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Nyheder2018august06

 

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Study finds possible connection between US tornado activity, Arctic sea ice

The effects of global climate change taking place in the Arctic may influence weather much closer to home for millions of Americans, researchers report.

7h

Turkish province wants its borders to look like Batman logo

More than 20,000 people have signed a petition for Batman, one of Turkey's 81 provinces, to be re-shaped so its borders resemble the Bat-Signal. Read More

6h

Trump-regeringen: Mildere udslipskrav til biler vil redde 1.000 liv hvert år

Biler bliver billigere uden nye krav – og så skifter folk dem oftere ud, lyder argumentet.

13h

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LATEST

The intensity of pride people feel for a given act or trait is set by an implicit mental map of what others value

As a personality characteristic, pride gets a pretty bad rap. Counted among the seven deadly sins (right up there with greed, lust and envy), it is considered by some to be the worst of the lot. And still others hold pride as the motivating factor behind all great mistakes.

3min

Researchers discover method to deliver herbal supplement curcumin to cancer cells by solving its insolubility

In India and other countries in Southeast Asia, curcumin is often used as a spice in cooking, particularly chicken or fish. It is known for its therapeutic effect and as a way to kill germs present in raw meet. Recently, scientists have also discovered that curcumin, a naturally occurring substance isolated from the Curcuma long plant, to be an effective agent for killing cancer cells.

3min

Facebook and YouTube Ban InfoWars but Invite New Headaches

The battle over Alex Jones illustrates how Facebook and YouTube's strength has become their greatest weakness.

6min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Gates-Crashing

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Rick Gates, Paul Manafort’s longtime business partner, testified in the fifth day of Manafort’s federal trial that the two men committed crimes . The first set of U.S. sanctions on Iran prompted by President Trump’s withdrawal from the Iran nuclear agreement went into effect. President Trump

6min

Engineers develop technology to pull specific contaminants from drinking and wastewater, pipelines

Rice University scientists are developing technology to remove contaminants from water—but only as many as necessary.

8min

Advancing transplantation: Hepatitis C-infected organs safe for transplantation when followed by antiviral treatment

Twenty patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a study published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. The researchers also report that the kidney transplants for these 20 patients are functioning just as well as kidneys that are transplanted from similar d

14min

Transplantation followed by antiviral therapy cured hepatitis C

Twenty patients who received kidneys transplanted from hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected donors experienced HCV cure, good quality of life, and excellent renal function at one year. These findings offer additional evidence that kidneys from HCV-infected donors may be a valuable transplant resource. Results from the single-group trial are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

14min

Scientists create atomic glue gun to build better nucleic acid therapeutics

When it comes to certain molecules, shape makes all the difference. The shape of limonene, for instance, a compound produced by citrus fruits, determines whether it tastes like orange juice or turpentine. In the case of therapeutics, the 3-D shape of a molecule can be critical to activity.

14min

African Killifish are the Fastest-Maturing Vertebrates

A new study finds the fish begin reproducing at two weeks of age.

17min

Trilobites: Welcome to the World, Little Fish. In 14 Days You’ll Start Making Babies.

The African annual fish can reach sexual maturity in about two weeks, scientists found, the fastest known among vertebrates.

21min

Climate And Wildfire Science Specialist Weighs In On Worsening Conditions In California

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with LeRoy Westerling, climate and wildfire science specialist at the University of California, Merced, about President Trump and Gov. Jerry Brown's, Calif., comments on worsening wildfires.

23min

Wildfires Continue To Burn Through California

Multiple wildfires are burning throughout California. The largest are the Carr Fire near Redding and the Mendocino County Complex Fire just north of Sonoma, Caif.

23min

Sequenced fox genome hints at genetic basis of behavior

For nearly 60 years, the red fox has been teaching scientists about animal behavior. In a long-term experiment, Russian foxes have been selected for tameness or aggression, recreating the process of domestication from wolves to modern dogs in real time. Today, with the first-ever publication of the fox genome, scientists will begin to understand the genetic basis of tame and aggressive behaviors,

25min

The value of pride

The intensity of pride people feel for a given act or trait is set by an implicit mental map of what others value.

35min

Wetter soil is leading to reduced methane gas absorption

A new paper finds that the existing effects of global warming are decreasing the soil's ability to absorb methane gas. The paper details findings from a study that measured forest-soil uptake of methane gas in a variety of locations and settings over a 13- to 27-year span and detected decreases of 53 to 89 percent.

40min

Solving its insolubility, researchers discover method to deliver curcumin to cancer cells

Scientists have discovered that curcumin to be an effective agent for killing cancer cells. Curcumin's effective has been extremely limited because it isn't natually soluble in water. Recently, however a team has created a sophisticated metallocyclic complex using platinum that has not only enabled curcumin's solubility, but whose synergy has proven 100 times more effective in treating various can

40min

Low-protein diet during pregnancy increases prostate cancer risk in offspring, rat study shows

Experiments with rats show that intrauterine protein restriction induces sex hormone imbalance, which appears to favor development of cancer in old age. The rate of prostate tumor development reached 50 percent among the old rats submitted to low-protein diet during pregnancy and lactation alike.

40min

Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity

Doxorubicin is a chemotherapy drug used in ovarian, bladder, lung, thyroid and stomach cancers, but it carries a harmful side effect. The drug causes a dose-dependent heart toxicity that can lead to congestive heart failure. Researchers have found an important contributor to that heart pathology — disruption of the metabolism that controls immune responses in the spleen and heart. This dysregulat

40min

Children are highly vulnerable to health risks of a changing climate

Children and adolescents are more vulnerable to climate-related disasters because of their anatomic, cognitive, immunologic, and psychologic differences compared to adults. Researchers set out some specific challenges associated with the impacts of climate change on the world's 2.3 billion children and suggest ways to address their under-prioritized needs.

40min

The Planet Is Dangerously Close to the Tipping Point for a 'Hothouse Earth'

It's frightening how easy it would be to turn Earth into a steaming hothouse, experts say.

42min

What Caused the Massive Magnitude-7 Indonesian Earthquake?

The temblor occurred where one tectonic plate is diving beneath another — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

55min

Epigenetic markers of ovarian cancer

Insilico Medicine and its collaborators from Johns Hopkins and Insilico Medicine, used an integrated approach by coupling identification of genome-wide expression patterns in multiple cohorts of primary ovarian cancer samples and normal ovarian surface epithelium with innovative computational analysis of gene expression data, leading to the discovery of novel cancer-specific epigenetically silence

57min

Researchers detail variation in costs of child vaccination program in Indian states

Researchers from the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy (CDDEP) have completed a study which outlines the cost of delivering routine childhood vaccines in seven Indian states. The findings, published in the British Medical Journal Global Health, provide useful information to India's Universal Immunization Program (UIP), where the data collected can be used to accurately plan and bud

57min

Smart wristband with link to smartphones could monitor health, environmental exposures

Engineers have created a smart wristband with a wireless connection to smartphones that will enable a new wave of personal health and environmental monitoring devices. Their technology could be added to watches and other wearable devices that monitor heart rates and physical activity.

1h

Striking a balance between immunity and inflammation

Hookworms infect people mostly in countries where sanitation is poor and people often walk barefoot. Working on a mouse model, a research team has studied the secretion of the immune protein RELMalpha that is triggered in the body, following infection, to protect body tissue. When the researchers knocked out RELMalpha, the mice produced super-killer macrophages that attached to the hookworm in far

1h

Mapping the inner workings of a living cell

Researchers show that a widely used chemical tracer, combined with a cutting-edge microscope, can track metabolic changes within the living cells of animals.

1h

Economists: Second-longest economic boom in US history ends in 2020 … with a recession.

This would be the end of one of the longest economic booms since the 1990 Dot Com bubble. Read More

1h

Analysis of 3 million Russian troll tweets reveals 5 distinct troll types

About 3 million tweets from Russian trolls have been published in an effort to illuminate how foreign agents have been disrupting political discourse in the U.S. Read More

1h

Dominoeffekt kan få klimaet til at gå amok

Forskere sår tvivl om 2-gradersmål i Paris-aftalen. Kloden kan blive 4-5 grader varmere, og havet stige 10-60 meter.

1h

Scientists create atomic glue gun to build better nucleic acid therapeutics

Now, scientists at Scripps Research and Bristol-Myers Squibb have created a powerful new tool for precisely controlling the 3D architecture — also called stereochemistry — of linkages known as thiophosphates, found in some promising new drugs that target genetic molecules and other disease targets, according to a paper published today in Science.

1h

Drug prices not always aligned with value, CU Anschutz researchers say

In many countries, health care reimbursements for drugs are directly related to their value or net health benefits in treating disease. But a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences , working in collaboration with a group of international clinical and economic experts, shows that's not the case in the U.S.

1h

Social investments could save Medicare, Medicaid, hospitals, health insurers billions

Reliable access to housing, nutrition, and transportation are some of the best predictors of your future health. However, investment in these 'upstream' services by health care stakeholders who could save billions from them has historically been low. Len M. Nichols of George Mason University and Lauren A. Taylor of Harvard Business School offer an economic model to incentivize these investments in

1h

Low- and middle-income countries' health systems ill-prepared for NCDs

In a new study appearing in the August issue of Health Affairs, Corrina Moucheraud of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health evaluated five low- and middle-income countries' readiness to handle the growing burden caused by noncommunicable diseases (NCDs).

1h

Medicaid expansion leads to greater access to diabetes medications

Prescriptions for diabetes medications increased in the first two years after states expanded eligibility for Medicaid as part of the Affordable Care Act, compared to states that didn't expand Medicaid, according to a new analysis by researchers from UChicago and USC.

1h

Earth at risk of heading towards 'hothouse Earth' state

An international team of scientists is showing that even if the carbon emission reductions called for in the Paris Agreement are met, there is a risk of Earth entering what the scientists call 'hothouse Earth' conditions.

1h

Organic makeup of ancient meteorites sheds light on early Solar System

The origin of organic matter found in meteorites that formed during the birth of the Solar System 4.5 billion years ago may provide key clues to understanding the birth of life here on Earth. It could also help astronomers investigate the potential habitability of other solar systems.

1h

Stress makes people better at processing bad news

Feeling stressed or anxious makes people more able to process and internalise bad news, finds a new study.

1h

Better sleep linked with family tree strength

The question of why we sleep has been a longstanding subject of debate, with some theories suggesting that slumber provides respite for the brain, which allows it to filter out insignificant neural connections, build new ones, strengthen memories and even repair itself. However, new research has used mathematical approaches to tackle the adaptive significance of sleep, and the findings suggest tha

1h

Tragedy Has Reinvigorated Better Call Saul

Better Call Saul was always a show whose premise—relatively nice guy Jimmy McGill breaks bad before Breaking Bad , becoming the sleazy lawyer Saul Goodman—carried tragic dimensions. But now, more than three years in, there’s an actual tragedy in the story. At the end of the third season , after losing his prestigious job and relapsing into his mental illness, Jimmy McGill’s brother Chuck set fire

1h

#Blessed: Is Everyone Happier Than You On Social Media?

If you've spent time on social media, you've seen lots of pictures of people seemingly having a better time than you. They may be smiling, but they're not necessarily happy. What are they telling us? (Image credit: Frederic Cirou/Getty Images/PhotoAlto)

1h

Rice U. system selectively sequesters toxins from water

Rice University engineers are developing ionic water-treatment technology that saves money and energy by selectively removing only hazardous contaminants and ignoring those that are harmless. The platform technology could be used to treat drinking water and wastewater from industrial applications like oil and gas wells.

1h

Women survive heart attacks better with women doctors

A review of nearly 582,000 heart attack cases over 19 years showed female patients had a significantly higher survival rate when a woman treated them in the ER, according to research by faculty members at Minnesota, Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard.

1h

Experimental Ebola Vaccinations to Resume in Democratic Republic of Congo

In response to a new outbreak, health workers will start administering vaccines again soon.

1h

Designing the Death of a Plastic

Decades ago, synthetic polymers became popular because they were cheap and durable. Now, scientists are creating material that self-destructs or breaks down for reuse on command.

1h

Angry People Think They’re Smarter Than They Are

Is Oscar the Grouch as smart as he thinks he is?

1h

Created line of spinal cord neural stem cells shows diverse promise

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that they have successfully created spinal cord neural stem cells (NSCs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) that differentiate into a diverse population of cells capable of dispersing throughout the spinal cord and can be maintained for long periods of time.

1h

Meet the next generation of American spaceflight

Space NASA announced the nine astronauts selected for its Commercial Crew program. On Friday, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine announced the identities of the nine astronauts who will be the first Commercial Crew missions—the first people to fly in …

1h

Is too much screen time harming children's vision?

Does digital eyestrain cause lasting damage to children's eyes? Should your child use reading glasses or computer glasses?

2h

Solving its insolubility, researchers discover method to deliver curcumin to cancer cells

Scientists have discovered that curcumin to be an effective agent for killing cancer cells. Curcumin's effective has been extremely limited because it isn't natually soluble in water. Recently, however a team led by Dipanjan Pan, a professor of bioengineering, has created a sophisticated metallocyclic complex using platinum that has not only enabled curcumin's solubility, but whose synergy has pro

2h

Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity

Doxorubicin is a chemotherapy drug used in ovarian, bladder, lung, thyroid and stomach cancers, but it carries a harmful side effect. The drug causes a dose-dependent heart toxicity that can lead to congestive heart failure. Researchers have found an important contributor to that heart pathology — disruption of the metabolism that controls immune responses in the spleen and heart. This dysregulat

2h

Gene recombination deactivates retroviruses during invasion of host genomes

Most vertebrate genomes contain a surprisingly large number of viral gene sequences — about eight percent in humans. And yet how do exogenous viruses — apparently having invaded from outside — manage to become integrated into the host genome? Answers to this question are provided in a study by an international team of researchers led by Alex Greenwood of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildli

2h

Organic makeup of ancient meteorites sheds light on early solar system

The origin of organic matter found in meteorites that formed during the birth of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago may provide key clues to understanding the birth of life here on Earth.It could also help astronomers investigate the potential habitability of other solar systems. That's according to a new study led by the University of Manchester.

2h

If you're a woman having a heart attack, insist on a female physician

Of more than 500,000 heart attack patients admitted to hospital emergency departments in Florida between 1991 and 2010, females treated by male doctors were less likely to survive.

2h

A targeted approach to treating glioma

Researchers from MIT, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a new way to treat low-grade glioma. They devised a test that can rapidly check for the IDH mutation during brain surgery, and if the mutation is present, they can implant microparticles that gradually release an IDH-targeted drug over several days or weeks.

2h

Visa restrictions can lead to increase in illegal migration

While hovernment-imposed restrictions on immigration can reduce overall migration, they can also be ineffective or even counterproductive, pushing more would-be migrants into unauthorized channels, finds new UCL-led research in collaboration with Royal Holloway and University of Birmingham.

2h

Women survive heart attacks better with women doctors: Study

A review of nearly 582,000 heart attack cases over 19 years showed female patients had a significantly higher survival rate when a woman treated them in the ER, according to research by faculty members at Minnesota, Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard.

2h

Rapid diagnostic coupled with local therapy developed for brain tumors

Working together, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and neurosurgeons from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), along with colleagues at MIT, are designing a new, rapid molecular diagnostic and sustained release therapeutic that could be deployed during brain surgery to treat gliomas and prevent their return.

2h

Wetter soil is leading to reduced methane gas absorption

A new paper from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York finds that the existing effects of global warming are decreasing the soil's ability to absorb methane gas. The paper details findings from a study that measured forest-soil uptake of methane gas in a variety of locations and settings over a 13- to 27-year span and d

2h

Ancient virus defends koalas against new viral attacks

New study in koalas uncovers how virulent retroviruses become harmless bits of 'junk DNA' over time.

2h

Thanks to climate change and wetter weather, forest soils are absorbing less methane

Increasing precipitation — a symptom of climate change — is making it harder for forest soils to trap greenhouse gases, creating a feedback loop that exacerbates global warming. So reports a new study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

2h

Earth at risk of heading towards 'hothouse Earth' state

An international team of scientists has published a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences showing that even if the carbon emission reductions called for in the Paris Agreement are met, there is a risk of Earth entering what the scientists call 'hothouse Earth' conditions.

2h

Women more likely to survive heart attack if treated by female doctor – study

US researchers say gender of ER doctor might affect female patients’ chances of survival Female heart attack patients treated by male doctors have a worse chance of survival than those treated by female doctors, a study suggests. Previous studies based on data from Australia and Sweden have revealed that men and women experience different care if they have a heart attack, while UK research has sh

2h

Domino-effect of climate events could push Earth into a ‘hothouse’ state

Leading scientists warn that passing such a point would make efforts to reduce emissions increasingly futile A domino-like cascade of melting ice, warming seas, shifting currents and dying forests could tilt the Earth into a “hothouse” state beyond which human efforts to reduce emissions will be increasingly futile, a group of leading climate scientists has warned. This grim prospect is sketched

2h

Women More Likely to Survive Heart Attacks If Treated by Female Doctors

“Coronary heart disease is also a woman’s disease, not a man’s disease in disguise,” wrote the cardiologist Bernadine Healy back in 1991. In a rousing editorial , Healy lamented that decades of research that focused almost entirely on men had “reinforced the myth that coronary heart disease is a uniquely male affliction and generated data sets in which men are the normative standard.” As a result

2h

This killifish can go from egg to sex in two weeks

The fastest known maturing vertebrate in the lab is even faster in the wild.

2h

Climate change: 'Hothouse Earth' risks even if CO₂ emissions slashed

Researchers warn that even limited climate warming could trigger conditions not seen in a million years.

2h

Amateur Archaeologist Discovers 1,800-Year-Old Golden Ring from Rome

An amateur historian just unearthed a treasure that would turn any archaeologist green with envy: An ornate gold ring dating back to Roman times.

2h

Organic makeup of ancient meteorites sheds light on early Solar System

The origin of organic matter found in meteorites that formed during the birth of the Solar System 4.5 billion years ago may provide key clues to understanding the birth of life here on Earth.

2h

Planet now at risk of heading toward 'hothouse Earth' state

Keeping global warming to within 1.5-2 degrees C may be more difficult than previously assessed, according to researchers. An international team of scientists has published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) showing that even if the carbon emission reductions called for in the Paris Agreement are met, there is a risk of Earth entering what the scientists call "Ho

2h

Thanks to climate change and wetter weather, forest soils are absorbing less methane

Farming, energy production, and landfills produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Forests can remove methane from the atmosphere through the activity of soil bacteria. But increasing precipitation—a symptom of climate change—is making it harder for forest soils to trap greenhouse gases, creating a feedback loop that exacerbates global warming.

2h

Ancient virus defends koalas against new viral attacks

The human genome is riddled with endogenous retroviruses—little pieces of degraded and generally harmless retrovirus DNA passed down through the generations, along with our own genetic information. Because most endogenous retroviruses have been part of our DNA for millions of years, scientists can't explain how they went from their virulent, disease-causing forms to the inert bits of "junk DNA" mo

2h

Visa restrictions can lead to increase in illegal migration

While Government-imposed restrictions on immigration can reduce overall migration, they can also be ineffective or even counterproductive, pushing more would-be migrants into unauthorised channels, finds new UCL-led research in collaboration with Royal Holloway and University of Birmingham.

2h

Low-protein diet during pregnancy increases prostate cancer risk in offspring

Experiments with rats show that intrauterine protein restriction induces sex hormone imbalance, which appears to favor development of cancer in old age. The rate of prostate tumor development reached 50 percent among the old rats submitted to low-protein diet during pregnancy and lactation alike.

2h

Women Die More from Heart Attacks Than Men–Unless ER Doc Is Female

Analyzing over 500,000 cases suggests having female physicians in the emergency room may save women’s lives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

2h

Children are highly vulnerable to health risks of a changing climate

Children and adolescents are more vulnerable to climate-related disasters because of their anatomic, cognitive, immunologic, and psychologic differences compared to adults. Researchers set out some specific challenges associated with the impacts of climate change on the world's 2.3 billion children and suggest ways to address their under-prioritized needs.

2h

10 quotes from Confucius that explain his philosophy

We all know who Confucius was, but what did he teach? Read More

2h

Coming to a night sky near you: The Perseid meteor shower!

The Perseid meteor shower during this weekend's new moon should be fabulous. Read More

2h

YouTube removes Infowars and The Alex Jones ChannelYouTube Alex Jones

On Monday morning, YouTube removed Infowars and The Alex Jones Channel from its platform, following similar bans from Apple, Spotify and Facebook. Read More

2h

Succession’s Masterful Finale Tips the HBO Show’s Hand

This article contains spoilers through all 10 episodes of HBO’s Succession. There have been few performances on TV this year as intense and as discomfiting as Jeremy Strong’s representation of the doomed scion Kendall Roy on HBO’s Succession . As the eldest son of the media magnate Logan Roy (Brian Cox), Kendall is the heir apparent, a recovering addict as desperate for his father’s love as his f

3h

Oxford University: Better sleep linked with family tree strength

The question of why we sleep has been a longstanding subject of debate, with some theories suggesting that slumber provides respite for the brain, which allows it to filter out insignificant neural connections, build new ones, strengthen memories and even repair itself. However, new Oxford University research has used mathematical approaches to tackle the adaptive significance of sleep, and the fi

3h

Study: Prioritize cardiac monitoring for high-risk breast cancer patients

Overall, heart failure is an uncommon complication of breast cancer treatment; however, the risk is higher in patients treated with certain types of chemotherapy and lower in younger patients, according to a study in a special 'Imaging in Cardio-oncology' issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. Researchers concluded that cardiac monitoring should be a higher priority for high-risk patients.

3h

Facebook asks big banks to share customer detailsFacebook Messenger

Facebook has asked major US banks to share customer data to allow it to develop new services on the social network's Messenger texting platform, a banking source told AFP on Monday.

3h

Photos: Trying to Keep Cool

Over the past month, record-setting high temperatures have been recorded across the northern hemisphere. Sometimes dangerous heat waves in Europe, Asia, and North America have driven people to beaches, lakes, water parks, even air-conditioned grocery stores, to find relief. Collected here, recent images of people and animals doing what they can to beat the heat.

3h

Better sleep linked with family tree strength

The question of why we sleep has been a longstanding subject of debate, with some theories suggesting that slumber provides respite for the brain, which allows it to filter out insignificant neural connections, build new ones, strengthen memories and even repair itself. However, new Oxford University research has used mathematical approaches to tackle the adaptive significance of sleep, and the fi

3h

Doctors Grapple with High Suicide Rates in Their Ranks

300 to 400 physicians kill themselves each year — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Trump’s War With the Koch Brothers Makes No Sense

It’s plausible to dismiss the current feud between Donald Trump and the mogul Charles Koch as merely an alpha-male ego-fest—in the words of the journalist and Koch-watcher Jane Mayer, “ a plutocratic pissing match ” for control of the Republican Party. Trump turned up the heat last week when he tweeted that the scion of the conservative donor network was “overrated,” which may be the first time t

3h

New Android version, 'Pie,' rolls out Monday on Pixel phonesGoogle Android 9 AP

The next version of Google's Android system will be called Pie.

3h

Apple and Facebook delete content of US conspiracy theorist Alex Jones

Apple on Monday deleted several podcasts of the far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, while Facebook removed four of his online pages which the social media platform accused of "glorifying violence."

3h

Genetics technology could lead to more crops, fresher food

A multinational agricultural company based in Idaho has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and make grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer.

3h

The Battle for the Beach

We're running out of sand. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

3h

Changing Autos, Changing Climate

What does the future of the auto industry look like? (Image credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

3h

Last week in tech: Brookstone died, Movie Pass changed again, and Apple entered the four comma club

Technology You can have summer fun and stay up on all the latest tech news, too. Check out the latest episode of the Last Week in Tech podcast with reader questions, supercomputers, and an update to vinyl records.

3h

Striking a balance between immunity and inflammation

Hookworms infect people mostly in countries where sanitation is poor and people often walk barefoot. Working on a mouse model, a UC Riverside research team has studied the secretion of the immune protein RELMalpha that is triggered in the body, following infection, to protect body tissue. When the researchers knocked out RELMalpha, the mice produced super-killer macrophages that attached to the ho

3h

Reducing NOVA1 gene helps prevent tumor growth in most common type of lung cancer

Researchers have identified a gene that when inhibited or reduced, in turn, reduced or prevented human non-small cell lung cancer tumors from growing.

3h

Combining on and off switches, one protein can control flowering in plants

New research has discovered a previously unknown mechanism for controlling cellular decisions, one which combines an on-and-off switch in a single protein, either promoting or preventing the transition to flowering in plants.

4h

Alexa, be my friend: Children talk to technology, but how does it respond?

Children communicate with technology differently than adults do, and a more responsive device — one that repeats or prompts the user, for example — could be more useful to more people. A new study examines how young children talk to technology.

4h

A system to synthesize realistic sounds for computer animation

Sounds accompanying computer-animated content are usually created with recordings. Now, a new system synthesizes synchronized sound at the push of a button.

4h

Animations prove effective in accurately measuring pain

'Painimations' may assess and monitor pain better than any previously used measures.

4h

Injectable trace minerals improve mineral status in beef heifers

In a set of recent studies, animal scientists study the effects of the injectable trace mineral Multimin®90 on reproductive performance in beef heifers.

4h

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Comprehensive pediatric CAR T guidelines developed

Almost one year after the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), researchers have recently published treatment guidelines for managing the treatment.

4h

Mosquito populations give a new insight into the role of Caucasus in evolution

A closer look into mosquitoes from three separate site in the Caucasus allowed for scientist to not only study the evolution of a curious group of species, but also provide a brand new insight into the role of the Caucasian region from an evolutionary perspective.

4h

Smart wristband with link to smartphones could monitor health, environmental exposures

Rutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created a smart wristband with a wireless connection to smartphones that will enable a new wave of personal health and environmental monitoring devices. Their technology, which could be added to watches and other wearable devices that monitor heart rates and physical activity, is detailed in a study published online in Microsystems & Nanoengineering.

4h

Stress makes people better at processing bad news

Feeling stressed or anxious makes people more able to process and internalize bad news, finds a new UCL-led study.

4h

Neural signature of balance

A study of young adults published in eNeuro demonstrates how the brain responds to disruptions in the body's balance. The research identifies a pattern of electrical activity that could be used to assess balance in patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

4h

People process bad news better under stress

Threat dissolves the human tendency to readily accept good news over bad, according to experiments conducted both in the lab and with on-duty firefighters. The findings, published in JNeurosci, provide a potential mechanism by which levels of optimism are adapted to the relative safety or danger of the environment.

4h

Molecular switch triggers itch

A new study of male mice published in JNeurosci uncovers two distinct pathways through which a single molecule can cause both itchy and painful skin. The research could inform the development of drugs for a variety of skin diseases.

4h

VIP neurons shift daily rhythms

Neurons in the brain's master clock that adjust their activity in response to light have a key role in the resetting of an animal's daily cycle, finds a study of male and female mice published in JNeurosci. These cells may be responsible for circadian rhythm disruptions stemming from exposure to artificial light at night.

4h

What Caused Massive Magnitude-7 Indonesian Earthquake?

Here's a look at the tectonic plates that made the 7.0-magnitude earthquake possible.

4h

People Are Feeding Their Dogs Grain-Free Diets, and It May Be Bad for Their Hearts

So-called "grain-free" dog foods have become popular these days; but the diets may not be good for some pooches' hearts.

4h

Typhoon Shanshan caught by NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite caught up with Typhoon Shanahan and provided forecasters with a visible picture of the storm that revealed the storm still maintained an eye, despite weakening.

4h

NASA gets an infrared look at intensifying Tropical Storm Ileana

Tropical Storm Ileana formed quickly close to the coast of southwestern Mexico around the same time as John, which is just located west of Ileana. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed the storm was strengthening as cloud top temperatures in Ileana had cooled.

4h

Radio jammers saved Venezuela’s president from deadly drone attack

Radio jamming systems apparently thwarted an attempted presidential assassination with improvised drone bombs in Venezuela

4h

The truth about the suspected link between social media and self-harm

Is social media really to blame for rises in self-harming? The evidence isn’t clear, but some social media use may even be good for teenagers, says Tom Chivers

4h

Explosive facelift left star looking much younger than its true age

A faraway star surrounded by a strange cloud of dust and gas had an explosive rebirth, spitting out debris and dimming by a factor of 10,000 in less than 50 years

4h

A weird Pacific cycle could make the Arctic warm up even faster

The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is cyclical, switching from warm to cold phases every 20 years or so. When it switches again it could speed up Arctic warming

4h

Did we really evolve domestic violence? We don’t know yet

A study suggests men in some societies who are violent to their partners may have more children – but that doesn’t mean that evolution favours domestic violence

4h

Deaths caused by the opioid fentanyl are rising in the UK

Drug data reveals that deaths from fentanyl, carfentanyl and cocaine are on the rise in England and Wales, but heroin and morphine deaths have declined slightly

4h

It may be impossible to evolve a large brain if you hibernate

Mammals that hibernate have smaller brains than those that don’t, suggesting that hibernation limits brain size by reducing annual food intake

4h

The medical cannabis debate is a chance to put science before dogma

Neither extreme prohibition nor extreme liberalism is a sensible drugs policy – on medical cannabis and elsewhere, let’s see what the facts say

4h

Two huge Antarctic glaciers are losing much more ice than we thought

The Totten and Moscow University glaciers in east Antarctica have lost billions of tonnes of ice since 2002. Between them they could raise sea levels by 5 metres

4h

Typhoon Shanshan caught by NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite caught up with Typhoon Shanahan and provided forecasters with a visible picture of the storm that revealed the storm still maintained an eye, despite weakening.

4h

Google Android 9 Pie: The 5 Best New FeaturesGoogle Android 9 AP

Here are five key features from Android Pie, which was released today.

4h

Danske gymnasieelever vinder olympiske medaljer i biologi

De danske deltagere kom både på medaljeskamlen og på forsiden af de iranske aviser, da de var til Biologi Olympiaden i Teheran

4h

Meds not the only answer for ADHD | Letters

There need to be national multi-agency collaborative pathways for the holistic assessment of children with attention difficulties We, as chartered psychologists (BPS), are delighted that the inadequate provision for children with mental health difficulties in the UK was highlighted ( Shocking failures on children with ADHD , 4 August). We agree with the findings that there are considerable local d

4h

Animations prove effective in accurately measuring pain

'Painimations' may assess and monitor pain better than any previously used measures.

4h

A system to synthesize realistic sounds for computer animation

Sounds accompanying computer-animated content are usually created with recordings. Now, a new system synthesizes synchronized sound at the push of a button.

4h

Bedrest Is Bunk

One quiet Sunday afternoon, shortly before the birth of my second child, I decided it was time to make my great escape. I was in the middle of my third— and longest—hospital stay. For weeks, I’d seen only the inside of my room, a beige cell with a view of the parking lot through a small window. I’d become desperate to escape, even if it was only to the hospital’s sterile corridors. I peaked out o

5h

Diabetes in bay area Chinese population linked to fat fibrosis

A new UC San Francisco study has discovered a key biological difference in how people of European and Chinese descent put on weight — a finding that could help explain why Asians often develop type 2 diabetes at a much lower body weight than Caucasians.

5h

Alexa, be my friend: Children talk to technology, but how does it respond?

Children communicate with technology differently than adults do, and a more responsive device — one that repeats or prompts the user, for example — could be more useful to more people. A new University of Washington study examines how children talk to technology.

5h

World history seen via a shop window | Brief letters

Apollo space missions | China’s emissions | Denis Healy sightings | Telephones | Identifying art Further to Peter Avery’s letter about watching cricket outside a TV rental showroom (4 August), in the late 1960s I was an avid follower of the Apollo space missions. One day the BBC announced the next broadcast from the capsule was going to be the first in colour. We did not have a colour set, so I ma

5h

To Kill Climate Rule, EPA Proposes Redefining the Dangers of Soot

Against prevailing science, the agency is suggesting a “safe” threshold for particulate pollution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

African killifish becomes fastest maturing vertebrate on record

For most of the year, annual killifish persist as diapausing embryos buried in sediments across the African savannah. When rainwater fills small depressions across the landscape, the fish must hatch, grow, mature, and produce the next generation before the pool dries up. Researchers have found that these small fish condense their life cycle even more in the wild than expected based on studies in t

5h

Expanding the limits of Li-ion batteries: Electrodes for all-solid-state batteries

Scientists have addressed one of the major disadvantages of all-solid-state batteries by developing batteries with a low resistance at their electrode/solid electrolyte interface. The fabricated batteries showed excellent electrochemical properties that greatly surpass those of traditional and ubiquitous Li-ion batteries; thereby, demonstrating the promise of all-solid-state battery technology and

5h

PET tracer identifies estrogen receptor expression differences in breast cancer patients

In metastatic breast cancer, prognosis and treatment is largely influenced by estrogen receptor (ER) expression of the metastases. However, little is known about ER expression across metastases throughout the body and surrounding normal tissue. Using a PET tracer, researchers have been able to identify differences in ER expression, which could help guide treatment for metastatic breast cancer pati

5h

There’s Nothing Wrong With Black English

The Nation recently published a poem in which a homeless narrator speaks a complex, nuanced variety of English with a long and interesting history. The variety of English is Black English, and the poet is Anders Carlson-Wee, a white man. In the wake of the controversy, The Nation ’s poetry editors have appended a kind of trigger warning to the poem calling its language “disparaging.” (They also a

5h

Fear and Anxiety at Refugee Road

There are roughly 3,000 immigrants from Mauritania in Columbus, Ohio. They came to America fleeing persecution and slavery in the West African country. For years, ICE allowed even those with failed asylum claims to remain in the U.S. "Since Donald Trump has become president, more than 50 people I know have been detained and deported," says a local Mauritanian community leader. A new documentary f

5h

The Double Damage of the President’s Trump Tower Admission

In an attempt to defend his son Donald Trump Jr. on Sunday, President Donald Trump may instead have incriminated him—and himself. Responding to a Washington Post report that he is increasingly concerned about his eldest son’s legal exposure, the president denied that claim in a tweet Sunday morning: Fake News reporting, a complete fabrication, that I am concerned about the meeting my wonderful so

5h

New system allows rapid response to heart attacks, limits cardiac damage

Researchers have developed a drug-delivery system that allows rapid response to heart attacks without surgical intervention. In laboratory and animal testing, the system proved to be effective at dissolving clots, limiting long-term scarring to heart tissue and preserving more of the heart's normal function.

5h

Ricocheting radio waves monitor the tiniest movements in a room

Metamaterials researchers have shown that patterns made by radio waves can detect a person's presence and location anywhere inside of a room. The technology is sensitive enough to detect a person breathing and could lead to new smart home devices for energy savings, security, healthcare and gaming.

5h

Possible connection between U.S. tornado activity, Arctic sea ice

The effects of global climate change taking place in the Arctic may influence weather much closer to home for millions of Americans, researchers report.

5h

Small birds fly at high altitudes towards Africa

A new study shows that small birds migrating from Scandinavia to Africa in the autumn occasionally fly as high as 4,000 meters above sea level — probably adjusting their flight to take advantage of favorable winds and different wind layers.

5h

The bark side of the force

What forces enable trees to stand upright? To grow straight, plants need a motor system that controls their posture by generating forces to offset gravity. Scientists have long thought that this motor force was controlled only by the internal forces induced in wood. In a new study, scientists show that bark is also involved in the generation of mechanical stresses in several tree species.

5h

Rick Turner obituary

Archaeologist who recovered Lindow Man, the best preserved bog body in Britain Rick Turner, who has died aged 66 of cancer, made the archaeological discovery of the 1980s when he recovered Lindow Man, the best preserved bog body in Britain. The find, in 1984, helped to pioneer new techniques of investigation and analysis, and provided fresh insight into how our ancestors lived. As county archaeolo

5h

NASA gets an infrared look at intensifying Tropical Storm Ileana

Tropical Storm Ileana formed quickly close to the coast of southwestern Mexico around the same time as John, which is just located west of Ileana. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed the storm was strengthening as cloud top temperatures in Ileana had cooled.

5h

Tap and pray: Churches using card readers for donations

Thousands of Christian churches across the world are now using portable card readers or apps to take donations as people increasingly stop carrying cash on them.

5h

No price hike, but new caps on MoviePass discount tix plan

MoviePass, a discount service for movie tickets at theaters, is walking back a planned 50 percent price increase following a subscriber backlash. But it will soon impose a cap of three movies per month, instead of one every day.

5h

Pentagon restricts use of fitness trackers, other devices

Military troops and other defense personnel at sensitive bases or certain high-risk warzone areas won't be allowed to use fitness tracker or cellphone applications that can reveal their location, according to a new Pentagon order.

5h

Suomi NPP satellite gets night-time and infrared views of Hurricane Hector

Hurricane Hector was impressive in night-time and infrared imagery taken from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite when it strengthened into a major hurricane. Hector recently crossed from the Eastern Pacific into the Central Pacific Ocean and strengthened into a Category 4 Hurricane.

5h

NASA data shows Tropical Storm John intensifying

Tropical Storm John formed quickly off the coast of southwestern Mexico around the same time as Ileana, which is just east of John. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed the cloud top temperatures in John had cooled indicating the storm was strengthening.

6h

African killifish becomes fastest maturing vertebrate on record

Annual killifish are known to live their lives at one of two speeds: "pause" or "fast-forward." For most of the year, the tiny freshwater fish persist as diapausing embryos buried in sediments across the African savannah, much like plant seeds. When rainwater fills small depressions across the landscape, the fish must hatch, grow, mature, and produce the next generation before the pool dries up.

6h

There may be a link between alcohol and dementia, but it’s complicated

Health A recent article in the British Medical Journal has rekindled the scientific argument over the relationship between abstaining from alcohol and developing dementia.

6h

Injectable trace minerals improve mineral status in beef heifers

It can be a struggle for beef cattle producers to maintain mineral status, especially for cattle on pasture, so many implement a trace mineral supplementation program. But research on newer trace mineral strategies, including injectables, has been inconsistent and incomplete. In a set of recent studies, University of Illinois animal scientists study the effects of the injectable trace mineral Mult

6h

NASA's Planet-hunting TESS catches a comet before starting science

Before NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) started science operations on July 25, 2018, the planet hunter sent back a stunning sequence of serendipitous images showing the motion of a comet. Taken over the course of 17 hours on July 25, these TESS images helped demonstrate the satellite's ability to collect a prolonged set of stable periodic images covering a broad region of the sk

6h

Novel vaccine approach proves powerful against Zika virus

A uniquely designed experimental vaccine against Zika virus has proven powerful in mice, new research has found.

6h

NASA's Planet-hunting TESS catches a comet before starting science

Before NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) started science operations on July 25, 2018, the planet hunter sent back a stunning sequence of serendipitous images showing the motion of a comet.

6h

Learning while sleeping?

Using magnetoencephalography, researchers showed that while the human brain is still able to perceive sounds during sleep, it is unable to group these sounds according to their organization in a sequence.

6h

NASA data shows Tropical Storm John intensifying

Tropical Storm John formed quickly off the coast of southwestern Mexico around the same time as Ileana, which is just east of John. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed the cloud top temperatures in John had cooled indicating the storm was strengthening.

6h

Tobacco 'power wall' linked to adolescents' views about e-cigarettes

The use of vaping products has risen sharply by young people in recent years as new products have emerged and marketing has increased. A new study finds that adolescents who view advertising for tobacco products on the tobacco 'power wall' in convenience stores may be more willing to try vaping products in the future.

6h

Novel vaccine approach proves powerful against Zika virus

A uniquely designed experimental vaccine against Zika virus has proven powerful in mice, new research has found.

6h

Injectable trace minerals improve mineral status in beef heifers

In a set of recent studies, University of Illinois animal scientists study the effects of the injectable trace mineral Multimin®90 on reproductive performance in beef heifers.

6h

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite gets night-time and infrared views of Hurricane Hector

Hurricane Hector was impressive in night-time and infrared imagery taken from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite when it strengthened into a major hurricane. Hector recently crossed from the Eastern Pacific into the Central Pacific Ocean and strengthened into a Category 4 Hurricane.

6h

Researchers identify potential diagnostic test for Kawasaki disease

For the first time, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Imperial College London, with international collaborators, have determined that Kawasaki Disease (KD) can be accurately diagnosed on the basis of the pattern of host gene expression in whole blood. The finding could lead to a diagnostic blood test to distinguish KD from other infectious and inflammatory co

6h

Chinese astronomers discover most lithium-rich giant in galaxy with LAMOST

A research team, led by the astronomers from National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, discovered the most lithium-rich giant ever known to date, with lithium abundance 3,000 times higher than normal giants.

6h

Size matters: if you are a bubble of volcanic gas

The chemical composition of gases emitted from volcanoes — which are used to monitor changes in volcanic activity — can change depending on the size of gas bubbles rising to the surface, and relate to the way in which they erupt. The results, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, could be used to improve the forecasting of threats posed by certain volcanoes.

6h

How common is endometrial cancer in women with postmenopausal bleeding?

Postmenopausal bleeding is a common symptom among most women with endometrial cancer but most women with postmenopausal bleeding won't be diagnosed with endometrial cancer, findings that raise questions about how to best manage postmenopausal bleeding for the early detection of endometrial cancer.

6h

Enzyme helps build motor that drives neuron death

The process, discovered in the axons of neurons, is implicated in Alzheimer's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and other diseases or injuries to the nervous system.

6h

Sequenced fox genome hints at genetic basis of behavior

For nearly 60 years, the red fox has been teaching scientists about animal behavior. In a long-term experiment, Russian foxes have been selected for tameness or aggression, recreating the process of domestication from wolves to modern dogs in real time. Today, with the first-ever publication of the fox genome, scientists will begin to understand the genetic basis of tame and aggressive behaviors,

6h

Rain-on-snow flood risk to increase in many mountain regions of the western US, Canada

Flooding caused by rain falling on snowpack could more than double by the end of this century in some areas of the western US and Canada due to climate change.

6h

Potential new class of drugs may reduce cardiovascular risk by targeting gut microbes

Cleveland Clinic researchers have designed a potential new class of drugs that may reduce cardiovascular risk by targeting a specific microbial pathway in the gut. Unlike antibiotics, which non-specifically kill gut bacteria and can lead to adverse side effects and resistance, the new class of compounds prevents microbes from making a harmful molecule linked to heart disease without killing the mi

6h

Combining on and off switches, one protein can control flowering in plants

New research has discovered a previously unknown mechanism for controlling cellular decisions, one which combines an on-and-off switch in a single protein, either promoting or preventing the transition to flowering in plants.

6h

African killifish becomes fastest maturing vertebrate on record

For most of the year, annual killifish persist as diapausing embryos buried in sediments across the African savannah. When rainwater fills small depressions across the landscape, the fish must hatch, grow, mature, and produce the next generation before the pool dries up. Researchers reporting on Aug. 6 in Current Biology have found that these small fish condense their life cycle even more in the w

6h

Study finds possible connection between US tornado activity, Arctic sea ice

The effects of global climate change taking place in the Arctic may influence weather much closer to home for millions of Americans, researchers report.

6h

Ricocheting radio waves monitor the tiniest movements in a room

Relief may be on the horizon for anyone who has ever jumped around a room like a jack-in-the-box to get motion-sensing lights to turn back on, thanks to a new motion sensor based on metamaterials that is sensitive enough to monitor a person's breathing.

6h

Male birds sing less to females on antidepressants

During courtship male starlings sing less to females who have been fed dilute concentrations of antidepressants, according to a new study led by the University of York.

6h

Mosquito populations give a new insight into the role of Caucasus in evolution

We know that the Caucasus is a relatively large mountainous region, situated between Black and the Caspian seas. In its turn, it is divided into three subregions: Ciscaucasia, Greater Caucasus and Transcaucasia, also known as South Caucasus.

6h

Hospitalsansatte går i vintertøj – projektdirektør tvivler på, der er under 20 grader

De ansatte går med sweatre og skisokker, men projektdirektøren for Aarhus Universitetshospital betragter det som usandsynligt, at temperaturerne i kontorlokalerne i hospitalets stue- og kælderplan ligger under 20 grader.

6h

More than 1 strain of parasite can make infection worse

The incredible amount of genetic diversity in parasites means humans are often infected with multiple strains, which can make infections worse and increase the prevalence of the parasite over time, a new study reports. Schistosoma mansoni is a water-borne parasite with two hosts: snails and humans. When eggs in excrement from infected humans make their way into bodies of water, they hatch and inf

6h

The Utility of White-Bashing

When I was a teenager, I occasionally affected a sort of absurdist faux-racial militancy, declaring myself the Generalissimo of the Most Serene Popular and Revolutionary Democratic Republic of Brooklyn, a breakaway statelet committed to Afro-Asian revolutionism. I asked my best friend—who was white, incidentally—to serve as minister without portfolio, and he happily obliged. Rest assured, this so

6h

Another blow for the dark matter interpretation of the galactic centre excess

For almost 10 years, astronomers have been studying a mysterious diffuse radiation coming from the centre of our galaxy. Originally, it was thought that this radiation could originate from the elusive dark matter particles that many researchers are hoping to find. However, physicists from the University of Amsterdam and the Laboratoire d"Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Théorique have now found further

6h

Sequenced fox genome hints at genetic basis of behavior

For nearly 60 years, the red fox has been teaching scientists about animal behavior. In a long-term experiment, foxes at the Russian Institute of Cytology and Genetics have been selected for tameness or aggression, recreating the process of domestication from wolves to modern dogs in real time. Today, with the first-ever publication of the fox genome, scientists will begin to understand the geneti

6h

Size matters—if you are a bubble of volcanic gas

The chemical composition of gases emitted from volcanoes—which are used to monitor changes in volcanic activity—can change depending on the size of gas bubbles rising to the surface, and relate to the way in which they erupt. The results, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, could be used to improve the forecasting of threats posed by certain volcanoes.

6h

Rain-on-snow flood risk to increase in many mountain regions of the western US, Canada

Flooding caused by rain falling on snowpack could more than double by the end of this century in some areas of the western U.S. and Canada due to climate change, according to new research from the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

6h

Combining on and off switches, one protein can control flowering in plants

As plants stretch toward the summer sun, they are marching toward one of the most important decisions of their lives—when to flower. Too early, and they might miss out on key pollinators. Too late, and an early frost could damage their developing seeds.

6h

Astronomers discover most lithium-rich giant in galaxy with LAMOST

A research team led by astronomers from the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, have discovered the most lithium-rich giant ever known to date, with lithium abundance 3,000 times higher than normal giants. It is in the direction of Ophiuchus, north side of the galactic disk, with a distance of 4,500 light years from Earth.

6h

New approach yields high-purity radium for medical applications

Producing radium isotopes to treat cancer could get easier. Researchers developed a method to recover medical radium isotopes. The process begins with the dissolved proton-irradiated thorium target solution. The process then takes the solution through a series of columns. In each column, different isotopes bind to the different substrates the column contains. With the anticipated scale-up to large

6h

Small-scale fisheries threatened—shared management, communication key to success

Intertidal ecosystems and the small-scale fisheries they support are an important part of coastal economies, environments, and cultures. Globally, fisheries such as the soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria), face multiple stresses related to climate change, invasive species and unsustainable land use.

6h

Highest-ever seawater temperature recorded at Scripps Pier

On Wednesday (Aug 1), researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego logged the warmest sea-surface temperature at Scripps Pier since records began in August 1916.

6h

America debates which party Russia should help next

A new poll highlights the dramatic influence of partisan thinking in the U.S. with regards to key principles of international law. Read More

6h

Which U.S. state will be the first to legalize shrooms?

Colorado and Oregon are leading the charge. Read More

6h

A prescription for MDMA? We're getting closer

New research in PTSD might make an MDMA script reality by 2021. Read More

6h

Comprehensive pediatric CAR T guidelines developed by MD Anderson and PALISI

Almost one year after the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators Network (PALISI) today published treatment guidelines for managing the treatment in the online is

6h

NASA's planet-hunting TESS catches a comet before starting science

Before NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) started science operations on July 25, 2018, the planet hunter sent back a stunning sequence of serendipitous images showing the motion of a comet.

6h

Hopes dim that gamma rays can reveal dark matter

A mysterious glow of gamma rays coming from the center of the Milky Way probably isn’t a sign of dark matter.

6h

The first detailed map of red foxes’ DNA may reveal domestication secrets

Thanks to a newly deciphered genome of red foxes, researchers have pinpointed regions in the animals’ DNA linked to taming them.

6h

Small-scale fisheries threatened: Shared management, communication key to success

New research shows that co-management approaches — based on shared responsibility for resource management among individuals and institutions — can build resilience to socio-environmental change by strengthening use of science in decision making and promoting adaptive capacities, such as learning and leadership.

6h

Differences in immune responses due to age, sex, and genetics

Age, sex, and specific human genetic variants are the key factors behind differences between immune responses among healthy humans, finds a study of 1,000 individuals.

6h

Male birds sing less to females on antidepressants from eating worms in sewage

Female starlings who have ingested dilute concentrations of antidepressants while feeding on worms, maggots and flies at sewage treatment plants appear to be less attractive to the opposite sex.

6h

Probiotic use is a link between brain fogginess, severe bloating

Probiotic use can result in a significant accumulation of bacteria in the small intestine that can result in disorienting brain fogginess as well as rapid, significant belly bloating, investigators report.

6h

Concepts for new switchable plasmonic nanodevices

Plasmonic waveguides open the possibility to develop dramatically miniaturized optical devices and provide a promising route towards the next-generation of integrated nanophotonic circuits for information processing, optical computing and others. Key elements of nanophotonic circuits are switchable plasmonic routers and plasmonic modulators.

6h

Analysis chronicles changes in US investment

A new analysis examines how changes in innovation within firms and a shortage of human capital in the United States in the fields of software and IT have driven US multinational companies to establish and expand new innovation hubs abroad.

6h

The universe's rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it

Next time you eat a blueberry (or chocolate chip) muffin consider what happened to the blueberries in the batter as it was baked. The blueberries started off all squished together, but as the muffin expanded they started to move away from each other. If you could sit on one blueberry you would see all the others moving away from you, but the same would be true for any blueberry you chose. In this

6h

Scientists register strong toroidal dipole response in wide frequency range

Physicists have managed to create an experimental structure with a strong toroidal dipole response of the electromagnetic field over a wide frequency range. This response is associated with a special configuration of electromagnetic currents causing high concentration of the field. A special dielectric metal lattice was created to produce and measure the response. The results can be used to create

6h

Rocket City, Alabama: Space history and an eye on the future

The birthplace of NASA's rockets lies in the land of cotton, hundreds of miles from Cape Canaveral's launch pads.

6h

Antarctic seas host a surprising mix of lifeforms—and now we can map them

What sort of life do you associate with Antarctica? Penguins? Seals? Whales?

6h

Kina indleder klapjagt på ozonsyndere

Kinesiske byggevareproducenter bruger ulovligt enorme mængder af den ozonnedbrydende gas CFC-11. Nu indleder myndighederne en klapjagt.

6h

Learning while sleeping? Our learning capabilities are limited

Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), researchers showed that while our brain is still able to perceive sounds during sleep, it is unable to group these sounds according to their organization in a sequence.

6h

PET tracer identifies estrogen receptor expression differences in breast cancer patients

In metastatic breast cancer, prognosis and treatment is largely influenced by estrogen receptor (ER) expression of the metastases. However, little is known about ER expression across metastases throughout the body and surrounding normal tissue. Using a PET tracer, researchers in the Netherlands have been able to identify differences in ER expression, which could help guide treatment for metastatic

6h

The bark side of the force

What forces enable trees to stand upright? To grow straight, plants need a motor system that controls their posture by generating forces to offset gravity. Scientists have long thought that this motor force was controlled only by the internal forces induced in wood. In a study published on Aug. 4 in New Phytologist, researchers from the CNRS and Cirad show that bark is also involved in the generat

6h

7h

Citizen scientists dive into reef protection project

Log on to your laptop. Start swotting up on sea life. Millions of everyday Australians are being encouraged to take a 'dry dive' on the Great Barrier Reef, as part of a first-of-its-kind, citizen science project.

7h

Can solar energy save the bees?

In response to the population decline of pollinating insects, such as wild bees and monarch butterflies, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are investigating ways to use "pollinator-friendly solar power."

7h

The Battle to Be Trump's Javert in New York

NEW YORK —Technically, the headquarters of Zephyr Teachout’s campaign to be New York’s next attorney general are in a former doctor’s office in Spanish Harlem, a drab ground-floor storefront where the Fordham University law professor plots electoral strategy, lawsuits, and prosecutions. But the heart of her bid—metaphorically, politically, substantively—is about three miles south, on the sidewalk

7h

Oldest-ever igneous meteorite contains clues to planet building blocks

Scientists believe the solar system was formed some 4.6 billion years ago when a cloud of gas and dust collapsed under gravity possibly triggered by a cataclysmic explosion from a nearby massive star or supernova. As this cloud collapsed, it formed a spinning disk with the sun in the center. Since then scientists have been able to establish the formation of the solar system piece by piece.

7h

First North American co-occurrence of Hadrosaur and Therizinosaur tracks found in Alaska

Paleontologists and geoscientists have discovered the first North American co-occurrence of hadrosaur and therizinosaur tracks in the lower Cantwell Formation of Alaska's Denali National Park, providing more evidence that Alaska was possibly the 'superhighway' for dinosaurs between Asia and western North America 65-70 million years.

7h

CPM for knee or shoulder joints: Advantage only in two therapeutic indications

Less pain in stiff shoulders and improved mobility after total knee replacement – but the final report does not confirm greater benefit in rotator cuff tears.

7h

Earthquakes can be weakened by groundwater

Researchers have found that the presence of pressurized fluid in surrounding rock can reduce the intensity of earthquakes triggered by underground human activities like geothermal energy production.

7h

How climate change influences wind power

Climate change poses a big challenge for wind energy production in Europe. This is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) using spatially and temporally highly resolved climate models. The mean wind power production of the entire European continent will change only slightly by the end of the 21st century. However, stronger seasonal fluctuati

7h

Greek fire death toll rises to 91: officials

A 95-year-old woman injured in Greece's deadliest fire last month died early Monday, raising the death toll to 91 as another top official blamed for the disaster stepped down.

7h

New study identifies bird migration stopover sites

Every fall, dozens of species of landbirds migrate from their summer breeding grounds in the United States and Canada to wintering grounds as far away as South America.

7h

Water and land plants control their photosynthesis similarly, regardless of their origin

Plants carry out photosynthesis and thus form the basis for most life on Earth. Researchers from Kaiserslautern and Potsdam have now investigated whether the production of photosynthesis proteins in land plants and algae differs. To do so, they examined translation; this is the process by which the genetic information is converted into proteins. They have discovered that all plants produce the sam

7h

7h

Small birds fly at high altitudes towards Africa

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that small birds migrating from Scandinavia to Africa in the autumn occasionally fly as high as 4,000 meters above sea level — probably adjusting their flight to take advantage of favorable winds and different wind layers.

7h

Ricocheting radio waves monitor the tiniest movements in a room

Metamaterials researchers from Duke University have shown that patterns made by radio waves can detect a person's presence and location anywhere inside of a room. The technology is sensitive enough to detect a person breathing and could lead to new smart home devices for energy savings, security, healthcare and gaming.

7h

Mosquito populations give a new insight into the role of Caucasus in evolution

A closer look into mosquitoes from three separate site in the Caucasus allowed for Russian scientist Dr. Mukhamed Karmokov to not only study the evolution of a curious group of species, but also provide a brand new insight into the role of the Caucasian region from an evolutionary perspective. His paper, which demonstrates how the mountain simultaneously unifies and divides its fauna is published

7h

Hitler: Election campaigner with limited influence?

Political scientists in Konstanz and Berlin qualify the perception of Hitler as one of the most influential speakers in history through their extensive analysis of Adolf Hitler's election campaign appearances and election results between 1927 and 1933.

7h

Here's how many times you actually need to reuse your shopping bags

The plastic bag ban by the major supermarkets (and Coles' pivot away from its ban after backlash, then pivot back to the ban after a backlash to the backlash) has left plenty of people scratching their heads.

7h

Soft multi-functional robots get really small…and spider-shaped

Scientists have created — of all things — a soft robotic spider. Don't worry, it doesn't bite: the spider is a demonstration of a new manufacturing process that can produce soft robots on the millimeter scale with micrometer-scale features for microsurgery and other procedures.

7h

Discovery provides more evidence that Alaska was possibly the 'superhighway' for dinosaurs

An international team of paleontologists and other geoscientists has discovered the first North American co-occurrence of hadrosaur and therizinosaur tracks in the lower Cantwell Formation within Denali National Park, suggesting that an aspect of the continental ecosystem of central Asia was also present in this part of Alaska during the Late Cretaceous.

7h

Designed features can make cities safer, but getting it wrong can be plain frightening

City planners and designers can help make spaces safer in many ways. One strategy is known as Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED, pronounced "sep-ted"). This approach is based on the idea that specific built and social environmental features can deter criminal behaviour.

7h

Convicted Russian hacker Anikeyev released from prison

The leader of a hacker group that targeted prominent Russian officials has been released from prison.

7h

Sorry, men, there's no such thing as 'dirt blindness' – you just need to do more housework

The problem with housework is that it is never-ending drudgery. As soon as the floor is cleaned, the dog throws up, the kids spill slime ingredients into the wood grain, and the tradie walks through the house with well-oiled work boots. And the cycle begins again.

7h

How snails get both ‘lefty’ and ‘righty’ shells

Researchers have discovered how certain biological structures—like terrestrial and marine snail shells—can have spirals that go both clockwise and counterclockwise, not only within the same species, but also within the shell of an individual organism. The researchers discovered a mechanism by which helical biomineral structures can be synthesized to spiral clockwise or counterclockwise using only

7h

Expanding the limits of Li-ion batteries: Electrodes for all-solid-state batteries

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have addressed one of the major disadvantages of all-solid-state batteries by developing batteries with a low resistance at their electrode/solid electrolyte interface. The fabricated batteries showed excellent electrochemical properties that greatly surpass those of traditional and ubiquitous Li-ion batteries; thereby, demonstrating the promise of all-s

7h

New system allows rapid response to heart attacks, limits cardiac damage

Researchers have developed a drug-delivery system that allows rapid response to heart attacks without surgical intervention. In laboratory and animal testing, the system proved to be effective at dissolving clots, limiting long-term scarring to heart tissue and preserving more of the heart's normal function.

7h

Could climate change affect the development of Turkic Khaganate?

The most important economic and political events in the history of the Turkic Kaganate (VI-VIII centuries AD) were affected by climatic disasters. Such conclusions were made by the assistant professor of the Department Russian History of Russia, Ural Federal University, Rustam Ganiev and senior researcher of the laboratory of dendrochronology of the Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology of the Ura

7h

Male birds sing less to females on antidepressants

Female starlings who have ingested dilute concentrations of antidepressants while feeding on worms, maggots and flies at sewage treatment plants appear to be less attractive to the opposite sex.

7h

Next-generation metabolomics may facilitate the discovery of new antidepressants

Antidepressants have become one of the most commonly prescribed drugs. With the technical advances in analytical instruments, metabolomics is entering into a 'next generation' phase. Dr. Li and colleagues from the University of California, San Diego, USA have summarized the analytical platforms of next-generation metabolomics (NGM) and its main applications in antidepressant R&D. In particular, th

7h

Researchers at the University of New Mexico uncover remnants of early solar system

Scientists believe the solar system was formed some 4.6 billion years ago when a cloud of gas and dust collapsed under gravity possibly triggered by a cataclysmic explosion from a nearby massive star or supernova. As this cloud collapsed, it formed a spinning disk with the sun in the center. Since then scientists have been able to establish the formation of the solar system piece by piece.

7h

The Car Industry Squirms, as It Gets What It Asked For

On Thursday, the Trump administration announced that it would weaken the country’s clean-car standards, which regulate how much air pollution can be emitted from car tailpipes. The proposal, which would take effect in 2020, would eliminate the federal requirement that new cars and light trucks get more fuel efficient on average every year. Instead, it would freeze the fuel-economy standard at abo

7h

The easiest meals the PopSci staff knows how to make

DIY Sheet-pan salmon, two-minute meatloaf, and six other recipes. We all know cooking for yourself is superior to eating fast food. And with these infallible recipes, you can whip up a meal even when you're exhausted.

7h

Soft multi-functional robots get really small…and spider-shaped

Scientists have created — of all things — a soft robotic spider. Don't worry, it doesn't bite: the spider is a demonstration of a new manufacturing process that can produce soft robots on the millimeter scale with micrometer-scale features for microsurgery and other procedures.

7h

Scientists create a UV detector based on nanocrystals synthesized by using ion implantation

Scientists at the Lobachevsky University have been working for several years to develop solar-blind photodetectors operating in the UV spectral band. In the field of electronic technology, this is an important task, since such devices cut off emission with a wavelength higher than 280 nm, which helps to avoid interference from sunlight and to record UV emission during daylight.

7h

Earthquakes can be weakened by groundwater

Researchers from EPFL and the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris have found that the presence of pressurized fluid in surrounding rock can reduce the intensity of earthquakes triggered by underground human activities like geothermal energy production.

7h

Concepts for new switchable plasmonic nanodevices: A magneto-plasmonic nanoscale router and a high-contrast magneto-plasmonic disk modulator controlled by external magnetic fields

Plasmonic waveguides open the possibility to develop dramatically miniaturized optical devices and provide a promising route towards the next-generation of integrated nanophotonic circuits for information processing, optical computing and others. Key elements of nanophotonic circuits are switchable plasmonic routers and plasmonic modulators. Recently Dr. Joachim Herrmann (MBI) and his external col

7h

Differences in immune responses due to age, sex, and genetics

Age, sex, and specific human genetic variants are the key factors behind differences between immune responses among healthy humans, finds a study of 1,000 individuals carried out by EPFL and the Pasteur Institute.

7h

Having larger muscles could compensate for poor muscle quality in CKD patients

University of Leicester research shows that having larger muscles can 'outweigh' lack of muscle quality when performing physical tasks.

7h

People with obesity may shed flu virus longer

Obesity may play an important role in influenza transmission, a new study shows. People who are obese have a higher risk of serious diseases and health conditions, with obesity increasing the risk of severe complications and death from the flu virus infections, especially for the elderly. Aubree Gordon, assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, studied the epidemi

7h

Pixelerede personer kan få et nyt ansigt – som viser følelser

Forskere skaber digitale ansigter med rigtige udtryk ud fra slørede billeder.

7h

Hollywood Doesn’t Make Movies Like The Fugitive Anymore

This movie was not supposed to be good. Here’s the plot: A middle-aged cardiovascular surgeon’s wife is killed by a one-armed man, and said surgeon is sent to death row. But his bus crashes on the way to prison, then a train crashes into the bus crash, then Dr. Richard Kimble escapes to go on the run with five U.S. marshals on his heels. This is literally the opening 20 minutes of The Fugitive .

8h

New system allows rapid response to heart attacks, limits cardiac damage

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a drug-delivery system that allows rapid response to heart attacks without surgical intervention. In laboratory and animal testing, the system proved to be effective at dissolving clots, limiting long-term scarring to heart tissue and preserving more of the heart's normal function.

8h

Study suggests little dogs lift legs higher to fool other dogs into thinking they are bigger

A team of researchers at Cornell University has found evidence suggesting that little dogs lift their legs when peeing at a higher angle than bigger dogs as a means of tricking other dogs into thinking they are bigger than they actually are. In their paper published in Journal of Zoology, the group describes a study they carried out with volunteer dogs and what they found.

8h

Building the backbone of a smarter smart home

The state of artificial intelligence (AI) in smart homes nowadays might be likened to a smart but moody teenager: It's starting to hit its stride and discover its talents, but it doesn't really feel like answering any questions about what it's up to and would really rather be left alone, OK?

8h

Poverty's impact on well-being is hard to ignore

Life expectancy in the UK varies dramatically depending on where you live. As a recent BBC Panorama investigation highlighted, "the rich live longer and the poor die younger". The presenters visited Stockton-on-Tees in County Durham, where some people can only expect to live to 69 and where wealthier people only a couple of miles away live on average about 18 years longer. In England, the differen

8h

Spitzer infrared observations of a gravitational wave source—a binary neutron star merger

GW170817 is the name given to a gravitational wave signal seen by the LIGO and Virgo detectors on 17 August 2017. Lasting for about 100 seconds, the signal was produced by the merger of two neutron stars. The observation was then confirmed – the first time this has happened for gravitational waves – by observations with light waves: the preceding five detections of merging black holes did not have

8h

CPM for knee or shoulder joints: Advantage only in two therapeutic indications

Less pain in stiff shoulders and improved mobility after total knee replacement — but the final report does not confirm greater benefit in rotator cuff tears.

8h

Pediatric telemedicine services can work well under the right conditions

Doctors who provide pediatric care over the telephone — known as 'telemedicine' — face a range of challenges that do not come with traditional face-to-face contact. In a qualitative study led by Motti Haimi of Clalit Health Services at the Children's Health Center in Haifa in Israel, researchers found that physicians in a pediatric telemedicine service frequently face difficulties and challenges

8h

Scientists develop unique materials to repair damaged organs and tissue

Tissue engineering is the future of medicine. Under Project 5-100, the Polymer Materials for Tissue Engineering and Transplantology Laboratory of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University created unique polymeric materials for medical purposes that repair traumatized human organs.The laboratory specialists developed a three-dimensional porous material made of collagen and chitosan, an

8h

RUDN scientists showed that light therapy may increase blood pressure in case of hypertension

A team from the Institute of Medicine, RUDN University discovered that light therapy (treating mental disorders with bright light) increased blood pressure in animals with inherited hypertension. It will help to make light therapy safer for patients with essential hypertension. The report was presented at the XXXth Annual Meeting of the Society for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms in Groning

8h

Buildin' with Red Beard and his Pack of Kids | Diesel Brothers

When he’s not crunching numbers at the office, Red Beard gets to do his own building with his kids! Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DieselBrosTV

8h

Researchers investigate stellar populations in the central region of the Andromeda galaxy

German astronomers have conducted a study of the central bulge of the Andromeda galaxy and analyzed its stellar populations. The research could improve our understanding of the bulge's structure and formation history. Results of the study are presented in a paper published July 24 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

8h

Romania reports 500 outbreaks of African swine fever in pigs

Romanian authorities have reported more than 500 separate outbreaks of African swine fever in pigs, mainly in the Danube Delta and near the Hungarian border.

8h

Ammonia synthesis—the greatest innovation of the 20th century

In addition to being a well-known cleaning product, ammonia is essential in the manufacture of fertilizers. The chemical process to synthesize ammonia has hardly changed in 100 years, and is still essential, although scientists do not know how to mitigate its negative consequences on the environment.

8h

Earthquakes can be weakened by groundwater

Researchers from EPFL and the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris have found that the presence of pressurized fluid in surrounding rock can reduce the intensity of earthquakes triggered by underground human activities like geothermal energy production.

8h

Gennembrud for dyrkning af kunstige lunger

Lunger dyrket i et laboratorium på 30 dage og transplanteret ind i fire grise uden nogen komplikationer, får læger til at fremskrive tidspunktet for dyrkning af kunstige organer til mennesker.

8h

'Heaven Will Be Mine' Review: In Space, No One Can Hear You Reach Out

Giant robots and melancholy pasts collide in the florid, impressionistic new visual novel.

8h

My Two-Week Edible-Insect Feast

If we’re willing to sink our teeth into lab-grown meat and plant-based burgers that magically bleed, maybe old-­fashioned bugs aren’t such a stretch.

8h

Wealthy nations dominate ocean fishing

Wealthy countries’ industrial fishing fleets dominate the global oceans. This imbalance in power and control has important implications for how our planet shares food and wealth, researchers say. “We were really excited to use a novel and open source of data that helped us drastically improve the resolution at which we can observe and analyze global patterns of industrial fishing behavior among c

8h

Probiotic use is a link between brain fogginess, severe bloating

Probiotic use can result in a significant accumulation of bacteria in the small intestine that can result in disorienting brain fogginess as well as rapid, significant belly bloating, investigators report.

8h

First North American co-occurrence of Hadrosaur and Therizinosaur tracks found in Alaska

An international team of paleontologists and geoscientists has discovered the first North American co-occurrence of hadrosaur and therizinosaur tracks in the lower Cantwell Formation of Alaska's Denali National Park, providing more evidence that Alaska was possibly the 'superhighway' for dinosaurs between Asia and western North America 65-70 million years. A paper entitled 'An unusual association

8h

Small-scale fisheries threatened: Shared management, communication key to success

New research shows that co-management approaches — based on shared responsibility for resource management among individuals and institutions — can build resilience to socio-environmental change by strengthening use of science in decision making and promoting adaptive capacities, such as learning and leadership.

8h

The Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up, study reports

When people think of the Arctic, snow, ice and polar bears come to mind. Trees? Not so much. At least not yet.

8h

Explorer Amundsen's ship returns to Norway after 100 years

The ship used by Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen finally returned home Monday, completing its journey around the North Pole 100 years after her chaotic expedition started.

8h

California's raging wildfires cause another death

California's deadly Carr wildfire—now the state's sixth most destructive—has claimed another life with a power linesman killed on the job its seventh fatality, officials said Sunday.

8h

Gallery: Beautiful Works of Art Are Generated by Austere Mathematical Rules

Images and sculptures inspired by mathematical principles show off the intense beauty of the discipline — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Wonders of the Cosmos

“Cosmos” comes from a Greek word for an orderly and systematic universe. We’ve learned a great deal about that order since Pythagoras used the term in the 6th century B.C., but… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Slovenians strive to live in peace with bears

When he used to go hunting, Miha Mlakar would dream of killing a bear. But today the 33-year-old from Slovenia makes his living watching the animals, peacefully, in their natural forest environment.

8h

Everything you ever wanted to know about vitamin D

Health Knowing your vitamin D levels might not be as important as you think. Millions of people take a vitamin D supplement in the hopes of curbing depression and fatigue, and even helping with cancer. But whether they need it or not is still a…

9h

It'll be toasty

When the Bloodhound supersonic car attempts to break the land speed record, managing heat around the vehicle is going to be important.

9h

Europe bakes again in near-record temperatures

Europe baked in near-record temperatures on Monday but hopes were for some respite after weeks of non-stop sunshine as people come to terms with what may prove to be the new normal in climate change Europe.

9h

BMW apologizes over engine fires caused by hardware problem

BMW AG's Korean unit apologized Monday over engine fires that prompted recalls and a probe, seeking to allay concerns over images of cars engulfed in flames.

9h

Singapore cyber attack may be state-linked: minister (Update)

The biggest ever cyber attack to hit Singapore was carried out by highly sophisticated hackers typically linked to foreign governments, a cabinet minister said Monday, but did not give names.

9h

Severe preeclampsia heart imaging study reveals roots of cardiac damage in pregnant women

Johns Hopkins researchers say a heart imaging study of scores of pregnant women with the most severe and dangerous form of a blood pressure disorder has added to evidence that the condition — known as preeclampsia — mainly damages the heart's ability to relax between contractions, making the organ overworked and poor at pumping blood.

9h

Why Is Buying Pet Food So Hard?

When my boyfriend and I got our first cat, Pete, a long-legged tuxedo, we fed him Friskies. Depending on the type of person you are, you either breezed through that sentence finding nothing remarkable, or you immediately judged me for buying pet food—ahem, pet “food”— made of ground-up chicken bones, beef tallow, soybean hulls, and other delightful byproducts. I know because we were, at the time,

9h

AI system makes finding potholes cheaper and easier

Governments may soon be able to use artificial intelligence (AI) to easily and cheaply detect problems with roads, bridges and buildings.

9h

Vaping draws strong support — from bots

More than 70 percent of a random sample of tweets analyzed appear to have been produced by bots, whose use to influence public opinion while posing as real people is coming under increased scrutiny.

9h

Mice individuality is influenced by their relations

Individuality exists in all animals, and a number of factors shape it over time. For mice, one of those factors is the social environment, as researchers have just shown. In this species, some stable character traits may even be inscribed in an individual's neuron activity and change when the group's composition changes.

9h

IVF: Genetic screening before embryo transfer fails to improve the chance of a baby

The genetic screening of fertilized eggs for embryo selection in assisted reproduction makes no difference to live birth rates, according to results from the largest published study of its kind. Results from this multicenter randomized controlled trial confirm the 'widely accepted' view that preimplantation genetic testing for chromosome abnormality (PGT-A) will not increase live birth rates in IV

9h

Quantum Computing Will Create Jobs. But Which Ones?

A new bill aims to support a growing quantum industry by training a new cross-disciplinary workforce.

9h

Image of the Day: Red Alert

Female zebra finches prefer red-beaked male finches over their orange-beaked counterparts.

9h

New tools, old rules: Limit screen-based recreational media at home

Screen time from computers, phones, tablet computers, video games, TV and other screen-based devices is associated with increased sedentary behavior in children and teens. Sedentary behaviors contribute to overweight and obesity. TV viewing has decreased among young people, but overall screen media consumption has increased substantially in this age group.

9h

More sensitive blood test diagnoses heart attacks faster

A new high-sensitivity blood test for heart attacks successfully diagnosed heart attacks faster and more accurately in the emergency room than the existing test.

9h

Parkinson's Drugs Aimed at Rare Gene Mutation Show Promise for Other Sufferers, Too

Shutting down an overactive enzyme could become a general treatment, rather than one solely intended for the few who inherit a mutated Parkinson’s gene — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Iran’s Economy Is Struggling Even Without U.S. Sanctions

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET The first set of U.S. sanctions on Iran prompted by the Trump administration’s withdrawal last May from the nuclear agreement goes into effect Monday, adding to pressure on the already hobbled Iranian economy. The sanctions target important elements of Iran’s economy, but they are comparatively less severe than the restrictions that go into effect on November 4. Those san

10h

Tørre slimhinder og luftvejsgener: Ozonforurening blæser ind over Danmark

Onsdag ventes en ekstraordinær høj koncentration af den sundhedsskadelige luftart ozon over det sydøstlige Danmark.

10h

This Unusual Meteorite Flew Around in Space Before Earth Was Born

The oldest igneous meteorite ever discovered may help scientists learn more about planet formation.

10h

Lithuania's 'Great Synagogue' Fell to the Nazis, But Archaeologists Have Uncovered It

Parts of a Nazi-destroyed Jewish synagogue in Lithuania are seeing the light of day again after archaeologists unearthed the religious center's buried bimah, or central prayer platform, in a recent excavation.

10h

Fentanyl drug deaths rise by nearly a third in England and Wales

Fatalities linked to synthetic opioid increased by 29% in a year, according to ONS figures Deaths caused by the drug fentanyl rose by nearly 30% last year, according to figures from the Office for National Statistics. While statistics show that the rate of deaths from drug poisoning in England and Wales has remained steady – 66.1 deaths per 1 million people (3,756 deaths) – fatalities involving t

10h

Scientists Have Uncovered a Disturbing Climate Change Precedent

They were strange days at the beginning of the age of mammals. The planet was still hungover from the astonishing disappearance of its marquee superstars, the dinosaurs. Earth’s newest crater was still a smoldering system of hydrothermal vents, roiling under the Gulf of Mexico. In the wake of Armageddon our shell-shocked ancestors meekly negotiated new roles on a planet they inherited quite by ac

10h

Dear Therapist: My Friend Treats Me Differently Since I Lost Weight

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I had gastric-sleeve surgery last fall and have since lost 111 pounds, with about 50 more to go. I’m exercising and eating right. I’m happier, healthier, and more active and confident than ever before. My best

10h

How Trump Radicalized ICE

S ettling into a sense of safety is hard when your life’s catalog of memories teaches you the opposite lesson. Imagine: You fled from a government militia intent on murdering you; swam across a river with the uncertain hope of sanctuary on the far bank; had the dawning realization that you could never return to your village, because it had been torched; and heard pervasive rumors of former neighb

10h

Meet the Tempest, the UK’s Very British Fighter Jet

With both allies and adversaries in doubt, an aircraft concept that looks out for numero uno.

10h

Who's Responsible for Your Bad Tech Habits? It's Complicated

As the conversation around tech is increasingly framed in terms of its impact on public health, the question of responsibility for our lopsided relationship with digital devices becomes more fraught.

10h

Google Faces Hurdles in China Beyond Censorship

New cybersecurity laws require data to be stored in China, offering government officials easier access.

10h

The Alex Jones Lawsuit Will Redefine Free Speech, Win or LoseYouTube Alex Jones

The infamous conspiracy theorist is being sued for claiming the parents of a child killed in the Sandy Hook shooting were “crisis actors” paid by gun control activists. But also on trial is what it means to speak freely on internet.

10h

IT-folk har det svært med politik, love og demokrati

Skal it-folk forholde sig til censur i Kina?

10h

Are antivaxers “holding science hostage”?

Melinda Wenner Moyer published an article in the New York Times arguing that fear of how antivaxers will react to scientific findings is leading scientists to self-censor. I'm not convinced that this is the case.

10h

Our daughter’s eczema was out of control until we found Dr Aron

Life was like Groundhog Day for our family but then a South African dermatologist and his regimen improved things considerably Fucibet, Clobevate, hydrocortisone creams and gels, Daktacort, Epaderm, Elocon, E45, Dermol, Eumovate, calamine lotion, Pinetarsol solution, antihistamines, Piriton, Ucerax, wet wraps, dry wraps, cradle cap shampoo, all kinds of moisturisers, topical steroids, topical ant

10h

Spacetime Emergence, Panpsychism and the Nature of Consciousness

How does experience, which is so intimately tied to our perception of time and space, arise from timeless, non-spatial ingredients? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

The marriage of topology and magnetism in a Weyl system

Topology is a global aspect of materials, leading to fundamental new properties for compounds with large relativistic effects. The incorporation of heavy elements gives rise to non-trivial topological phases of matter, such as topological insulators, Dirac and Weyl semimetals. The semimetals are characterized by band-touching points with linear dispersion, similar to massless relativistic particle

10h

Research shows how carbon-filled oceans affect a tiny but important organism

They're impossible to see with the naked eye. They're difficult to pronounce.

10h

Image: Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko horizon

On 6 August of 2014, after a decade of travelling through interplanetary space, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft arrived at its final target: Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/C-G). The mission was the first to successfully land on a comet when it sent the lander Philae down to the surface a few months later, while the orbiter studied 67P/C-G in detail before the mission's end on 30 September 2016.

10h

Handshake makes for better deals in business

Like any ritual, a handshake may seem like a bizarre gesture when you really stop to consider it. "Why do we touch hands and move them up and down?" says Juliana Schroeder, an assistant professor at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business. "If you were an alien coming to earth and looking at what people do, you would think, 'What is the purpose of this thing?'"

10h

Mice individuality is influenced by their relations

Individuality is not exclusive to humans. Though this idea was previously rebutted by biologists, today, it is accepted that individuality is found in all animal species. It is defined as all the behavior differences between individuals of a single species that are relatively stable over time. Though the process, called individuation, is supported by genetic and development components, researchers

10h

Blowing Up Illegal Fishing Boats Helps Indonesian Fishers

The extreme practice could put the island nation’s fish catch on a path toward sustainability — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Key gene to accelerate sugarcane growth is identified

Despite international breeding efforts, advanced agronomy and effective management of pests and diseases, sugarcane yields have been static for decades owing to constraints on culm development. The culm's sugar storage capacity is physically limited, restricting the volume of sucrose and biomass that can be obtained from the crop for sugar and second-generation (2G) ethanol production, according t

11h

Rush to dam

Developing economies around the world are investing in hydropower.

11h

Crop-spraying drones

Drones are now delivering pesticides, fertilisers and crop monitoring to farms around the world.

11h

In pictures

Parts of eastern Australia are suffering their worst drought in memory, as these aerial images show.

11h

Kommissionen tog fejl: EU-roaming gav danskerne højere mobilregninger

Danske kunder må finde sig i de prisstigninger, som mobilselskaberne sidste år indførte, da de skulle tilbyde kunderne gratis roaming. Det har Energistyrelsen vurderet trods EU-Kommissionens forsikringer om det modsatte.

11h

The Middling, Melancholy Charm of Like Father

It feels strange to define Like Father as a comedy, since there’s only really one joke in the film, and that’s a winking allusion to Seth Rogen stoner movies. All the other structural elements of the genre are present: a madcap premise involving two people who get drunk and accidentally wake up on a cruise, a wedding flameout, an extravagant set piece involving karaoke, sequins, and Styx. But Lik

11h

Mapping the inner workings of a living cell

Imaging tools like X-rays and MRI have revolutionized medicine by giving doctors a close up view of the brain and other vital organs in living, breathing people. Now, Columbia University researchers report a new way to zoom in at the tiniest scales to track changes within individual cells.

11h

The New Health Care: Workplace Wellness Programs Don’t Work Well. Why Some Studies Show Otherwise.

Randomized controlled trials, despite their flaws, remain a powerful tool.

11h

Techtopia #64 – SommerMIX: Kvinder kan også kode

Kun omkring 25 pct. af de ansatte i den danske it-branche er kvinder. Og de færreste af dem programmerer.

11h

Flere temperaturproblemer på nyt hospital: Ansatte fryser i kælderen

I kælderen går de rundt i vintertøj. På hospitalets højere etager sveder patienter og personale.

11h

Strange metals are even weirder than scientists thought

Some strange metals are odd in more ways than one, and that could help scientists understand high-temperature superconductors.

11h

My IVF life: the science experiment to make a baby – from a partner's view

E, Jean Hannah Edelstein’s husband, explains his side of IVF treatment, from the sperm analysis to the importance of patience What’s it like to be the partner of someone going through IVF treatment? This week, I sat down to discuss the experience with my husband, E. Like me, E is in his mid-30s and has never had kids before. Here’s what he told me. We discussed IVF very early in our relationship

11h

From sharks to chimps to moon bears: tales of a supervet

Romain Pizzi, who pioneered keyhole surgery for animals, is arguably the most versatile and inventive vet in the world In 2012, the conservation charity Free the Bears approached Romain Pizzi , one of the most innovative wildlife surgeons in Europe, with an unusual patient. A specialist in laparoscopic (keyhole) surgery – until recently rare in veterinary medicine – Pizzi has operated on giraffes

11h

A periodic table of molecular knots

Consider a short piece of rope—could you guess which knots are more likely to form if you crumple and shake it? Synthetic chemists have long been working on a molecular version of this problem, and so far, have succeeded at synthesizing a half-dozen knot types using molecular self-assembling techniques. But which other knot types could be realised in the future? This is the challenging question th

11h

Varmeudfordringen II: Sådan skal Søren køle sin gamle bil

Der skal kloakrør, salt og måske Rockwool til at nedkøle en overophedet Polo. Det mener læserne, som har været friske på vores sommerudfordring.

12h

Mice individuality is influenced by their relations

Individuality exists in all animals, and a number of factors shape it over time. For mice, one of those factors is the social environment, as researchers at CNRS, INSERM and Sorbonne Université have just shown. In this species, some stable character traits may even be inscribed in an individual's neuron activity and change when the group's composition changes. These results are published on Aug. 6

12h

Mapping the inner workings of a living cell

A team of Columbia researchers show that a widely used chemical tracer, combined with a cutting-edge microscope, can track metabolic changes within the living cells of animals.

12h

More sensitive blood test diagnoses heart attacks faster

A new high-sensitivity blood test for heart attacks successfully diagnosed heart attacks faster and more accurately in the emergency room than the existing test.

12h

New tools, old rules: Limit screen-based recreational media at home

Screen time from computers, phones, tablet computers, video games, TV and other screen-based devices is associated with increased sedentary behavior in children and teens. Sedentary behaviors contribute to overweight and obesity. TV viewing has decreased among young people, but overall screen media consumption has increased substantially in this age group.

12h

How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

Sam Vogelstein used to suffer a hundred seizures a day. Then he tried a marijuana-based drug that wasn't available in the U.S. It stopped his seizures and has just been approved by the FDA. (Image credit: Lesley McClurg/KQED)

12h

Virusangreb lammer processorproduktion hos TSMC

TSMC, som laver processorer til Apple og Qualcomm, er blevet ramt af et virusangreb, som har lukket dele af produktionen.

13h

Japanese students use VR to recreate Hiroshima bombing

It's a sunny summer morning in the city of Hiroshima, Japan. Cicadas chirp in the trees. A lone plane flies high overhead. Then a flash of light, followed by a loud blast. Buildings are flattened and smoke rises from crackling fires under a darkened sky.

13h

Meet the guy with four arms, two of which someone else controls in VR

These robotic limbs could someday help people work together when they’re far apart.

14h

How ablation destroys cancer to prolong lives

Ablation, a minimally invasive tumour-destroying technique using focused radiation, is proving effective. So why is it not more widely known? Seven years ago, when Heather Hall was informed by her oncologist that her kidney cancer had spread to the liver, she initially assumed she had just months to live. “I’d been on chemotherapy for a while, but they’d done a CT scan and found three new tumours

16h

‘Naivt’ Datatilsyn kontaktede Randers Kommune om problemer med hovsa-mails allerede i 2013

Korrespondencen mellem Datatilsynet og Randers Kommune tyder på tandløst tilsyn, mener jurist. Datatilsynet erkender, at man var gået hårdere til Randers Kommune i dag, end man gjorde i 2013.

16h

Tættere på kunstige organer til mennesker: Lunger transplanteret til grise

Fire grise har fået transplanteret kunstige lunger uden komplikationer. Det er et stort fremskridt indenfor bioteknologi.

16h

Vaping draws strong support — from bots

More than 70 percent of a random sample of tweets analyzed appear to have been produced by bots, whose use to influence public opinion while posing as real people is coming under increased scrutiny. Findings appear in "Okay, We Get It. You Vape': An Analysis of Geocoded Content, Context, and Sentiment regarding E-Cigarettes on Twitter.' It is one of the first known studies to rely on geocoded twe

17h

Early trauma may be risk factor for anxiety and depression in adults with head/neck cancer

Among individuals with head and neck cancer (HNC), those who experienced childhood trauma were more likely to have advanced cancer, to have higher alcohol consumption, and to experience symptoms of anxiety and depression. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that childhood trauma history should be considered during treatmen

17h

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt: Test Drive, Price, Details

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Hollywood's greatest-ever car chase, Ford has trotted out an updated version of the iconic green fastback from the film *Bullitt*.

17h

Ny bilfusk kan gøre danske biler flere tusind kroner dyrere

Bilfabrikanter snyder på vægten for billigst muligt at leve op til EUs krav om at reducere CO2-udledningen. Men snyderiet øger regningen for danske bilkøbere.

18h

Anti-cancer drug puts tumor cells to ‘sleep’

Researchers have discovered a new class of anti-cancer drugs that can stop specific cancer cells from proliferating—putting them to “sleep,” potentially permanently. How our cells proliferate from a single egg cell into a precisely formed human composed of trillions of cells is a stupendous feat of genetic regulation. But it also contains the seeds of cancer when the controls fail and these cance

21h

Genetic screening before embryo transfer fails to improve the chance of a baby

The genetic screening of fertilized eggs for embryo selection in assisted reproduction makes no difference to live birth rates, according to results from the largest published study of its kind. Results from this multicenter randomized controlled trial are reported today in the journal Human Reproduction and, say the authors, confirm the 'widely accepted' view that preimplantation genetic testing

22h

Nano-sized ‘rebar’ makes graphene twice as strong

Researchers have found that fracture-resistant “rebar graphene” is more than twice as tough as pristine graphene. Graphene is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon. On the two-dimensional scale, the material is stronger than steel, but because graphene is so thin, it is still subject to ripping and tearing. Rebar graphene is the nanoscale analog of rebar (reinforcement bars) in concrete, in which embe

22h

Surprisingly little of the ocean still counts as wilderness

The ocean is no longer the wild frontier it once was. In fact, a new study finds that only 13 percent of the ocean still counts as wilderness. “The idea of wilderness is powerful for people, as well as for nature,” says Ben Halpern, director of the University of California, Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis and a contributing author of the study. “Just knowing

22h

To stay warm in the cold, microbes go dark

Microorganisms in colder climates darken themselves to capture more heat from the sun and improve their chances for survival, a study suggests. Scientists examined yeasts collected at different latitudes, finding dark-pigmented ones more frequently away from the tropics. Dark-pigmented microbes also maintained higher temperatures under a given amount of light, and in cold conditions had a clear g

22h

Weight-loss drug could fight resistant lung cancer

New research could pave the way for using versions of an existing drug to keep lung cancer cells from becoming drug-resistant. Researchers have discovered that a key enzyme in lipid metabolism controls the response to a class of targeted drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in lung cancer. Cells use nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, and lipids to produce the energy to support the

22h

The Press Doesn’t Cause Wars—Presidents Do

President Donald Trump escalated his battle against the news media this weekend. “The Fake News hates me saying that they are the Enemy of the People only because they know it’s TRUE,” he wrote. “I am providing a great service by explaining this to the American People. They purposely cause great division & distrust. They can also cause War! They are very dangerous & sick!” Some of these claims ar

23h

Aiming for the Stars, and a Chunk of Rock, in Senegal

On a mission to improve science education, the country got a lift with the arrival of an international team of astronomers viewing the far reaches of space.

23h

Starwatch: the Perseid meteors return for their annual display

Expect a good show over the weekend, when dust particles from the orbit of Comet Swift-Tuttle burn up (or even explode) in our atmosphere Widely regarded as the best meteor shower of the year, the Perseids will return to our skies this week. The peak activity from the shower is expected at the weekend, during the nights of 11-12 and 12-13 August. The chart shows the radiant of the meteors in the

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