes achieved remission to a non-diabetic state after a weight-loss intervention delivered within six years of diagnosis. Now a study published Aug. 2 in the journal Cell Metabolism reveals that this successful response to weight loss is associated with the early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancrea
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Fecal deposits reveal the fruit fly's pheromone flag
Fruit flies have a rich language of smell messages that they exchange, but now their secret is out. In a report published Aug. 2 in Current Biology, scientists were able to tap into the communications among freely interacting flies using a bioluminescent technology to monitor their brain activity. They discovered that males signal their presence by placing droppings that act as a calling card for
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Study challenges evolution of FOXP2 as human-specific language gene
FOXP2, a gene implicated in affecting speech and language, is held up as a textbook example of positive selection on a human-specific trait. But in a paper published Aug. 2 in the journal Cell, researchers challenge this finding. Their analysis of genetic data from a diverse sample of modern people and Neanderthals saw no evidence for recent, human-specific selection of FOXP2 and revises the histo
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
How to make the gene-editing tool CRISPR work even better
Scientists have found conclusive evidence that Cas9, the most popular enzyme currently used in CRISPR gene editing, is less effective and precise than one of the lesser-used CRISPR proteins, Cas12a. Because Cas9 is more likely to edit the wrong part of a plant's or animal's genome, disrupting healthy functions, the scientists make the case that switching to Cas12a would lead to safer and more effe
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
Fairy-wrens learn alarm calls of other species just by listening
Birds often eavesdrop on the alarm calls of other species, making it possible for them to take advantage of many eyes looking out for danger. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Aug. 2 have found that fairy-wrens can learn those unfamiliar calls — which they liken to a foreign language — even without ever seeing the bird that made the call or the predator that provoked it.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
When the seed becomes a plant, it has 48 hours to survive
During germination, the embryo within the seed must develop into a young seedling capable of photosynthesis in less than 48 hours. During this time, it relies solely on its internal reserves, which are quickly consumed. It must therefore rapidly create functional chloroplasts, cellular organelles that will enable it to produce sugars to ensure its survival. Researchers from the universities of Gen
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
The high-tech evolution of scientific computing
Science has always relied on a combination of approaches to derive an answer or develop a theory. The seeds for Darwin's theory of natural selection grew under a Herculean aggregation of observation, data, and experiment. The more recent confirmation of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) was a decades-long interplay of theory, experiment, and comp
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Exoplanets: how we used chemistry to identify the worlds most likely to host life
Are we alone in the universe? This question has been with us for thousands of years, but it is only now that science is on the cusp of providing a real answer. We now know of dozens of rocky planets orbiting stars other than our sun where, for all we know, life might exist. And soon, with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, we will have the first chance to peer into the atmospheres of so
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Ditch the joystick? Swiss develop jacket that pilots drones
Ever dreamt of flying without flapping wings, airplanes, hand-gliders or wing suits—just soaring free over the landscape with arms outstretched like Superman?
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Australia supermarket bagged after plastic backflip
A leading Australian supermarket was Thursday forced into a backflip after facing a barrage of criticism for reneging on plans to phase out free plastic bags.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Widespread giant African cobra revealed to be five distinct species
Cobras are among the most widely known venomous snakes, and yet a new research paper has revealed that what was thought to be a single widespread cobra species, the forest cobra, is, in fact, made up of five separate species. Two of these species, the Black Forest Cobra and the West African Banded Cobra, are new to science and are first named in this paper.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
49
Stochasticity–inherent fluctuations in materials merit exploration
Scientists and engineers who work with materials – metals, polymers, ceramics, composites, and glasses – know that at some scale, predictive ability breaks down amid the fluctuations known as "stochasticity." On the atomic scale for example, even the most perfect crystal has thermodynamic fluctuations, in the form of "point defects" – atoms missing from the crystal lattice. In another example, the
13h

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The DNC Enlists Kids in Its Fight Against Hackers
The Democratic National Committee will award $500 to the child who comes up with the best defensive strategy for state election websites at Def Con next week.
13h

Viden
Læk afslører: Google bøjer sig for Kinas censur
I 2010 forlod Google Kina i protest mod myndighedernes kontrol. Men nu afslører et læk fra medarbejderne, at virksomheden har lavet hemmelige aftaler med Kina.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
Real or crocodile tears? Psychopaths may not know the difference
New research has found people with high levels of psychopathic traits have difficulty telling when someone is genuinely afraid or upset, based on people's facial expressions.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
41
New light shed on the people who built Stonehenge
Despite over a century of intense study, we still know very little about the people buried at Stonehenge or how they came to be there. Now, archeologists suggest that a number of the people that were buried at the Wessex site had moved with and likely transported the bluestones used in the early stages of the monument's construction, sourced from the Preseli Mountains of west Wales.
13h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Fish reproduction: Two times a lady
A DNA probing technique clarifies the mechanism behind clonal reproduction of female dojo loach fish, also providing insight into the ancestral origin of the clonal population.
13h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Scientists develop novel drug that could potentially treat liver cancer more effectively
A research team has developed a novel peptide drug called FFW that could potentially stop the development of hepatocellular carcinoma or primary liver cancer. This landmark discovery opens door for more effective treatment of liver cancer with less side effects.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Stem cell research for cystic fibrosis leaps forward
The fight against cystic fibrosis has taken a major step forward, with new research showing that cells causing the debilitating genetic disorder could be successfully replaced with healthy ones.
13h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
41
Broadband internet causes sleep deprivation, a new study finds
Individuals with DSL access tend to sleep 25 minutes less than their counterparts without DSL Internet. They are significantly less likely to sleep between 7 and 9 hours, the amount recommended by the scientific community, and are less likely to be satisfied with their sleep, researchers find. The effect is largely driven by individuals that face time constraints in the morning and by the use of e
13h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Pine sawflies: Research sheds light on the evolution of cooperation
Pine sawflies terrify forest owners, but they help researchers understand the evolution of cooperation. A new study shows that ecological context affects the frequency of cooperators and freeloaders in groups of pine sawflies.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Plants can tell the time using sugars
A new study by an international team of scientists, including the University of Bristol, has discovered that plants adjust their daily circadian rhythm to the cycle of day and night by measuring the amount of sugars in their cells.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
32
The end-Cretaceous extinction unleashed modern shark diversity
A study that examined the shape of hundreds of fossilized shark teeth suggests that modern shark biodiversity was triggered by the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event, about 66 million years ago.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
40
Fairy-wrens learn alarm calls of other species just by listening
Birds often eavesdrop on the alarm calls of other species, making it possible for them to take advantage of many eyes looking out for danger. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on August 2 have found that fairy-wrens can learn those unfamiliar calls—which they liken to a foreign language—even without ever seeing the bird that made the call or the predator that provoked it. Instead, the
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
44
How to make the gene-editing tool CRISPR work even better
Among the most significant scientific advances in recent years are the discovery and development of new ways to genetically modify living things using a fast and affordable technology called CRISPR. Now scientists at The University of Texas at Austin say they've identified an easy upgrade for the technology that would lead to more accurate gene editing with increased safety that could open the doo
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Fecal deposits reveal the fruit fly's pheromone flag
Fruit flies have a rich language of smell messages that they exchange, but now their secret is out. In a report published August 2 in Current Biology, scientists were able to tap into the communications among freely interacting flies using a bioluminescent technology to monitor their brain activity. They discovered that males signal their presence by placing droppings that act as a calling card fo
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Microbes go dark to stay warm in cooler climates
Microorganisms in colder climates darken themselves to capture more heat from the sun and improve their ability to survive, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Mysterious DNA modification important for fly brain
Emory scientists have identified a function for a mysterious DNA modification in fruit flies' brain development, which may provide hints to its role in humans.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Invasive tropical plant can completely remove metal pollutants from Britain's rivers – new study
Pollutants in rivers and other water bodies are a serious problem for marine life as well as human health. However, removing them from the water can be a costly process, often requiring energy from fossil fuels, which adds to both operating costs and environmental damage. Consequently, using plants to remove pollutants – a process known as phytoremediation – has become increasingly attractive arou
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
When the seed becomes a plant, it has 48 hours to survive
During germination, the embryo within a seed must develop into a young seedling capable of photosynthesis in less than 48 hours. During this time, it relies solely on its internal reserves, which are quickly consumed. It must therefore rapidly create functional chloroplasts, cellular organelles that will enable it to produce sugars to ensure its survival. Researchers from the University of Geneva
13h

Feed: All Latest
56
These Headphones Make the Perfect Running Buds
These headphones won’t fail—or fall out—when you’re dripping with sweat on the final sprint.
13h

Latest Headlines | Science News
56
Fossil teeth show how a mass extinction scrambled shark evolution
The dinosaur-destroying mass extinction event didn’t wipe out sharks, but it did change their fate.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
UB researchers discover a disease threatening the most plentiful starfish in Antarctica
A study led by experts from the University of Barcelona's Faculty of Biology and Institute for Research on Biodiversity (IRBio) have identified a disease that is affecting the starfish Odontaster validus, one of the most common species on the Antarctic sea floor.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Metabolomics applications for precision nutrition, formula, & neurodegenerative disorders
Metabolomics is the latest omics systems science technology with emerging applications towards psychiatry, personalized medicine, and most recently, precision nutrition research.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Mushrooms of the Far East hold promise for the anti-cancer therapy
Mushrooms from the Far East area contain the natural chemical compounds, which could be used for the design of the novel drugs with highly specific anti-tumor activities and low-toxicity. These compounds may offer new avenues for oncology, providing us with either stand-alone alternatives to chemotherapy, chemopreventive medicines, or drugs to be used in combination with other therapies.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
8
Machine learning links dimensions of mental illness to abnormalities of brain networks
A new study using machine learning has identified brain-based dimensions of mental health disorders, an advance towards much-needed biomarkers to more accurately diagnose and treat patients.
13h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Measuring climate impact of forests management — a groundbreaking approach
A group of forestry research experts led by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, has developed a rigorous new fact-based carbon accounting system that reflects how forest management practices can help mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
13h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
64
Queen bees and the microbial fountain of youth
To the untrained eye beholding a beehive, all animals seem equal, but new research reveals that some are more equal than others.
13h

The Scientist RSS
Parkinson’s Disease Enzyme Implicated in More Cases Than Realized
Levels of active LRRK2 were high even in Parkinson’s patients without a mutation in LRRK2, suggesting that inhibitors of the protein could treat a wider patient population than expected.
14h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
Differences in immune responses create a genetic conflict between sexes
A unique study has discovered that there is a genetic sexual conflict in the immune system in animals. In females, the variation in central genes of the immune system is too high, whereas in males, it is too low. The researchers argue that the conflict is linked to differences in the immune responses of females and males.
14h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Scientists present concept for the elimination of traffic jams
A team of researchers presents proposals for the traffic management of the future. A dynamic and fair toll for road use could reduce congestion.
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Iceland stops hunting minke whales but only for this season
One of Iceland's top whaling companies says it has stopped hunting minke whales this year, in response to a new government regulation that enlarged the protected area for baleen whales.
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
What is a blockchain token?
People are just becoming acquainted with the idea of digital money in the form of cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, where transactions are recorded on a secure distributed database called a blockchain. And now along comes a new concept: the blockchain-based token, which I've been following as a blockchain researcher and teacher of courses about cryptocurrency and blockchain tokens.
14h

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
2
Captain's Spotlight: Sean Dwyer, Part 2 | Deadliest Catch
Captain Sean Dwyer is a leading pioneer for the next generation of fishermen, and faces huge challenges as one of the youngest Deadliest Catch captains. Learn how he won the respect of his crew and earned his stripes. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://ww
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Study confirms lower rate of repeat surgery when hip implants use 'cross-linked' polyethylene
A long-term follow-up study from Australia confirms that hip implants with components made of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) substantially lower the risk of revision surgery after total hip replacement, reports a study in the Aug. 1, 2018, issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Genomic study ties insect evolution to the ability to detect airborne odors
A new study reveals that all insects use specialized odorant receptors that enable them to detect and pursue mates, identify enemies, find food and — unfortunately for humans — spread disease. This puts to rest a recent hypothesis that only some insects evolved the ability to detect airborne odors as an adaptation to flight, the researchers said.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
UMN Medical School researchers study how cues drive our behavior
Recent research published in Nature Neuroscience by University of Minnesota Medical School neuroscientist Benjamin Saunders, Ph.D., uses a Pavlovian model of conditioning to see if turning on a light — a simple cue — just before dopamine neurons were activated could motivate action.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
LSU Health research discovers new link between hypoxia and blood clot risk
Research led by Rinku Majumder, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biochemistry at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found how hypoxia (a low concentration of oxygen) decreases Protein S, a natural anticoagulant, resulting in an increased risk for the development of potentially life-threatening blood clots (thrombosis). Although hypoxia has been associated with an increased risk for thromb
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
'New physics' charmingly escapes us
In the world of elementary particles, traces of a potential 'new physics' may be concealed in processes related to the decay of baryons. Analysis of data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider performed by scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow have, however, shown that one of the rarest decays of baryons containing the charm qua
14h

New on MIT Technology Review
200+
Facebook will now remind you how much of your life you spend staring at it
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14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Why can't all plastic waste be recycled?
The UK produced 11m tonnes of plastic waste in 2017, and recycled around two thirds of it. Or so it seemed. A report by the National Audit Office (NAO) shows that over half of the UK's recyclable waste is sent overseas for recycling, but much of it is likely to end up in landfill or the ocean instead.
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Researchers uncover remnants of early solar system
Scientists believe the solar system was formed some 4.6 billion years ago when a cloud of gas and dust collapsed under gravity possibly triggered by a cataclysmic explosion from a nearby massive star or supernova. As this cloud collapsed, it formed a spinning disk with the sun in the center.
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
High-caliber research launches NSLS-II beamline into operations
A new experimental station (beamline) has begun operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Called the Beamline for Materials Measurement (BMM), it offers scientists state-of-the-art technology for using a classic synchrotron technique: X-ray absorption spectroscopy.
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
First numerical dating results for fluvial valleys of the eastern Cantabrian margin
For the first time, a preliminary chronostratigraphic framework has been established for three Cantabrian river basins through the direct dating of Quaternary fluvial deposits, whose results contribute to reconstructing how these basins have evolved over the last 400,000 years
14h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
400+
Both long term abstinence and heavy drinking may increase dementia risk
People who abstain from alcohol or consume more than 14 units a week during middle age (midlife) are at increased risk of developing dementia, a new study finds.
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
29
Sorry, Elon Musk, but it's now clear that colonising Mars is unlikely – and a bad idea
Space X and Tesla founder Elon Musk has a vision for colonising Mars, based on a big rocket, nuclear explosions and an infrastructure to transport millions of people there. This was seen as highly ambitious but technically challenging in several ways. Planetary protection rules and the difficulties of terraforming (making the planet hospitable by, for example, warming it up) and dealing with the h
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
63
Integrated sensor could monitor brain aneurysm treatment
Implantation of a stent-like flow diverter can offer one option for less invasive treatment of brain aneurysms—bulges in blood vessels—but the procedure requires frequent monitoring while the vessels heal. Now, a multi-university research team has demonstrated proof-of-concept for a highly flexible and stretchable sensor that could be integrated with the flow diverter to monitor hemodynamics in a
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Research finds quakes can systematically trigger other ones on opposite side of Earth
New research shows that a big earthquake can not only cause other quakes, but large ones, and on the opposite side of the Earth.
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Australia to 'vehemently' oppose Japan push to ease whaling ban
Australia Thursday vowed to "vehemently" oppose a new push by Japan to undermine a global moratorium on commercial whaling, and urged like-minded nations to stand firm against Tokyo.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Scientists develop novel drug that could potentially treat liver cancer more effectively
A research team led by scientists from the Cancer Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore has developed a novel peptide drug called FFW that could potentially stop the development of hepatocellular carcinoma or primary liver cancer. This landmark discovery opens door for more effective treatment of liver cancer with less side effects.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Scientists present concept for the elimination of traffic jams
A team of researchers from Cologne and New York presents proposals for the traffic management of the future. A dynamic and fair toll for road use could reduce congestion.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Research on pine sawflies sheds light on the evolution of cooperation
Pine sawflies terrify forest owners, but they help researchers understand the evolution of cooperation.A study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä shows that ecological context affects the frequency of cooperators and freeloaders in groups of pine sawflies.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Heatwave and climate change having negative impact on our soil say experts
The recent heatwave and drought could be having a deeper, more negative effect on soil than we first realised say scientists. That's because organisms in soil are highly diverse and are responsible not only for producing the soil we need to grow crops, but also provide humans with many other benefits, such as cleaning water and regulating greenhouse gas emissions.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
UK higher education students feel less empowered than their Irish counterparts
Professor Rachel Brooks at the University of Surrey is leading on new research which looks at the differences between the political activity of English and Irish higher education (HE) students.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Differences in immune responses create a genetic conflict between sexes
A unique study from Lund University in Sweden has discovered for the first time that there is a genetic sexual conflict in the immune system in animals. In females, the variation in central genes of the immune system is too high, whereas in males, it is too low. The researchers argue that the conflict is linked to differences in the immune responses of females and males.
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The case for greater focus on mosquitoes, ticks in epidemiology
The textbook approach to managing disease outbreaks focuses on three factors — pathogen, host, and environment–but it leaves out one critical component in the case of afflictions such as Zika, malaria, and Lyme: the insect or arthropod responsible for transmission to humans. A new report in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America proposes a new version of the classic 'epidemiologic tr
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Starbucks and Alibaba join forces as China coffee war brews
Starbucks coffees will be delivered to Chinese consumers with the help of e-commerce giant Alibaba, the companies said Thursday, as two of the world's biggest names in retail join forces in a China coffee war that is rapidly heating up.
14h

NYT > Science
40K
Trump Administration Unveils Its Plan to Relax Car Pollution Rules
The proposal would freeze rules requiring cleaner, more efficient cars and unravel one of President Obama’s signature policies to fight global warming.
14h

NYT > Science
1K
Fields Medal Is Stolen Minutes After It’s Given in Brazil
Caucher Birkar, a Cambridge University professor, was one of four winners of the award, which is regarded as the world’s most prestigious prize for math.
14h

Big Think
11
Study: Online hate comments by women are apparently more offensive
A new study asserts that liberals and conservatives alike equally disdain hateful comments online, but only when they’re written by women. Read More
14h

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
41
Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, research finds
Despite increased attention to opioid abuse, prescriptions have remained relatively unchanged for many US patients, new research finds.
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Siemens shares nosedive on overhaul plan, energy woes
Shares in Siemens plummeted Thursday after falling demand for gas turbines weighed on quarterly earnings, and the German conglomerate announced a major revamp of its industrial units.
14h

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300+
Online Hate Is Rampant. Here's How to Keep It From Spreading
Covering hateful memes plays into their makers’ hands. But not covering them seems neglectful. So what's to be done?
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Broadband Internet causes sleep deprivation, a new study finds
Individuals with DSL access tend to sleep 25 minutes less than their counterparts without DSL Internet. They are significantly less likely to sleep between seven and nine hours, the amount recommended by the scientific community, and are less likely to be satisfied with their sleep, Bocconi University's Francesco Billari and colleagues find. The effect is largely driven by individuals that face ti
14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Stem cell research for cystic fibrosis leaps forward
The fight against cystic fibrosis (CF) has taken a major step forward, with pioneering research by University of Adelaide scientists showing that cells causing the debilitating genetic disorder could be successfully replaced with healthy ones.
14h

The Atlantic
1K
The Pope's Groundbreaking Rejection of the Death Penalty
Pope Francis has approved a change to the official teachings of the Catholic Church, calling for the worldwide abolition of the death penalty. The pope has frequently spoken out against the death penalty; in a speech in Rome last year, for example, Francis called the punishment “inadmissible because it is an attack on the inviolability and dignity of the person.” The new change to the Catechism,
14h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Research on pine sawflies sheds light on the evolution of cooperation
Pine sawflies terrify forest owners, but they help researchers understand the evolution of cooperation.
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Grab raises $2 billion to fight ride-hailing competition
Ride-hailing firm Grab said on Thursday it has raised $2 billion from investors to expand its offerings including electronic payments, food delivery and courier services as it fights fierce competition in the fast-growing sector.
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Rolls-Royce flies into loss on Trent engine trouble
Britain's Rolls-Royce sank into the red in the first half after taking another big hit from expensive repairs to its Trent 1000 engine, it said Thursday.
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
BMW profits dip on investments in e-cars
German high-end carmaker BMW on Thursday reported a dip in quarterly profits after ramping up spending on electric and self-driving cars.
15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Obesity extends duration of influenza a virus shedding
Obesity, which increases influenza disease severity, also extends by about 1.5 days how long influenza A virus is shed from infected adults compared to non-obese adults, according to a multi-year study of two cohorts of Nicaraguan households. The findings implicate chronic inflammation caused by obesity as well as increasing age as reasons for extended viral shedding, which puts others at risk of
15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Research finds quakes can systematically trigger other ones on opposite side of Earth
New research shows that a big earthquake can not only cause other quakes, but large ones, and on the opposite side of the Earth.
15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Fish reproduction: Two times a lady
A DNA probing technique clarifies the mechanism behind clonal reproduction of female dojo loach fish, also providing insight into the ancestral origin of the clonal population.
15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Integrated sensor could monitor brain aneurysm treatment
Implantation of a stent-like flow diverter can offer one option for less invasive treatment of brain aneurysms – bulges in blood vessels — but the procedure requires frequent monitoring while the vessels heal. Now, a multi-university research team has demonstrated proof-of-concept for a highly flexible and stretchable sensor that could be integrated with the flow diverter to monitor hemodynamics
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
International report confirms 2017 was one of three warmest years on record
It's official: 2017 was the third-warmest year on record for the globe, behind 2016 (first) and 2015, according to the 28th annual State of the Climate report. The planet also experienced record-high greenhouse gas concentrations as well as rises in sea level.
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Heatwave and climate change having negative impact on our soil, say experts
The recent heatwave and drought could be having a deeper, more negative effect on soil than we first realised say scientists.
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
How origami might reshape the future of everything
The next generation of solar panels and air bags will be shaped by the ancient Japanese art of paper folding.
15h

Futurity.org
1
Illegal drugs aren’t tough to get in rural places
Popular media often depict illegal drug use as an urban problem rather than a rural one, but a new study shows access to illicit drugs is the same, no matter where a person lives. Sociologist Patrick Habecker looked at Nebraskans’ social access to illegal drugs— knowing someone to obtain drugs from—and found that more than one-third of both urban and rural residents could obtain marijuana through
15h

Popular Science
83
Here's how to declare email bankruptcy
DIY Delete them all. When email overload hits, the best way to tackle it might be to delete everything and start over from scratch. Here's how to erase those messages in bulk.
15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
New light shed on the people who built Stonehenge
Despite over a century of intense study, we still know very little about the people buried at Stonehenge or how they came to be there. Now, an University of Oxford research collaboration, published in Nature Scientific Reports, suggests that a number of the people that were buried at the Wessex site had moved with and likely transported the bluestones used in the early stages of the monument's con
15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
20
Real or crocodile tears? Psychopaths may not know the difference
New research has found people with high levels of psychopathic traits have difficulty telling when someone is genuinely afraid or upset, based on people's facial expressions.
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
68
Brown dwarf in a dynamical-tide regime detected by WASP survey
European astronomers have discovered a new transiting brown dwarf in a dynamical-tide regime as part of the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) survey. The newly found object, designated WASP-128b, orbits its host on a close orbit—the measured stellar rotation rate places it in a regime where tidal interaction is dominated by dynamical tides. The finding is detailed in a paper published July 19 o
15h

The Atlantic
3K
That Meme You’re Sharing Is Probably Bogus
Perhaps you’ve seen a meme floating around social media recently, purporting to reveal the etymology of the word tag . “How old were you when you learned the game TAG stands for ‘Touch and Go’?” asks the most popular version of the meme. “I was today years old.” This nugget of would-be wisdom spread like wildfire— one early iteration on Facebook has been shared more than 312,000 times. Fortunatel
15h

The Atlantic
100+
Can Philanthropy Save a City?
STOCKTON , Calif.—The philanthropists came on air-conditioned buses from big cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco. They were driven past vacant lots overrun with weeds, auto-repair shops and fast-food restaurants and meat markets, and deposited at a construction site that had once held a liquor store that police had long tried to shut down because it was dominated by drug dealers. And there,
15h

The Scientist RSS
77
Plastics Emit Greenhouse Gases as They Degrade
The materials are a previously unaccounted-for source of methane and ethylene, researchers find.
15h

The Scientist RSS
1
Image of the Day: Scatterbrain
Distributed neuronal networks help the brain sort smells.
15h

The Scientist RSS
TS TechEdge Test Page
Some summary
15h

The Scientist RSS
100+
President Trump Picks Meteorologist to Lead OSTP
The nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier has been met positively by members of the scientific community.
15h

Scientific American Content: Global
95
Newly Discovered Cell Type May Fuel Cystic Fibrosis
The surprising insight could provide foundation for future cure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
New light shed on the people who built Stonehenge
Despite over a century of intense study, we still know very little about the people buried at Stonehenge or how they came to be there. Now, a new University of Oxford research collaboration, published in Scientific Reports suggests that a number of the people that were buried at the Wessex site had moved with and likely transported the bluestones used in the early stages of the monument's construc
15h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Using LIDAR to find unmarked graves of murder victims
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. reports that LIDAR can be used to find the unmarked graves of murder victims. In their paper published in the journal Forensic Science International, the group describes the technique and how well it worked.
15h

Feed: All Latest
48
Surface Go Review: Welcome to the Tiny-Computer Future
Is it fast? No. But Microsoft's Surface Go packs in tons of features you'll love.
15h

BBC News – Science & Environment
1K
Stonehenge: First residents from west Wales
The first long-term residents of Stonehenge came from west Wales, a study suggests.
15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Otago researcher claims new study a step forward in fight to eliminate tuberculosis
The McAuley Professor of International Health at the University of Otago is labelling the findings of new international collaborative research a step forward in the fight to eliminate the world's top infectious disease killer, tuberculosis.
15h

Science | The Guardian
5K
Bones found at Stonehenge belonged to people from Wales
Tests show 5,000-year-old remains found at the world heritage site came from more than 100 miles away in west Wales The bones of people buried at Stonehenge, who died and were cremated about 5,000 years ago, have given up their secrets: like the bluestones, which form part of the famous prehistoric monument, they came from west Wales, near the Preseli Hills where the stones were quarried. The rem
15h

Latest Headlines | Science News
100+
Cremated remains reveal hints of who is buried at Stonehenge
Ancient stone monument held burials of people from more than 200 kilometers away, a new study suggests.
15h

Futurity.org
1
9 of 10 dementia caregivers don’t get enough sleep
More than 90 percent of people caring for a family member with dementia experience poor sleep, new research shows. These kinds of disruptions can… place caregivers at risk for depression, weight gain, heart disease, and premature death. The study found that most participants got less than six hours of sleep each night, accompanied by frequent awakenings—as often as four times per hour. These kind
16h

Futurity.org
7
Plate tectonics aren’t vital for alien life after all
There may be more habitable planets in the universe than we thought. A new study suggests that plate tectonics—long assumed to be a requirement for suitable conditions for life—aren’t actually necessary. When searching for habitable planets or life on other planets, scientists look for biosignatures of atmospheric carbon dioxide. On Earth, atmospheric carbon dioxide increases surface heat through
16h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
A breakthrough for understanding GBM: Origin cells for deadly brain tumors identified
A new study by KAIST researchers identified where the mutation causing glioblastoma starts. According to the study, neural stem cells away from the tumor mass are the cells of origin that contain mutation drivers for glioblastoma, one of the most aggressive brain tumor. This breakthrough research, reported in Nature on August 1, 2018, gives insights for understanding why glioblastomas almost alway
16h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
500+
An artificial material that has negative refraction and no reflection
A team of researchers with members from Wuhan University and the University of Texas has created an artificial material that offers both negative refraction and no reflection. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their material, how it was made, and possible uses for it. Baile Zhang with Nanyang Technological University offers a News & Views piece on the work done by
16h

Dana Foundation
20
Try Some Brainy Pages for National Coloring Book Day
Image: Shutterstock Coloring and coloring books have been a popular activity among children for many years and has even re-emerged as a trend for adults. Not only is it fun, coloring can be relaxing and a great way to reduce stress, among other benefits. Today is National Coloring Book Day, and what better way to celebrate than by spending time with your friends, children, grandchildren, or by yo
16h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Image: Satellite views fires raging in California
More than a dozen wildfires are burning in the state of California, with several of them threatening life and property. The Ferguson Fire (right) ignited July 13 in the Sierra National Forest west of Yosemite National Park. Much of the forest in this area suffered extreme stress due to the extended drought of 2012 through 2017, and bark beetle damage, leaving many dead trees through which the fire
16h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Fishing bans protect fish and don't harm fishing communities
Fishing bans don't have to hurt fishing communities, according to a new study led by Stanford researchers. The group tracked vessels during a short-lived trawling moratorium in the Adriatic Sea and found that fishers maintained their catch levels by fishing elsewhere. The findings suggest that such bans can protect overfished regions without hurting people's livelihoods and could influence efforts
16h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Q&A: How Facebook regulates the wild west of political ads
With less than three months to go before the midterm elections, Facebook is enforcing strict new requirements on digital political ads. Among other things, they force political ad buyers to verify their identities by receiving mail at a known U.S. address.
16h

The Atlantic
100+
How Lolita Seduces Us All
Let us now reread the old texts, examining them with a cold eye to determine what they reveal about the #MeToo transgressions of the artistic past. Even the popular entertainments must be probed for common savagery. Molly Ringwald watched her film The Breakfast Club in the company of her young daughter and realized that one scene contains within it a suggestion of offscreen physical harassment. A
16h

Futurity.org
4
‘Sponge’ sucks the color out of polluting dyes in seconds
Researchers have created an environmentally friendly way to remove color from dyes in water in a matter of seconds. Dyes are common in industries such as textiles, cosmetics, food processing, papermaking, and plastics. Globally, we produce about 700,000 metric tons—the weight of two Empire State Buildings—of dye each year to color our clothing, eye shadow, toys, and vending machine candy. During
16h

Popular Science
500+
Please do not try to survive on an all-meat diet
Health Here's what you should know about the latest carnivore trend. If your love of ribeye knows no bounds, perhaps you’d be interested in the carnivore diet. The rules are simple—eat only meat—and the purported benefits seem boundless.
16h

Ingeniøren
25
Overtræk på naturen: Vi har allerede forbrugt hele årets budget
Menneskehedens forbrug har i år allerede passeret jordens årlige biokapacitet. Danmark passerede vores lokale målstreg allerede i marts.
16h

BBC News – Science & Environment
6K
Plastic pollution: How one woman found a new source of warming gases hidden in waste
Researchers uncover a little known source of climate warming gases coming from plastic waste.
16h

Feed: All Latest
56
This Community Is Advocating for Air Quality—With Science
With the help of local scientists, the unincorporated community of Brandywine plans to collect its own air quality data to test the impacts of new power plants.
16h

Scientific American Content: Global
12
The Biggest Waves in the World, Explained
Forecasting technology and surfer experience create record rides on the planet’s biggest breakers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
16h

Live Science
65
Life Needs Sunlight — and That Could Change Where We Look for Aliens
With every new exoplanet discovered, the same question arises: Could this world host life? That capability requires so much more than liquid water.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Social media use in China, U.S. can inform sport organizations' strategy
People from different cultures who follow a team on social media do so for different reasons. That's the basic finding of research published by a University of Arkansas graduate and three faculty members, and they believe the reasons they found will help sport organizations develop effective strategies to engage users.
17h

Live Science
8
This Scale Ranks Extraterrestrial-Life Discoveries, Grounding Overblown Headlines
A team of researchers pursuing the search for extraterrestrial intelligence has decided to revive a scale meant to ground alien-detection alerts in reality.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Bird DNA helps explain Amazonian rivers' role in evolution
When the young naturalist Alfred R. Wallace left England to explore the New World in 1848, one of his key observations in the Amazon region was that large rivers were unsurpassable barriers for some species of animals, particularly primates and birds. Even more interesting, he noticed that closely related species often occupied forests on opposite sides of a river, but they were never found togeth
17h

Viden
Sultne isbjørne går til angreb på mennesker
Weekendens isbjørnedrab på Svalbard er ikke en enlig svale. Der er nemlig langt større chance for at støde på isbjørne end tidligere, lyder fra WWF.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
New facility to simulate conditions on Venus
The German Space Agency (DLR) has opened a new simulation facility at its Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) in Berlin. The facility could help researchers better understand the surface of Venus hidden behind the planet's dense atmosphere.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Particle physicists team up with AI to solve toughest science problems
Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest particle accelerator at the European particle physics lab CERN, produce about a million gigabytes of data every second. Even after reduction and compression, the data amassed in just one hour is similar to the data volume Facebook collects in an entire year – too much to store and analyze.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
19
Clothing, furniture also to blame for ocean and freshwater pollution
Think summer holidays and you'll likely call up images of a beautiful beach or a glittering blue lake. But more and more lakes, rivers and coastal areas are plagued by an oversupply of nutrients that causes algae to grow at an explosive rate, which can eventually lead to water bodies that can't support aquatic life.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
73
'Tornado' lab-on-a-chip technology with micro tweezers to detect dangerous viruses, biological contaminants
Purdue University researchers have developed a new class of optical nanotweezers that can trap and detect biomolecules, viruses and DNA more rapidly. The technology can also use light to promptly detect cancer or improve the production of medications, an important step forward as nearly half of Americans have used at least one prescription drug within the past month.
17h

Scientific American Content: Global
500+
Can What You Eat Affect Your Mood?
Increasingly, nutritional psychiatry says yes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
CRISPR diversifies: Cut, paste, on, off, and now—evolve
Life is astoundingly diverse. By taking antibiotics to stop infections or using yeast to brew beer, we are co-opting useful products and processes that evolved naturally. But what happens when the trait we want can't be found in nature?
17h

Live Science
1K
Meet Goliath, a Massive Tadpole as Long as Your Face
A giant tadpole recently found in the wild is bigger than a can of Coke — and it's still growing.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Animals and fungi enhance the performance of forests
A new study shows that in addition to the diversity of tree species, the variety of animal and fungus species also has a decisive influence on the performance of forests. Besides timber production, forest performance contributes to carbon storage and climate regulation. The study is based on 10 years of research in species-rich subtropical forests. A team of researchers led by the German Centre fo
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
23
Insight into catalysis through novel study of X-ray absorption spectroscopy
An international team has made a breakthrough at BESSY II. For the first time, they succeeded in investigating electronic states of a transition metal in detail and drawing reliable conclusions on their catalytic effect from the data. These results are helpful for the development of future applications of catalytic transition-metal systems. The work has now been published in Chemical Science, the
17h

The Atlantic
500+
Blueberry Earth: The Delicious Thought Experiment That's Roiling Planetary Scientists
Hey, it’s summer! It’s blueberry season! Can I offer you a thought experiment on what would happen if the Earth were replaced by “an equal volume of closely packed but uncompressed blueberries”? When Anders Sandberg saw this question, he could not let it go. The asker was one “billybodega,” who posted the scenario on Physics Stack Exchange. A moderator of the usually staid forum closed the discus
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
78
Insight into loss processes in perovskite solar cells enables efficiency improvements
In perovskite solar cells, charge carriers are mainly lost through recombination occurring at interface defect sites. In contrast, recombination at defect sites within the perovskite layer does not limit the performance of the solar cells at present. Teams from the University of Potsdam and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) were able to reach this interesting conclusion through extremely accurate
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
The timescale of precise sea ice prediction in Northern Sea Route
Climate change has accelerated sea-ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean. This has various negative impacts including acidification of ocean water and potential contribution to severe winters in mid-latitude regions. However, it has also opened up new opportunities for commercial maritime navigation in summer (Fig. 1). The Northern Sea Route could reduce the navigational distance between Europe and Asia
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
18
Questioning conventional understanding of antifreeze proteins
Scientists have discovered that an ice-binding protein (fcIBP) from sea ice microalga does not fit in the conventional classification of ice-binding proteins, suggesting unknown mechanisms behind its antifreeze property. This finding could lead to a broader application of the antifreeze protein in food and medical industries.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Optical secrets of disulfide nanotubes are disclosed
An international collaborative of researchers has demonstrated a strong light-matter interaction in suspensions and self-assembled films of tungsten disulfide nanotubes (NT-WS2). The results of the research are published in Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.
17h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Scientists discover genomic key to plateau adaptation
Chinese scientists studying genomic data of hot-spring snakes have discovered the genetic mechanism for ectothermic animals' adaptation to extreme, high-elevation environments. The study, titled "Comparative genomic investigation of high-elevation adaptation in ectothermic snakes," was published in PNAS on July 31.
17h

Feed: All Latest
300+
Climate Change's Looming Mental Health Crisis
“As we have more natural disasters, one would expect to also have increases in those kinds of mental health consequences.”
17h

The Atlantic
After ISIS, Iraq Is Still Broken
MOSUL , Iraq—The week before Iraq’s parliamentary elections in May, chunks of black gunk floated through the gutters of Wadi Hajar, a decimated neighborhood in West Mosul. Men with missing limbs hovered near a truck carrying staffers from an NGO offering legal services, waiting to ask for help. One of them, Muhammad Mustafa, had come to the NGO to seek a birth certificate for his daughter, who wa
17h

The Atlantic
73
The Upside of Career Restlessness
In 2010, Margot Lee Shetterly, the author of Hidden Figures , was sitting in her parents’ home, catching up with her dad about some of his co-workers at NASA Langley Research Center, many of whom were black female scientists. “Why haven’t I heard this story before?” Shetterly’s husband asked. It was then that she realized there were probably many people who didn’t realize the crucial role that wo
17h

Scientific American Content: Global
33
Scaring Animals Can Help Save Them
Conservationists are using behavior modification to bolster kangaroo mice, bears, elk and other critters — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h

The Atlantic
67
How Will Orange Is the New Black End?
This article contains spoilers through the sixth season of Orange Is the New Black. Previous seasons of Orange Is the New Black have ended with miracles , with accidental manslaughter, with hope, and with despair. The sixth season ended with an affirmation of how bitterly unequal America is, as Piper (Taylor Schilling) was hopscotched into early release thanks to a guard’s desire to be rid of her
18h

The Atlantic
1K
Trump’s Groceries Gaffe Is Even More Baseless Than It Seems
Has Donald Trump ever been grocery shopping? If there was any doubt that the developer turned celebrity turned president lived a cloistered life among the New York elite, his gaffe at a recent rally confirmed it. Among the traditional Trump smorgasbord of boasts and attacks Tuesday night, Trump touched on another of his greatest hits: the specter of noncitizen voter fraud and the need for voter I
18h

The Atlantic
500+
Why Democrats Aren’t Talking Impeachment
Beto O’Rourke, the congressman from Texas who’s seeking to oust Senator Ted Cruz, recently broke with fellow Democrats by daring to mention The Issue That Shall Not Be Uttered. Referencing President Donald Trump’s behavior at the Helsinki summit, O’Rourke said: “Standing on stage in another country with the leader of another country who wants to and has sought to undermine this country, and to si
18h

Ingeniøren
17
Teslas biler får Atari-klassikere med i næste software-opdatering
Arkadespillet Pole Position vil gøre brug af bilens rat, skriver Elon Musk, der håber også at kunne inkludere Tempest og Missile Command i spilpakken.
18h

Feed: All Latest
100+
The Strange Life of a Murderer Turned Crime Blogger
Holland is home to a thriving community of journalists and bloggers who cover criminals and the drug trade. Those writers are often targeted by their subjects—and so was Martin Kok.
18h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Preview: 'Marvel Powers United VR' lets players be the superheroes
After watching "Spider-Man" cartoons or reading "X-Men" comic books, nearly everyone—at one point or another—imagines that they had superpowers. They run through the house pretending to swing around Manhattan like a favorite web slinger or they play-act as Wolverine cutting through Sentinels.
19h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
9
Muscle 'switch' may control the benefits of exercise
Studying lab animals and humans, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center discovered that a protein called JNK helps to drive response to exercise. If JNK is activated during exercise, the researchers say, that stimulates skeletal muscle growth. If it's not activated, muscles improve their adaptation for endurance and aerobic capacity.
19h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
48
Maternal dengue immunity protects against fetal damage in mice following Zika infection
A mother's prior dengue immunity protects her unborn baby from devastating brain effects associated with Zika virus infection. These findings could guide development of more effective flavivirus vaccines and hint at what types of immune responses are maximally protective against fetal brain damage after Zika invasion.
19h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Google Glass helps kids with autism read facial expressions, Stanford study finds
Children with autism were able to improve their social skills by using a smartphone app paired with Google Glass to help them understand the emotions conveyed in people's facial expressions, according to a pilot study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
19h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Cupertino shelves proposed 'head tax' on Apple employees for now
Apple Trillion US T. Cook
The Cupertino City Council on Tuesday night put the brakes on a controversial plan to impose an employee "head tax" on Apple and other businesses.
19h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
DreamBox Learning gets $130 million for math education software
Bellevue, Wash., education-software company DreamBox Learning has received a $130 million investment from private equity firm TPG. The money, more than triple what the company has previously raised in its 12-year life span, is intended to bring accessible math education to more schools across the world.
19h

Ingeniøren
62
Regionsrådsformand kræver redegørelse for køleproblemer på nybygget sygehus
Køleproblemer på ny sygehusafdeling skyldes, at man ikke er helt på plads i det nye byggeri, siger regionsrådsformand.
19h

Latest Headlines | Science News
400+
Google Glass could help children with autism socialize with others
Google Glass has a new lease on life, and this time it’s helping children with autism improve their social skills, a pilot trial suggests.
19h

BBC News – Science & Environment
71
Tracking Scotland's wildfires from space
Breakthroughs in satellite imaging are helping scientists in Scotland better understand wildfires in real time.
19h

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Tankee, a free safe-space video network for kid gamers, launching this fall
Parents who feel a cold chill up their back whenever their kids venture into the world of online gaming have a new resource. This week, an Austin-based video service aimed at 6- to 12-year-olds called Tankee came out of stealth mode with plans to launch officially in the fall.
19h

New on MIT Technology Review
200+
How to turn a kitchen microwave into a plasma-etching device
Plasmas have never been easy to create or exploit. But now you can make them in your own kitchen.
19h

BBC News – Science & Environment
1K
Heathrow high
It's Europe's busiest airport but why is Heathrow also a magnet for hot weather?
20h

Ingeniøren
2
Bilfabrikanter må ikke indberette for lavt forbrug af brændstof – men gerne for højt
Gennem et smuthul i loven om CO2 udledning kan bilfabrikanter manipulere med tallene. Ved at blæse tallene op nu, får de lettere ved at leve op til fremtidige målsætninger.
20h

Ingeniøren
1
Facebook lukker for datastrømmen til tusindvis af apps
Efter den ene skandale efter den anden om misbrug af brugernes data vil Facebook gennemgå de mange apps, der trækker data ud fra sitet.
20h

Ingeniøren
16
Dødelige hedebølger kan gøre tætbefolket del af Kina ubeboelig
Ekstreme hedebølger risikerer at gøre Kinas tættest befolkede område ubeboeligt om 50 år, viser et nyt studie.
20h

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