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Nyheder2018august07

 

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Archaeologists found traces of submerged Stone Age settlement in Southeast Finland

The prehistoric settlement submerged under Lake Kuolimojarvi provides us with a clearer picture of the human occupation in South Karelia during the Mesolithic and Early Neolithic Stone Age (about 10,000 – 6,000 years ago) and it opens up a new research path in Finnish archaeology.

8h

Earth risks tipping into 'hothouse' state: study

The planet urgently needs to transition to a green economy because fossil fuel pollution risks pushing the Earth into a lasting and dangerous "hothouse" state, researchers warned on Monday.

1d

Det sagde de ikke i skåltalerne: Biogas løber med en tredjedel af støtten til vedvarende energi

Rettet: Politikerne fejrede et nyt energiforlig med at fremhæve flere havmøller og billigere strøm. Men en ny opgørelse viser, at biogas de næste 12 år vil modtage fra en fjerdedel til halvdelen af den grønne støtte.

18h

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Cybersecurity’s insidious new threat: workforce stress

This week’s Black Hat event will highlight things like job-related stress and mental health issues in the cyber workforce.

7min

‘Snapchat dysmorphia’: How chasing the perfect selfie can lead to plastic surgery

People are bringing heavily edited selfies to plastic surgeons and asking for procedures that will make them look like their idealized versions of themselves. Read More

8min

Hailstorm kills two animals and injures 14 people at a zoo in Colorado

Two animals died and 14 people were injured after hailstones reported to be the size of baseballs hit a zoo in Colorado.

9min

Back to the future: breast cancer reprises pathways found in fetal cells

Scientists have uncovered a reason for the uncanny likeness between cells in the most malignant cancers and the embryonic cells of the organ in which the cancer originated: cells in human basal-like breast cancers share features with the embryonic mammary (breast) stem cells that are the progenitors of all cell types in the mammary gland (of a mouse).

12min

Household phenomenon observed by Leonardo da Vinci finally explained

Since the 1820s scientists have believed that hydraulic jumps occur partly as a result of the gravitational pull. But a new article has disproved this longstanding theory.

12min

Mass timber: Thinking big about sustainable construction

The Longhouse, a prototype 'mass timber' building designed by students, demonstrates that even huge buildings can be built primarily with wood.

12min

Got the 'drunchies'? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

After seeing an ad in a campus newspaper promoting unhealthy late-night foods, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat.

12min

Discovery of a new tumor suppressor previously thought to be an oncogene

A gene that has for decades been considered a tumor promoter, the PLK1 gene, can also perform the exact opposite function: halting the development of cancer. The role of PLK1 as a target for powerful drugs must now be reviewed. For the time being, the scientists have discovered that the expression of PLK1 in breast tumors can determine a different prognosis, depending on the tumor sub-type.

12min

What Effects Tree Thinning Has On Wildfires

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Matthew Hurteau, a forest ecologist at University of New Mexico, about the effectiveness of tree clearing and thinning in preventing wildfires or mitigating their intensity.

18min

Sound waves are a form of antigravity because they have negative mass

As sound waves travel, they float upwards away from the pull of gravity. That’s because they have negative mass, so they’re repelled by massive objects

27min

Future heatwaves will knock nuclear, gas and coal power plants offline

Power plants are shutting down in the northern hemisphere due to a lack of cool water, and the problem will only get worst in a warming and drier world

27min

Extreme weather finally brings home the reality of climate change

Climate scientists have shied away from attributing heatwaves and floods to global warming – but now there can be no more denying the facts

27min

Global warming may become unstoppable even if we stick to Paris target

There could be a planetary threshold beyond which the earth will keep warming even if we stop pumping out more fossil fuels – the so-called 'Hothouse Earth' scenario

27min

Women more likely to survive heart attacks if treated by female doctor

An analysis of more than 580,000 heart attacks found that women are slightly less likely to die from a heart attack if they are seen by a female doctor

27min

More than 90 people killed in massive earthquake on island of Lombok

Rescuers still have not reached some devastated parts of the Indonesian tourist island of Lombok after a powerful earthquake flattened houses and toppled bridges

27min

Physicists find surprising distortions in high-temperature superconductors

Physicists used simulations and neutron scattering experiments to show the presence of tiny lattice distortions near the optimal superconductivity of an iron pnictide compound. Their work could help researcher design superconducting materials with novel and predictable properties.

33min

Behavioral changes insufficient at preventing early childhood obesity

Young children and their families in poor communities were able to make some achievable and sustainable behavioral changes during the longest and largest obesity prevention intervention, but, in the end, the results were insufficient to prevent early childhood obesity.

33min

Those fragrances you enjoy? Dinosaurs liked them first

The compounds behind the perfumes and colognes you enjoy have been eliciting olfactory excitement since dinosaurs walked the Earth amid the first appearance of flowering plants, new research reveals.

33min

Soy diets might increase women's bone strength

Researchers now have discovered through a new animal study that soy protein found in food might counter the negative effects of menopause on bone and metabolic health. Moreover, the researchers believe that soy protein might also have positive impacts on bone strength for women who have not yet reached menopause.

33min

Managed waterways are not isolated from effects of climate change

A study has found that human changes to rivers and streams in the United States and Canada do not isolate these natural resources from the effects of climate change.

33min

Disney results fall short of expectations, as Fox bid nears

Disney's earnings grew in the latest quarter, but results missed expectations, as the company paid more for NBA sports rights at ESPN and saw lower licensing revenue from "Spider-Man" and "Cars."

36min

Scientists create new technique for modeling turbulence in the atmosphere

Army researchers have designed a computer model that more effectively calculates the behavior of atmospheric turbulence in complex environments, including cities, forests, deserts and mountainous regions.

36min

Zika may harm nearly 1 in 7 babies exposed to the virus in the womb

A new CDC report tallies neurological and developmental problems, in addition to birth defects, possibly due to Zika in U.S. territory–born babies.

37min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Special Featured

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines After reimposing sanctions against Iran, President Trump warned in a tweet that “anyone doing business with Iran will NOT be doing business with the United States.” On the sixth day of Paul Manafort’s trial, his former deputy, Rick Gates, described how Manafort skirted taxes and used offshore companies to accept millions of dollars fr

45min

Soy diets might increase women's bone strength

Researchers from the University of Missouri now have discovered through a new animal study that soy protein found in food might counter the negative effects of menopause on bone and metabolic health. Moreover, the researchers believe that soy protein might also have positive impacts on bone strength for women who have not yet reached menopause.

46min

1h

Viral Political Ads May Not Be As Persuasive As You Think

Does more engagement mean your message is resonating with more people? For politicians campaigning on social media, focusing too much on shares and likes might be a mistake.

1h

Capturing elephants from the wild shortens their lives

Humans have been capturing wild Asian elephants for more than 3,000 years, and this still continues today despite the fact that the populations are declining. An international team of researchers has now analysed records of timber elephants in Myanmar to understand the effects of capture. The study shows that even years after their capture, wild-caught elephants' mortality rate remains increased,

1h

The sun should not set twice before hip fracture repair

Optimal timing to reduce mortality after hip surgery in medically stable older patients is on the day of admission or the following day, according to a large study.

1h

How axons change chemical cues to mechanical force

Neural networks in the brain form by an axon extending from one neuron to interact with another. Chemical cues in the neuron microenvironment are responsible for activating the extending axon, but which molecular factors are responsible for interpreting this chemical information into a mechanical force for the axon to reach its destination has been unclear. Researchers show shootin1 to be this mys

1h

Army scientists create new technique for modeling turbulence in the atmosphere

Army researchers have designed a computer model that more effectively calculates the behavior of atmospheric turbulence in complex environments, including cities, forests, deserts and mountainous regions.

1h

The Mendocino Complex is California's largest fire on record—for now

Environment Warmer nights are fueling the future of wildfires. The Mendocino Complex fire has burned through more than 450 square miles, surpassing last December's Thomas fire to become the largest wildfire in the state’s history.

1h

Can Elon Musk Really Take Tesla Private?Elon Musk Tesla Private

The Tesla CEO tweeted he had secured funding for a buyout of the electric carmaker, and market madness ensued.

1h

Sea Levels Rise On A Community Not Convinced Of Climate Change

America's first full casualty of climate change could be Tangier Island, a tiny sliver of land in the Chesapeake Bay. (Image credit: Kaycie Goral/1A)

1h

War on sharks: How rogue fishing fleets plunder the ocean's top predator

It was billed as the biggest poaching bust in history, a monumental win for conservationists.

1h

Why the tipping point where the planet becomes a 'Hothouse Earth' is terrifyingly real

"Hothouse Earth" is basically a self-sustaining engine of warming and carbon. Ummm … Read More

1h

Those fragrances you enjoy? Dinosaurs liked them first

The compounds behind the perfumes and colognes you enjoy have been eliciting olfactory excitement since dinosaurs walked the Earth amid the first appearance of flowering plants, new research reveals.

2h

FCC now says there were no cyber attacks during net neutrality comment periodFCC Ajit Pai DDoS CIO

The partisanship in the battle over net neutrality continues, with FCC Chairman Ajit Pai pointing fingers about a claimed attack on the agency's servers during the critical public-commenting period before the Republican-controlled FCC repealed federal net neutrality rules.

2h

Books of The Times: David Quammen Turns Tough Science Into Page-Turning Pleasure

In “The Tangled Tree,” Quammen tells the story of a groundbreaking idea in biology, and of the scientists who discovered and explained it.

2h

Those fragrances you enjoy? Dinosaurs liked them first

The compounds behind the perfumes and colognes you enjoy have been eliciting olfactory excitement since dinosaurs walked the Earth amid the first appearance of flowering plants, new research reveals.

2h

Study finds behavioral changes insufficient at preventing early childhood obesity

Young children and their families in poor communities were able to make some achievable and sustainable behavioral changes during the longest and largest obesity prevention intervention, but, in the end, the results were insufficient to prevent early childhood obesity.

2h

What Does It Mean to Ban Alex Jones?

On Monday, Apple, Facebook, YouTube, and Spotify “banned” the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his media company, Infowars, from their platforms. Jones has seized on the moment, selling his show Monday as a “world exclusive” responding to “being banned on the internet,” hashtagged #MondayMotivation as well as #Censorship. But if you went to Apple’s App Store, you could find his company’s app, w

2h

NASA's Planet-Hunter Caught Stunning Video of a Distant Comet

The video, captured during the testing phase of NASA's new satellite for finding exoplanets, shows a bright white comet drifting past black, jiggling stars.

2h

Hyperloop to build $500 million research centre in Spain

Virgin Hyperloop One, a US startup developing a near-supersonic rail transit system, has reached an agreement with Spanish state-owned rail infrastructure company Adif to build a $500 million research centre in Spain, its first in Europe, the two companies said Tuesday.

2h

Vets ready for rare efforts to save ailing endangered orca

Veterinarians are preparing rare emergency efforts to administer antibiotics to a young emaciated orca that's part of an endangered pod and whose survival is uncertain.

2h

1st of Christa McAuliffe's lost lessons released from space

The first of Christa McAuliffe's lost lessons finally was released from space Tuesday, 32 years after she died aboard Challenger.

2h

BMW to recall 323,700 diesel cars over fire danger: report

Germany's luxury automaker BMW is going to recall 23,700 diesel cars in Europe over an engine fire danger, following a similar action in South Korea, a German media newspaper reported Tuesday.

2h

Oregon has its share of fire storms

Oregon, one state above California, is also having its share of fire storms and weather concerns. Five large fires/complexes are alight in the southwest corner of the state and all started on the same day with a region-wide lightning storm.

2h

Physicists find surprising distortions in high-temperature superconductors

There's a literal disturbance in the force that alters what physicists have long thought of as a characteristic of superconductivity, according to Rice University scientists.

2h

A scientific dating game—biologists play RNA-protein matchmakers

Virtually all functions in our bodies require precise interactions between radically different types of molecules. The vast majority of the time, these encounters yield nothing, but a special few sustain life as we know it.

2h

Top-performing soil microbes could be key to sustainable agriculture

A new study sheds light on how plant genetics and environmental factors affect microbial soil populations in the field.

2h

Predicting genomic instability that can lead to disease

They are the most common repeated elements in the human genome; more than a million copies are scattered among and between our genes. Called Alu elements, these relatively short, non-coding sequences of DNA cause genomic structural variation. Now scientists have developed a novel computational tool that predicts genomic instability that can lead to disease.

2h

Bioengineers use magnetic force to manage pain

Bioengineers have demonstrated that a gel-like material containing tiny magnetic particles could be used to manage chronic pain from disease or injury. Broadly, the study demonstrates the promising use of biomechanical forces that push and pull on cells to treat disease.

2h

Back to the future: breast cancer reprises pathways found in fetal cells

Salk Institute scientists have uncovered a reason for the uncanny likeness between cells in the most malignant cancers and the embryonic cells of the organ in which the cancer originated: cells in human basal-like breast cancers share features with the embryonic mammary (breast) stem cells that are the progenitors of all cell types in the mammary gland (of a mouse).

2h

Zika's Effects on Babies Can Show Up Later

The CDC finds one in seven children exposed to the virus in utero experiences health problems by age one.

2h

Photos of Abandoned Russia

Across the vastness of Russia—the world’s largest country, at some 6.6 million square miles—and over the span of its long history, countless houses, factories, churches, villages, military bases, and other structures have been built and then left behind: imperial-era palaces, log cabins of pioneers in the Far East, Christian cathedrals, massive Soviet blocks of concrete, speculative-mining camps,

2h

Space Station Crew Photographs Raging California Wildfires

The Golden State’s fiery woes are clearly visible all the way from low-Earth orbit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Summer's extreme weather captured

The last month has seen deadly wildfires, monsoon rains and droughts hit several countries.

2h

A scientific dating game: biologists play RNA-protein matchmakers

Virtually all functions in our bodies require precise interactions between radically different types of molecules. The vast majority of the time, these encounters yield nothing, but a special few sustain life as we know it. Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas are pursuing what differentiates a fruitful encounter from a dud. Their ultimate goal is to prevent the relationships that beco

2h

Research Brief: UMN Medical School researchers study how cues drive our behavior

Recent research published in Nature Neuroscience by University of Minnesota Medical School neuroscientist Benjamin Saunders, PhD, uses a Pavlovian model of conditioning to see if turning on a light — a simple cue — just before dopamine neurons were activated could motivate action.

2h

Rice University physicists find surprising distortions in high-temperature superconductors

Rice University physicists used simulations and neutron scattering experiments to show the presence of tiny lattice distortions near the optimal superconductivity of an iron pnictide compound. Their work could help researcher design superconducting materials with novel and predictable properties.

2h

New model of a peripheral nervous system disease

Scientists have discovered that a microscopic roundworm develops similar nerve damage to human patients when their muscle cells are genetically engineered to produce TTR proteins.

2h

Mojave Desert birds crashed over the last century due to climate change

More than 100 years ago, biologists conducted a thorough survey of birds in the Mojave Desert. A recent resurvey shows that the species richness of the desert habitat has dropped by 43 percent over the past century, on average, at the sites revisited. The main environmental change correlated with bird decline was a decrease in rainfall caused by climate change, which suggests that temporary source

2h

Aboard the ISS, researchers investigate complex dust behavior in plasmas

Four hundred kilometers above Earth, researchers examined waves in complex plasma under microgravity conditions and found that the microparticles behaved in nonuniform ways in the presence of varying electrical fields. They report some of the first findings from the Plasma-Kristall 4 (PK-4) experiment in a new paper.

2h

2h

Your Plastic Bags Are Releasing Greenhouse Gases

Plastics aren't just messing up the environment by clogging the oceans and piling up in landfills.

3h

Why (almost) everyone needs to stretch when they exercise

Health Even if it won't prevent injury. There seems to be a lot of confusion regarding the value – or lack thereof – of muscle stretching to accelerate recovery after exercise.

3h

Jim Acosta’s Dangerous Brand of Performance Journalism

The verb to accost comes from the old French that meant “to sail up close to a ship or a shoreline.” CNN’s Jim Acosta lived up to his patronymic (which has comparable coastal roots in Portuguese and Spanish) when he confronted White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders with guns blazing last week, demanding to know if she shared Donald Trump’s belief that the press is the enemy of the Ame

3h

Football and hockey players aren’t doomed to suffer brain damage

A comprehensive look at the brains and behavior of retired professional football players and retired hockey players finds no signs of early dementia.

3h

California's Mendocino complex of fires now largest in state's history

California has been dealing with record breaking fires for the past month and they aren't even halfway through their fire season. The Mendocino Complex eclipsed last year's Thomas fire which burned 283,800 acres last December 2017 in Ventura and Santa Barbara.

3h

Sensor could help doctors select effective cancer therapy

Chemical engineers have developed a sensor that lets them see hydrogen peroxide inside cancer cells and determine whether they are responding to drugs that affect redox signaling.

3h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Exploring curcumin’s anticancer effects Turmeric. Image courtesy of Pixabay/cgdsro. The anticancer properties of turmeric are attributed to its active ingredient curcumin, a polyphenol extracted from the rhizomes of the medicinal plant Curcuma longa. Curcumin is thought to block the action of proteasomes, which are cellular organelles that recycle damaged proteins,…

3h

Different opinion on the reported role of Poldip2 and ACSM1 in a mammalian lipoic acid salvage pathway controlling HIF-1 activation [Biological Sciences]

Paredes et al. (1) describe polymerase-δ interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) as a novel regulator of mitochondrial lipoylation through stabilization of Ac-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 1 (ACSM1). We have several concerns with their proposed model based on the following reasons. Prior mammalian and yeast biochemical studies are not consistent with…

3h

Reply to Bailey et al.: New perspectives on the novel role of the Poldip2/ACSM1 axis in a functional mammalian lipoylation salvage pathway [Biological Sciences]

We appreciate Bailey et al.’s (1) interest in our publication (2), in which we define a role for polymerase-δ interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) in controlling a salvage pathway of lipoylation. Our study builds on a substantial body of evidence, indicating that the mammalian mitochondrial lipoyltransferase LIPT1 lipoylates using lipoyl-AMP. While…

3h

Profile of Myles Brown [Profiles]

Ever since oncologist Myles Brown used tamoxifen to treat a patient with metastatic breast cancer during his fellowship, he has wanted to understand how cancer cells can sometimes become resistant to this therapy after months of success. That quest led him to his life’s work on estrogen receptor (ER) biology….

3h

Understanding when people will report crimes to the police [Social Sciences]

In a recent PNAS article, Hagan et al. (1) use administrative records of 911 calls to study how people in urban neighborhoods decide whether to report crimes to the police. The authors argue that an important factor in the decision is what researchers have called “legal cynicism,” or a general…

3h

Zooming in on a small multidrug transporter reveals details of asymmetric protonation [Commentary]

Drug resistance poses a major threat to human health. A principal mechanism of multidrug resistance is the active transport of chemically unrelated compounds out of the cell by integral membrane proteins known as multidrug transporters (1). Multidrug transporters are represented by four superfamilies: ABC (ATP-binding cassette), MFS (major facilitator superfamily),…

3h

Simple scaling law predicts peak efficiency in oscillatory propulsion [Engineering]

Oscillatory propulsion is ubiquitous among swimming and flying animals, and may some day be practical as a replacement for rotary propulsion in watercraft and small air vehicles. The strength and efficiency of flapping thrust production closely depend on a dimensionless parameter called the Strouhal number (St), representing the ratio of…

3h

How adaptive immunity constrains the composition and fate of large bacterial populations [Physics]

Features of the CRISPR-Cas system, in which bacteria integrate small segments of phage genome (spacers) into their DNA to neutralize future attacks, suggest that its effect is not limited to individual bacteria but may control the fate and structure of whole populations. Emphasizing the population-level impact of the CRISPR-Cas system,…

3h

Selection of an ASIC1a-blocking combinatorial antibody that protects cells from ischemic death [Applied Biological Sciences]

Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have emerged as important, albeit challenging therapeutic targets for pain, stroke, etc. One approach to developing therapeutic agents could involve the generation of functional antibodies against these channels. To select such antibodies, we used channels assembled in nanodiscs, such that the target ASIC1a has a configuration…

3h

Switching of the folding-energy landscape governs the allosteric activation of protein kinase A [Biochemistry]

Protein kinases are dynamic molecular switches that sample multiple conformational states. The regulatory subunit of PKA harbors two cAMP-binding domains [cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains] that oscillate between inactive and active conformations dependent on cAMP binding. The cooperative binding of cAMP to the CNB domains activates an allosteric interaction network that…

3h

Mavacamten stabilizes an autoinhibited state of two-headed cardiac myosin [Biochemistry]

We used transient biochemical and structural kinetics to elucidate the molecular mechanism of mavacamten, an allosteric cardiac myosin inhibitor and a prospective treatment for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We find that mavacamten stabilizes an autoinhibited state of two-headed cardiac myosin not found in the single-headed S1 myosin motor fragment. We determined this…

3h

Many-body effect determines the selectivity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ in proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Calcium ion is a versatile messenger in many cell-signaling processes. To achieve their functions, calcium-binding proteins selectively bind Ca2+ against a background of competing ions such as Mg2+. The high specificity of calcium-binding proteins has been intriguing since Mg2+ has a higher charge density than Ca2+ and is expected to…

3h

Electrostatic lock in the transport cycle of the multidrug resistance transporter EmrE [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

EmrE is a small, homodimeric membrane transporter that exploits the established electrochemical proton gradient across the Escherichia coli inner membrane to export toxic polyaromatic cations, prototypical of the wider small-multidrug resistance transporter family. While prior studies have established many fundamental aspects of the specificity and rate of substrate transport in…

3h

Tethered multifluorophore motion reveals equilibrium transition kinetics of single DNA double helices [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We describe a tethered multifluorophore motion assay based on DNA origami for revealing bimolecular reaction kinetics on the single-molecule level. Molecular binding partners may be placed at user-defined positions and in user-defined stoichiometry; and binding states are read out by tracking the motion of quickly diffusing fluorescent reporter units. Multiple…

3h

Tumor promoter TPA activates Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in a casein kinase 1-dependent manner [Cell Biology]

The tumor promoter 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) has been defined by its ability to promote tumorigenesis on carcinogen-initiated mouse skin. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has a decisive role in mouse skin carcinogenesis, but it remains unclear how TPA activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mouse skin carcinogenesis. Here, we found that TPA could enhance…

3h

Waves cue distinct behaviors and differentiate transport of congeneric snail larvae from sheltered versus wavy habitats [Ecology]

Marine population dynamics often depend on dispersal of larvae with infinitesimal odds of survival, creating selective pressure for larval behaviors that enhance transport to suitable habitats. One intriguing possibility is that larvae navigate using physical signals dominating their natal environments. We tested whether flow-induced larval behaviors vary with adults’ physical…

3h

Warming reverses top-down effects of predators on belowground ecosystem function in Arctic tundra [Ecology]

Predators can disproportionately impact the structure and function of ecosystems relative to their biomass. These effects may be exacerbated under warming in ecosystems like the Arctic, where the number and diversity of predators are low and small shifts in community interactions can alter carbon cycle feedbacks. Here, we show that…

3h

Inferring the shape of global epistasis [Evolution]

Genotype–phenotype relationships are notoriously complicated. Idiosyncratic interactions between specific combinations of mutations occur and are difficult to predict. Yet it is increasingly clear that many interactions can be understood in terms of global epistasis. That is, mutations may act additively on some underlying, unobserved trait, and this trait is then…

3h

Identifying a large number of high-yield genes in rice by pedigree analysis, whole-genome sequencing, and CRISPR-Cas9 gene knockout [Evolution]

Repeated artificial selection of a complex trait facilitates the identification of genes underlying the trait, especially if multiple selected descendant lines are available. Here we developed a pedigree-based approach to identify genes underlying the Green Revolution (GR) phenotype. From a pedigree analysis, we selected 30 cultivars including the “miracle rice”…

3h

Unbiased classification of mosquito blood cells by single-cell genomics and high-content imaging [Immunology and Inflammation]

Mosquito blood cells are immune cells that help control infection by vector-borne pathogens. Despite their importance, little is known about mosquito blood cell biology beyond morphological and functional criteria used for their classification. Here, we combined the power of single-cell RNA sequencing, high-content imaging flow cytometry, and single-molecule RNA hybridization…

3h

Analysis of CD8+ T cell response during the 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa [Medical Sciences]

The recent Ebola epidemic exemplified the importance of understanding and controlling emerging infections. Despite the importance of T cells in clearing virus during acute infection, little is known about Ebola-specific CD8+ T cell responses. We investigated immune responses of individuals infected with Ebola virus (EBOV) during the 2013–2016 West Africa…

3h

Liquid crystalline bacterial outer membranes are critical for antibiotic susceptibility [Microbiology]

The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is a robust, impermeable, asymmetric bilayer of outer lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and inner phospholipids containing selective pore proteins which confer on it the properties of a molecular sieve. This structure severely limits the variety of antibiotic molecules effective against Gram-negative pathogens and, as antibiotic…

3h

Selective visual representation of letters and words in the left ventral occipito-temporal cortex with intracerebral recordings [Neuroscience]

We report a comprehensive cartography of selective responses to visual letters and words in the human ventral occipito-temporal cortex (VOTC) with direct neural recordings, clarifying key aspects of the neural basis of reading. Intracerebral recordings were performed in a large group of patients (n = 37) presented with visual words…

3h

Top-down, contextual entrainment of neuronal oscillations in the auditory thalamocortical circuit [Neuroscience]

Prior studies have shown that repetitive presentation of acoustic stimuli results in an alignment of ongoing neuronal oscillations to the sequence rhythm via oscillatory entrainment by external cues. Our study aimed to explore the neural correlates of the perceptual parsing and grouping of complex repeating auditory patterns that occur based…

3h

“Shepherd’s crook” neurons drive and synchronize the enhancing and suppressive mechanisms of the midbrain stimulus selection network [Neuroscience]

The optic tectum (TeO), or superior colliculus, is a multisensory midbrain center that organizes spatially orienting responses to relevant stimuli. To define the stimulus with the highest priority at each moment, a network of reciprocal connections between the TeO and the isthmi promotes competition between concurrent tectal inputs. In the…

3h

Synaptotagmin oligomerization is essential for calcium control of regulated exocytosis [Neuroscience]

Regulated exocytosis, which underlies many intercellular signaling events, is a tightly controlled process often triggered by calcium ion(s) (Ca2+). Despite considerable insight into the central components involved, namely, the core fusion machinery [soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)] and the principal Ca2+ sensor [C2-domain proteins like synaptotagmin (

3h

A population of gut epithelial enterochromaffin cells is mechanosensitive and requires Piezo2 to convert force into serotonin release [Physiology]

Enterochromaffin (EC) cells constitute the largest population of intestinal epithelial enteroendocrine (EE) cells. EC cells are proposed to be specialized mechanosensory cells that release serotonin in response to epithelial forces, and thereby regulate intestinal fluid secretion. However, it is unknown whether EE and EC cells are directly mechanosensitive, and if…

3h

Mice harboring the human SLC30A8 R138X loss-of-function mutation have increased insulin secretory capacity [Physiology]

SLC30A8 encodes a zinc transporter that is primarily expressed in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. In β-cells it transports zinc into insulin-containing secretory granules. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in SLC30A8 protect against type 2 diabetes in humans. In this study, we generated a knockin mouse model carrying one of the most…

3h

Rates of cavity filling by liquids [Applied Physical Sciences]

Understanding the fundamental wetting behavior of liquids on surfaces with pores or cavities provides insights into the wetting phenomena associated with rough or patterned surfaces, such as skin and fabrics, as well as the development of everyday products such as ointments and paints, and industrial applications such as enhanced oil…

3h

Isothermal pressure-derived metastable states in 2D hybrid perovskites showing enduring bandgap narrowing [Applied Physical Sciences]

Materials in metastable states, such as amorphous ice and supercooled condensed matter, often exhibit exotic phenomena. To date, achieving metastability is usually accomplished by rapid quenching through a thermodynamic path function, namely, heating−cooling cycles. However, heat can be detrimental to organic-containing materials because it can induce degradation. Alternatively, the application…

3h

Foam-driven fracture [Applied Physical Sciences]

In hydraulic fracturing, water is injected at high pressure to crack shale formations. More sustainable techniques use aqueous foams as injection fluids to reduce the water use and wastewater treatment of conventional hydrofractures. However, the physical mechanism of foam fracturing remains poorly understood, and this lack of understanding extends to…

3h

Ancient drug curcumin impedes 26S proteasome activity by direct inhibition of dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 [Biochemistry]

Curcumin, the active ingredient in Curcuma longa, has been in medicinal use since ancient times. However, the therapeutic targets and signaling cascades modulated by curcumin have been enigmatic despite extensive research. Here we identify dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2), a positive regulator of the 26S proteasome, as a direct target…

3h

Elesclomol restores mitochondrial function in genetic models of copper deficiency [Biochemistry]

Copper is an essential cofactor of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Inherited loss-of-function mutations in several genes encoding proteins required for copper delivery to CcO result in diminished CcO activity and severe pathologic conditions in affected infants. Copper supplementation restores CcO function in…

3h

Efficient cruising for swimming and flying animals is dictated by fluid drag [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Many swimming and flying animals are observed to cruise in a narrow range of Strouhal numbers, where the Strouhal number St=2fA/U is a dimensionless parameter that relates stroke frequency f, amplitude A, and forward speed U. Dolphins, sharks, bony fish, birds, bats, and insects typically cruise in the range 0.2

3h

Cytoskeletal tension regulates mesodermal spatial organization and subsequent vascular fate [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Morphogenesis during human development relies on the interplay between physiochemical cues that are mediated in part by cellular density and cytoskeletal tension. Here, we interrogated these factors on vascular lineage specification during human-induced pluripotent stem-cell (hiPSC) fate decision. We found that independent of chemical cues, spatially presented physical cues induce…

3h

Orthogonal self-assembly of an organoplatinum(II) metallacycle and cucurbit[8]uril that delivers curcumin to cancer cells [Chemistry]

Curcumin (Cur) is a naturally occurring anticancer drug isolated from the Curcuma longa plant. It is known to exhibit anticancer properties via inhibiting the STAT3 phosphorylation process. However, its poor water solubility and low bioavailability impede its clinical application. Herein, we used organoplatinum(II) ← pyridyl coordination-driven self-assembly and a cucurbit[8]uril…

3h

Computational discovery of chemically patterned surfaces that effect unique hydration water dynamics [Chemistry]

The interactions of water with solid surfaces govern their apparent hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, influenced at the molecular scale by surface coverage of chemical groups of varied nonpolar/polar character. Recently, it has become clear that the precise patterning of surface groups, and not simply average surface coverage, has a significant impact on the…

3h

Zinc depletion induces ribosome hibernation in mycobacteria [Chemistry]

Bacteria respond to zinc starvation by replacing ribosomal proteins that have the zinc-binding CXXC motif (C+) with their zinc-free (C−) paralogues. Consequences of this process beyond zinc homeostasis are unknown. Here, we show that the C− ribosome in Mycobacterium smegmatis is the exclusive target of a bacterial protein Y homolog,…

3h

Tractable near-optimal policies for crawling [Computer Sciences]

The problem of maintaining a local cache of n constantly changing pages arises in multiple mechanisms such as web crawlers and proxy servers. In these, the resources for polling pages for possible updates are typically limited. The goal is to devise a polling and fetching policy that maximizes the utility…

3h

Eda-activated RelB recruits an SWI/SNF (BAF) chromatin-remodeling complex and initiates gene transcription in skin appendage formation [Developmental Biology]

Ectodysplasin A (Eda) signaling activates NF-κB during skin appendage formation, but how Eda controls specific gene transcription remains unclear. Here, we find that Eda triggers the formation of an NF-κB–associated SWI/SNF (BAF) complex in which p50/RelB recruits a linker protein, Tfg, that interacts with BAF45d in the BAF complex. We…

3h

Chemical feedbacks weaken the wintertime response of particulate sulfate and nitrate to emissions reductions over the eastern United States [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-) account for half of the fine particulate matter mass over the eastern United States. Their wintertime concentrations have changed little in the past decade despite considerable precursor emissions reductions. The reasons for this have remained unclear because detailed observations to constrain the wintertime gas–particle chemical…

3h

Flexible magnetic composites for light-controlled actuation and interfaces [Engineering]

The interaction between light and matter has been long explored, leading to insights based on the modulation and control of electrons and/or photons within a material. An opportunity exists in optomechanics, where the conversion of radiation into material strain and actuation is currently induced at the molecular level in liquid…

3h

Indigenous impacts on North American Great Plains fire regimes of the past millennium [Environmental Sciences]

Fire use has played an important role in human evolution and subsequent dispersals across the globe, yet the relative importance of human activity and climate on fire regimes is controversial. This is particularly true for historical fire regimes of the Americas, where indigenous groups used fire for myriad reasons but…

3h

Parametric transitions between bare and vegetated states in water-driven patterns [Environmental Sciences]

Conditions for vegetation spreading and pattern formation are mathematically framed through an analysis encompassing three fundamental processes: flow stochasticity, vegetation dynamics, and sediment transport. Flow unsteadiness is included through Poisson stochastic processes whereby vegetation dynamics appears as a secondary instability, which is addressed by Floquet theory. Results show that th

3h

Constraints on Paleoproterozoic atmospheric oxygen levels [Evolution]

The oxygenation of Earth’s surface environment dramatically altered key biological and geochemical cycles and ultimately ushered in the rise of an ecologically diverse biosphere. However, atmospheric oxygen partial pressures (pO2) estimates for large swaths of the Precambrian remain intensely debated. Here we evaluate and explore the use of carbonate cerium…

3h

Recombinant Listeria promotes tumor rejection by CD8+ T cell-dependent remodeling of the tumor microenvironment [Immunology and Inflammation]

Agents that remodel the tumor microenvironment (TME), prime functional tumor-specific T cells, and block inhibitory signaling pathways are essential components of effective immunotherapy. We are evaluating live-attenuated, double-deleted Listeria monocytogenes expressing tumor antigens (LADD-Ag) in the clinic. Here we show in numerous mouse models that while treatment with nonrecombinant LADD…

3h

Opinion: Risk to study nonparticipants: A procedural approach [Medical Sciences]

Current ethical guidance for research on human subjects is primarily concerned with protecting study participants.* They are, after all, the “human subjects” whose interests are the focus of oversight. But research—whether on human subjects or not—may also strongly affect individuals who are not study participants. US law defines study participants…

3h

Tsix-Mecp2 female mouse model for Rett syndrome reveals that low-level MECP2 expression extends life and improves neuromotor function [Medical Sciences]

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a mutation in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). There is currently no disease-specific treatment, but MECP2 restoration through reactivation of the inactive X (Xi) has been of considerable interest. Progress toward an Xi-reactivation therapy has been hampered by a…

3h

RNA triphosphatase DUSP11 enables exonuclease XRN-mediated restriction of hepatitis C virus [Microbiology]

Seventy percent of people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) will suffer chronic infection, putting them at risk for liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. The full range of mechanisms that render some people more susceptible to chronic infection and liver disease is still being elucidated. XRN exonucleases can restrict HCV…

3h

Gating-induced large aqueous volumetric remodeling and aspartate tolerance in the voltage sensor domain of Shaker K+ channels [Neuroscience]

Neurons encode electrical signals with critically tuned voltage-gated ion channels and enzymes. Dedicated voltage sensor domains (VSDs) in these membrane proteins activate coordinately with an unresolved structural change. Such change conveys the transmembrane translocation of four positively charged arginine side chains, the voltage-sensing residues (VSRs; R1–R4). Countercharges and lipid phospho

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Endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to accumulation of wild-type SOD1 aggregates associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [Neuroscience]

Abnormal modifications to mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Misfolding of wild-type SOD1 (SOD1WT) is also observed in postmortem tissue of a subset of sporadic ALS (sALS) cases, but cellular and molecular mechanisms generating abnormal SOD1WT species are unknown. We analyzed aberrant human…

3h

Quantum optics approach to radiation from atoms falling into a black hole [Physics]

We show that atoms falling into a black hole (BH) emit acceleration radiation which, under appropriate initial conditions, looks to a distant observer much like (but is different from) Hawking BH radiation. In particular, we find the entropy of the acceleration radiation via a simple laser-like analysis. We call this…

3h

Microrheology of DNA hydrogels [Physics]

A key objective in DNA-based material science is understanding and precisely controlling the mechanical properties of DNA hydrogels. We perform microrheology measurements using diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) to investigate the viscoelastic behavior of a hydrogel made of Y-shaped DNA (Y-DNA) nanostars over a wide range of frequencies and temperatures. We…

3h

Junctional membrane Ca2+ dynamics in human muscle fibers are altered by malignant hyperthermia causative RyR mutation [Physiology]

We used the nanometer-wide tubules of the transverse tubular (t)-system of human skeletal muscle fibers as sensitive sensors for the quantitative monitoring of the Ca2+-handling properties in the narrow junctional cytoplasmic space sandwiched between the tubular membrane and the sarcoplasmic reticulum cisternae in single muscle fibers. The t-system sealed with…

3h

Neural tracking of the musical beat is enhanced by low-frequency sounds [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Music makes us move, and using bass instruments to build the rhythmic foundations of music is especially effective at inducing people to dance to periodic pulse-like beats. Here, we show that this culturally widespread practice may exploit a neurophysiological mechanism whereby low-frequency sounds shape the neural representations of rhythmic input…

3h

Neural detection of socially valued community members [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

As people form social groups, they benefit from being able to detect socially valuable community members—individuals who act prosocially, support others, and form strong relationships. Multidisciplinary evidence demonstrates that people indeed track others’ social value, but the mechanisms through which such detection occurs remain unclear. Here, we combine social network…

3h

Correction for Daniel et al., Mechanistic insights in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair of ribosomal DNA [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Mechanistic insights in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair of ribosomal DNA,” by Laurianne Daniel, Elena Cerruti, Lise-Marie Donnio, Julie Nonnekens, Christophe Carrat, Simona Zahova, Pierre-Olivier Mari, and Giuseppina Giglia-Mari, which was first published July 2, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1716581115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E6770–E6779). The authors note t

3h

Correction for Otto et al., Past role and future outlook of the Conservation Reserve Program for supporting honey bees in the Great Plains [Correction]

SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “Past role and future outlook of the Conservation Reserve Program for supporting honey bees in the Great Plains,” by Clint R. V. Otto, Haochi Zheng, Alisa L. Gallant, Rich Iovanna, Benjamin L. Carlson, Matthew D. Smart, and Skip Hyberg, which was first published July 2, 2018;…

3h

1 in 7 Babies Exposed to Zika in the Womb Have Health Problems

Some of the children looked healthy at birth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

In a Second, the Entire World Shape-Shifts

Sharon Roseman gets lost every day. It happens everywhere she goes—in the grocery store, in the neighborhood she’s lived in for 20 years, and even in her own house. “When Sharon wakes, her walls seem to have moved overnight,” Michelle Coomber, who made a film about Roseman, told The Atlantic . “Her world can be transformed in the blink of an eye.” The short documentary is a portal into Roseman’s

3h

Pizza Doesn't Give You Acne—But What About Sugar?

Among the die-hard skin-care fans on reddit.com’s community SkincareAddiction, there’s a prevailing belief that committing to a dairy-free diet will majorly affect the prevalence of acne. Take the user andbutter, who writes that “giving up dairy was the best thing I’ve done for my skin.” Or the user umidkmybffjill, who claims , “I cut out dairy and switched to almond milk (not soy because I read

3h

Arne Duncan: ‘Everyone Says They Value Education, but Their Actions Don’t Follow’

Arne Duncan, the former education secretary under President Barack Obama, has always been more candid than others who’ve served in that role. He’s often used his platform to talk about what he sees as the persistent socioeconomic and racial disparities in access to quality schools. His new book, How Schools Work: An Inside Account of Failure and Success From One of the Nation’s Longest-Serving Se

3h

Double time limit for embryo research, say ethics experts

In countries which already permit embryo research, there are no 'compelling moral arguments' why the time limit for experimentation should not be doubled, say ethics experts. This could enable synthetic embryos in the lab which can grow into humans, improved IVF treatment, the creation of 'organoid' models of human organs for replacement and research to allow infertile/same sex couples to have gen

3h

How people view crime depends on the politics of when they were growing up

A new study indicates that the different political periods in which people 'came of age' has an important influence on their perception of crime, even decades later.

3h

Triple-negative: Genes associated with risk for aggressive breast cancer

A new study has identified specific genes associated with increased risk for triple-negative breast cancer, providing the basis for better risk management.

3h

Families with college kids more likely to lose their home during recessions

In times of economic difficulties, having to pay a child through college could be a major reason for a family to lose their home, according to a new study by U.S. researchers.

3h

Tropical birds benefit from more forest by rivers in oil palm areas

Protected riverbank habitats within areas of oil palm cultivation can play a key role in reducing the negative impacts on tropical bird numbers but need to be increased in size, new research has shown.

3h

Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes: Hope for inhibitors against amyloid plaques

Effective therapeutics to counteract the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes are not yet available. Scientists have now come a little bit closer to a solution: They have described a new class of designed macrocyclic peptides that are highly potent inhibitors of amyloid formation.

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Corn variety gets nutrients from bacteria, potentially reducing need for fertilizer

Is it possible to grow cereal crops without having to rely on energy-requiring commercial fertilizers? In a new study publishing Aug. 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, researchers describe a newly identified corn variety which acquires nitrogen — an essential nutrient for plants — by feeding its sugars to beneficial bacteria, which can in turn take up nitrogen from the air and pass it b

3h

Benzodiazepine and related drug prescriptions have increased among young people in Sweden

The prevalence rate of prescriptions for benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-related drugs (BZD) — medications used to treat anxiety, insomnia, epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric conditions — increased by 22 percent between 2006 and 2013 among individuals aged 0-24 years in Sweden, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine.

3h

Research reveals molecular details of sperm-egg fusion

By revealing the structure of proteins that enable sperm and egg to fuse to form zygotes in plant and protozoan species, the new study may aid in discovering the fusion process for humans, which remains a mystery.

3h

Ability to taste RNA speeds the growth and increases survival of fruit fly larvae

Fruit fly larvae can taste ribonucleosides, the building blocks of gene transcripts, according to a new study publishing on Aug. 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Hubert Amrein and Dushyant Mishra of Texas A&M Health Science Center and their colleagues.

3h

Link between appendicitis and allergies discovered

Children with allergies have a lower risk of developing complicated appendicitis, according to a new study. The findings could pave the way for new diagnostic tools in the future.

3h

Seeing the light: Scientists unlock seed germination process

Scientists have identified a key gene that helps seeds decide whether to germinate. The MFT gene stops seeds germinating in the dark or under shady conditions, where their chances of survival would be poor, according to new research.

3h

To be happier, try a “rougher” schedule

A new study suggests using "rough scheduling" for leisure activities to avoid making even fun feel like work. Read More

3h

Biodiversity isn’t just pretty: it future-proofs our world

Biodiversity refers to genetic diversity within species, diversity between species, and diversity of ecosystems. We take a look at all three. Read More

3h

Defense Department project develops first tools to detect ‘deepfake videos’

A Defense Department project has developed some of the first tools able to detect when videos have been digitally manipulated—content often called deepfake videos. Read More

3h

Invasive Tick Species Spreads in Eastern US

The Asian longhorned tick, first found in the country last year, is now present in several states.

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Corn Variety Grabs Fertilizer from the Air

A variety of corn from Oaxaca, Mexico, has aerial roots that harbor nitrogen-fixing bacteria, allowing the corn to suck nitrogen straight from the air. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Oregon has its share of fire storms

Oregon, one state above California, is also having its share of fire storms and weather concerns. Five large fires/complexes are alight in the southwest corner of the state and all started on the same day with a region-wide lightning storm.

4h

Corn variety gets nutrients from bacteria, potentially reducing need for fertilizer

Is it possible to grow cereal crops without having to rely on energy-requiring commercial fertilizers? In a new study publishing August 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, researchers describe a newly identified corn variety which acquires nitrogen—an essential nutrient for plants—by feeding its sugars to beneficial bacteria, which can in turn take up nitrogen from the air and pass it back

4h

Research reveals molecular details of sperm-egg fusion

The fusion of a sperm cell with an egg cell is the very first step in the process that leads to new individuals in sexually reproducing species. Fundamental as this process may be, scientists are only now beginning to understand the complexities of how it works.

4h

Ability to taste RNA speeds the growth and increases survival of fruit fly larvae

Fruit fly larvae can taste ribonucleosides, the building blocks of gene transcripts, according to a new study publishing on August 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Hubert Amrein and Dushyant Mishra of Texas A&M Health Science Center and their colleagues. Moreover, the ability to detect ribonucleosides in the environment helps promote the rapid growth needed by developing larvae and dra

4h

Klimaministeren: Vi skal i gang med at hive CO2 ud af luften

Lars Christian Lilleholt (V) vil finde ud af, hvordan vi kan opsamle nogle af de 50 millioner ton CO2 vi årligt udleder i Danmark. Og det er ikke så let.

4h

Hurricane Hector threatens Hawaii, John targets Mexico

Hurricane Hector whirled toward Hawaii Tuesday with 130 mph winds and bringing the threat of dangerous swells on two islands in the US archipelago state.

4h

TV-for-phone start-up raises $1bn, Hollywood backing

Former Walt Disney Studios chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg has raised $1 billion in initial funding for his NewTV start-up seeking to tailor television to smartphone lifestyles, pulling in Hollywood's biggest studios.

4h

US Navy: Welding problem found on missile tubes for new subs

The U.S. Navy said Tuesday there's a problem with welds on missile tubes that are going into new submarines.

4h

California's Mendocino complex of fires now largest in state's history

California has been dealing with record breaking fires for the past month and they aren't even halfway through their fire season. The Mendocino Complex eclipsed last year's Thomas fire which burned 283,800 acres last December 2017 in Ventura and Santa Barbara. Besides the huge and horrifying Mendocino Complex, there are four other extremely large fires consuming large swaths of the state as well.

4h

Space probe to plunge into fiery corona of the sun

On August 11, NASA plans to launch Earth's first spacecraft to venture inside the orbits of Venus and Mercury to touch the very edge of the sun's fiery corona.

4h

Scientists determine the structure of a lipid that keeps our tears clear

Researchers report the structure of a key long-chain lipid in the tear film lipid layer, which prevents tears from drying out. Their finding may be used to improve treatments for dry eye.

4h

Iron-silica particles unlock part of the mystery of Earth's oxygenation

The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere was thanks, in part, to iron and silica particles in ancient seawater, according to a new study by geomicrobiologists. But these results solve only part of this ancient mystery.

4h

New method helps determine effectiveness of interventions in reducing spread of HIV

Using genetic sequencing to understand the evolutionary relationships among pathogens, an international team of researchers has developed a new method to determine how effective interventions are against the spread of infectious diseases like HIV.

4h

Scientists shed new light on hepatitis B virus origins

Researchers have provided new insight on the geographical origins and global spread of two classes of the hepatitis B virus (HBV), according to a new study.

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Taking a pill can effectively treat brutal lung disease

Researchers have figured out why air sacs in the lungs clog up with a thick substance called surfactant in a brutal disease called Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP), and they show taking cholesterol-busting pills called statins can effectively treat the disease.

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What it’s like to photograph planet Earth from space

Technology Retired astronaut Chris Hadfield on how to make great photos from the ISS “The world is a very generous photography subject and you have the best tripod in existence.”…

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Wikipedia, the Last Bastion of Shared Reality

The ever-widening maelstrom surrounding tweets by Sarah Jeong , the latest hire by the New York Times editorial board, may consume all the atoms in the known universe, and as Wikipedia is of this world, it, too, must be a place to immortalize (or attempt to immortalize) Jeong as racist. Over the years, Jeong has angrily and colorfully tweeted hundreds of times about her frustrations with white pe

4h

Forests crucial for limiting climate change to 1.5 degrees

Trying to tackle climate change by replacing forests with crops for bioenergy power stations that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) could instead increase the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, scientists say.

4h

Telemedicine Could Help Fill the Gaps in America's Abortion Care

A growing body of research suggests that medication abortion could be offered without any in-person interaction at all.

4h

California's Mendocino complex of fires now largest in state's history

California has been dealing with record breaking fires for the past month and they aren't even halfway through their fire season. The Mendocino Complex eclipsed last year's Thomas fire which burned 283,800 acres last December 2017 in Ventura and Santa Barbara.

4h

Rachel Gibbons obituary

My friend Rachel Gibbons, who has died aged 90, spent much of her working life serving the now defunct Inner London Education Authority (Ilea), striving to improve maths teaching in the capital and in the UK in general. “Ray” as she was widely known, began working for Ilea as head of maths, before becoming deputy warden at Ilea’s Ladbroke Maths Teachers’ Centre and then an Ilea inspector, in whic

4h

Tesla boss Musk rattles Wall Street with tweet on going private (Update)Elon Musk Tesla Private

Controversial Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk said Tuesday he was considering taking the company private, sending shares sharply higher before trading was halted.

4h

Navajo robotics team heads to international competition

A team of Navajo high school students from a remote town in southern Utah is building a robot to represent North America in an international robotics competition.

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Top-performing soil microbes could be key to sustainable agriculture

Beautiful things can happen when plants surround themselves with the right microbes. A study on Acmispon strigosus, a plant in the pea family, showed a 13-fold growth increase in plants that partnered with a highly effective strain of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Bradyrhizobium.

4h

Babies Who Seem Fine At Birth May Have Zika-Related Problems Later, Study Finds

The largest study to follow women infected with Zika while they were pregnant finds about 6 percent of children had problems at birth, but 14 percent had complications by their first birthday. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

4h

California Strikes Back Against the Trump Administration’s Auto Pollution Rollback

The state’s rebuttal lays out a road map to California’s legal strategy against the federal government in coming months and years.

5h

Questions About 'PUBG'? Ask PlayerUnknown Himself

Also known as Brendan Greene, the game's creator helps out fans in our newest episode of "Tech Support."

5h

Top-performing soil microbes could be key to sustainable agriculture

In a study published today in New Phytologist, UCR's Joel Sachs has advanced our understanding of how plant genetics and environmental factors affect microbial soil populations in the field.

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The best gardening tools for keeping your yard lush without the waste

Gadgets Worm farms, weeders, push mowers… The whole nine yards to control fine yards. Maintaining your yard takes time, precision, and tools. Don't mess around with unhelpful gear that'll take up space. Here's our list of useful, non-wasteful tools to…

5h

Genetic 'toolkit' helps periwinkles gain advantage on the seashore

Periwinkles, struggling to survive the seashore battleground, have developed a genetic 'toolkit' to help them adapt to different environments, a new study shows.

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Study finds managed waterways are not isolated from effects of climate change

A new study led by researchers at Indiana University has found that modifications such as dams and reservoirs in the United States and Canada do not isolate rivers and streams from the effects of climate change.

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Study finds managed waterways are not isolated from effects of climate change

A study led by researchers at Indiana University has found that human changes to rivers and streams in the United States and Canada do not isolate these natural resources from the effects of climate change.

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Mojave Desert birds crashed over the last century due to climate change

More than 100 years ago, UC Berkeley biologists conducted a thorough survey of birds in the Mojave Desert. A recent resurvey shows that the species richness of the desert habitat has dropped by 43 percent over the past century, on average, at the sites revisited. The main environmental change correlated with bird decline was a decrease in rainfall caused by climate change, which suggests that temp

5h

Researchers look to worms for a new model of a peripheral nervous system disease

Scientists have discovered that a microscopic roundworm develops similar nerve damage to human patients when their muscle cells are genetically engineered to produce TTR proteins.

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Genetic 'toolkit' helps periwinkles gain advantage on the seashore

Periwinkles, struggling to survive the seashore battleground, have developed a genetic 'toolkit' to help them adapt to different environments, a new study shows.

5h

Boris Johnson Would Like Your Attention Again

After a month-long sabbatical from the public eye following his high-profile resignation from Prime Minister Theresa May’s cabinet, Boris Johnson is back. The ex–British foreign secretary’s decision to quit May’s government came as a form of protest to her so-called Chequers plan: a softening of Brexit that would see the United Kingdom maintain a close relationship with the European Union after i

5h

Many plants can be poisonous to pets and livestock

Not all plants are wholesome for foraging animals.

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Small indoor greenhouses let apartment dwellers grow veggies

You don't need a green thumb to grow vegetables indoors.

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Boblende gas, sort jord og varmt vand: Her er tre af klimaets dominoeffekter

Det menneskeskabte CO2-udslip har sat skub i en række dominoeffekter, som kan få klimaforandringerne til at accelerere yderligere.

5h

UCLA bioengineers use magnetic force to manage pain

UCLA bioengineers have demonstrated that a gel-like material containing tiny magnetic particles could be used to manage chronic pain from disease or injury. Broadly, the study demonstrates the promising use of biomechanical forces that push and pull on cells to treat disease.

5h

Safeguarding compliance with new vehicle emissions legislation

The emissions performance of vehicles is improving, but continuous monitoring is needed to follow the implementation of the new vehicle emissions legislation and compliance with it, according to a new Science for Policy report from the Joint Research centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service.

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Hector weakens but remains Category 4 Hurricane

Hurricane Hector has weakened slightly but still remains a robust Category Four storm at present. At 500 AM HST (1500 UTC), the center of Hurricane Hector was located near latitude 16.1 North, longitude 147.8 West. Hector is moving toward the west near 16 mph (26 km/h). This general motion is expected to continue through Thursday. On the forecast track, Hector is expected to pass roughly 165 miles

5h

Trump's Tweets Conflate Wildfires and Water Access

The president also ignores the role of climate change in fueling fires, experts say — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA gets an infrared 'baby picture' of Tropical Storm Kristy

Tropical Storm Kristy formed after John and Ileana in the Eastern Pacific Ocean today, Aug 7, but it is far to the west of John and Ileana and no threat to land areas.

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Families with college kids more likely to lose their home during recessions

In times of economic difficulties, having to pay a child through college could be a major reason for a family to lose their home. This is according to two US researchers, Jacob Faber of New York University and Peter Rich of Cornell University, in a study published in Springer's journal Demography. Their investigations show that during the Great Recession of the 2000s, banks often foreclosed on the

5h

Seeing the light: Scientists unlock seed germination process

The MFT gene stops seeds germinating in the dark or under shady conditions, where their chances of survival would be poor, according to new research from the University of York.

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EU seeking to restrict chemicals in tattoo inks over cancer fears

Member states expected to get vote on proposals but UK will not have a say due to Brexit Brussels is on course to restrict the type of chemicals used in tattoo inks in response to an explosion in the popularity of body art and concerns that some of the substances used might cause cancer, change DNA or be harmful to human reproduction. A proposal to implement tight limits on the use of 4,000 chemi

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Predicting genomic instability that can lead to disease

A novel computational tool predicts genomic instability that can lead to disease.

6h

Why Scientists Could Use a March for Philosophy

Without the insights rendered by philosophy, our scientific explorations of the physical world would be, if not blind, then dangerously nearsighted — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Wait! Don't Throw Away That Hand Sanitizer Yet

Wait! Don't Throw Away That Hand Sanitizer Yet Yes, a hospital superbug may be growing more tolerant to alcohol exposure — but alcohol-based hand rubs still save millions of lives a year. HandSanitizer_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: jananya sriphairo via Shutterstock Human Tuesday, August 7, 2018 – 11:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Rumors of hand sanitizer's demise are greatly e

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Hector weakens but remains Category 4 Hurricane

Hurricane Hector has weakened slightly but still remains a robust Category Four storm at present.

6h

Tropical birds benefit from more forest by rivers in oil palm areas

Protected riverbank habitats within areas of oil palm cultivation can play a key role in reducing the negative impacts on tropical bird numbers but need to be increased in size, new research from the University of Kent has shown.

6h

Baby sea snails ride waves into shallower waters, study suggests

The warming ocean may cause the larvae of bottom-dwelling snails to hatch earlier in the spring, when waves are larger, potentially impacting their ability to survive and serve as food for other sea creatures.

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NASA studies space applications for GaN crystals

An exotic material poised to become the semiconductor of choice for power electronics —- because it is far more efficient than silicon—is now being eyed for potential applications in space.

6h

Pulling and braking of 'ancient motor' in cell division

Study adds to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in cell reproduction and sheds light on a cellular-level mystery that has confounded researchers.

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Baby sea snails ride waves into shallower waters

The warming ocean may cause the larvae of bottom-dwelling snails to hatch earlier in the spring, when waves are larger, potentially impacting their ability to survive and serve as food for other sea creatures. A new study sheds new light on the sensory organs the snail larvae use to feel — and perhaps even hear — whether the water is turbulent or wavy, and improve their odds of being carried to

6h

Naltrexone helps HIV positive individuals reduce heavy alcohol use

Extended-release naltrexone — an injection that decreases heavy drinking in the general population when taken in conjunction with counseling — appears to help HIV-positive individuals reduce their number of heavy drinking days too, say researchers.

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Key aspects of human cell aging reversed by new compounds

Key aspects of the aging of human cells can be reversed by new compounds. In a laboratory study of endothelial cells, researchers tested compounds designed to target mitochondria. The number of senescent cells (older cells that have deteriorated and stopped dividing) was reduced by up to 50 percent.

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Largest haul of extrasolar planets

Forty-four planets in planetary systems beyond our own have been unveiled in one go, dwarfing the usual number of confirmations from extrasolar surveys, which is typically a dozen or less. The findings will improve our models of planetary systems and may help researchers investigate exoplanet atmospheres. Novel techniques developed to validate the find could hugely accelerate the confirmation of m

6h

Archaeologists found traces of submerged Stone Age settlement in Southeast Finland

The prehistoric settlement submerged under Lake Kuolimojarvi provides us with a clearer picture of the human occupation in South Karelia during the Mesolithic and Early Neolithic Stone Age (about 10,000 to 6,000 years ago).

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Parts of Spain and Portugal are more than 46 C – here's what is going on

Wildfires, drought and extreme heat have been the talk of the town and country across Europe this summer. Attention has now turned to Portugal and Spain, where temperatures at the weekend reached more than 46℃ in some parts of both countries – close to the all-time European record of 48℃, set in Greece in 1977. Records aside, the obvious question is what is causing the current Iberian heatwave and

6h

NASA's GPM looks at John's rainfall rates in eastern Pacific Ocean

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite had an extremely good view of strengthening Tropical Storm John on August 6, 2018 and measured its rainfall rates.

6h

Scientists shed new light on hepatitis B virus origins

Researchers have provided new insight on the geographical origins and global spread of two classes of the hepatitis B virus (HBV), according to a study in eLife.

6h

Det kan du gøre for at begrænse dit klimaaftryk

To klimaeksperter fastholder, at vi alle kan gøre vores, og kommer med konkrete råd

6h

Rediscovering the sources of Egyptian metals

Two new studies, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, offer the first comprehensive analytical datasets of Protodynastic to Old Kingdom Egyptian copper-based artifacts (c. 3rd millennium BC), analyzing the provenance of Egyptian copper. As elaborated in a methodological comment, the studies constitute an important step forward in current knowledge on copper provenance and the subseq

6h

Discovery of copper band shows Native Americans engaged in trade more extensively than thought

A research team including Matthew Sanger, assistant professor of anthropology at Binghamton University, State University at New York, has found a copper band that indicates ancient Native Americans engaged in extensive trade networks spanning far greater distances than what has been previously thought.

6h

Household phenomenon observed by Leonardo da Vinci finally explained

An everyday occurrence spotted when we turn on the tap to brush our teeth has baffled engineers for centuries—why does the water splay when it hits the sink before it heads down the plughole?

6h

Mass timber: Thinking big about sustainable construction

The construction and operation of all kinds of buildings uses vast amounts of energy and natural resources. Researchers around the world have therefore been seeking ways to make buildings more efficient and less dependent on emissions-intensive materials.

6h

Lab identifies pulling and braking of 'ancient motor' in cell division

Researchers at Dartmouth College have revealed how a key protein functions during the millions of cell divisions that occur in the human body each minute. The research describes two separate but coordinated pulling actions generated by the protein dynein that ensure healthy cell division in humans and other organisms.

6h

Women in Fisheries website launched

New research exploring women's roles in fishing families officially gets going this week, as the Women in Fisheries project launches its new website.

6h

NASA watches as Tropical Storm Ileana weakens from two factors

Tropical Storm Ileana continued to move north along the coast of western Mexico on Aug. 7 but cloud tops warmed as a result of interaction with land and nearby Hurricane John. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed cloud top temperatures in Ileana were strongest around its center.

6h

Indian-Americans have fewer sudden infant deaths, Rutgers study finds

Indian-Americans have the highest percentage of sleeping with their babies among ethnic groups in New Jersey but the lowest rate of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID), a Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences study shows.Researchers attributed this paradoxical finding to a variety of compensatory factors, including Indian-Americans' practice of placing their infants on their backs to sleep.

6h

Right under our noses: A novel lichen-patterned spider found on oaks in central Spain

Once again, a new spider species has been found in a strongly humanised area in Europe. Wearing its camouflage, blending perfectly with the lichens on the oak trunks, this orb weaver appears to have been quietly waiting to get noticed all along. However, only recently did the team of Eduardo Morano and Dr Raul Bonal describe this elusive species as new to science in a paper published in the open a

6h

Capturing elephants from the wild shortens their lives

Humans have captured wild Asian elephants for different purposes for more than 3,000 years. This still continues today despite the fact that the populations are declining. An international team of researchers has now analysed records of timber elephants in Myanmar to understand the effects of capture on the survival of the animals.

6h

Upgrade for virtual brain cell

Simulated neuron gives strong predictions for future research.

6h

Forests crucial for limiting climate change to 1.5 degrees

Trying to tackle climate change by replacing forests with crops for bioenergy power stations that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) could instead increase the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, scientists say.

6h

Research identifies new treatment targets in breast cancer

Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U), in collaboration with the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, have generated the first single cell resolution atlas of genes that control the formation of breast tissue. The atlas provides a comprehensive molecular map that will be used to help researchers understand how breast cancers form and to pinpoint new way

6h

Unwise opioids for wisdom teeth: Study shows link to long-term use in teens and young adults

Getting wisdom teeth removed may be a rite of passage for many teens and young adults, but the opioid painkiller prescriptions that many receive could set them on a path to long-term opioid use, a new study finds. Young people ages 13 to 30 who filled an opioid prescription immediately before or after they had their wisdom teeth out were nearly 2.7 times as likely as peers to still be filling opio

6h

USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for atrial fibrillation with electrocardiography

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the current evidence is insufficient regarding screening for atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat, with electrocardiography (ECG), a noninvasive test that records the electrical activity of the heart.

6h

Effect on weight gain in young children in 2 randomized clinical trials

Two randomized clinical trials on the prevention of obesity in young children had differing results; one trial didn't change body mass index (BMI) growth trajectories over three years among low-income children at risk for obesity and another trial showed some modest results.

6h

Potential indicator for the early detection of dementias

Researchers at the University of Basel have discovered a factor that could support the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. This cytokine is induced by cellular stress reactions after disturbances of the mitochondria, the 'cell's power plants,' as neuropathologists write in the journal Cell Reports.

6h

Aboard the ISS, researchers investigate complex dust behavior in plasmas

400 kilometers above Earth, researchers examined waves in complex plasma under microgravity conditions and found that the microparticles behaved in nonuniform ways in the presence of varying electrical fields. They report some of the first findings from the Plasma-Kristall 4 experiment, a collaboration between the European Space Agency and the Russian State Space Corporation Roscosmos, in Physics

6h

Capturing elephants from the wild shortens their lives

Humans have been capturing wild Asian elephants for more than 3,000 years, and this still continues today despite the fact that the populations are declining. An international team of researchers has now analysed records of timber elephants in Myanmar to understand the effects of capture. The study shows that even years after their capture, wild-caught elephants' mortality rate remains increased,

6h

Renovations lead to big improvement at Nuclear Astrophysics lab

The nuclear reactions that form stars are often accompanied by astronomically high amounts of energy, a challenge for nuclear astrophysicists trying to study these reactions; the chances of re-creating such a spark are unfathomably low. However, after renovations to its accelerator, one laboratory reported record-breaking performance. Following six years of upgrades to the Electron Cyclotron Reson

6h

Observing the mechanism of metastasis for the first time

The exact mechanisms for how broken cellular function appears in cells far removed from a cancer's primary tumor remain an area of ongoing research. Scientists have now confirmed a link between healthy-tumor hybrid cells and metastatic tumors for the first time in live animals. In APL Bioengineering, they discuss how they studied the distinct, heterogenous gene expression profiles found in human h

6h

Responsive parenting intervention results in lower BMIs through age three

An intervention designed to promote healthy growth, which taught first-time moms how to respond with age-appropriate responses to their babies' needs, resulted in children having lower body mass indexes (BMIs) when they were three years old.

6h

Genetic factors contributing to 'strabismus' — or misaligned eyes

Researchers at the National Institute of Genetics in Japan discovered a key gene for generating eye movements. Using zebrafish, they developed a compelling model system to analyze the brain-eye muscle connections, and found that the brain neurons use repulsive forces mediated by a protein encoded by the protocadherin 17 gene to position properly and reach the target eye muscle. The findings potent

6h

Early mediation leads to better outcomes, study says

The sooner a case is referred to mediation the better, according to the first empirical analysis of mediation in Singapore's courts.

6h

Rediscovering the sources of Egyptian metals

Two new studies offer the first comprehensive analytical datasets of Protodynastic to Old Kingdom Egyptian copper-based artifacts (c. 3rd millennium BC), analyzing the provenance of Egyptian copper. As elaborated in a methodological comment, the studies constitute an important step forward in current knowledge on copper provenance and the subsequent economic, social and cultural insights into anci

6h

Discovery of copper band shows Native Americans engaged in trade more extensively than thought

A research team has found a copper band that indicates ancient Native Americans engaged in extensive trade networks spanning far greater distances than what has been previously thought.

6h

How a computer learns to dribble: Practice, practice, practice

Basketball players need lots of practice before they master the dribble, and it turns out that's true for computer-animated players as well. By using deep reinforcement learning, players in video basketball games can glean insights from motion capture data to sharpen their dribbling skills.

6h

AI can now tell your boss what skills you lack—and how you can get them

Coursera is unveiling a new machine learning tool to show companies what skills their employees are acquiring from its classes and their level of expertise.

6h

Baby Born with Itty, Bitty Tooth … Which a Dentist Promptly Pulled

A newborn in England surprised her parents — and her doctors — when they saw that the infant was born with a tiny tooth, according to news reports.

6h

Farmers are drawing groundwater from the giant Ogallala Aquifer faster than nature replaces it

Every summer the U.S. Central Plains go dry, leading farmers to tap into groundwater to irrigate sorghum, soy, cotton, wheat and corn and maintain large herds of cattle and hogs. As the heat rises, anxious irrigators gather to discuss whether and how they should adopt more stringent conservation measures.

6h

The circular economy – a solution to the world's water crises?

Now in their third year of drought, Cape Town citizens narrowly avoided running out of water altogether this summer. The authorities threatened to shut off water altogether and refer residents to communal water taps if the dam levels reached below a certain point, the dreaded "Day Zero."

6h

The problem with taking scientific questions to court

Health Juries can blame a product for giving you cancer—but that doesn’t mean it’s true. Legal cases which try to prove that a particular chemical or product is the cause of an illness like cancer, are complicated. What the legal system considers enough…

6h

A Public-Health Reason to Tune In to TV's Dear White People

A season two story line shows how race, socioeconomic status and power dynamics influence sexual decision-making — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Iron-silica particles in ancient seawater helped cyanobacteria oxygenate Earth's oceans billions of years ago

The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere was thanks, in part, to iron and silica particles in ancient seawater, according to a new study by geomicrobiologists at the University of Alberta. But these results solve only part of this ancient mystery.

7h

Mass timber: Thinking big about sustainable construction

The Longhouse, a prototype 'mass timber' building designed by an MIT class, demonstrates that even huge buildings can be built primarily with wood.

7h

Household phenomenon observed by Leonardo da Vinci finally explained by Cambridge research

Since the 1820s scientists have believed that hydraulic jumps occur partly as a result of the gravitational pull. But a paper published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics has disproved this longstanding theory.

7h

NASA's GPM looks at John's rainfall rates in eastern Pacific Ocean

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite had an extremely good view of strengthening Tropical Storm John on August 6, 2018 and measured its rainfall rates.

7h

Mendocino Wildfire Becomes California's Largest, and It's Still Growing

The Mendocino Complex Fire has burned 283,800 acres of land and destroyed nearly 200 structures.

7h

Forests crucial for limiting climate change to 1.5 degrees

Trying to tackle climate change by replacing forests with crops for bioenergy power stations that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) could instead increase the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, scientists say.

7h

Let slow-growth forests recover before logging once more

Loggers need to control their appetite for slow-growing trees to spare the Amazon rainforest from deforestation.

7h

Capturing elephants from the wild shortens their lives

Humans have been capturing wild Asian elephants for more than 3,000 years, and this continues today despite the fact that the populations are declining. An international team of researchers has now analysed records of timber elephants in Myanmar to understand the effects of capture. The study shows that even years after their capture, wild-caught elephants' mortality rate remains increased, and th

7h

Renovations lead to big improvement at Nuclear Astrophysics lab

In nature, the nuclear reactions that form stars are often accompanied by astronomically high amounts of energy, sometimes over billions of years. This presents a challenge for nuclear astrophysicists trying to study these reactions in a controlled, low-energy laboratory setting. The chances of re-creating such a spark without bombarding targets with high-intensity beams are unfathomably low. Howe

7h

Aboard the ISS, researchers investigate complex dust behavior in plasmas

400 kilometers above Earth, researchers examined waves in complex plasma under microgravity conditions and found that the microparticles behaved in nonuniform ways in the presence of varying electrical fields. They report some of the first findings from the Plasma-Kristall 4 (PK-4) experiment in Physics of Plasmas.

7h

Elbilers opladningstid øges kraftigt i kulde

At oplade en elbil ved minusgrader kan tage tre gange så lang tid som ved mere moderate temperaturer, viser ny forskning.

7h

Catalysts for better biofuel production

Biomass is far more complex than conventional feedstock and the development of the necessary catalysts is traditionally a lengthy and complicated process. For Europe to meet its long-term target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80-95 % by 2050, cost-effective biomass conversion to fuels is essential.

7h

Study of 21 retired NFL and NHL players doesn't find evidence of early onset dementia

New research is adding important information to the body of knowledge about the cognitive and behavioral status of a group of retired professional athletes who spent their careers in contact sports.

7h

US teens: Higher prevalence of obesity than Grenada youth

Medical researchers have found a lower prevalence of overweight and obesity among youth in Grenada compared to US adolescents. The differences may reflect the impact of the westernized diet and lifestyle. The research may lead to a change in worldwide obesity prevention strategy.

7h

Size matters: If you are a bubble of volcanic gas

The chemical composition of gases emitted from volcanoes — which are used to monitor changes in volcanic activity — can change depending on the size of gas bubbles rising to the surface, and relate to the way in which they erupt. The results could be used to improve the forecasting of threats posed by certain volcanoes.

7h

Corals are becoming more tolerant of rising ocean temperatures

Scientists replicate landmark study to determine changes in coral sea temperature tolerance over time. In the three species of Hawaiian corals retested, bleaching occurred later, with higher survivorship and growth rates than the same species of corals in 1970. However, scientists warn that temperatures are rising faster than corals can change.

7h

Globally, greater attention needed for seemingly 'minor' kidney damage

New research uncovers an 'alarming increase' in acute kidney injury rates among Irish patients.

7h

Advancing transplantation: Hepatitis C-infected organs safe for transplantation when followed by antiviral treatment

Twenty patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a new study. The researchers also report that the kidney transplants for these 20 patients are functioning just as well as kidneys that are transplanted from similar donors without HCV.

7h

The value of pride

The intensity of pride people feel for a given act or trait is set by an implicit mental map of what others value, according to new research.

7h

How many people make a good city? It's not the size that matters, but how you use it

Australia's population clock is, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, steadily ticking away at an overall total population increase of one person every 1 minute and 23 seconds. It's set to tick over to 25 million around 11pm tonight.

7h

Symmetrical cleavage of disulphides is fast and biocompatible

A team of researchers led by Prof. Frank Glorius and Michael Teders from the University of Münster and by Prof. Dirk Guldi from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg have presented a new chemical reaction path which may prove to be of interest both for research and for the production of active ingredients in medicines. The new reaction leads to a splitting of bonds between two sulphur atoms. The ch

7h

Got the 'drunchies'? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

After seeing an ad in a campus newspaper promoting unhealthy late-night foods, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat.

7h

Retired pro football and hockey players learn that CTE isn't inevitable

An in-depth study of retired football and hockey players–including cognitive, psychological, and brain imaging techniques–finds no increase in the rate of early-onset dementia, reports the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America, JHTR is published by Wolters Kluwer.

7h

Iron-silica particles unlock part of the mystery of Earth's oxygenation

The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere was thanks, in part, to iron and silica particles in ancient seawater, according to a new study by geomicrobiologists at the University of Alberta. But these results solve only part of this ancient mystery.

7h

NASA watches as Tropical Storm Ileana weakens from two factors

Tropical Storm Ileana continued to move north along the coast of western Mexico on Aug. 7 but cloud tops warmed as a result of interaction with land and nearby Hurricane John. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed cloud top temperatures in Ileana were strongest around its center.

7h

Study of 21 retired NFL and NHL players doesn't find evidence of early onset dementia

New University at Buffalo research is adding important information to the body of knowledge about the cognitive and behavioral status of a group of retired professional athletes who spent their careers in contact sports.

7h

A quiet Sunday night discovering a supermassive black hole

Earlier this year, on a quiet Sunday night, my colleague Jack and I found the fastest-growing supermassive black hole in the known universe. We were fortunate to be part of the team that made one of the greatest discoveries in astronomy this year.

7h

Mathematician discusses solving a seemingly unsolvable equation

After 10 years, Prof. Raimar Wulkenhaar from the University of Münster's Mathematical Institute and his colleague Dr. Erik Panzer from the University of Oxford have solved a mathematical equation which was considered to be unsolvable. The equation is to be used to find answers to questions posed by elementary particle physics. In this interview with Christina Heimken, Wulkenhaar looks back on the

7h

Hydrogen-powered mobility edges closer with next-generation fuel cell systems

Scientists have made significant progress in the design of vital components used in hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. Improved features will lower production costs and help create a clean automotive future.

7h

When will cryptocurrencies be adopted by retail?

Starbucks isn't accepting bitcoin—yet. Read More

7h

Machine learning technique reconstructs images passing through a multimode fiber

Through innovative use of a neural network that mimics image processing by the human brain, a research team reports accurate reconstruction of images transmitted over optical fibers for distances of up to a kilometer.

7h

Can the Parker Solar Probe take the heat?

The star of the show is a dark gray block, about the size of a textbook, and several inches thick. As an audience of reporters watches, an engineer runs a flaming blowtorch over the block until its face heats to a red glow.

7h

Forecasting model could predict which bills get passed

When the United States pulled out of the Paris Climate Accord last year, 20 states—including New York and California—resolved to form a new, nonfederal agreement to address climate change and greenhouse gas emissions.

7h

Trump Goes From Threatening Iran to Threatening the World

Donald Trump and his advisers have a consistent record of confronting and threatening Iran, most prominently by withdrawing from the nuclear deal. But on Tuesday, Trump expanded the threats against Iran to all those who do business with the country, declaring on Twitter they “will NOT be doing business with the United States.” If taken literally, this would mean a new front in America’s economic

7h

Men are still more likely than women to be perceived as leaders, study finds

Women hold just 26 percent of executive-level positions in S&P 500 companies—and sadly that is no accident, according to a new study by researchers in the University at Buffalo School of Management.

7h

A look at how the changing climate is impacting New York State's building stock

Much of the talk about buildings and climate change has focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. What often gets overlooked is ensuring that buildings are prepared for future climate impacts.

7h

Terrifying insights into climate change could build legislative momentum for emissions cuts, researchers argue

New research in climate science indicates that extreme events, such as heat waves, the collapse of major ice sheets, and mass extinctions are becoming dramatically more probable. Though cuts in rising emissions appear unlikely with the stalled 2015 Paris agreement, University of California San Diego scientists argue that new developments present an opportunity to shift the politics around climate

7h

Recipe for a spacewalk

ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen may be stationed on the ground, but his expertise was vital to the recent spacewalk of two NASA astronauts, Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold. From maintaining constant radio contact on the day, to simulating activities underwater and planning for emergencies months in advance, he shares what it takes to make a spacewalk run smoothly as Europe's second ever ground suppor

7h

Hole in ionosphere is caused by sudden stratospheric warming

Forecasting space weather is even more challenging than regular meteorology. The ionosphere—the upper atmospheric layer containing particles charged by solar radiation—affects many of today's vital navigation and communication systems, including GPS mapping apps and airplane navigation tools. Being able to predict activity of the charged electrons in the ionosphere is important to ensure the integ

7h

Pacific Ocean's effect on Arctic warming

New research shows that changes in the heat flow of the northern Pacific Ocean may have a larger effect on the Arctic climate than previously thought.

7h

Million fold increase in the power of waves near Jupiter's moon Ganymede

Chorus waves are electromagnetic waves. Converted to sound they sound like singing and chirping birds at dawn. They can cause polar lights above the Earth as well as damage to satellites. Now, a team of researchers has found that such waves are intensified million-fold around Jupiter's moon Ganymede. This study provides important observational constraints for theoretical studies.

7h

Dansk bølgekraftkoncept får knap 19 millioner til fuldskalaprojekt

Wavepiston har netop hentet midler fra EU's Horizon-program til næste fase af teknologiudviklingen: Et demonstrationsanlæg i fuld skala, tilsluttet elnettet.

7h

Rare Medieval Bible Returned to Canterbury Cathedral 500 Years After It Was Lost

This 13th-century Bible circled back to where it stood nearly 500 years ago.

7h

'Great show' predicted for Perseid meteor peak on August 12–13

The Perseid meteor shower, an annual celestial event beloved by millions of skywatchers around the world, is about to make its annual return to the night sky. And thanks to a new Moon, there'll be no bright moonlight to hinder the view.

7h

Image: California fires as seen from the space station

The Earth, in all its majesty and its tragedy, is the subject of images taken aboard the International Space Station. This image of the Carr and Ferguson fires was captured by European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (@Astro_Alex), on August 3, 2018, from the station.

7h

Invasive crayfish lead to more mosquitoes and risk of disease in Southern California

Invasive red swamp crayfish are a serious problem in the Santa Monica Mountains and other parts of Southern California. They devastate native wildlife, including threatened species such as the California red-legged frog, throwing off the natural balance of ecosystems.

7h

Scientists determine the structure of a lipid that keeps our tears clear

In this month's issue of the Journal of Lipid Research, researchers report the structure of a key long-chain lipid in the tear film lipid layer, which prevents tears from drying out. Their finding may be used to improve treatments for dry eye.

7h

Dartmouth lab identifies pulling and braking of 'ancient motor' in cell division

Study adds to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in cell reproduction and sheds light on a cellular-level mystery that has confounded researchers.

7h

New method helps determine effectiveness of interventions in reducing spread of HIV

Using genetic sequencing to understand the evolutionary relationships among pathogens, an international team of researchers has developed a new method to determine how effective interventions are against the spread of infectious diseases like HIV.

7h

Five things you need to do to build a home on Mars

If you had to live the rest of your life on Mars, what would you miss the most? Figuring out how we could we be comfortable living on the red planet is a challenge but with increasing discussion about how to send people to Mars with the ultimate aim of colonising the planet, how to replace the sensation of the sunshine on your face or the grass beneath your feet is prescient one.

7h

New study shows promise for long-term weather forecasts in South America

The Paraguay River is an essential lifeblood for the landlocked country that shares it name. It provides Paraguayans with fishing, irrigation for agriculture and access to shipping. But it's also prone to seasonal flooding, with especially high consequences for the populations living on its banks, including where it skirts Paraguay's capital, Asunción.

7h

Animation app offers better way to rate pain

Researchers have designed a mobile app called “Painimation” to improve communication about pain between patients and doctors. The app has the potential to assess and monitor pain better than previously used measurement tools. “Many pain patients will say their pain can’t be measured on the 0-to-10 scale and that it is too challenging to describe their pain using words.” “Currently, our only avail

8h

In the realm of fantasy

In 2017, the most viewed architectural project in the world was the Tianjin Binhai Library. The building is part of an urban project designed to revitalise the port district of an environmentally grim but economically boisterous Chinese harbour city. I believe that the architects of this library have not created a building, but instead have produced above all the image of a library: a spectacular

8h

Disease X and the Unknowability of the Next Epidemic

What may strike next, the World Health Organization fears, is something no doctor has ever heard of or knows how to treat. It’s come to be known as Disease X.

8h

Naltrexone helps HIV positive individuals reduce heavy alcohol use

Extended-release naltrexone — an injection that decreases heavy drinking in the general population when taken in conjunction with counseling — appears to help HIV-positive individuals reduce their number of heavy drinking days too, say Yale researchers.

8h

Baby sea snails ride waves into shallower waters, study suggests

The warming ocean may cause the larvae of bottom-dwelling snails to hatch earlier in the spring, when waves are larger, potentially impacting their ability to survive and serve as food for other sea creatures. A Rutgers University-New Brunswick study sheds new light on the sensory organs the snail larvae use to feel — and perhaps even hear — whether the water is turbulent or wavy, and improve th

8h

Catching the dance of antibiotics and ribosomes at room temperature

Antibiotics have been a pillar of modern medicine since the 1940s. Streptomycin, which belongs to a class of antibiotics called aminoglycosides, was the first hint of light in the millennia-long search for a treatment for tuberculosis, which remains one of the deadliest infectious diseases in human history.

8h

Scientists design new MRI coil for preclinical studies

Researchers from ITMO University developed and tested an MRI coil providing high-resolution imaging of the whole body of a mouse. Such coils are used in preclinical testing, as well as in imaging of various body systems. The new coil produces images with three times higher resolution than standard commercial volume MRI coils. Scientists used inexpensive materials and manufacturing technology that

8h

Using comics to understand post-war transitions

The aim of the research was to understand the role of the borderland regions in post war transitions. The researchers investigated peace building in Sri Lanka and Nepal and the role of brokers in shaping relations between centre and periphery.

8h

How MoviePass Has Changed Ticket Buying

You didn’t have to be an economist to deduce that MoviePass’s former business model wasn’t going to be a real moneymaker. The app’s users paid $9.95 a month—less if they bought a year’s subscription in advance—and in return could get one free movie ticket a day, excluding 3-D or IMAX screenings. The average price of a movie ticket in America is a little less than $9 ; in many major metropolitan a

8h

Klimaeksperter efter ildevarslende studie: Her er de største klima-problemer

To eksperter peger på de største klimaproblemer og -syndere.

8h

Materials for solar batteries of new generation are being created at SUSU

Alternative energy sources are a means of rational resource saving. Development of nanotechnology is a path toward such alternative energy sources. For several years, scientists at South Ural State University have been working on the creation of solar batteries from organic, light-sensitive material. Such batteries are nontoxic and would provide great advantages in alternative power engineering of

8h

How domestic partner violence can impact fertility rates in a small-scale society (Updated)

A team of researchers with members from institutions in France and the U.S. has found a case of intimate partner violence being associated with higher marital fertility rates. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the researchers describe findings from their study of a group in the Amazon in which women who were abused tended to have more offspring.

8h

New research finds cuckoos change their egg sizes according to their host

An international study into the sizes of oriental cuckoo eggs compared with the egg sizes of their four corresponding hosts in Russia has shown, for the first time, that cuckoos vary the size of their eggs to match those of their hosts, providing evidence of evolutionary adaptation.

8h

From devils to superheroes—our complicated relationship with bats

Did you know that the collective noun for bats is a "cloud", or that in the first scientific classification of mammals, bats were placed close to humans because, like us, they have two nipples? The book Bat, by Tessa Laird, is full of similar tidbits that you will want to share with others. It is also engrossing, eloquent and beautifully illustrated.

8h

Discovery of a new tumor suppressor previously thought to be an oncogene

A gene that has for decades been considered a tumor promoter, the PLK1 gene, can also perform the exact opposite function: halting the development of cancer. The role of PLK1 as a target for powerful drugs must now be reviewed. For the time being, the scientists have discovered that the expression of PLK1 in breast tumors can determine a different prognosis, depending on the tumor sub-type.

8h

Taking a pill can effectively treat brutal lung disease

Researchers report in Nature Communications they figured out why air sacs in the lungs clog up with a thick substance called surfactant in a brutal disease called Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP), and they show taking cholesterol-busting pills called statins can effectively treat the disease.

8h

Scientists shed new light on hepatitis B virus origins

Researchers have provided new insight on the geographical origins and global spread of two classes of the hepatitis B virus (HBV), according to a study in eLife.

8h

LSU Health research reveals new obesity prevention target

A team of LSU Health New Orleans researchers has found a lower prevalence of overweight and obesity among youth in Grenada compared to US adolescents. The differences may reflect the impact of the westernized diet and lifestyle. The research may lead to a change in worldwide obesity prevention strategy.

8h

Koala virus could explain why humans have 'junk' DNA

A koala virus could help researchers explain millions of years of accumulated 'junk' DNA in the human genome.An international team of researchers — including scientists from The University of Queensland — is studying a virus infecting koalas in the hope it could demonstrate how viruses have altered the DNA of humans and other species throughout history.

8h

Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes: Hope for inhibitors against amyloid plaques

Effective therapeutics to counteract the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes are not yet available. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now come a little bit closer to a solution: They have described a new class of designed macrocyclic peptides that are highly potent inhibitors of amyloid formation.

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8h

‘Mossy cells’ offer new target in fight against brain disorders

A small population of brain cells deep in a memory-making region of the brain controls the production of new neurons and may have a role in common brain disorders, according to a new study. The research shows that “mossy cells” in the hippocampus regulate local stem cells to control their production of new neurons, which is important for normal learning and memory, stress response, and mood regul

8h

We still don't know enough about species living around the UK's coastline

The UK has a rich history of marine biology, with famous scientists such as Charles Darwin who did pioneering work in the field, and strong research institutions with international expertise in marine sciences. So, surely then, scientists must know everything there is to know about the country's coasts and rockpools? Unfortunately not. While there are scientific names for the overwhelming majority

8h

Kommune i vildrede efter fatal plejehjemsbrand: Uforståeligt at det gik så stærkt

Tre ældre kvinder på et plejehjem i Allingåbro er døde efter en brand, der tilsyneladende spredte sig mellem selvstændige brandceller på få minutter

8h

Rediscovering the sources of Egyptian metals

Two new studies, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, offer the first comprehensive analytical datasets of Protodynastic to Old Kingdom Egyptian copper-based artifacts (c. 3rd millennium BC), analyzing the provenance of Egyptian copper. As elaborated in a methodological comment, the studies constitute an important step forward in current knowledge on copper provenance and the subseq

8h

Largest haul of extrasolar planets for Japan

Forty-four planets in solar systems beyond our own have been unveiled in one go, dwarfing the usual number of confirmations from extrasolar surveys, which is typically a dozen or less. The findings will improve our models of solar systems and may help researchers investigate exoplanet atmospheres. Novel techniques developed to validate the find could hugely accelerate the confirmation of more extr

8h

Scientists design new MRI coil for preclinical studies

Researchers from ITMO University developed and tested an MRI coil providing high-resolution imaging of the whole body of a mouse. Such coils are used in preclinical testing, as well as in imaging of various body systems. The new coil produces images with three times higher resolution than standard commercial volume MRI coils. Scientist used inexpensive materials and manufacturing technology that m

8h

Link between appendicitis and allergies discovered

Children with allergies have a lower risk of developing complicated appendicitis, according to a new study from Lund University and Skåne University Hospital in Sweden. The findings, now published in JAMA Pediatrics, could pave the way for new diagnostic tools in the future.

8h

Venture capitalists' reputations take a hit when publicly listed companies they once endorsed fail

New research suggests that venture capitalists' reputations can be damaged by events not within their full control.

8h

New program keeps elderly out of emergency

A medical program developed by emergency and palliative care clinicians at a large Australian hospital is seeing elderly aged care residents successfully treated at home. The program is reducing demand on the emergency department and is cost effective, delivering about AU$8 million a year in economic benefits after costs or a return of $17 for every $1 invested.

8h

Lessons from flies: genetic diversity impacts disease severity

New research offers clues as to why some diseases are highly variable between individuals. The phenomenon is apparent in retinitis pigmentosa, a condition that causes the light-sensing cells in the eye to degenerate. By analyzing thousands of flies, scientists at University of Utah Health found that variation in a background gene, called Baldspot, can make a difference in severity of the disease.

8h

Why the global survey on safety is deeply flawed

There has been a rise in global statistical initiatives that measure and rank countries in terms of various aspects of the human condition. Some of the more prominent examples include the Human Development Index, the World Governance Indicators, the Global Peace Index and the Corruption Perceptions Index.

8h

Lintz: Sundhedsplatformen er en test af vores tålmodighed

Formand for Overlægeforeningen Lisbeth Lintz ærgrer sig over udskydelsen af Sundhedsplatformens opdatering. Hun håber, at problemer med medicineringen snart bliver løst.

8h

Læger og regioner advarer mod hurtig reform af det nære sundhedsvæsen

Både Lægeforeningen og Danske Regioner udtrykker bekymring for, om kommunerne kan løfte opgaven, når man med den kommende sundhedsreform vil overgå til nærhedsfinansiering af sundhedsvæsenet.

8h

Ny cheflæge i Grønland

Overlæge Berit Bjerre Handberg er ansat som ny cheflæge i Det Grønlandske Sundhedsvæsen.

8h

Researchers spot an inside-out planetary nebula

An international team of researchers has discovered what they describe as an inside-out planetary nebula—a planetary nebula with surroundings that are the opposite of what normally occurs. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the group describes their find and offer possible explanations for its existence.

8h

Ideology and the transition to environmental sustainability

Last week, EPA and the Department of Transportation proposed a retreat on Obama-era auto pollution and energy efficiency rules. According to New York Times environmental reporter Coral Davenport:

8h

Many don’t see women as leaders at work

Despite progress toward greater gender equality, on average, men are still more likely than women to emerge as leaders, according to a new study. Researchers aggregated 59 years of research, encompassing more than 19,000 participants and 136 studies from lab, business, and classroom settings. They discovered that while the gender gap has narrowed in recent decades, it still persists. Today, for e

8h

Captain's Spotlight: Jake Anderson, Part 1 | Deadliest Catch

Jake Anderson's faced many life challenges and defeated the odds to achieve his dream of captaining a boat. Can he continue to handle the pressure of leading his crew, and keep his dream from becoming a nightmare? Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.fa

8h

As Uber Gives up on Self-Driving Trucks, Kodiak Jumps In

The startup wants to become the go-to source for the tech to make trucks drive themselves.

8h

Gene editing technique allows silkworms to produce spider silk

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has succeeded in using a gene editing technique to get silkworms to produce spider silk. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the technique they used and the quality of the silk produced.

9h

Astronomers saw the first mass eruption from a star that’s not the sun

The first coronal mass ejection observed fleeing another star was as massive as scientists expected, but carried less energy.

9h

Seeing the light: Scientists unlock seed germination process

Scientists have identified a key gene that helps seeds decide whether to germinate. The MFT gene stops seeds germinating in the dark or under shady conditions, where their chances of survival would be poor, according to new research from the University of York.

9h

Tropical birds benefit from more forest by rivers in oil palm areas

Protected riverbank habitats within areas of oil palm cultivation can play a key role in reducing the negative impacts on tropical bird numbers but need to be increased in size, new research from the University of Kent has shown. Converting rainforests to oil palm plantations has well documented impacts on tropical wildlife, including birds. But so far there has been little research on the value n

9h

Families with college kids more likely to lose their home during recessions

In times of economic difficulties, having to pay a child through college could be a major reason for a family to lose their home. This is according to two US researchers, Jacob Faber of New York University and Peter Rich of Cornell University, in a study published in Springer's journal Demography.

9h

Discovery of copper band shows Native Americans engaged in trade more extensively than thought

A research team including Matthew Sanger, assistant professor of anthropology at Binghamton University, State University at New York, has found a copper band that indicates ancient Native Americans engaged in extensive trade networks spanning far greater distances than what has been previously thought.

9h

Researchers solved mystery of clownfish coloration

The anemonefish is more familiarly known as the clownfish, as its bright coloration reminds of the face painting of a clown. The striking and unique coloration consists of white stripes on an orange background, but its biological function has remained a mystery thus far. Now, a study by the researchers of the University of Turku and the University of Western Australia has revealed new information

9h

How Much Power Does It Take to Fly in a Real-Life Jet Suit?

To hover a human over the ground, you need some serious engineering—and the momentum principle.

9h

Moto Z3 Play Review: Unlocked and Loaded

Motorola goes all-in on Mods and glass with its new Moto Z3 phones. Our full WIRED review.

9h

Genetic Tests Can Hurt Your Chances Of Getting Some Types Of Insurance

Federal law keeps insurers from using genetic test results when pricing and issuing health insurance. But the tests might keep you from being able to get life insurance or a long-term-care policy. (Image credit: Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images)

9h

System picks and chooses ions to remove toxins from water

Engineers are building a treatment system that they can tune to selectively pull toxins from drinking water and wastewater from factories, sewage systems, and oil and gas wells. They say the technology will cut costs and save energy compared to conventional systems. “Traditional methods to remove everything, such as reverse osmosis, are expensive and energy intensive,” says Qilin Li, a professor

9h

Why Aren’t There More Indra Nooyis?

When the PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi’s younger daughter, Tara, was a child, she would call her mother’s office to ask for permission to play Nintendo. The receptionist would answer the phone and run down a list of questions Nooyi had prepared—“Have you finished your homework?” and so on. “She goes through the questions and she says, ‘Okay, you can play Nintendo half an hour,’ Nooyi recalled in a 2014

9h

Romanian, German archeologists find 3,400-year-old fortress

Romanian and German archeologists have discovered a prehistoric fortress dating back as far as 3,400 years in western Romania.

9h

14,000 firefighters battling 18 major California blazes

Some 14,000 firefighters, including inmate volunteers, are battling 18 major blazes burning thousands of square miles throughout California with aircraft, assorted vehicles and picks and shovels.

9h

Plants Are the World's Dominant Life-Form

Flora make up the majority of Earth’s biomass, followed by bacteria — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Google's Duplex AI Scares Some People, but I Can't Wait for It to Become a Thing

Google's new assistant sounds almost scarily human — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Indian ride-hailing service Ola plans UK expansion

Indian ride-hailing service Ola is stepping up its international expansion with plans to launch in the U.K., its second overseas market.

9h

Testing finds flaws with electronic car safety systems

Cars and trucks with electronic driver assist systems may not see stopped vehicles and could even steer you into a crash if you're not paying attention, an insurance industry group warns.

9h

NY mayor signs into law new crackdown on Airbnb

New York's mayor on Monday signed into law a landmark bill forcing home-sharing platforms such as Airbnb to disclose information about hosts and imposing hefty fines for non-compliance.

9h

Solar cookout aims to woo traditional chefs, cut carbon

The savory aromas of roasting hot dogs and chicken kebabs wafted out of metal and glass vacuum tubes heated by mirrors curved to capture the sun's heat.

9h

Heat brings relief for French vineyards

Torrid temperatures across much of France have made the past few weeks unbearable for many, but with grape harvests kicking off this week, the country's winemakers say the heat could not have come at a better time.

9h

Portuguese wildfires encircle Algarve resort town

Hundreds of Portuguese firefighters and soldiers battled ferocious forest fires that threatened to engulf an Algarve resort town Tuesday, after sweltering temperatures kindled blazes that have whipped across the region.

9h

Cast from the past: World's oldest fishing net sinkers found in South Korea

Archaeologists excavating a cave in South Korea have found evidence that suggests human beings were using sophisticated techniques to catch fish as far back as 29,000 years ago, much earlier than experts previously thought.

9h

An Observatory for the (Mouse) Brain

Guest post by Kayt Sukel Jérôme Lecoq prepares the OpenScope rig for an experiment. Image courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science Any classic Star Trek fan worth their salt can easily summon the opening line for this beloved television show: “Space, the Final Frontier…” Now, the Allen Institute for Brain Science is trying to boldly go where no man—or lab—has gone before. It has announced Op

9h

How axons change chemical cues to mechanical force

Neural networks in the brain form by an axon extending from one neuron to interact with another. Chemical cues in the neuron microenvironment are responsible for activating the extending axon, but which molecular factors are responsible for interpreting this chemical information into a mechanical force for the axon to reach its destination has been unclear. Researchers at the Nara Institute of Sci

9h

Don’t despair – climate change catastrophe can still be averted | Simon Lewis

The future looks fiery and dangerous, according to new reports. But political will and grassroots engagement can change this This is the summer when, for many, climate change got real . The future looks fiery and dangerous. Hot on the heels of Trump, fake news and the parlous state of the Brexit negotiations, despair is in the air. Now a new scientific report makes the case that even fairly modest

9h

Globally, greater attention needed for seemingly 'minor' kidney damage

Rates of Acute Kidney Injury among Irish patients have more than doubled in the past 10 years, according to a new study led by researchers at the Graduate Entry Medical School (GEMS), University of Limerick. The research is published today in the academic journal, Nephrology Dialysis and Transplantation.

9h

Researchers uncover potential new drug targets in the fight against HIV

Johns Hopkins scientists report they have identified two potential new drug targets for the treatment of HIV. The finding is from results of a small, preliminary study of 19 people infected with both HIV — the virus that causes AIDS — and the hepatitis C virus. The study revealed that two genes — CMPK2 and BCLG, are selectively activated in the presence of type 1 interferon, a drug once used as

9h

What locusts teach us about sense of smell

New research sheds light on how a sensory input—molecules coming from a blooming flower, for instance—becomes an internal experience—actually smelling the rose. While the question has been a central one for philosophers for millennia, in more recent times, it’s also been a question for scientists. The locusts’ being able to recognize a scent comes down to the locust being flexible in its interpre

9h

Letters: What’s In a Name?

Why Don’t More Men Take Their Wives’ Last Names? In July, Caroline Kitchener wrote about a dilemma many couples face in the run-up to marriage: What is to be done about the last name? I am one of the statistically insignificant men who did what the article discussed: When we married seven years ago, my wife kept her last name and I took it. Our decision was based on the fact that my wife was well

9h

What Your Boss Could Learn by Reading the Whole Company’s Emails

When Andrew Fastow, the former chief financial officer of Enron, finishes a public-speaking gig these days, a dozen or so people from the audience are typically waiting to talk to him. Some ask about his role in the scandal that brought down the energy company. Others want to know about his six years in prison. After a 2016 event in Amsterdam, as the crowd was thinning out, Fastow spotted two men

9h

Here's how much protein you really need

Health Athletes do need more protein—but that doesn't necessarily mean you need supplements. Gym buffs get a lot of grief for their shaker bottles full of chalky protein powder—but should they?

9h

Scale API Wants Self-Driving Cars to Share Data

If data-labeling companies like Scale API have to re-do the same kind of work for multiple autonomous driving companies, the really important stuff—the weird edge cases—might get missed.

10h

The Genetics (and Ethics) of Making Humans Fit for Mars

We could make people less stinky, more resistant to radiation, even less dependent on food and oxygen. But would the new creature be human?

10h

Image of the Day: Nose Dive

Numbers of avian species in the Mojave Desert have fallen.

10h

How to Recover from Romantic Heartbreak

Use “negative reappraisal,” and understand you have work to do—time alone may not be enough — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

America Is Not Ready for Exploding Drones

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro was intoning something about economic renewal, flanked by his wife and a handful of high officials, in a country gripped by poverty, starvation, and shortages. Then, in a moment broadcast live on television that has since gone viral, his wife’s face changed. For an instant she seemed to duck as she reached for the official next to her; Maduro glanced up with ap

10h

Artist's paper cup pyramid highlights waste problem

After walking past bags of rubbish in Oxford, artist Simon Mandarino decided to illustrate the issue in a rather more visual way.

10h

The Universe Is Expanding. But Astrophysicists Aren't Sure How Fast.

The universe's rate of expansion is in dispute, and we may need new physics to solve it.

10h

Forskeradvarsel: Overladt til sig selv vil feedbacksystemer bringe Jorden på katastrofekurs

Reduktion af CO2-udledning er ikke nok til at forhindre Jorden i blive omdannet til et supervarmt drivhus. Menneskeheden skal påtage sig en forvaltning af Jorden, der stabiliserer Jordens klima, mener en international forskergruppe.

10h

Drug addiction is a tragedy. But we could stop so many people dying | Karen Tyrell

We know exactly what works to prevent drug-related deaths – and yet the numbers are still rising I was a drug worker in a London prison when I met Stuart, a guitar-playing Scot with a kind smile and a firm conviction that his life was over. When I met him he was dependent on heroin. His family had disowned him and he was in prison. He was scared, exhausted, and desperate. Over the next few months,

10h

How a computer learns to dribble: Practice, practice, practice

Basketball players need lots of practice before they master the dribble, and it turns out that's true for computer-animated players as well. By using deep reinforcement learning, players in video basketball games can glean insights from motion capture data to sharpen their dribbling skills.

10h

Corals are becoming more tolerant of rising ocean temperatures

Scientists replicate landmark study to determine changes in coral sea temperature tolerance over time. In the three species of Hawaiian corals retested, bleaching occurred later, with higher survivorship and growth rates than the same species of corals in 1970. However, scientists warn that temperatures are rising faster than corals can change.

10h

New nanoparticles help detect deep-tissue cancers

Researchers have developed a new form of nanoparticle and associated imaging technique that can detect multiple disease biomarkers, including those for breast cancer, found in deep-tissue in the body.

10h

Foot-and-mouth disease vaccination could reduce poverty in eastern Africa

Vaccinating livestock against foot-and-mouth disease could help to reduce poverty in eastern Africa, according to new research.

10h

The Viral Video Star Behind the Fitness Fad That May Replace CrossFit

“B ro, what kind of muscles you have?” asks Ido Portal in a short video introducing his philosophy. He’s barefoot and shirtless, his long hair pulled back as he tumbles across the frame and does handstand push-ups in the rain. “ No —bro, what kind of patterns you have? Can you flip? Can you invert? Can you crawl?” The 48-year-old Ido Portal has spent the past three decades honing a physical credo

10h

Chemical footprint in present-day atmosphere mimics that observed in ancient rock

Early Earth was a hot, gaseous, dusty and dynamic planet with an atmosphere and an ocean. Then its surface cooled and stabilized enough for clouds, landmasses and early life to form about four billion years ago, during what's called the isotopic age of rocks, or the Archean Period. Atmospheric chemical byproducts from that time traveled through the air and deposited inside the planet's oldest rock

10h

When did Aboriginal people first arrive in Australia?

Many Aboriginal Australians would say with conviction that they have always been here. Their ancestors and traditional learnings tell them of this history, and their precise place within it.

10h

Mojave birds crashed over last century due to climate change

Bird communities in the Mojave Desert straddling the California/Nevada border have collapsed over the past 100 years, most likely because of lower rainfall due to climate change, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study.

10h

Scientists create a UV detector based on nanocrystals synthesized via ion implantation

Scientists at the Lobachevsky University have been working for several years to develop solar-blind photodetectors operating in the UV spectral band. In the field of electronic technology, this is an important task, since such devices cut off emission with a wavelength higher than 280 nm, which helps to avoid interference from sunlight and to record UV emission during daylight.

10h

Million-fold increase in the power of waves near Jupiter's moon Ganymede

Listening to electromagnetic waves around the Earth, converted to sound, is almost like listening to singing and chirping birds at dawn with a crackling campfire nearby. Such waves are therefore called chorus waves. They cause the Northern Lights, but also high-energy 'killer' electrons that can damage spacecraft. In a recent study to be published in Nature Communications, the authors describe ext

10h

The bark side of the force

What forces enable trees to stand upright? To grow straight, plants need a motor system that controls their posture by generating forces to offset gravity. Scientists have long thought that this motor force was controlled only by the internal forces induced in wood. In a study published on 4 August 2018 in New Phytologist, researchers from the CNRS and Cirad show that bark is also involved in the

11h

Small birds fly at high altitudes towards Africa

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that small birds migrating from Scandinavia to Africa in the autumn occasionally fly as high as 4,000 metres above sea level—probably adjusting their flight to take advantage of favourable winds and different wind layers.

11h

For popularity on Twitter, partisanship pays

Pundits claim that we’re all living in political echo chambers. A new study shows that, on Twitter at least, they’re right.

11h

Ethical OS Helps Tech Startups Avert Moral Disasters

A new guidebook for tech companies helps them imagine future scenarios where their tech might end up causing societal harm.

11h

The One Telecom Group That Actually Supports Net Neutrality

Incompas was formed to represent upstart rivals to the Baby Bells. Under a former congressmember, it has expanded to include tech giants.

11h

The Ultra-Pure, Super-Secret Sand That Makes Your Phone Possible

The processor that makes your laptop or cell phone work was fabricated using quartz from this obscure Appalachian backwater.

11h

The Real 'Fallout': Viral Videos Were the Scourge—and Savior—of Tom Cruise's Career

Rebounding from Oprah's couch was its own impossible mission.

11h

The Defense Department has produced the first tools for catching deepfakes

Fake video clips made with artificial intelligence can also be spotted using AI—but this may be the beginning of an arms race.

11h

How to Create a Science Policy Group

A checklist for graduate students — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Corals are becoming more tolerant of rising ocean temperatures

The existence and causes of coral bleaching are recognized as an increasing world-wide environmental concern related to climate change. A number of experiments have been conducted since the early 1970s at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology's (HIMB) Coral Reef Ecology Laboratory in Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i and the Mid-Pacific Marine Laboratory (MPL) at Enewetak, Marshall Islands to determine the

11h

The Ultimate Betrayal of Paul Manafort

You know what would be surprising? If Rick Gates and Paul Manafort had suddenly suspended their apparently deeply ingrained habits of fraudulence and thievery during the three months they ran the Donald Trump campaign. Other chapters of their recent history—the chapters bracketing the campaign—include alleged episodes of witness tampering, lying to federal prosecutors, bank and tax fraud, as well

11h

Naturlige processer kan forstærke global opvarmning

Hvis jordens temperatur stiger 2 °C, er der risiko for en dominoeffekt, der betyder, at den ikke…

11h

Hitler: Election campaigner with limited influence?

While history has cast Adolf Hitler as a trailblazing propagandist, he has also been portrayed as a successful political campaign speaker—but does this narrative stand up to scientific scrutiny? Political scientists from the University of Konstanz and the Hertie School of Governance have now revisited the question as to how effective Adolf Hitler's public campaign appearances were in garnering ele

11h

Expanding the limits of Li-ion batteries—electrodes for all-solid-state batteries

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have addressed one of the major disadvantages of all-solid-state batteries by developing batteries with a low resistance at their electrode/solid electrolyte interface. The fabricated batteries showed excellent electrochemical properties that greatly surpass those of now ubiquitous Li-ion batteries, thereby demonstrating the promise of all-solid-state ba

11h

Switchable plasmonic routers controlled by external magnetic fields by using magneto-plasmonic waveguides

Plasmonic waveguides open the possibility to develop dramatically miniaturized optical devices and provide a promising route towards the next generation of integrated nanophotonic circuits for information processing, optical computing and others. Key elements of nanophotonic circuits are switchable plasmonic routers and plasmonic modulators.

11h

Q and A: Scientist and Advocate BethAnn McLaughlin

The neuroscientist talks about her experiences with trying to change how the scientific community copes with sexual assault and harassment.

11h

Scientists develop unique materials to repair damaged organs and tissue

Tissue engineering is the future of medicine. The Polymer Materials for Tissue Engineering and Transplantology Laboratory of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) has created unique polymeric materials for medical purposes that repair traumatized human organs.

11h

Court's AT&T-Time Warner ruling 'clearly erroneous': US gov't

The US Justice Department attacked Monday a court ruling that allowed June's $85 billion mega-merger between AT&T and Time Warner to go forward, saying a federal judge had relied on faulty economics.

11h

Ny professor skal bidrage til forståelsen af Parkinsons oprindelse

Overlæge Per Borghammer fra Aarhus Universitet og Aarhus Universitetshospital er ny klinisk professor i nuklearmedicin og neurovidenskab og skal forske i Parkinsons sygdom.

11h

Tankevækkende forskel på antal patienter i praksis

En praktiserende læge med 3.000 patienter yder næppe en halv så god behandling som kollegaen med 1.600 patienter.

11h

Opdateringen af Sundhedsplatformen skubbes tre måneder

Bestyrelsen for Sundhedsplatformen har besluttet at vente med at implementere den nyeste version af Sundhedsplatformen til februar 2019.

11h

En dag på kontoret – nå nej, almen praksis

Det er Danmarks bedste job at være praktiserende læge. Læs her om min fredag for nogle uger siden – og kom så ud i praksis, kære unge læger.

11h

Freitag foreslår 100 ekstra uddannelsespladser i almen praksis

Regeringens forslag om 30 nye pladser på videreuddannelseforløbene i almen medicin er ikke nok til at komme lægemanglen til livs, mener formand for PLO Christian Freitag.

11h

Tidligere Thorning-rådgiver ny chef for public affairs i Lif

Helle Thornings tidligere parlamentariske rådgiver Trine Wesselhoff skal fremover varetage Lifs Public affairs aktiviteter.

11h

Psykiatriske ambulancer skal kunne rykke ud i hele landet

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti vil bruge 80 mio. kr. over fire år på at udbrede psykiatriske udrykningsteams, der skal minde om Region Hovedstadens model.

11h

Nye regler lemper omstridt gebyr på lægevagt og frivilligt arbejde

En række former for lægearbejde er med nye regler blevet undtaget for krav om registrering af behandlingssted.

11h

Der må nye folk på koncernchefgangen

Ledelsen af Region Hovedstaden har nu to kritiske rigsrevisionsrapporter på deres skuldre.

11h

Mickael Bech forlader VIVE

Forskningscenter skal have ny direktør. Mickael Bech skifter direktørposten i VIVE ud med et professorat på Institut for Statskundskab på Aarhus Universitet.

11h

SpaceX Falcon 9 Lifts Off In Florida, Places Indonesian Satellite In Orbit

The launch marks the first reuse of an improved Falcon 9 "Block 5," which includes several upgrades designed to allow SpaceX to quickly refurbish and re-launch the rocket. (Image credit: John Raoux/AP)

11h

5 Things to Know About the New Tick Species in the US

A tick species that's native to Asia has now spread to the United States, and it's popping up in numerous places along the East Coast, according to U.S. officials.

11h

Renewable Energy Saves Water and Creates Jobs

Eight graphs tell the story; see for yourself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Wildfires the size of Los Angeles may be California's worst

Multiple wildfires that together grew Monday to nearly the size of Los Angeles could become the worst in fire-prone California's history, authorities warned.

11h

How people view crime depends on the politics of when they were growing up

A new study in the British Journal of Criminology indicates that the different political periods in which people 'came of age' has an important influence on their perception of crime, even decades later.

11h

Too much sleep linked to ill health

More than seven or eight hours a night of sleep is associated with higher risk of premature death Sleeping longer than the recommended seven or eight hours a night has been linked with a higher risk of premature death, according to new research. Researchers looked at data from 74 studies involving more than three million people and found those who slept for 10 hours were 30% more likely to die pr

11h

Double time limit for embryo research say ethics experts

In countries which already permit embryo research, there are no 'compelling moral arguments' why the time limit for experimentation should not be doubled say ethics experts. This could enable synthetic embryos in the lab which can grow into humans, improved IVF treatment, the creation of 'organoid' models of human organs for replacement and research to allow infertile/same sex couples to have gene

11h

Congress Finally Can Tell Hemp From Pot

Hemp is currently a Schedule I federally controlled substance, in the same legal category as LSD, heroin, and Ecstasy. Like all forms of cannabis, it was criminalized in 1970, partially because Congress was worried that law enforcement couldn’t tell the difference between hemp and marijuana. “There was tremendous biological understanding of the difference, but Congress was not making policy based

11h

Double time limit for embryo research say ethics experts

In countries which already permit embryo research, there are no "compelling moral arguments" why the time limit for experimentation should not be doubled say ethics experts.

12h

Forsker: GDPR er kæmpe konkurrencefordel for EU-virksomheder

Amerikanske forbrugere er begyndt at vende ryggen til mange af de store tech-virksomheder, fordi de har mistet tiltroen til deres persondatabehandling. Netop stigende persondatabevisthed blandt forbrugerne er en konkurrencefordel for virksomheder i EU.

12h

Facebook vil have fingre i bankdata med kundeservice-løsning

Zuckerberg kan ikke få nok persondata på sin platform og er i snak med amerikanske banker om at dele data.

12h

Forbedret version af Sundhedsplatformen må vente: Vigtig opdatering udskudt

Med udskydelsen af det nye Landspatientregister er det ikke realistisk på meget kort tid at sadle om og bygge forbedringer, der fungerer i det gamle system, som så alligevel skal ændres få måneder efter, anfører regioner.

12h

Energiorganisationer efterlyser handlekraft fra politikere

Regeringen har nedsat et vækstteam for energi- og miljøområdet. Men man burde starte med at implementere de mange konkrete anbefalinger, et tilsvarende udvalg kom med for fem år siden, lyder opfordringen fra brancheorganisationer.

12h

Ian Wootton obituary

My father, Ian Wootton, who has died aged 97, was professor of chemical pathology at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School in London and part of a golden age in the development of the discipline of clinical biochemistry, which concentrates on the analysis of bodily fluids. He began as a research assistant at Hammersmith hospital, west London, to Earl King, the founding father of clinical biochemi

12h

Minister: Det vil være uanstændigt at trække tæppet væk under biogassen

Energiminister Lars Chr. Lilleholt finder det vigtigt at sikre de investorer, som har satset penge på danske biogasanlæg i tillid til de danske støtteregler.

12h

CS efter succesopsendelse: Måske tager vi en flyvning mere med Nexø II

Weekendens raketopsendelse gik over al forventning, og raketten er så intakt, at den måske får en tur mere. Næste mål er bemandede missioner.

12h

Sensor could help doctors select effective cancer therapy

MIT chemical engineers have developed a sensor that lets them see hydrogen peroxide inside cancer cells and determine whether they are responding to drugs that affect redox signaling.

12h

Million fold increase in the power of waves near Jupiter's moon Ganymede

Chorus waves are electromagnetic waves. Converted to sound they sound like singing and chirping birds at dawn. They can cause polar lights above the Earth as well as damage to satellites. Now, a team of researchers led by Yuri Shprits of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences found that such waves are intensified millionfold around Jupiter's moon Ganymede. This study provides important observa

12h

Pacific Ocean's effect on Arctic warming

New research, led by former Carnegie postdoctoral fellow Summer Praetorius, shows that changes in the heat flow of the northern Pacific Ocean may have a larger effect on the Arctic climate than previously thought. The findings are published in the Aug. 7, 2018, issue of Nature Communications.

12h

Pacific Ocean's effect on Arctic warming

New research, led by former Carnegie postdoctoral fellow Summer Praetorius, shows that changes in the heat flow of the northern Pacific Ocean may have a larger effect on the Arctic climate than previously thought. The findings are published in the August 7, 2018, issue of Nature Communications.

13h

'Dear Doctor' Letters Use Peer Pressure, Government Warning To Stop Overprescribing

Researchers found that a simple letter to doctors, focusing on their high prescribing rates, reduced their tendency to give risky antipsychotic drugs to their patients, including some with dementia. (Image credit: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

13h

Climate Change Threatens Midwest's Wild Rice, A Staple For Native Americans

When harvests are bad, Native Americans in the region may go without rice for the year. And there have been a lot of bad years lately, as climate change causes more frequent and severe rainstorms. (Image credit: Joe Proudman/Courtesy of University of California Davis)

13h

Iltsvind: Kryds fingre for kraftig blæst i den kommende tid

Iltsvindet breder sig i de danske farvande, hvor situationen i Limfjorden nu er nær katastrofal, og hvor iltsvindet også har ramt Faxe Bugt og Hjelm Bugt syd for Møn.

13h

How people view crime depends on the politics of when they were growing up

A new study in the British Journal of Criminology indicates that the different political periods in which people 'came of age' has an important influence on their perception of crime, even decades later.

13h

If the face fits: Tokyo 2020 to deploy facial recognition2020 Tokyo Olympics

Hundreds of thousands of Tokyo 2020 athletes, staff and reporters will be scanned by cutting-edge facial recognition technology in an Olympic Games first, organisers said Tuesday.

14h

Chinese tech 'wolf' Huawei stalks Apple and Samsung

Ren Zhengfei, the founder of Chinese telecoms behemoth Huawei, likens the company to a ruthless "wolf" tirelessly running down its prey, an ethos that could soon make it the apex predator of the smartphone world.

14h

The Trans Fat 51-Day Half-Life Myth

Various websites repeat the myth that trans fats are slowly metabolized, with a 51-day half-life. There is no evidence for that claim.

15h

ePrivacy: Nyeste udspil udvander regler om metadata og cookies

Det østrigske EU-formandskab foreslår at stryge regler om cookie-blokering i browsere, mens de vil give teleselskaber større muligheder for udnyttelse af kunders metadata.

16h

Ny forskning: Kroppen bekæmper farlig virus med gammel sludder-virus

I kampen mod virusinfektioner anvender vores krop måske gammel vira, som vi har arvet fra vores forfædre. Sådan gør koalabjørne ihvertfald, viser ny forskning.

17h

New emerging research suggests Montmorency tart cherries may help enhance gut health

Montmorency tart cherries may play a role in improving gut health, suggests a first-of-its kind human trial of nine adults combined with a parallel laboratory study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. An international team of scientists found that Montmorency tart cherries helped to positively impact the gut microbiome — a collection of trillions of bacteria and other microbes t

17h

Key aspects of human cell aging reversed by new compounds

Key aspects of the aging of human cells can be reversed by new compounds developed at the University of Exeter, research shows.

17h

Severely obese people can reduce risk of atrial fibrillation with exercise

New research suggests that exercise can have a moderating effect on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation.

17h

Paper identifies genes associated with risk for aggressive breast cancer

A new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute has identified specific genes associated with increased risk for triple-negative breast cancer, providing the basis for better risk management.

17h

Injection of vasoactive intestinal peptide into the eye improves corneal transplant survival

A new study in The American Journal of Pathology reports for the first time that injection of neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) directly into the eye of mice enhanced corneal graft survival. VIP produced other benefits, including acceleration of endothelial wound closure, protection of corneal endothelial cells (CEnCs), and improved corneal graft clarity. If proven successful in cli

17h

The sun should not set twice before hip fracture repair

Optimal timing to reduce mortality after hip surgery in medically stable older patients is on the day of admission or the following day, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

17h

What Rick Gates’s Testimony Means for Manafort—And Trump

Robert Mueller cultivates a reputation as a staid, even dour, man of the law, but the special counsel’s team isn’t above a bit of courtroom showmanship. Last week, prosecutors trying Paul Manafort in federal court in northern Virginia suggested they might not call Rick Gates, Manafort’s former partner and protégé, to testify against him. That raised eyebrows: Gates, who pleaded guilty after being

18h

Mayo research team identifies genes that increase risk for triple-negative breast cancer

A research team led by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a geneticist at Mayo Clinic, has identified specific genes associated with an increased risk for developing triple-negative breast cancer. Their research was published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

21h

Only half of sexual medicine doctors ask about orientation

Only about half of sexual medicine doctors in a recent survey say they routinely ask patients directly about sexual orientation, a small study finds. Of those doctors who do not ask, more than 40 percent say that sexual orientation is irrelevant to patient care, a position contrary to longstanding clinical evidence, the researchers say. “If providers don’t ask, patients may not provide important

22h

The starch risk to teeth

An examination of research on oral health, commissioned by the World Health Organisation, has indicated that for oral health we should stick to whole grain carbohydrates and avoid processed ones, especially if sweet.

22h

Record heat in California is no fluke, experts warn

At Scripps Pier in San Diego, the surface water reached the highest temperature in 102 years of records, 78.8 degrees.

22h

Stretchy sensor keeps watch during brain aneurysm care

Researchers have developed a sensor that could improve the way brain aneurysm treatments are monitored. Implantation of a stent-like flow diverter offers one option for less invasive treatment of brain aneurysms—bulges in blood vessels—but the procedure requires frequent monitoring while the vessels heal. “The nanostructured sensor system could provide advantages for patients, including a less in

22h

Why Facebook’s Thinning Profit Margins Are a Secret Asset

Moderating content requires expensive lawyers, well-run operational teams, and a lot of money. But as Facebook builds these complex systems, it becomes harder for an upstart to replicate.

23h

Fastest rotor ever made may shed light on quantum physics

Researchers have created the fastest human-made rotor in the world, which they believe will help them study quantum mechanics. At more than 60 billion revolutions per minute, this machine is more than 100,000 times faster than a high-speed dental drill. “People say that there is nothing in vacuum, but in physics, we know it’s not really empty…” “This study has many applications, including materia

23h

Check out the fuzzy monkey that inspired the Lorax

Researchers may have discovered the inspiration for Dr. Seuss’ Lorax character and his Truffula trees. Primate biologists at NYU used facial recognition software to create a multidimensional map of primates in central Africa. The researchers believe that Dr. Seuss took his inspiration for the Lorax from the Patas monkey. (Credit: Nassarasta/Wikimedia Commons ) The weird science behind oobleck (wa

23h

Too much of this protein may drive kidney cancer

Scientists have uncovered a potential therapeutic target for kidney cancers that have a common genetic change. Scientists have known this genetic change can lead to an overabundance of blood vessels, which help feed nutrients to the tumors, but the latest finding shows a potential new cancer-driving pathway. More than 90 percent of the most common type of kidney cancer have a genetic change that

23h

Created line of spinal cord neural stem cells shows diverse promise

Researchers report that they have successfully created spinal cord neural stem cells (NSCs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) that differentiate into a diverse population of cells capable of dispersing throughout the spinal cord and can be maintained for long periods of time.

23h

Drug prices not always aligned with value, researchers say

In many countries, health care reimbursements for drugs are directly related to their value or net health benefits in treating disease. But a new study shows that's not the case in the United States.

23h

System selectively sequesters toxins from water

Engineers are developing ionic water-treatment technology that saves money and energy by selectively removing only hazardous contaminants and ignoring those that are harmless. The platform technology could be used to treat drinking water and wastewater from industrial applications like oil and gas wells.

23h

One in 10 IBS with diarrhoea patients wish they were dead when their condition is bad

New research, published in the UEG Journal, assessed the burden associated with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea by surveying 513 patients and 679 healthcare professionals. A quarter of patients reported that IBS stops them from enjoying life and 11 percent agreed with the statement; 'when my IBS is bad, I wish I was dead'.

23h

The secret origins of blue diamonds are finally coming to the surface

Environment These gems are rare bits of Earth’s recycling. Where blue diamonds come from is a question that’s eluded scientists for centuries. But now, secrets of the scarcest stones in the world are coming to the surface.

23h

The Atlantic Daily: Unable to Allow

What We’re Following Enforcement Customs: Amid new deportation directives, undocumented immigrants and refugees who have lived in the United States for decades describe a climate of increasing fear. Activists’ and politicians’ recent calls to “abolish ICE ” point to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement whose systemic flaws are seemingly impossible to fix. Franklin Foer explores the inner workin

23h

The Two Words That Made Saudi Arabia Furious at Canada

The pandemonium started with a tweet, as so many political uproars seem to do these days. “Canada is gravely concerned about additional arrests of civil society and women’s rights activists in Saudi Arabia, including Samar Badawi,” said a tweet from the Canadian government’s official foreign-policy account last Friday. “We urge the Saudi authorities to immediately release them and all other peace

23h

Who could join Apple in Wall Street's $1 trillion stock club?

Apple is the reigning king of Wall Street, the newest and only member of Wall Street's "$1 Trillion Stock Club."

23h

How to tell the difference between persuasion and manipulation

Why is manipulating people morally wrong but influencing them is not? Here's the fundamental distinction between manipulation and non-manipulative influence. Read More

23h

Ancient virus defends koalas against new viral attacks

A new study in koalas uncovers how virulent retroviruses become harmless bits of 'junk DNA' over time.

23h

Rain-on-snow flood risk to increase in many mountain regions of the western U.S., Canada

Flooding caused by rain falling on snowpack could more than double by the end of this century in some areas of the western United States and Canada due to climate change.

23h

Is too much screen time harming children's vision?

Does digital eyestrain cause lasting damage to children's eyes? Should your child use reading glasses or computer glasses?

23h

Scientists create atomic glue gun to build better nucleic acid therapeutics

Scientists have created a powerful new tool for precisely controlling the 3-D architecture — also called stereochemistry — of linkages known as thiophosphates, found in some promising new drugs that target genetic molecules and other disease targets.

23h

1d

Android 9 Pie has officially arrived—here’s what you need to know

Technology Will your phone get the latest version of Google’s mobile OS? Android Pie is available today—kinda.

1d

Twin California fires are second-largest in state history

Twin Northern California blazes fueled by dry vegetation and hot, windy weather grew Monday to become the second-largest wildfire in state history, becoming the norm as climate change makes the fire season longer and more severe.

1d

Judge: Social media user isn't entitled to anonymity

A social media platform can be compelled to divulge account information belonging to a woman who anonymously chatted online about plans for last summer's deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, a federal magistrate judge ruled Monday.

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