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Nyheder2018august03

 

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Trump administration lifts ban on pesticides linked to declining bee numbers

Environmentalists say lifting the restriction poses a grave threat to pollinating insects The Trump administration has rescinded an Obama-era ban on the use of pesticides linked to declining bee populations and the cultivation of genetically modified crops in dozens of national wildlife refuges where farming is permitted. Environmentalists, who had sued to bring about the two-year-old ban, said o

9h

Plastic food pots and trays are often unrecyclable, say councils

The majority of plastic containers used for yoghurts, ice cream, ready meals and fruit end up in landfill.

5h

San Diego Researchers Measure The Highest Ocean Surface Temperature In A Century

The water, collected by scientists with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, measured 78.6 degrees Fahrenheit. "It really is weird," a research scientist said. It all started with the blob. (Image credit: Tim Buss/Flickr)

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LATEST

Sådan fungerer de nye transistorer

Opdagelsen af transistoreffekten i 1948 har igangsat en intensiv teknisk og videnskabelig forskning. Både i Danmark og resten af verden udvikles der forskellige transistorkonstruktioner.

3min

Paid Leave from Work Can Help Domestic Violence Victims Leave Abusers

“Just leave.” It’s the advice many domestic violence victims hear most. But leaving—the meetings with lawyers, the court appearances, the apartment hunting, the counseling sessions, the all-consuming physical and emotional path to recovery—requires time and flexibility. Dawn Dalton, the policy director at the Washington D.C. Coalition Against Domestic Violence, said scheduling demands are consist

16min

The Pot Breathalyzer Is Here. Maybe

As marijuana legalization spreads, police are asking for better tools to detect drugged drivers. Some police are now working with researchers to try to bring a THC breathalyzer to market. (Image credit: Hound Labs)

20min

Electronic Monitoring Isn’t a More Humane Form of Prison. Here’s Why.

Opinion: Electronic monitors violate people’s civil rights and carry unfair financial penalties.

22min

BioLite FirePit Review: A More Civilized Fire

Thanks to a rechargeable battery and Bluetooth-compatibility, you can get all the coziness and conviviality of a wood fire—without the hassle.

22min

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending August 4, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

24min

A Perfect Storm of Factors Is Making Wildfires More Expensive to Control

Longer wildfire seasons and development are driving up firefighting costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Family Weekly: The Inner Lives of Middle Schoolers

This Week in Family Sometimes, helping families can require teamwork between unlikely bedfellows, as two of our stories this week illustrated. Pregnancy discrimination has been rampant in workplaces since women started entering the workforce, despite legislation drafted to crack down on it. Ashley Fetters, an Atlantic staff writer, examined the uneasy coalition , forged in the 1970s, between anti

31min

Mars and Saturn Are Ready for Their Close-ups

Mars and Saturn make their approaches to Earth, where Hubble has been waiting.

1h

Best Weekend Deals: SNES Classic, Apple Watch, Dell XPS

What's on your weekend shopping list? Roku, Apple, and Nintendo have a few ideas.

1h

Tesla Says Its New Self-Driving Chip Is Finally Baked

The car company says it developed its own computer chip, taking it one more step toward vertically integrating its autonomous driving technology.

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Abiy Ahmed Meets the Ethiopian Diaspora

Last Saturday afternoon, the streets of Washington, D.C. were a sprawling symphony of green, yellow, and red. The flags of Ethiopia and Eritrea flew from car windows, tri-color banners hung from apartment railings, and peace ribbons adorned the facades of local businesses. Trucks and cars bearing messages of unity stationed themselves outside the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, drawing cr

1h

The GOP Is in Triage Mode in Ohio

In a normal political year, the kind that was once routine in America, a Republican president would not feel compelled to parachute into a heavily Republican congressional district to help drag a Republican candidate across the finish line. A Republican vice president would feel no need to stump there. The Republican Congressional Committee would feel no need to advertise there. The Congressional

2h

Amatør-forening skyder raket 6,5 kilometer op i luften

Rumentusiaster arbejder på at være de første amatører, der sender et menneske ud i rummet.

2h

5-year drought raises questions over Israel's water strategy

For years, public service announcements warned Israelis to save water: Take shorter showers. Plant resilient gardens. Conserve. Then Israel invested heavily in desalination technology and professed to have solved the problem by tapping into the abundant waters of the Mediterranean Sea. The once ubiquitous conservation warnings vanished.

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Endelig kommer de flyvende biler (måske)

Virksomheder investerer milliarder af kroner i at få flyvende biler og taxaer i luften.

3h

The World Abetted Assad’s Victory in Syria

After more than seven years of a civil war that has left half of Syria’s population displaced, cities reduced to rubble, and over 500,000 killed, President Bashar al-Assad appears to be on the brink of victory. In July, units loyal to Assad recaptured Deraa, where the peaceful protests that turned into a violent rebellion against him first began in 2011. The recapture came as Assad conquered the

3h

Scorching Summer in Europe Signals Long-Term Climate Changes

Hot weather has touched all of the continent, but it has had the most impact in northern countries, unaccustomed to sustained heat, suggesting that hard years lie ahead.

3h

Ældre løvtræer taber grene under tørken

De rekordmange sommerdage med minimale mængder nedbør udgør en stressfaktor for typiske danske løvtræer såsom bøg, ask og ahorn.

4h

Raketopsendelse ved Bornholm

Copenhagen Suborbitals sender i dag raketten Nexø II op.

5h

Don't call 12-year-old Mexican university student 'genius'

The youngest student ever admitted to Mexico's National Autonomous University wouldn't call himself a "genius."

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Trump wants a Space Force, but Pentagon has different idea

President Donald Trump wants a Space Force, a new military service he says is needed to ensure American dominance in space. But the idea is gaining little traction at the Pentagon, where the president's defense chief, Jim Mattis, says it would add burdensome bureaucracy and unwanted costs.

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Googlers bristle at censoring search for China: report

Word that Google is crafting a search engine to meet China's draconian censorship rules has sparked widespread employee anger at the company which has responded by limiting workers' access to documents about the project, a report said Friday.

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Raketopsendelse ved Bornholm

Efter næsten et års forsinkelse melder raketentusiasterne fra Copenhagen Suborbitals sig i dag klar til at sende raketten Nexø II-raketten af sted.

6h

States of Matter: Bose-Einstein Condensate

A Bose-Einstein condensate is a state of matter in which extremely cold atoms clump together and act as if they were a single atom.

10h

The Atlantic Daily: Desires Never Guessed

What We’re Following Trouble With Truth: President Trump’s repeated condemnations of the Mueller probe as a “Witch Hunt” could be having a psychological effect on Americans: Cognitive scientists say that the familiarity bred by repetition can make even false claims feel true. The author of Lies My Teacher Told Me describes how history education has contributed to what many describe as a “post-tru

13h

The Information War Is On. Are We Ready For It?

Disinformation, misinformation, and social media hoaxes have evolved into high-stakes information war. But our frameworks for dealing with them have remained the same.

14h

22-Year-Old Survives Rare 'Internal Decapitation' Injury from Crash. He Previously Beat Brain Cancer.

A young man in Indiana who beat brain cancer as a teen has defied the odds yet again by surviving an often-fatal injury called internal decapitation.

14h

The EPA's twisted logic argues against environmentally friendly cars

Environment A new proposal wants to cut fuel efficiency standards, and it's going after California to do it. If you'd like to buy a more fuel-efficient car or pickup truck after 2020, think again. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Environmental…

14h

Texas indicts Arkema over 'toxic cloud' during Harvey flooding

French chemical manufacturer Arkema was indicted Friday in Texas over the release of a "toxic cloud" at its plant near Houston during historic flooding last year caused by Hurricane Harvey.

14h

More states sue to stop online plans for 3D-printed guns

More states are suing the Trump administration to dissolve a settlement it reached with a company that wants to post instructions online for making 3D-printed firearms that are hard to trace and detect.

14h

12-yr-old Mexico university student doesn't like word genius

The youngest student ever admitted to Mexico's National Autonomous University says he doesn't like to use the word genius to describe himself.

14h

Deadly California blaze spawned destructive fire tornado

A deadly Northern California wildfire burned so hot in dry and windy conditions that it birthed a record-breaking tornado of flame, officials said Friday.

14h

Scientists find elusive molecule that helps sperm find egg

Scientists affiliated with the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified a key molecule driving chemoattraction between sperm and egg cells in marine invertebrates. The study was recently published in Nature Communications.

14h

Meet Nasa's commercial flight astronauts

They will be aboard the first US flights to the International Space Station since the shuttle programme ended.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Beam Them Up, SpaceX

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines NASA announced the nine astronauts who will take the first spaceflights from U.S. soil since 2011, aboard spacecraft developed by SpaceX and Boeing. The Labor Department announced that the U.S. added 157,000 new jobs this month , about 30,000 less than expected. China threatened to place $60

15h

Improved passphrases could make online experiences both user-friendly and secure

Human factors researchers' alternative passphrase systems showed significantly better user recall compared with existing systems.

15h

Dan Littman (NYU / HHMI) 2: Shaping of Immune Responses by the Microbiota

https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/th17/#part-2 Th17 cells are important in our protective immune response to bacteria and fungi. They also can exist, however, in a pathogenic form that causes autoimmune disease. Talk Overview: In his first lecture, Dan Littman discusses the opposing roles of Th17 cells. They protect mucosal surfaces from infection with bacteria and fungi, but they can also caus

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Dan Littman (NYU / HHMI) 1: Th17 Cells and Innate Lymphoid Cells in Defense and Disease

https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/th17/#part-1 Th17 cells are important in our protective immune response to bacteria and fungi. They also can exist, however, in a pathogenic form that causes autoimmune disease. Talk Overview: In his first lecture, Dan Littman discusses the opposing roles of Th17 cells. They protect mucosal surfaces from infection with bacteria and fungi, but they can also caus

15h

The marvel of LED lighting is now a global blight to health

What are the health and environmental effects of electric night light? Read More

15h

Report: Atmospheric CO2 levels hit all-time high in 2017

A new report from the American Meteorological Society shows that Earth’s atmosphere had the highest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in 2017 than it's had in the past 800,000 years. Read More

15h

Reading the motor intention from brain activity within 100ms

Researchers have developed a new technique to decode motor intention of humans from electroencephalography. This technique is motivated by the well documented ability of the brain to predict sensory outcomes of self-generated and imagined actions utilizing so called forward models. The method enabled, for the first time, nearly 90 percent single trial decoding accuracy across tested subjects, with

15h

Nanotube 'rebar' makes graphene twice as tough

Researchers have found that reinforcing graphene with embedded carbon nanotubes makes the 2D nanomaterial more than twice as tough as pristine graphene.

15h

This Hospital Superbug Can Now Withstand Hand Sanitizer

Now, at least one type of bacteria in hospitals appears to be growing more tolerant to alcohol-based hand sanitizers, a new study from Australia suggests.

15h

The rules of attraction: Scientists find elusive molecule that helps sperm find egg

A recent report in Nature Communications by scientists affiliated with the Marine Biological Laboratory identifies a key molecule driving chemoattraction between sperm and egg cells in marine invertebrates.

15h

Harvard Research Fellow Estimates Puerto Rico's Death Toll Following Hurricane Maria

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Satchit Balsari, a research fellow at Harvard Medical School and the T.H. Chan School of Public Health about his estimate of Puerto Rico's death toll following Hurricane Maria and recommendations for preparedness.

15h

And Then No One on the CBS Earnings Call Asked Les Moonves About Harassment

They talked about money. They talked about a job well done. They talked about the happy fact that CBS had, over the previous quarter, surpassed, just by a hair, analysts’ expectations for profit and revenue. What was not discussed, on the CBS earnings call that took place on Thursday , was the New Yorker investigation into the network’s CEO, Les Moonves, and other members of its executive team. L

15h

NASA Names Astronauts for Boeing and SpaceX Flights to International Space Station

Their voyages are scheduled for next year, and they would be the first American astronauts to launch from American soil since 2011.

15h

Newsbook: Read These 3 Books About Global Warming

Predictions and solutions in these books drawing on scientific research and social policy.

15h

Ensuring equality: New method to measure and operationalize inclusive culture

Inclusiveness of workplace culture can be measured by a concrete set of six factors, according to a study published today in JAMA Network Open from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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GM seeks to exempt Buick SUV from looming Trump tariffs

Auto giant General Motors has asked US authorities to exclude its Buick Envision SUV from the sweeping tariffs Washington has threatened to impose on auto imports.

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NYSE joins forces with Starbucks on bitcoin platform

The New York Stock Exchange's parent company announced plans on Friday to launch a bitcoin trading platform and partner with Starbucks on a digital currency payment app.

16h

Quota raised for subsistence hunting of Chukchi polar bears

Polar bear hunters in remote villages on the coast of the Chukchi Sea will have higher harvest quotas next year, a sign of the health of the region's bear population.

16h

Hurting while healing: hospital staff displaced by wildfire

For the past week, Robert Tierney Jr. has been registering patients at a Northern California hospital in the mornings and checking out possible rentals after work, trying to count his blessings even though his house is one of the more than 1,000 destroyed in a deadly wildfire.

16h

Biologists consider options to save emaciated orca

Federal biologists are weighing a range of emergency options to save an emaciated endangered orca, including possibly feeding it live salmon at sea dosed with medication.

16h

Groundbreaking poplar study shows trees can be genetically engineered not to spread

The largest field-based study of genetically modified forest trees ever conducted has demonstrated that genetic engineering can prevent new seedlings from establishing.

16h

Each tropical tree species specializes in getting the nutrients it needs

Researchers looking for general patterns in the way tropical trees capture nutrients were surprised to find that every species has its own way of getting the nutrients it needs. The concept of biodiversity extends to their behavior.

16h

A Mysterious, Powerful Force Is Flinging Radio Waves at Us from Deep Space

Earth might be getting bombarded by thousands of high-energy radio waves from deep space every day — and scientists have no good explanation (yet).

16h

Lab-Grown Lungs Transplanted into Pigs

The lungs survived with no complications in the animals for up to two months.

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Eyewire Release Report 8/3/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. If you’ve already seen what a notification has to say and you don’t want it hanging around in your notifications list anymore, you can now delete it! Click the “x” to delete it. (If you click the new “✓,” this will mark the notification as read, without delet

16h

Groundbreaking poplar study shows trees can be genetically engineered not to spread

The largest field-based study of genetically modified forest trees ever conducted has demonstrated that genetic engineering can prevent new seedlings from establishing.

16h

Nanotube 'rebar' makes graphene twice as tough

Rice University researchers have found that reinforcing graphene with embedded carbon nanotubes makes the 2D nanomaterial more than twice as tough as pristine graphene.

16h

What role do inflammatory cytokines play in creating T cell exhaustion in cancer?

A better understanding of the role secreted inflammatory cytokines play in the tumor microenvironment that results in the differentiation of effector T cells into exhausted T cells points to possible approaches to improve the antitumor activity of T cells and to intervene in T cell exhaustion.

16h

Drug tests for gamers as soccer's eWorld Cup jackpot climbs

The players finished their soccer matches and huddled waiting to discover who would have to undergo doping tests. The random draw completed, two men went off to provide urine samples.

16h

Mud at the bottom of a Mexican lake holds secrets about the Maya empire's demise

Science The ancient Maya faced severe drought, according to a mineral deposit. Using the mineral gypsum, found at the bottom of a lake in Mexico, researchers showed that rainfall to the area dropped by nearly half during the collapse of the Maya,…

16h

Improved passphrases could make online experiences both user-friendly and secure

Although passphrases, or phrase-based passwords, have been found to be more secure than traditional passwords, human factors issues such as typographical errors and memorability have slowed their wider adoption. Kevin Juang and Joel Greenstein, in their recently published Human Factors article, "Integrating Visual Mnemonics and Input Feedback With Passphrases to Improve the Usability and Security

16h

Workshop advances plans for coping with disruptions on ITER

Close-up look at workshop on mitigating disruptions in ITER, the international fusion experiment under construction in France to demonstrate the practicality of fusion power.

16h

Art Lee, Fly-Fishing Virtuoso and Writer, Dies at 76

Mr. Lee was a Catskills fixture whose reputation as an angler spread far and wide. He once took Jimmy Carter fishing and wrote a whole book on a knot.

16h

23andMe's Pharma Deals Have Been the Plan All Along

A new partnership with GlaxoSmithKline drew intense scrutiny from customers, reflecting eroding public trust in companies' ability to protect private information.

16h

Study examines how age and ethnicity impact HIV testing

Brandon Brown, an HIV researcher at the University of California, Riverside's School of Medicine, is the lead author on a study published today in the journal Medicine, in which he and his co-authors argue that interventions are urgently needed to reach older adults and Hispanics to address HIV testing and beliefs.

17h

Cocaine relapse is reversed with BDNF microinjections in the brain

Investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina discover that brain-derived neurotropic factor reduced cocaine relapse in a preclinical model when administered before a cue-induced relapse event, as reported in Addiction Biology.

17h

The marriage of topology and magnetism in a Weyl system

Topology is a global aspect of materials, leading to fundamental new properties for compounds with large relativistic effects. The incorporation of heavy elements give rise to non-trivial topological phases of matter, such as topological insulators, Dirac and Weyl semimetals. The semimetals are characterized by band-touching points with linear dispersion, similar to massless relativistic particles

17h

Study: Psychopaths can’t tell when people fake distress

A new study shows that psychopaths have a hard time telling when someone's genuinely distressed, and that they don't seem to care much either way. Read More

17h

The Bermuda Triangle mystery is solved. Again.

Scientists claim that huge rogue waves account for the disappearance of ships in the Bermuda Triangle. Read More

17h

Art Lee, Fly-Fishing Virtuoso and Writer, Dies at 76

Mr. Lee was a Catskills fixture whose reputation as an angler spread far and wide. He once took Jimmy Carter fishing and wrote a whole book on a knot.

17h

An Ancient River in Syria Sections Off a Modern War

A trip along the Euphrates reveals damaged and depopulated towns, and an uneasy front held by a tenuous American presence.

17h

The New Old Age: The Illness Is Bad Enough. The Hospital May Be Even Worse.

The elderly are particularly vulnerable to “post-hospital syndrome,” some experts believe, and that may be why so many patients return.

17h

Math + good posture = better scores

A San Francisco State University study finding that students perform better at math while sitting with good posture could have implications for other kinds of performance under pressure.

17h

New research opens door to expanding stem cells available for transplants

Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research and collaborators have identified a way to expand blood-forming, adult stem cells from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB).

17h

UC Davis researchers find quiet viruses alter body's response to vaccines, pathogens

UC Davis researchers have shown that low levels of cytomegalovirus (CMV) have a significant impact on microbe and immune cell populations and how the immune system responds to the influenza vaccine. The study was published in the Journal of Virology.

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A Better Prosthetic Foot for the Developing World

Technology A new approach to prosthetic design allows for quick and easy fitting while keeping the costs low. 08/03/2018 Marcus Woo, Contributor To read more…

17h

Language Gene Dethroned

Contrary to earlier results, FOXP2 did not undergo a "selective sweep" as humans developed language, a study finds.

17h

Low plasma levels of omega-3 fatty acids associated with preterm birth

Pregnant women who had low plasma levels of long chain n-3 fatty acids in their first and second trimesters were at a significantly higher risk of early preterm birth when compared with women who had higher levels of these fatty acids, according to new research.

17h

Even low levels of air pollution linked with serious changes in the heart, according to new UK research

Researchers have found that people exposed to air pollution levels well within UK guidelines have changes in the structure of the heart, similar to those seen in the early stages of heart failure.

17h

Warming seas are robbing some fish of their vital sense of smell

Nexus Media News At stake? Their survival and the livelihoods that depend on them. Ocean acidification is causing fish to lose their sense of smell, potentially throwing marine ecosystems entirely out of balance.

17h

The fate of Arctic mosquitoes depends on habitat and access to blood meals

The future of Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) in western Greenland depends on aquatic habitat and access to blood meals, according to a new study. The study found that female mosquitoes carrying eggs were most abundant near ponds, especially in areas frequented by animals such as caribou, birds and the Arctic hare.

17h

Rebuilding the tree of life of freshwater macroinvertebrates in the European continent

Scientists analyzed how water macroinvertebrate species, such as beetles, mosquitos and dragonflies, evolved and diversified since their beginnings. With the analysis of the ecological features of about 6,600 European species, the researchers rebuilt the functional space they occupy.

17h

Rethinking ketchup packets: New approach to slippery packaging aims to cut food waste

New research aims to cut down on waste — and consumer frustration — with a novel approach to creating super slippery industrial packaging. The study establishes a method for wicking chemically compatible vegetable oils into the surfaces of common extruded plastics, like those used for ketchup packets and other condiments.

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Response to Comment on "Genomic signals of selection predict climate-driven population declines in a migratory bird"

Fitzpatrick et al . discuss issues that they had with analyses and interpretation in our recent manuscript on genomic correlates of climate in yellow warblers. We provide evidence that our findings would not change with different analysis and maintain that our study represents a promising direction for integrating the potential for climate adaptation as one of many tools in conservation managemen

17h

Improved passphrases could make online experiences both user-friendly and secure

The human factors researchers' alternative passphrase systems showed significantly better user recall compared with existing systems.

18h

A deeper look at severe asthma yields NET results

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital published this week in Science Immunology models allergic lung inflammation and provides new insights into how asthma develops and progresses, with important implications for the most clinically advanced drugs designed to treat severe asthma.

18h

Twin study highlights importance of both genetics and environment on gene activity

A study in PLOS Genetics used a unique cohort of over 700 pairs of twins to identify the factors influencing chemical modifications to DNA across the genome. The study compared found that epigenetic marks are more similar between identical twins — highlighting the role of DNA sequence variation in regulating gene activity. Sites at which epigenetic variation is strongly linked to environmental ex

18h

Sword vs Pen: Pen wins!

It was a fierce battle, but in the end you proved that the pen indeed IS mightier than the sword! Writers rejoice! Thanks to all who participated! Leaderboard:

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Photos of the Week: Proud Walrus, Irate Elephant, Jovian Clouds

A lunar eclipse observed from Brazil, keeping cool in Europe’s heatwave, wildfires tear through parts of California, a controversial election takes place in Zimbabwe, cliffside movie viewing in Norway, a fridge filled with felt sodas in California, an armored personnel carrier dropped into the sea near Lebanon, a “flying motorcycle” in China, and much more.

18h

Eating crickets can be good for your gut, according to new clinical trial

A new clinical trial shows that consuming crickets can help support the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and that eating crickets is not only safe at high doses but may also reduce inflammation in the body.

18h

Parasite infections with multiple strains are more harmful to vertebrate hosts

The incredible amount of genetic diversity in parasites means humans are often infected with multiple strains, which could make infections worse and increase the prevalence of the parasite over time.

18h

Tropical forest seeds use three strategies to survive

From tiny banana seeds to giant coconuts, it's tough for seeds to survive in tropical soils where they are under constant attack by fungi, bacteria, insects and animals. By understanding how seeds defend themselves, tropical biologists contribute to reforestation, crop management and sustainable agriculture in the tropics.

18h

Who owns the aquifer?

Researchers map out groundwater at stake in the wake of a court decision that bolsters Native American rights to the precious resource across an increasingly arid West.

18h

Abandoned farmlands enrich bird communities

Abandoned farmlands hold potential for the preservation of wetland and grassland birds as rehabilitation zones.

18h

Housing for health

In a novel approach to improving outcomes for children, a pediatric hospital worked with community partners to address neighborhood effect syndrome as a target for pediatric health care — treating the neighborhood as a patient.

18h

Lead or follow: What sets leaders apart?

Leaders are more willing to take responsibility for making decisions that affect the welfare of others. In a new study, researchers identified the cognitive and neurobiological processes that influence whether someone is more likely to take on leadership or to delegate decision-making.

18h

Five rad and random tennis products I found this week

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 52. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

18h

NASA Unveils the Astronauts Who Will Fly the First Private 'Space Taxis'

SpaceX and Boeing are vying to take the first US crew members to the ISS. Now they know who'll be on board.

18h

So Apple Is Worth $1 Trillion. Now Comes the Hard Part

The string of breakthrough products has slowed, and history shows it's hard for the winners in one era to succeed in the next era.

18h

Industry insiders don't use their products like we do. That should worry us.

Technology Steve Jobs didn't let his kids use iPads, and maybe you shouldn't either. From the fast food industry to Silicon Valley, numerous executives use the products they create differently than we do.

18h

The Link Between Climate Change and 'Flesh-Eating' Bacteria

Flesh-eating bacteria will become more prevalent with climate change.

18h

NASA assigns crews to first test flights, missions on commercial spacecraft

NASA has introduced the first U.S. astronauts who will fly on American-made, commercial spacecraft to and from the International Space Station — an endeavor that will return astronaut launches to U.S. soil for the first time since the space shuttle's retirement in 2011.

18h

High-resolution imaging of nanoparticle surface structures is now possible

Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), extremely high resolution imaging of the molecule-covered surface structures of silver nanoparticles is possible, even down to the recognition of individual parts of the molecules protecting the surface.

18h

Cystic fibrosis impacts growth in the womb, research shows

New research has shown that babies with cystic fibrosis are born weighing less than babies without the condition, even allowing that they are more likely to be born prematurely.

18h

How hungry bacteria sense nutrients in their environment

New research sheds light on how bacteria regulate metabolism — a finding that could help to combat infectious diseases including tuberculosis.

18h

Blocking digestive hormone may prevent diet-induced pancreatic cancer

A high-fat diet may promote the growth of pancreatic cancer independent of obesity because of the interaction between dietary fat and cholecystokinin (CCK), a digestive hormone. In addition, blocking CCK may help prevent the spread of pancreatic tumors to other areas of the body (metastases).

18h

NASA Announces Crew For First Commercial Space Flights

NASA has selected the astronauts who will blast off on new commercial space vehicles set for next year. Two of them flew on the final mission of NASA's space shuttle in 2011. (Image credit: NASA)

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Chile enacts historic ban on plastic bags

Chile made history on Friday when it became the first country in Latin America to ban the commercial use of plastic bags.

18h

Old mining techniques make a new way to recycle lithium batteries

Using 100-year-old minerals processing methods, chemical engineering students have found a solution to a looming 21st-century problem: how to economically recycle lithium ion batteries.

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Why Did Someone Unleash a Bunch of Goats in a Quiet Neighborhood?

Friday’s forecast for Boise, Idaho, called for clouds with a hint of sunshine and a toasty high of 89 degrees Fahrenheit. It did not call for goats, but there they were. Joe Parris, a local reporter, shared photos from the the bizarre scene on a residential street: dozens of goats—maybe as many as 100, Parris estimated—meandering across lawns and sidewalks. They munched on grass and climbed up mo

19h

NASA finds a compact center in Hurricane Hector

Hurricane Hector has a small, tight center surrounded by strong storms. Infrared satellite imagery provides temperature data, and when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hector the coldest cloud tops circling the center were compact.

19h

Top math laureate gets new medal after prize stolen

A Kurdish refugee whose top mathematics prize was stolen minutes after he received the honor this week in Rio de Janeiro will get a replacement medal Saturday, organizers said.

19h

Nasa names astronauts for first commercial flights

The US space agency assigns the first men and women to fly on commercial rockets and capsules.

19h

Rekorder på stribe: Sådan ser 205.000 fly på én dag ud

Det er blevet billigt at smække rumpen i flysædet, og det gør ondt på klimaet.

19h

Engineered genetic machinery derived from E. coli delivers new amino acids to proteins

Approximately 15 years ago, scientists first saw the potential of an engineered, bacteria-derived genetic machinery for incorporating non-canonical amino acids into proteins produced in eukaryotic cells. But the method has faced a number of technical restrictions that limited its widespread development. Researchers have developed a new method that overcomes many of the previous obstacles.

19h

Study: Older people less apt to recognize they've made a mistake

Researchers have found that older people are less likely than younger people to realize when they've made a mistake. The finding offers new insight into how aging adults perceive their decisions and view their performance.

19h

Key gene to accelerate sugarcane growth is identified

Researchers have developed a sugarcane line with the ScGAI gene expression silenced. The modification resulted in an adequate phenotype for use in 2G ethanol production, featuring a bigger culm and more biomass.

19h

NASA finds power in Tropical Storm Shanshan's center

An infrared look by NASA's Terra satellite found powerful storms in the center of Tropical Storm Shanshan, the newest tropical storm in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Shanshan has triggered warnings in the Marianas Islands.

19h

Stonehenge: First people came from west Wales

The first long-term residents of Stonehenge, along with the first stones, arrived about 5,000 years ago.

19h

UK children with ADHD wait up to two years for diagnosis, say experts

Postcode lottery chaos and misconceptions of mental health condition lead to delayed treatment, harming chances of education and future prospects ‘When I started taking ADHD medication it was as if someone flicked a switch’ Children with ADHD are waiting up to two years for a diagnosis in the UK, harming their chances of education and prospects for the future, say experts. ADHD – attention defici

19h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Why Facebook and Instagram Are Telling You To Limit Your Social Media Time

Facebook is the latest tech company to hop aboard the “digital wellness” train. We discuss on this week's Gadget Lab podcast.

19h

Each tropical tree species specializes in getting the nutrients it needs

Trees communicate via a "wood wide web" of roots and microbes in ways that enhance their growth and can reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, mitigating climate change. But no one knows why so many tropical trees team up with bacteria to capture nitrogen from the air when they already grow in nitrogen-rich soils. A super-sized experiment at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) to

19h

The marriage of topology and magnetism in a Weyl system

Topology is a global aspect of materials, leading to fundamental new properties for compounds with large relativistic effects. The incorporation of heavy elements give rise to non-trivial topological phases of matter, such as topological insulators, Dirac and Weyl semimetals. The semimetals are characterized by band-touching points with linear dispersion, similar to massless relativistic particles

19h

Eating crickets can be good for your gut, according to new clinical trial

A new clinical trial shows that consuming crickets can help support the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and that eating crickets is not only safe at high doses but may also reduce inflammation in the body.

19h

Engineered genetic machinery derived from E. coli delivers new amino acids to proteins

Proteins—the molecular machines that drive the processes underlying biology—are made from just 20 canonical building blocks called amino acids. For nearly two decades, scientists have sought methods to engineer new amino acids to build proteins.

19h

NASA finds power in Tropical Storm Shanshan's center

An infrared look by NASA's Terra satellite found powerful storms in the center of Tropical Storm Shanshan, the newest tropical storm in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Shanshan has triggered warnings in the Marianas Islands.

19h

The subtle mechanics of an avalanche — as seen in 3D

Drawing on the fact that the snow in an avalanche can behave like both a solid and a fluid, a researcher has managed to simulate a snow slab avalanche with unrivaled precision.

19h

Engineered genetic machinery derived from E. coli delivers new amino acids to proteins

Approximately 15 years ago, scientists first saw the potential of an engineered, bacteria-derived genetic machinery for incorporating non-canonical amino acids into proteins produced in eukaryotic cells. But the method has faced a number of technical restrictions that limited its widespread development. Boston College researchers have developed a new method that overcomes many of the previous obst

20h

Each tropical tree species specializes in getting the nutrients it needs

Researchers looking for general patterns in the way tropical trees capture nutrients were surprised to find that every species has its own way of getting the nutrients it needs. The concept of biodiversity extends to their behavior.

20h

Nia Wilson and the Formula for Covering Black Death

In a family video taken on Sunday, July 22, Nia Wilson is captured angling her phone and attempting to catch her best side. She’s donning pigtails and a floral top complemented by meticulously applied pink eyeshadow with hints of glitter. Wilson greets off-camera friends and family with hugs and smiles; a bright blue pool serves as her backdrop. She’d spend that afternoon at a pool-party cookout

20h

Safety claims up in smoke

A new study found that just a half-hour of hookah smoking resulted in the development of cardiovascular risk factors similar to what has been seen with traditional cigarette smoking.

20h

VLA detects possible extrasolar planetary-mass magnetic powerhouse

Astronomers have detected a possible planetary-mass object with a surprisingly powerful magnetic field some 20 light-years from Earth. It can help scientists better understand magnetic processes on stars and planets.

20h

Even Ewan McGregor Doesn't Know If He's Coming Back to 'Star Wars'Disney Star Wars Rights

And his 'Christopher Robin' costar Hayley Atwell doesn’t know if she’s rejoining the Marvel universe, either.

20h

Pilot project to warn of potentially dangerous 'meteotsunami' waves in Great Lakes

Great Lakes researchers are establishing an experimental network of air-pressure sensors around lakes Michigan and Erie to see if they can detect potentially harmful "meteotsunami" waves.

20h

Next to its solar twins, the sun stands out

Our sun has subtly different chemistry from its peers, which may help pinpoint stars with systems like our own.

20h

Q&A: Do Cockroaches Carry Diseases?

A W.H.O. study said there was not enough evidence to conclude that the insects were vectors for human diseases.

20h

Search for Alien Life Should Be a Priority, Scientists Tell Senators

Four scientists made the case Aug. 1 to a panel of senators that they should fund NASA's search for life beyond Earth.

20h

NASA finds a compact center in Hurricane Hector

Hurricane Hector has a small, tight center surrounded by strong storms. Infrared satellite imagery provides temperature data, and when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hector the coldest cloud tops circling the center were compact.

20h

Assembly of fluctuating molecules in artificial cell membrane

Lipids and membrane proteins existing in cell membranes, which are located at the outermost layer of cells, are responsible for recognizing extracellular environments and transferring that information inside the cell. Due to their deep relation to bacterial and viral infection and immunological response and neural transmission, they are important research topics in the fields of biology, medicine

20h

Genome Study Upends Understanding of How Language Evolved

Research casts doubt on the idea that a gene linked to language evolution is special to modern humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Theia: The first neuron discovered and named by gamers

The community has spoken. The official name of the first neuron type ever discovered by Eyewirers is Theia! Theia is a titaness of sight and the shining light of the clear blue sky. This brilliant name was suggested by Eyewirer @ dereks. Theia won 44.2% of the popular vote and was followed by Wright Flyer with 16%. This shiny new ganglion cell name replaces the scientific name “type 27.” You can

20h

Hannibal Buress’s Secrets to Comedy

In comedy, “there are no barriers to entry,” Hannibal Buress said in a recent interview with The Atlantic , animated in the video above. “You can just do it. Write. It's a pen and paper, or typing on a computer, or typing on your phone!” Buress goes on to detail his experience earning his chops in stand-up, how he pitched a sketch to Saturday Night Live that failed miserably, and more.

20h

JRC analysis assists response to Laos dam collapse

Scientists have carried out a dam break analysis to assist with emergency response efforts following catastrophic flooding in the Mekong Delta.

20h

A periodic table of molecular knots

Using computational predictive models, the scientists identified a shortlist, a kind of 'periodic table', of the most designable knot types, i.e. those knots that could easily self-assemble under appropriate physical and chemical conditions. This study, and the increasingly predictive capability of molecular modelling techniques, can create novel possible perspectives for future advanced applicati

20h

Locusts help uncover the mysteries of smell

By looking into the brains of locusts, researchers have determined how one smell can affect another, and how a locust can recognize a smell even though its brain activity looks different depending on the context.

20h

Monash scientists show that highly lethal viruses hijack cellular defences against cancer

Henipaviruses are among the deadliest known viruses and have no effective treatments. They include Hendra, lethal to humans and horses, and the Nipah virus, a serious threat in parts of Asia. Researchers have now discovered that Henipaviruses hijack a mechanism used by cells to counter DNA damage and prevent harmful mutations (important in diseases like cancer). This finding adds insight into how

20h

Big-data study pinpoints more than 150 genes associated with atrial fibrillation

Drawing on genomic data from more than one million individuals, researchers have led a large collaborative effort to discover as-yet unknown genetic risk factors for atrial fibrillation: An irregular, often rapid heart rate affecting millions of Americans and more than 30 million people worldwide.

20h

Moral decision making is rife with internal conflict, say developmental psychologists

A new in-depth study of moral reasoning challenges the popular notion that people are unable to think through difficult moral problems and rely primarily on automatic 'gut' reactions to make tough decisions.

20h

The Challenge of Finding Homes for Rural America’s Foster Children

In 2012, there were 397,000 children in foster care in the United States. By then this figure had, happily, been declining for years, from a high of 567,000 in 1999 . But since then, it has steadily risen again: In 2016, the most recent year for which data is available, the number of children had increased to 437,000 —and the American foster-care system isn’t equipped to handle them all. There ar

20h

The Lasting Trauma of Alex Jones’s Lies

T his week, The New York Times reported that Alex Jones, InfoWars founder and professional peddler of lies, is seeking more than $100,000 in court costs from the family of Noah Pozner , one of the 20 children who were murdered in the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. Jones is seeking that amount to recover the court costs involved with his legal defense: Veronique De La Rosa and L

20h

A new released Chinese soybean genome facilitates soybean elite cultivar improvement

Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) is one of the most important crops, providing more than half of global oilseed production and more than a quarter of the world's protein for food and animal feed. Studies have indicated that the cultivated soybean was domesticated in China approximately 5,000 years ago and then disseminated worldwide. During the introduction and dissemination process, soybean has u

20h

Analysis chronicles changes in US investment in R&D

The distribution of U.S. investment in research and development (R&D) across countries and industries has undergone a dramatic shift since the 1990s, with R&D becoming less concentrated geographically and growing rapidly in less developed markets such as China and India. The phenomenon of R&D globalization is also distinguished by its concentration in the domains of software and information techno

20h

World first: Scientists successfully transplant lab-grown lungs into pigs

Lab-grown lungs have been successfully placed in pigs for the first time. How long until we get to humans? Read More

20h

Researchers study how cues drive our behavior

Neuroscientists have uses a Pavlovian model of conditioning to see if turning on a light — a simple cue — just before dopamine neurons were activated could motivate action.

20h

Heatwave and climate change having negative impact on our soil say experts

The recent heatwave and drought could be having a deeper, more negative effect on soil than we first realized say scientists. That's because organisms in soil are highly diverse and are responsible not only for producing the soil we need to grow crops, but also provide humans with many other benefits, such as cleaning water and regulating greenhouse gas emissions.

20h

Astronauts picked for SpaceX, Boeing capsule test flights

NASA on Friday assigned the astronauts who will ride the first commercial capsules into orbit next year and bring crew launches back to the U.S.

20h

The coded images that let advertisers target all our senses at once

We're so bombarded with commercial messages every day that creating an ad that actually sticks in the mind is an increasingly difficult task. Research shows that one way to make advertised products more memorable is to engage consumers' feelings and emotions by stimulating multiple senses at once. And advertisers are now more consciously using this approach in what you'd typically think of as a vi

20h

Parasite infections with multiple strains are more harmful to vertebrate hosts

The incredible amount of genetic diversity in parasites means humans are often infected with multiple strains, which could make infections worse and increase the prevalence of the parasite over time, according to a new study.

20h

Physicists Tied Laser Beams into Knots

The technology could improve future precision light sources. But right now the biggest surprise is how many holes there are in a laser figure-eight.

21h

Ensuring equality: Penn develops method to measure and operationalize inclusive culture

Inclusiveness of workplace culture can be measured by a concrete set of six factors, according to a study published today in JAMA Network Open from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

21h

What factors might contribute to inclusive culture in health care organizations?

Researchers compiled six factors that health care workers believe can contribute to an inclusive culture within health care organizations and promote a diverse workforce.

21h

Everyone Cares About Pregnancy Discrimination

A few weeks after The New York Times published its widely cited report titled “Pregnancy Discrimination Is Rampant Inside America’s Biggest Companies,” Bradley Mattes, the co-founder and president of the Ohio-based Life Issues Institute, a partner of the national anti-abortion group Susan B. Anthony List, recorded a short clip for the anti-abortion radio show Life Issues. Calmly but with convicti

21h

Abandoned farmlands enrich bird communities

Agriculture and conversion of pristine lands into urban or industrial areas have exerted immense pressure on natural biota due to habitat destruction and fragmentation in industrialized countries around the world. But since the 1900s, farmlands have been increasingly abandoned due to the decline in domestic agriculture and, in some countries, a decline in population. This yields an opportunity for

21h

Petrobras profits leap in second quarter on higher oil prices

Brazil's flagship oil company Petrobras announced sharply higher net profits for the second quarter of 10.072 billion reais ($2.7 billion) Friday, crediting higher crude prices for the improvement.

21h

Hurricane Maria death toll may be far higher than thought

The number of people who died as a result of Hurricane Maria, which hit Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017, may be as high as 1,139, far surpassing the official death count of 64, researchers say. For a new study, researchers used official government records to calculate the number, which took into account not just those who died from the immediate effects of the hurricane, but also from secondary

21h

The Green Big Apple: New Yorkers document the city's plants

Susan Hewitt found a special prize recently while wandering the streets of New York.

21h

The endangered species list: counting lemurs in Madagascar

Most people are familiar with the endangered species list. Officially known as the IUCN Red List of threatened species, it's coordinated by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and provides the most up-to-date indication of the health of the world's plants, animals and fungi to guide critical conservation action.

21h

Teachers play a key role in helping students feel they 'belong' at school

The Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) released a report on Australian students' sense of belonging in school in May. It described as "disturbing" some of the differences in Australian students' sense of belonging between male and female students, students from high and low socio-economic backgrounds, and Indigenous and non-Indigenous backgrounds.

21h

Video: The chemistry of Yellowstone's hot springs

Yellowstone National Park is a popular destination for vacationers and nature lovers. But if you don't obey the park's rules and regulations, you could end up in off-limits areas where the water is dangerous because of its acidity and extreme heat. In this video, Reactions explains how Yellowstone's geochemistry leads to its unique waters.

21h

Chinese Heavy Metal: How Beijing Could Use Rare Earths to Outplay America

By putting tariffs on these materials, vital for energy and defense technology, the White House would be shooting the U.S. in the foot — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Analysis chronicles changes in US investment in R&D

A new analysis examines how changes in innovation within firms and a shortage of human capital in the United States in the fields of software and IT have driven US multinational companies to establish and expand new innovation hubs abroad.

21h

Key gene to accelerate sugarcane growth is identified

Brazilian researchers developed a sugarcane line with the ScGAI gene expression silenced. The modification resulted in an adequate phenotype for use in 2G ethanol production, featuring a bigger culm and more biomass.

21h

Parasite infections with multiple strains are more harmful to vertebrate hosts

The incredible amount of genetic diversity in parasites means humans are often infected with multiple strains, which could make infections worse and increase the prevalence of the parasite over time.

21h

The chemistry of Yellowstone's hot springs (video)

Yellowstone National Park is a popular destination for vacationers and nature lovers. But if you don't obey the park's rules and regulations, you could end up in off-limits areas where the water is dangerous because of its acidity and extreme heat. In this video, Reactions explains how Yellowstone's geochemistry leads to its unique waters.

21h

How clean is your desk? The unwelcome reality of office hygeine

If you work in an office, the chances are there are some colleagues you would rather sit next to than others. But we're not just talking personality likes or dislikes here – what can also be a factor is how clean they keep their desk.

21h

Scientists successfully transplant lab-grown lungs into pigs

Pigs implanted with lab-grown lungs recovered from surgery with no breathing problems.

21h

Study: Older people less apt to recognize they've made a mistake

University of Iowa researchers have found that older people are less likely than younger people to realize when they've made a mistake. The finding offers new insight into how aging adults perceive their decisions and view their performance.

21h

JRC analysis assists response to Laos dam collapse

Scientists at the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, have carried out a dam break analysis to assist with emergency response efforts following catastrophic flooding in the Mekong Delta.

21h

Tropical forest seeds use three strategies to survive

The oldest living seeds found on Earth germinated after resting more than 30,000 years in Arctic soils. But in the humid tropics, seeds do not last. "A long-lived seed in the tropics is probably only a few decades old. This may not seem like much time, but it is critical to reestablish trees after deforestation and ensure species' survival," said Camilo Zalamea, post-doctoral fellow and lead autho

21h

How nutrients are removed in oxygen-depleted regions of the ocean

In the course of global climate change, scientists are observing the increase of low-oxygen areas in the ocean, also termed oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Large-scale OMZs exist, for example, in the Pacific off the coast of South America or in the Indian Ocean. Since little to no oxygen is present in these regions—depending on the depth of the water—organisms whose metabolisms are independent of oxy

21h

Banning Muslim Veils Tends to Backfire—Why Do Countries Keep Doing It?

Denmark this week wrote the latest chapter in a global story that is becoming strangely familiar. The country’s new ban on any “garment that hides the face in public”—widely understood to be targeting Islamic veils like the burqa and niqab—entered into effect on Wednesday. Limitations on wearing face veils in public have already been enacted in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Bulgaria, and Aust

21h

Pheromones in fight against pests

Nowadays, everybody is aware of the toxic effects of the conventional insecticides that are used to protect plants from pest insects. The insecticides are harmful to the farmer who sprays them on the field and for the pollinating insects, e.g., bees; and insecticide residues on fruits and vegetables are harmful to the consumer. But are there any safer ways to protect the plants from pest insects?

21h

A periodic table of molecular knots

Using computational predictive models, the scientists identified a shortlist, a kind of 'periodic table', of the most designable knot types, i.e. those knots that could easily self-assemble under appropriate physical and chemical conditions. This study, and the increasingly predictive capability of molecular modelling techniques, can create novel possible perspectives for future advanced applicati

22h

Research shows how hungry bacteria sense nutrients in their environment

University of Leicester research sheds light on how bacteria regulates metabolism which could help to combat infectious diseases including tuberculosis

22h

Research shows that cystic fibrosis impacts growth in the womb

New research, published in Thorax, funded by the Cystic Fibrosis Trust has shown that babies with cystic fibrosis (CF) are born weighing less than babies without the condition, even allowing that they are more likely to be born prematurely.

22h

The fate of Arctic mosquitoes depends on habitat and access to blood meals

The future of Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) in western Greenland depends on aquatic habitat and access to blood meals, according to a Dartmouth study. The study found that female mosquitoes carrying eggs were most abundant near ponds, especially in areas frequented by animals such as caribou, birds and the Arctic hare. Published in Ecosphere, the findings provide new insight into mosquito pop

22h

A new released Chinese soybean genome facilitates soybean elite cultivar improvement

Soybean was domesticated in China and has become one of the most important oilseed crops. Due to bottlenecks in their introduction and dissemination, soybeans from different geographic areas exhibit extensive genetic diversity. Now researchers from China reported a high-quality de novo soybean genome for a Chinese soybean accession 'Zhonghuang 13.' This genome and a subsequently established compre

22h

The best of both worlds: Basic-to-acidic flash switching for organic synthesis

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology developed a fast and practical technique using a micro-flow reactor for the synthesis of pure N-carboxy anhydrides (NCAs). They exploited the advantages of carrying out the synthesis under basic conditions and avoided its disadvantages by flash switching to acidic conditions after 0.1 seconds. This approach enabled them to produce several types of NCAs i

22h

Computer simulation identifies a key principle for next-generation carbon fibers

Performing state-of-the-art computer simulations, a KAIST research team identified an atomistic design principle to produce high-quality, next-generation carbon fibers.

22h

Iranian Christians Are Victims of Trump’s Refugee Policy

When t he Iranian woman and her husband sold their belongings and traveled to Austria with their child two years ago, she says they believed they would be joining their families in the United States. “ When I was at the [U.S.] visa interview, the officer congratulated me,” she told me through an interpreter. “I even … received a letter … two to three weeks later, saying we had been approved” for

22h

Klimaforsker: Over 40 grader i Danmark er ikke utænkeligt i fremtiden

I dele af Sydeuropa forventes i weekenden rekordhøje temperaturer på 48 grader.

22h

States Struggle to Reduce CO2 Emissions from Transportation

The proposal to freeze fuel efficiency standards have dealt those efforts another setback — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

China's Huawei eyes smartphone summit after passing Apple

China's Huawei on Friday said it could replace Samsung as the world's top smartphone maker by late next year, just days after data showed it surpassed Apple for the number-two spot despite being essentially barred from the key US market.

22h

High-resolution imaging of nanoparticle surface structures is now possible

Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), extremely high resolution imaging of the molecule-covered surface structures of silver nanoparticles is possible, even down to the recognition of individual parts of the molecules protecting the surface. This was the finding of joint research between China and Finland, led in Finland by Academy Professor Hannu Häkkinen of the University of Jyväskylä. The

22h

Two dead in Spain as Europe wilts under record heatwave

Two men died from heatstroke in Spain as Europe sweltered in a record heatwave Friday, with temperatures hitting a scorching 45 degrees Celsius in some areas and meteorologists saying only scant relief is in sight in the coming days.

22h

High-resolution imaging of nanoparticle surface structures is now possible

Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), extremely high resolution imaging of the molecule-covered surface structures of silver nanoparticles is possible, even down to the recognition of individual parts of the molecules protecting the surface. This was the finding of joint research between China and Finland, led in Finland by Academy Professor Hannu Häkkinen of the University of Jyväskylä.

22h

Abandoned farmlands enrich bird communities

Abandoned farmlands hold potential for the preservation of wetland and grassland birds as rehabilitation zones.

22h

How to Become an Experimental Test Pilot

Aviation school, hundreds of hours of training, and expert level engineering skills are just a few of the necessary steps needed to pilot an experimental aircraft. Stream Full Episodes of Hard to Kill: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/hard-to-kill/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitt

22h

Hospital bacteria are starting to tolerate hand sanitizer

Strains of bacteria have developed increased tolerance to the alcohols in hand sanitizers, which requires hospitals to rethink how they protect patients from drug-resistant bacteria. A new study finds that strains of Enterococcus faecium , a notorious healthcare-associated bacterial pathogen, have emerged since 2010 that are ten times more tolerant of alcohol-based hand sanitizers than older stra

22h

S. Korea to launch probe into BMW over alleged delayed recall

South Korea will launch an investigation into BMW, a minister said Friday, over an alleged delay in recalling more than 100,000 cars following a spate of engine fires.

22h

Tropical forest seeds use three strategies to survive

From tiny banana seeds to giant coconuts, it's tough for seeds to survive in tropical soils where they are under constant attack by fungi, bacteria, insects and animals. By understanding how seeds defend themselves, tropical biologists contribute to reforestation, crop management and sustainable agriculture in the tropics.

22h

How our brains keep us from saving money

While many factors are at play, we can blame our brains—at least to some degree—for our poor saving habits, according to a new study. The average American working-age couple has saved only $5,000 for retirement, while 43 percent of working-age families have no retirement savings at all, according to a 2016 analysis of a Federal Reserve survey. And as of 2017, people were saving less than 3 percen

22h

Amazon pays just $2.2M in tax in UK despite surge in profits

Amazon is facing criticism after its British tax bill fell despite a big jump in sales and profits.

22h

The subtle mechanics of an avalanche as seen in 3-D

Drawing on the fact that the snow in an avalanche can behave like both a solid and a fluid, a young researcher at EPFL and SLF has managed to simulate a snow slab avalanche with unrivaled precision.

22h

A beginner's guide to finding wild edible plants that won't kill you

DIY Go eat in the woods. Lost in the woods? You don't need to look far for food. A nutritious buffet of wild edible plants surrounds you, just waiting to be plucked, cracked, and uprooted.

22h

Websites offering vaginal rejuvenation put women at risk, warn doctors

Poorly regulated aesthetic medicine industry needs more research to confirm or deny benefits and safety of procedures, say plastic surgeons A growing number of websites are offering treatments to tighten and refresh vaginas, but leading plastic surgeons have warned that the safety and effectiveness of such procedures is not yet known. Paul Banwell, a consultant plastic surgeon and member of the B

22h

Here's what we know about CRISPR safety – and reports of 'genome vandalism'

A movie just recently released called "Rampage" features Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson using a genetic engineering technology called CRISPR, to transform a gorilla, among other animals, into a flying dragon-monster with gigantic teeth. Though this is science fiction, not to mention impossible, the movie captures the imagination of the public and their recent interest and fascination with CRISPR.

22h

Readers Respond to the April 2018 Issue

Letters to the editor from the April 2018 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

The week in wildlife – in pictures

A quarter of a million roosting gannets in Yorkshire, an orca whale mother keeps her dead calf afloat and Norwegian reindeer seek cool in busy road tunnels – it’s the week in wildlife Continue reading…

23h

Research shows how hungry bacteria sense nutrients in their environment

University of Leicester researchers have shed new light on how bacteria sense nutrients in their environment—which could provide important knowledge in the development of drugs and antibiotics to combat a range of diseases including tuberculosis.

23h

Foodora pulls out of Australia

Food delivery service Foodora is pulling out of Australia, with the German-based firm saying it is shifting focus to other markets months after being hit with lawsuits over its treatment of workers.

23h

Hacker breaches defenses at social news star Reddit

Popular social news website Reddit on Thursday was warning users that a hacker broke into its systems, intercepting some employee text messages to get past defenses.

23h

Assembly of fluctuating molecules in artificial cell membrane

Toyohashi University of Technology has, in cooperation with Kanazawa University, discovered the aggregates of a hydrophilic-polymer-modified lipid in a lipid bilayer membrane. A contradict phenomenon that the aggregated bulky polymer appeared lower in the atomic force microscope topography was discovered, and related causes were revealed. These findings will lead to further understanding of the fu

23h

Who owns the aquifer?

Stanford researchers map out groundwater at stake in the wake of a court decision that bolsters Native American rights to the precious resource across an increasingly arid West.

23h

Study challenges evolution of how humans acquired language

A gene implicated in affecting speech and language, FOXP2, is held up as a 'textbook' example of positive selection on a human-specific trait. But in a paper in the journal Cell on Aug. 2, researchers challenge this finding.

23h

VLA detects possible extrasolar planetary-mass magnetic powerhouse

Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have made the first radio-telescope detection of a planetary-mass object beyond our Solar System. The object, about a dozen times more massive than Jupiter, is a surprisingly strong magnetic powerhouse and a "rogue," traveling through space unaccompanied by any parent star.

23h

On the frontline of India's human-elephant war

On the day Yogesh became another of the dozens of Indians trampled to death each year, the coffee plantation worker knew from the fire crackers set off nearby that danger was at hand.

23h

DJI Mavic Air Review: The Drone to Buy

Packed with automated features that make flying and filming fun and easy, the $800 DJI Mavic Air is our top pick.

23h

Elon Musk Wants to Put an Arcade in Your Tesla, and the Rest of the Week in Games

There's plenty to catch up on, including Valve remembering that they can actually make games.

23h

Toyota posts record Q1 net profit, maintains full-year forecast

Japanese car giant Toyota on Friday posted a record first-quarter net profit but warned that threatened US sanctions on the auto sector could have a "very big" impact on earnings.

23h

Extreme makeover: Fukushima nuclear plant tries image overhaul

Call it an extreme makeover: In Japan's Fukushima, officials are attempting what might seem impossible, an image overhaul at the site of the worst nuclear meltdown in decades.

23h

Rat lungworm disease is popping up in the mainland United States

A disease caused by a parasite endemic to Asia sickened at least 12 people in eight states in the continental United States from 2011 to 2017.

23h

The best of both worlds: Basic-to-acidic flash switching for organic synthesis

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology developed a fast and practical technique using a micro-flow reactor for the synthesis of pure N-carboxy anhydrides (NCAs). They exploited the advantages of carrying out the synthesis under basic conditions and avoided its disadvantages by flash switching to acidic conditions after 0.1 seconds. This approach enabled them to produce several types of NCAs i

23h

Lead or follow: What sets leaders apart?

Leaders are more willing to take responsibility for making decisions that affect the welfare of others. In a new study, researchers at the University of Zurich identified the cognitive and neurobiological processes that influence whether someone is more likely to take on leadership or to delegate decision-making.

23h

VLA detects possible extrasolar planetary-mass magnetic powerhouse

Astronomers have used the VLA to detect a possible planetary-mass object with a surprisingly powerful magnetic field some 20 light-years from Earth. It can help scientists better understand magnetic processes on stars and planets.

23h

Safety claims up in smoke

A new study from the UCLA School of Nursing published in the American Journal of Cardiology found that just a half-hour of hookah smoking resulted in the development of cardiovascular risk factors similar to what has been seen with traditional cigarette smoking.

23h

1968: Water for Breathing; 1868: Sex and Rabies in Dogs

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Reading the motor intention from brain activity within 100ms

A study by Tokyo Tech researchers has developed a new technique to decode motor intention of humans from Electroencephalography. This technique is motivated by the well documented ability of the brain to predict sensory outcomes of self-generated and imagined actions utilizing so called forward models. The method enabled for the first time, nearly 90 percent single trial decoding accuracy across t

23h

I morgen sker det: Danskere affyrer 300 kg tung raket over Østersøen

Raketten Nexø 2 bliver sendt op fra Østersøen i morgen, hvis alt går efter planen. Du kan live-streame opsendingen.

23h

Christopher Robin Is as Deeply Weird as It Is Charming

This summer-blockbuster season has presented audiences with several horrifying, apocalyptic scenarios: Thanos gathering his infinity stones , terrorists threatening nuclear war , dinosaurs running rampant around the planet . But nothing this year sent me into a spiral of existential dread as much as the revelation that adult Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor), the protagonist of the Winnie-the-Poo

23h

How Racism Gave Rise to Acupuncture for Addiction Treatment

BALTIMORE—Inside the Penn North recovery center one day last fall, dozens of recovering addicts propped their feet up on black folding chairs and closed their eyes. An acupuncturist stuck five small gold pins into each person’s ears. La’Von Dobie, one of Penn North’s addiction counselors, sat down next to me. She told the acupuncturist that her right ankle was hurting, so he stuck two thin needle

23h

LGBQ teens face a higher risk of type 2 diabetes

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and questioning youth are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and to be obese, research shows. The findings also suggest they engage in less physical activity, and opt for more sedentary activities than their heterosexual peers do. The study examines how health behaviors linked to minority stress—the day-to-day stress that stigmatized and marginalized populations face—m

23h

Living with Parkinson’s

Best known for M*A*S*H*, Alan Alda has also appeared in 48 films, on Broadway, and written two books. Photo credit: Eileen Barroso, Columbia University It was hard to miss Alan Alda’s announcement this week on CBS This Morning that the legendary actor had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease more than three years ago. Alda, 82, said one of the reasons he was speaking out was to offer a message

23h

Blending liquid MOFs produces new glass materials

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of crystalline materials with a structure of inorganic nodes connected by organic ligands. There are currently more than 60,000 known MOFs, and they are being investigated as promising materials for gas storage, including CO2 sequestration and hydrogen storage, and can even be used to harvest water in the desert. Research so far has concentrated on MOFs

1d

Letters: ‘All of Us Authors Are in It Together’

The Authors Who Love Amazon In July, Alana Semuels wrote about how the e-commerce site has enhanced the possibilities for profitable self-publishing. Amazon has done a service making self-publishing within reach of everyone. But Alana Semuels’s essay, starting with the subtitle (“The e-commerce giant has finally made self-publishing lucrative”), misleads readers about the true state of things. Wh

1d

Sight Is an Unusual Meditation on Motherhood That’s Hard to Put Down

S ome might say pregnancy—that miraculous and tedious experience—dulls the brain. But not Jessie Greengrass, a British writer whose debut novel is a highly unusual contribution to the recent flurry of books about motherhood. Sight ’s meditative narrator, an unnamed “I” who is expecting her second child, ponders big themes: the body’s mysteries, maternal responsibility, life’s unpredictability, he

1d

Varmen kan ikke holdes nede ved blot at justere systemerne på ophedet sygehus

Selvom indeklimasystemer på varmeplaget hospital bliver justeret, er det ikke sikkert, at man kan holde temperaturerne under de ønskede 25,5 grader.

1d

Aarhusianske forskere designer antikræft-molekyle til immunterapi

Forskere fra Aarhus Universitet håber, at et specialdesignet molekyler med flere antistoffer en dag kan gøre kemokure overflødige.

1d

Lab-grown pig lungs are great news for the future of organ transplantation

Health Even if they're not quite ready for human patients. Thousands of Americans every year undergo lung transplantation in order to replace organs failing for one of dozens of reasons.

1d

New approach to super slippery packaging aims to cut down on food waste

Almost everyone who eats fast food is familiar with the frustration of trying to squeeze every last drop of ketchup out of the small packets that accompany french fries.

1d

Which Vision Of Farming Is Better For The Planet?

Should we concentrate farming in a small area, or spread it out to reduce the environmental impact? It's a dilemma farmers face as they feed a growing planet. A new study weighs in. (Image credit: Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center)

1d

Urgent Care Centers Are Fueling Antibiotic Resistance

Urgent care centers, emergency departments, and clinics are over-prescribing antibiotics. Can they reform without alienating their "customers": patients?

1d

Image of the Day: Puppet Master

Researchers study the mechanistic effects of behavioral changes caused by parasites in fruit flies.

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Water monitoring device will provide fast diagnosis of deadly bacteria

A novel microbial detection module will help water distribution networks speed up the process of contamination measuring. This will lead to significant savings with real-time critical data.

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One cool camera—LSST's cryostat assembly completed

Work on the camera for the future Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) has reached a major milestone with the completion and delivery of the camera's fully integrated cryostat. With 3.2 gigapixels, the LSST camera will be the largest digital camera ever built for ground-based astronomy. It's being assembled at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

1d

Workplaces serve as training ground or deterrent for civic participation

Workplaces can encourage or deter an employee's participation in civic life outside of the office, depending on how the workplace is structured, according to research co-written by a University of Illinois expert who studies labor unions and politics.

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Why beers warm up faster in humid weather

Condensation on a can of beer or soda provides more heat than the surrounding air, which means humid weather warms up your drink more than twice as much as dry heat does. “Probably the most important thing a beer koozie does is not simply insulate the can, but keep condensation from forming on the outside of it,” says Dale Durran, professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington.

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This Amazing Photo Reveals a Lunar Eclipse Like You've Never Seen It Before

Australian amateur astronomer Tom Harradine made an image of the century's longest lunar eclipse that reveals the true scale of the Earth's dark umbra.

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Forecasting with imperfect data and imperfect model

"Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future," Nobel Laureate Niels Bohr once said.

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Complexity test offers new perspective on small quantum computers

State-of-the-art quantum devices are not yet large enough to be called full-scale computers. The biggest comprise just a few dozen qubits—a meager count compared to the billions of bits in an ordinary computer's memory. But steady progress means that these machines now routinely string together 10 or 20 qubits and may soon hold sway over 100 or more.

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Image: Smoke obscuring large portions of Northern California and Oregon

The West and Northwest are experiencing very difficult fire seasons this summer and there seems to be no end in sight for the fires that are plaguing Oregon and California.

1d

In a first, scientists precisely measure how synthetic diamonds grow

Natural diamond is forged by tremendous pressures and temperatures deep underground. But synthetic diamond can be grown by nucleation, where tiny bits of diamond "seed" the growth of bigger diamond crystals. The same thing happens in clouds, where particles seed the growth of ice crystals that then melt into raindrops.

1d

Captain America on Mars

The Marvel hero's origin story has implications for human adaptation to living on other planets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cigarettes account for half of waste recovered on Vancouver and Victoria shorelines

Plastic waste—particularly from smoking– still dominates litter collected from B.C. coastlines, a recent study from the University of British Columbia has found.

1d

Engineered pig lung transplant 'a success'

Scientists have successfully transplanted a bioengineered lung into a pig.

1d

That Newfound Mineral Isn't Harder Than Diamond — But It Is from Space

This newly discovered space-borne mineral is tough, but not that tough.

1d

Rat Lungworm Cases Are Popping Up in the US, Report Finds

In recent years, more than a dozen people in the contiguous U.S. have been infected with the parasite known as "rat lungworm."

1d

'Hobbits' Lived on the Same Island As Today's Pygmies, But They Aren't Related

Ever since finding the remains of the "hobbits" — a small-statured species of ancient human — on the island of Flores in Indonesia, scientists have wondered whether the modern Pygmy people who now call the island home were in any way related to them.

1d

Boston police to expand use of body cameras after Northeastern report shows they boost trust, lead to fairer trials

Police body cameras can improve trust between officers and citizens while providing valuable evidence to ensure fairer trial results, according to a Northeastern study of a year-long pilot project involving police body cameras in Boston.

1d

Low plasma levels of omega-3 fatty acids associated with preterm birth

Pregnant women who had low plasma levels of long chain n-3 fatty acids in their first and second trimesters were at a significantly higher risk of early preterm birth when compared with women who had higher levels of these fatty acids, according to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in collaboration with Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen

1d

Copenhagen Suborbitals: 5 svære punkter i lørdagens opsendelse

Lørdag opsender Copenhagen Suborbitals deres raket Nexø II. Der er en del kritiske punkter i en raketopsendelse, herunder er de (formodentligt) vanskeligste.

1d

Barneleg: Hackere vil vise, at selv børn kan hacke USA's valgmaskiner

Sidste år formåede hackere på Defcon at vise, at hacks mod USA's valgmaskiner var mulige. I år vil de gå endnu længere.

1d

Succes: Nexø II landet med faldskærm efter tur på 6.500 meter

Copenhagen Suborbitals' raket Nexø II er netop landet i Østersøen med faldskærm. Følg recovery i livelink her.

1d

How Companies Like JPay Are Making Millions Charging Prisoners to Send An Email

For companies like JPay, the business model is simple: Whatever it costs to send a message, prisoners and their families will find a way to pay it.

1d

Using Artificial Intelligence to Fix Wikipedia's Gender Problem

A software program from Primer scours news articles and scientific journals for women scientists who don't have entries in the online encyclopedia.

1d

Robots Are Renting Airbnbs to Get a Better Grip

Airbnb: great for travelers, and even better for putting a robot's new manipulation skills to the test.

1d

Honeybee hive-mates influenced to fan wings to keep hive cool

Rachael Kaspar used to be scared of bees. That was before she studied their behavior as an undergraduate at CU Boulder. Since learning their secret lives and social behaviors, she has developed an appreciation for the complex, hard-working bees.

1d

Invisible dark matter

Deep beneath a mountain in the Apennine range in Italy, an intricate apparatus searches for the dark matter of the universe. University of Massachusetts physics students played a crucial part of the DarkSide-50 detector's latest discoveries—and, in fact, have been part of this project since its inception.

1d

Image: The Orion test crew capsule

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (second from left) tours the Orion test crew capsule for the Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) test, with Orion AA-2 Crew Module Manager Dr. Jon Olansen, left, NASA Johnson Space Center Director Mark Geyer and Orion Program Manager Mark Kirasich, right, Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018 at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

1d

Too hot? Spare a thought for Londoners in 1858

Temperatures hit the 30s and there were no proper drains, bringing flies, disease and panic.

1d

The ‘language gene’ didn’t give humans a big leg up in evolution

Genetic tweaks in a language gene didn’t sweep to prominence during recent human evolution.

1d

The Real Reason Grimes and Elon Musk’s Relationship Is So Surreal

Add this to the list of cherished American institutions that the Donald Trump era has stampeded: the bipartisan romance. The inspirational spectacle of James Carville and Mary Matalin scrapping on TV and cuddling on the couch— maybe we can all get along! —has been replaced by ugly breakup stories . Like that of the Republican ex-cheerleader who felt “isolated” in her marriage to a Democratic stat

1d

Synthesis of the veterinary antibiotic florfenicol by a fast chemo-enzymatic route

Fluorinated structures make up more than 20 percent of modern drugs, but benign and fast fluorination schemes are scarce. In a study published in the European Journal of Organic Chemistry, scientists have now combined dynamic kinetic resolution and nucleophilic fluorination for the asymmetric synthesis of florfenicol, a veterinary antibiotic. After enzymatic resolution of the racemate, two differe

1d

How Africans developed scientific knowledge of the deadly tsetse fly

Few animals are more problematic than the tiny African insect known to English speakers as the tsetse fly. This is the carrier of "sleeping sickness," an often deadly neurological illness in humans, as well as a disease that has killed millions of cattle, reshaping the landscape and economy in some parts of the continent.

1d

Wildflowers combat climate change with diversity

In 1859, when Charles Darwin first articulated the theory of evolution, he speculated that a process of natural selection led species to adapt to their environments over time. He believed traits that helped an organism survive were passed down to offspring, who would pass those traits on to more offspring, eventually leading to the diversity of life we see today.

1d

New method refines cell sample analysis

Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a novel method for analyzing cells and their components called iterative indirect immunofluorescence imaging (4i). This innovation greatly refines the standard immunofluorescence imaging technique used in biomedicine and provides clinicians with an enormous amount of data from each individual sample. 4i makes it possible to observe the spatial

1d

Should the Moon Be Quarantined?

Nearly a half century after astronauts first visited the moon, it is once again a flash point for debates on how to safely, responsibly explore the solar system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Thin films can enhance vorticity in the ocean

Scientists from the Higher School of Economics and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences have investigated how vortex flows penetrate the interior of a liquid. The authors of the article have shown that specific (thin liquid and insoluble) films on the surface of water enhance eddy currents. These currents are produced by the interacting surface waves directed

1d

Summer Jobs Programs Aren't Enough

On a bright, hot afternoon in early July, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel stood in the backyard of Le Penseur, a youth-and-family-services center on the South Side, and dipped a brush into sky-blue paint. He filled in a stripe of the Chicago flag sketched on a wooden box resembling an oversized birdhouse. More unfinished boxes sat on tables surrounding the yard. He was surrounded by a group of teenage

1d

See the Scars That Oil Exploration Cut Across Alaska’s Wilderness

A huge grid covers the landscape just outside the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, from seismic testing for oil and gas. Parts of the refuge itself could soon look the same way.

1d

A Radar Blip, a Flash of Light: How U.F.O.s ‘Exploded’ Into Public View

Sightings of U.F.O.s in Washington in July 1952 garnered headlines around the world and caused so much concern that the government was forced to speak out.

1d

Researchers discover a disease threatening the most plentiful starfish in Antarctica

A study led by experts from the University of Barcelona's Faculty of Biology and Institute for Research on Biodiversity (IRBio) have identified a disease that is affecting the starfish Odontaster validus, one of the most common species on the Antarctic sea floor. The disease, which is the first to be described in an echinoderm in Antarctica's marine environment, has afflicted up to 10 percent of t

1d

Study reveals the changing scope of Native American groundwater rights

California's Coachella Valley may be ground zero for a new chapter in water rights for Native American tribes, according to a new Stanford study published in the journal Science.

1d

Trump’s Tweets and the Creation of ‘Illusory Truth’

As Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election has heated up, so too have Donald Trump’s Twitter fingers. The president is fond of repeating certain disparaging phrases about Mueller’s investigation on the social media platform, repeatedly referring to it as a “ hoax ” and a “ scam .” But his favorite moniker by far is “ Witch Hunt ”—embellished,

1d

'New physics' charmingly escapes us

In the world of elementary particles, traces of a potential "new physics" may be concealed in processes related to the decay of baryons. Analysis of data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider performed by scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow have, however, shown that one of the rarest decays of baryons containing the charm qua

1d

Differences in immune responses create a genetic conflict between sexes

A unique study from Lund University in Sweden has discovered for the first time that there is a genetic sexual conflict in the immune system in animals. In females, the variation in central genes of the immune system is too high, whereas in males, it is too low. The researchers argue that the conflict is linked to differences in the immune responses of females and males.

1d

Broadband internet causes sleep deprivation, a new study finds

About 200,000 working days are lost in Germany every year due to insufficient sleep, with an economic loss of $60 billion, or about 1.6 percent of its GDP, according to a 2016 Report of the RAND Corporation. Francesco Billari and Luca Stella (Bocconi University), with Osea Giuntella (University of Pittsburgh), in a study just published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, find tha

1d

Rethinking ketchup packets: New approach to slippery packaging aims to cut food waste

New research from Virginia Tech aims to cut down on waste — and consumer frustration — with a novel approach to creating super slippery industrial packaging. The study, which has yielded a provisional patent, establishes a method for wicking chemically compatible vegetable oils into the surfaces of common extruded plastics, like those used for ketchup packets and other condiments.

1d

The subtle mechanics of an avalanche — as seen in 3D

Drawing on the fact that the snow in an avalanche can behave like both a solid and a fluid, a young researcher at EPFL and SLF has managed to simulate a snow slab avalanche with unrivaled precision.

1d

Monash scientists show that highly lethal viruses hijack cellular defences against cancer

Henipaviruses are among the deadliest known viruses and have no effective treatments. They include Hendra, lethal to humans and horses, and the Nipah virus, a serious threat in parts of Asia. Researchers have now discovered that Henipaviruses hijack a mechanism used by cells to counter DNA damage and prevent harmful mutations (important in diseases like cancer). This finding adds insight into how

1d

Locusts help uncover the mysteries of smell

By looking into the brains of locusts, researchers in the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis have determined how one smell can affect another, and how a locust can recognize a smell even though its brain activity looks different depending on the context.

1d

Want the truth about alcohol? You won’t hear it from the government | Julian Baggini

Official guidelines are based on morality, not evidence, so will never admit that there may be benefits to drug or alcohol use Alcohol has been getting a pretty bad health rap in recent years. Recommended weekly maximums have gone down from 28 units for men and 21 for women to 14 for both , which is not much more than a bottle of wine. Moderate boozers had a rare opportunity to raise a virtuous g

1d

Datatilsynet: TLS er kun minimumskrav til kryptering af mails

Alle virksomheder, offentlige som private, skal have krypterede emails på TLS fra januar næste år, men yderligere kryptering kan også være påkrævet.

1d

Novartis and Sanofi Stockpile Meds in Preparation for Brexit

If the UK leaves the EU in March without a deal, transport of insulin and other essential drugs could be delayed.

1d

Double standards in hematology for integrative and complementary medicine: a case study

In this post I discuss several yoga studies that were presented to a gathering of some of the world’s best MPN researchers and clinicians. They illustrate an apparent double standard in hematological cancer research, which allows integrative and complementary treatments to skip over the normally high rigor and standards typical of the sub-specialty.

1d

Derfor dropper Uber (og Google) selvkørende lastbiler

Transportselskabet lukker sin afdeling for selvkørende lastbiler for i stedet at dedikere sine ingeniører til udviklingen af selvkørende personbiler og lidar-teknologi.

1d

Signalkaos rammer fremtidens eltog: Kommer først til Aarhus om otte år

DSB og Banedanmark har sammen besluttet, at der ikke skal køre nye eltog nord for Fredericia før ved indgangen til 2027. Årsag: Problemerne for de nye togsignaler breder sig som ringe i vandet.

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Tricky taxonomy: the problems with naming new species – Science Weekly podcast

Species are hard to define, as they don’t fit neatly into the categories that science wants to put them into. But increasingly, people are naming new species without enough evidence to suggest they are indeed a separate taxon. Graihagh Jackson investigates why so-called taxonomic vandalism is on the rise and what we can do about it Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Aud

1d

Tricky taxonomy: the problems with naming new species – Science Weekly podcast

Species are hard to define, as they don’t fit neatly into the categories that science wants to put them into. But increasingly, people are naming new species without enough evidence to suggest they are indeed a separate taxon. Graihagh Jackson investigates why so-called taxonomic vandalism is on the rise and what we can do about it

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