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Nyheder2018august08

 

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Rare teeth from ancient mega-shark found on Australia beach

A rare set of teeth from a giant prehistoric mega-shark twice the size of the great white have been found on an Australian beach by a keen-eyed amateur enthusiast, scientists said Thursday.

1h

Apples nye datacenter vil anvende overskudsvarmen – måske

Ingeniøren har besøgt Apples nye datacenter, som er under opførelse ved Viborg. Der er endnu intet fysisk tegn på, at man har planer om at udnytte overskudsvarmen fra det enorme datacenter.

5h

Lichen is losing to wildfire, years after flames are gone

As increasingly hot and severe wildfires scorch the West, some lichen communities integral to conifer forests aren't returning, even years after the flames have been extinguished, according to a study from scientists at the University of California, Davis.

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Elon Musk: Tesla's next software update to have 'classic' Atari games built in

As if driving a Tesla wasn't different enough already from the cars and trucks we have been wheeling around on the road for decades, how about adding some "Asteroids" to the mix?

2min

Omfattende forurening standser Lundbeck-udvidelse

Omfattende forurening på fabriksgrund stopper medicinalfirmaet Lundbecks planer om udvidelse af produktionsfaciliteter på Vestsjælland.

5min

Google makes up for years of allowing scammers top spots in search results with new system

The way to shop for home services in Dallas-Fort Worth and beyond has changed for the better. Google has stepped up with a new service that's supposed to separate professional, reliable companies from scammers.

14min

US juveniles with conduct problems face high risk of premature death

We already know that adolescents with conduct and/or substance use problems are at increased risk for premature death. This prospective study of more than 3,700 US juveniles discovered that there is an independent association between conduct disorder and mortality hazard. In other words, the connection between conduct disorder and risk of early death appears to exist even when other contributing f

24min

To stop mosquitoes, target their young

Bacterial larvicide, not standard insecticides, are the best solution for mosquito control, according to new research by Florida International University biologist Philip Stoddard.

26min

San Jose airport shows off facial recognition for international flights

Mineta San Jose International Airport demonstrated a facial recognition system that will make it the first West Coast airport to launch, for all international flights, a technology that officials said has already slashed the processing time for travelers.

26min

Samsung looks to go bigger than ever with Note 9

Samsung's new Note 9 phone, expected to be unveiled at a big bash in Brooklyn on Thursday morning, looks to be the biggest one yet, but it could be the last in the lineup.

32min

Livsfarlige revlehuller udstiller dilemma mellem psyke og fysik

Bliver du fanget i strømmen fra et revlehul, råder danske livredningstjenester dig til at svømme til siden. Forskning viser dog, at revlehuller fungerer markant anderledes end antaget, hvorfor det i de fleste tilfælde er mest fordelagtigt at lade sig drive med strømmen.

35min

Magic Leap, the $2 billion 3D software startup, is finally live. It doesn't come cheap.

Magic Leap, the secretive Plantation, Fla.-based tech company that has raised more than $2 billion in venture capital to build sophisticated 3-D software, has finally gone live.

44min

Criminal case filed against BMW over S. Korea car fires

A group of BMW owners in South Korea filed a criminal complaint against the German automaker Thursday over alleged delays in recalling more than 100,000 cars after a spate of engine fires, their lawyer said.

1h

Boeing says 737 production woes will last through year's end

US aerospace giant Boeing on Wednesday admitted supply chain hold-ups would affect production of its bestselling 737 jetliner until the end of the year, and could hamper third-quarter deliveries.

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Crop-destroying Armyworm caterpillar detected in Asia

A caterpillar native to the Americas that has devastated crops across Africa has made its way to Asia, scientists in India said Thursday, warning of a threat to food security.

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Ack! Distant fires leave California's capital city in a haze

No major wildfires are burning near Sacramento but for two weeks a dull haze and the faint smell of smoke from distant blazes has blanketed California's capital region, forcing summer campers to stay inside, obscuring normally bright skylines and leaving ash on cars.

1h

Tesla CEO's buyout bid raises eyebrows, legal concerns

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is seeking relief from the pressures of running a publicly held company with a $72 billion buyout of the electric car maker, but he may be acquiring new headaches with his peculiar handling of the proposed deal.

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Typhoon Shanshan clips Japan coast, sparing Tokyo

Typhoon Shanshan clipped Japan's eastern coast on Thursday morning, sparing Tokyo but bringing heavy rain, strong winds and high waves to some areas along the Pacific coast.

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Three Japan automakers admit false emissions data

Japan's Suzuki Motor, Mazda and Yamaha have admitted using false emissions data for some vehicles, the transport ministry said Thursday, in the latest product quality scandal to hit the country's auto sector.

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Following federal guidelines may help acceptance of police use of body-worn cameras

Thousands of police departments have adopted body-worn cameras over the last few years. Previous research on acceptance of the cameras has yielded mixed findings. A new study that examined how Tempe, Arizona, planned and carried out a body-worn camera program found that adhering to federal guidelines helped ensure integration and acceptance among police, citizens, and other stakeholders.

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Lichen is losing to wildfire, years after flames are gone

As increasingly hot and severe wildfires scorch the West, some lichen communities integral to conifer forests aren't returning, even years after the flames have been extinguished, according to a study from scientists at the University of California, Davis.

1h

Udbud: Skat vil købe nyt indkomstregister for 325 millioner kroner

Skat vil købe nyt indkomstregister, det såkaldte eIndkomst, der modtager cirka 10 millioner indberetninger om måneden om indkomst på alle danske skattepligtige.

3h

NASA satellites assist states in estimating abundance of key wildlife species

Climate and land-use change are shrinking natural wildlife habitats around the world. Yet despite their importance to rural economies and natural ecosystems, remarkably little is known about the geographic distribution of most wild species — especially those that migrate seasonally over large areas.

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NASA satellites assist states in estimating abundance of key wildlife species

Climate and land-use change are shrinking natural wildlife habitats around the world. Yet despite their importance to rural economies and natural ecosystems, remarkably little is known about the geographic distribution of most wild species—especially those that migrate seasonally over large areas. By combining NASA satellite imagery with wildlife surveys conducted by state natural resources agenci

4h

Can rare lymphocytes combat rheumatoid arthritis?

Immunologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have demonstrated that ILC2, a group of rare lymphoid cells, play a key role in the development of inflammatory arthritis. ILCs have several functional similarities to T-cells and are important agents of our congenital immune system. The FAU researchers' findings could form the basis for new approaches for treating rheumatoid arthr

4h

Why house sparrows lay both big and small eggs

Bigger isn't always better, as biologists who spent six years looking at the egg sizes of an insular population of house sparrows on Hestmannoy in Norway discovered. Having different sized eggs allowed the sparrows to raise successful nestlings, no matter the weather, the researchers found.

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Higher alcohol taxes are cost-effective in reducing alcohol harms

Increasing taxes on alcohol is one of the most cost-effective methods of reducing the harms caused by alcohol consumption, according to research in the new issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

4h

Following federal guidelines may help acceptance of police use of body-worn cameras

A new study that examined how Tempe, Ariz., planned and carried out a body-worn camera program found that adhering to federal guidelines helped ensure integration and acceptance among police, citizens, and other stakeholders.

4h

Samsung Galaxy Note 9: How to Watch Live Stream, Date, Start Time

Samsung's big summer show, Galaxy Unpacked, kicks off today. Here's how to tune in.

4h

Ketogenic diets may lead to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes

New research published in the Journal of Physiology indicates that ketogenic diets, which are low carbohydrate high fat eating plans that are known to lead to weight loss, may cause an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in the early stage of the diet.

7h

New York City Limits the Number of Ubers and Lyfts on Its Streets

The Big Apple deals the ride-hail companies with their first set of serious American regulations. Which city will impose regulations next?

7h

Whales Suck–So They Evolved Baleen

Whale ancestors probably never had teeth and baleen at the same time, and only developed baleen after trying toothlessness and sucking in prey. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Parker Solar Probe: How Nasa is trying to 'touch' the Sun

Nasa's Parker Solar Probe will get closer to our star than any other in history.

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New to YouTube: a fact-checking collaboration with Wikipedia, Encyclopedia Brittanica

Global warming, the MMR vaccine, UFOs, and more are in the spotlight so far. But will it work? Read More

9h

Female doctors boost women’s survival after heart attack

Women who have had a heart attack have a significantly higher survival rate when a female doctor treats them in the emergency room, a new study of nearly 582,000 cases shows. In fact, in the sample, 1,500 fewer women would have died—women male doctors treated—if their survival rate was the same as women female physicians treated. Further, women had a better survival rate with male doctors who hav

9h

See over 300 artworks in the Uffizi without going to Italy

You can now see some of the world’s most admired ancient artifacts and sculptures in 3D from home. A new website contains over 300 digitized sculptures and fragments from the collection of the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. The Uffizi Gallery, adjacent to the Piazza della Signoria in central Florence, houses some of the world’s finest masterpieces, including works by Botticelli, Caravaggio, d

9h

'Believing you're a winner' gives men a testosterone boost and promiscuous disposition

New findings suggest that the male body tries to 'optimize' self-perceived improvements in social status through hormonal shifts that promote 'short-term mating.'

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Soy may strengthen bones before and after menopause

Soy protein in food might be a way to counter the negative effects of menopause on bone health—and may also have benefits for women who haven’t yet reached menopause, a study with rats shows. Osteoporosis, decreased physical activity, and weight gain are serious health concerns for postmenopausal women, researchers say. “The findings suggest that all women might see improved bone strength by addi

9h

Blocking 1 gene curbs lung cancer’s growth

In a new study, reducing or inhibiting a gene called NOVA1 in turn reduced or prevented human non-small lung cancer tumors from growing, researchers report. When researchers injected mice with non-small cell lung cancer cells that contained the gene NOVA1, three of four mice formed tumors. When they injected the mice with cancer cells without NOVA1, three of four mice remained tumor-free. “Non-sm

10h

The Lancet Psychiatry: Exercise linked to improved mental health, but more may not always be better

Peer-reviewed / Observational study / PeopleA study of 1.2 million people in the USA has found that people who exercise report having 1.5 fewer days of poor mental health a month, compared to people who do not exercise. The study found that team sports, cycling, aerobics and going to the gym are associated with the biggest reductions, according to the largest observational study of its kind publis

10h

Beloved Baby Eaglet In D.C. Euthanized After Suffering West Nile Disease

Valor was one of two young eaglets in a nest at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C. The tree is monitored 24/7 by a popular webcam. He fell from the nest late last month, and died on Tuesday. (Image credit: American Eagle Foundation, EAGLES.ORG; Screenshot by Flickr user heights.18145)

10h

Boxers or briefs? Loose-fitting underwear may benefit sperm production

Men who most frequently wore boxers had significantly higher sperm concentrations and total sperm counts when compared with men who did not usually wear boxers, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

10h

Largest study yet shows type of underwear is linked to men's semen quality

Men who wear boxer shorts have higher sperm concentrations than men who wear tighter fitting underwear, according to new research published in Human Reproduction. The study differs from previous research on this topic because it includes a larger number of men (656) than previous studies, and because it is the first to go beyond the traditional, narrow focus on semen quality and include informatio

10h

The Most Powerful Publishers in the World Don’t Give a Damn

There is a meme you maybe won’t remember, from a different internet epic, that goes like this: Are bloggers journalists? It was a real question that became a joke because it’s the kind of thing someone would only ask now with a wink of nostalgia for the naiveté of an earlier time, when terms like “hyperlocal” and “blogosphere” were used in earnest. The web itself was different then, and the way p

10h

Trilobites: Give a Cow a Brush, and Watch It Scratch That Itch

Some researchers think mechanical brushes aren’t just some spa amenity for dairy cows — they’re important to the animal’s well-being.

10h

Asbestos in a Crayon, Benzene in a Marker: A School Supply Study’s Toxic Results

A public interest group tested 27 back-to-school products and found dangerous chemicals in four of them.

10h

Are Tighty-Whities Bad for a Man's Sperm Count?

Deciding between boxers and briefs may be about more than just comfort. Men's underwear choices may affect their sperm health, a new study suggests.

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Boxers Or Briefs? Experts Disagree Over Tight Underwear's Effect On Male Fertility

The jury's still out on whether underwear preference matters to male fertility, but men who wear briefs, or other tight options, were found to have slightly lower sperm counts in a new study. (Image credit: Michael Cogliantry/Getty Images)

10h

Is There A Better Way To Fight Massive Wildfires?

Massive wildfires in Western states are rapidly depleting funds set aside to fight fires. At the same time, many experts argue our priorities are wrong — we should be spending more on prescribed burns, and less on fighting fires in unpopulated areas.

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Explore 1 Of The World's Largest Collections Of Bird Eggs And Nests

The Western Foundation for Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo, Calif., houses one of the largest collections of birds eggs and nests in the world. As part of our summer road trip collaboration with Atlas Obscura, we explore the collection and meet the scientists who run the foundation.

10h

Itsy bitsy spider robots might crawl around inside you one day

Health They're the smallest soft robots of their kind. Harvard University's new peacock spider robot is less than an inch long, and it has some amazing properties.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Collins His Lawyer

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Republican Representative Chris Collins of New York was indicted on insider trading charges and subsequently removed from the House Energy and Commerce Committee by Speaker Paul Ryan. Senator Rand Paul said he delivered a letter from President Trump to the administration of Russian President

10h

This Meteor 'Exploded' Over Greenland, But Nobody Saw It. Here's Why It Matters.

A fireball that streaked across the sky above the Thule Air Base in Greenland on July 25 was notable for not only the 2.1 kilotons of energy it released but also the stir it caused on social media.

10h

Invasive species: How the tegu lizard could invade the southern U.S.

With the tegu’s successful occupation of Florida’s ecosystems, a new study predicts that this invasive species could potentially spread across the southern U.S. and into Mexico. But these voracious lizards are just another incident in our devastating history of invasive species. Read More

10h

Sorry, men, there’s no such thing as ‘dirt blindness’ – you just need to do more housework

While the gender gap is narrowing, women still do seven hours more housework per week than men (and that doesn’t include the child-caring). Read More

10h

Dying groundskeeper battles chemical giant Monsanto

Cancer-stricken Dewayne Johnson vowed to fight to his death in a David versus Goliath court battle against agrochemical giant Monsanto, whose weed killer he blames for robbing him of his future.

10h

New York moves to cap Uber, app-ride vehiclesNew York city Uber

New York's city council on Wednesday dealt a blow to Uber and other car-for-hire companies, passing a bill to cap the number of vehicles they operate and impose minimum pay standards on drivers.

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The Atlantic Daily: Nebulous Chatter

What We’re Following As Goes Ohio … : The closely watched special election in Ohio’s reliably red 12th district went to Troy Balderson, the Republican candidate, by a slim margin Tuesday night. That tight race might point to a chance for Democrats to win House seats in suburban districts this fall. At the recent Netroots Nation conference, however, progressive Democrats were less concerned with w

11h

Best of both worlds: Combining two skeleton-building chemical reactions

Scripps Research scientists have developed a powerful new strategy for synthesizing molecular skeletons of chemicals used in drugs and other important products, a technique that provides unprecedented flexibility and control over chemical synthesis, according to a paper published July 30 in Nature.

11h

GPM passes over weakening Hurricane John

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite provided very good coverage of hurricane John when it passed above the eye of the tropical cyclone on August 8, 2018. GPM found heavy rainfall within the large hurricane.

11h

Exercise can help beat cocaine addiction, study finds

Exercise can help prevent relapses into cocaine addiction, according to new research led by the University at Buffalo.

11h

Inducing labor can help prevent cesarean births

A new national study has found that inducing labor in first-time mothers at 39 weeks can help prevent cesarean births and high blood pressure. The University of Texas Medical Branch participated in the study and Dr. George Saade, chief of obstetrics and the principal investigator at UTMB, said that babies born to women induced at 39 weeks did not have worse outcomes compared to those who were not

11h

As Medicaid work requirements gain traction, experts propose ways to reduce potential harm

Before Medicaid work requirements get into full gear, a team of Medicaid researchers is offering specific recommendations to help states ensure that they don't harm the health of people enrolled in Medicaid. They recommend focusing on adults under 50 in expansion plans, clearly guiding physicians on certifications, offering services to support working and job-seeking enrollees, and spacing out rep

11h

Inducing labor at 39 weeks reduces likelihood of C-sections

Inducing labor in healthy first-time mothers in the 39th week of pregnancy results in lower rates of cesarean sections compared with waiting for labor to begin naturally at full term, according to a multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).Additionally, infants born to women induced at 39 weeks did not experience more stillbirths, newborn deaths or other major health com

11h

Inducing labor at 39 weeks decreases need for cesarean section

Inducing labor in healthy women at 39 weeks into their pregnancy reduces the need for cesarean section and is at least as safe for mother and baby as waiting for spontaneous labor. Choosing to induce could also reduce the risk that mothers will develop preeclampsia and that newborns will need respiratory support after delivery, according to a study publishing in the New England Journal of Medicine

11h

Induced labor at 39 weeks reduces cesarean births

For many years, obstetricians counseled women that inducing labor increased the likelihood of a cesarean birth, although there was no solid evidence in clinical trials to support that. Now, a large national study shows electively inducing labor at 39 weeks actually reduces the rate of cesarean deliveries and decreases maternal and fetal complications. Newborns have fewer respiratory problems. Wome

11h

Why This Little Boy's Cough Sounds Like a Squeaky Toy

While most coughs sound hoarse or hacky, one young boy in India had a cough that squeaked.

11h

More young footballers dying of heart problems than thought, FA study finds

FA increases number of screenings for youth players after study finds several players died of heart problems not spotted by tests Young footballers are dying from heart problems at a higher rate than was previously thought, according to doctors who oversee the cardiac screening programme for the Football Association. Their evaluation of 20 years of screening young footballers at the age of 16 who

11h

CVS-Brand Nasal Spray Recalled for Potential Bacterial Contamination

A CVS-brand nasal spray is being voluntarily recalled due to potential bacterial contamination, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today (Aug. 8).

11h

Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not?

Young women with simple pregnancies can safely ask a doctor to induce labor, a study finds. It doesn't increase their risk of needing a C-section after all and can even offer potential benefits. (Image credit: Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images)

11h

Best of both worlds: Combining two skeleton-building chemical reactions

The method could speed the discovery of new drugs and other products by offering the ability to simply and efficiently build a wide variety of molecular architectures.

11h

Sexy Sea Worms Light Up Bermuda in One-of-a-Kind Mating Ritual

There's a bioluminescent marine worm party off Bermuda, and everyone's invited.

12h

Genetic mutations of appendix cancer identified, may impact treatment

To understand why some patients with appendix cancer respond to standard treatment while others do not, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with Foundation Medicine, performed genetic profiling on 703 appendiceal tumors — the largest such study of this disease to date — to compare mutations present in both cancer types.

12h

What It Would Take for Iran to Talk to Trump

On August 6, Donald Trump’s administration reimposed economic sanctions on Iran that Barack Obama’s administration had lifted when it signed the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) in 2015, the anticipated next step following Trump’s decision to leave the deal in May. Since then, the Trump administration has talked about bringing more economic pressure on Tehran not only to end its nuclear

12h

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Ten ways climate change can make wildfires worse

As out-of-control wildfires ravage large swathes of Portugal, Spain and northern California, AFP talked to scientists about the ways in which global warming can amplify the problem.

12h

Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s Disease?

Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s Disease? Instead of trying to fight the disease, researchers are focusing on beefing up the brain cells to live alongside the disease. Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s Disease? Video of Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s Disease? Human Wednesday, August 8, 2018 – 16:30 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — I have a friend whose grandmother died of Alzheimer’s di

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Doubts Arise Again About CRISPR'd Human Embryos

One lab finds that a similar method produces large genetic deletions when performed in mouse embryos.

12h

By turning its back on Wall Street, Tesla could avoid market pressures

Exiting US stock markets, a possibility raised Tuesday by Tesla CEO Elon Musk, could ease some of the pressure on the electric automaker but will come at a hefty cost.

12h

New York Times to pass 4 million subscribers 'soon'

The New York Times, the most prestigious newspaper in the United States, announced Wednesday that it expects to "soon" cross the threshold of four million subscribers, even if growth is slowing.

12h

Support increases when opioid 'safe consumption sites' called 'overdose prevention sites'

'Safe consumption sites,' where people can use pre-obtained drugs with medically trained personnel on hand to treat overdoses, garner higher public support when they are called 'overdose prevention sites,' according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

12h

NASA's GPM passes over weakening Hurricane John

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite provided very good coverage of hurricane John when it passed above the eye of the tropical cyclone on Aug. 8, 2018. GPM found heavy rainfall within the large hurricane.

12h

New RNA & DNA-sequencing platform matches thousands of drugs to late-stage cancer patients

A comprehensive RNA and DNA sequencing platform benefits late-stage and drug-resistant multiple myeloma patients by determining which drugs would work best for them, according to results from a clinical trial published in JCO Precision Oncology in August.

12h

New guideline released for managing vegetative and minimally conscious states

For people in a vegetative or minimally conscious state caused by brain injury, an accurate diagnosis and ongoing medical and rehabilitative care based on the latest scientific evidence could mean a better chance for recovery, according to a new guideline by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the National Institute on Disability, Independent L

12h

California Company Reaches $119.5 Million Settlement Over Massive Gas Leak

For months, starting in late 2015, a gas leak in Los Angeles spewed methane into the air. The Southern California Gas Company has agreed to reimburse local governments and mitigate the damage. (Image credit: Ted Soqui/Corbis via Getty Images)

12h

Suomi NPP satellite find Typhoon Shanshan near Japan's coast

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite caught up with Typhoon Shanahan and provided forecasters with a visible picture of the storm on Aug. 8. The satellite image revealed the storm still maintained an eye, although now cloud-filled.

12h

NASA sees wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Yagi

Tropical Storm Yagi was experiencing wind shear when NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and analyzed the storm.

12h

Bad policing, bad law, not 'bad apples,' behind disproportionate killing of black men

Killings of unarmed black men by white police officers across the nation have garnered massive media attention in recent years, raising the question: Do white law enforcement officers target minority suspects?

12h

Scientists 'squeeze' nanocrystals in a liquid droplet into a solid-like state – and back again

A team led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) found a way to make a liquid-like state behave more like a solid, and then to reverse the process.

12h

Online Stock Trading Has Serious Security Holes

An analysis of dozens of trading platforms reveals a range of cybersecurity concerns across mobile, desktop, and the web.

12h

Research reveals effective method to control algae growth on Hawaiian coral reefs

Researchers with the State of Hawai'i Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) and the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa found a management approach that combining manual removal and outplanting native urchin was effective at reducing invasive, reef smothering macroalgae by 85% on a coral reef off O'ahu, Hawai'i.

12h

Study illuminates genes behind beautiful 'glow' of Bermuda fireworms

A new study looks at the genes behind an incredible, luminous seasonal mating display produced by swarms of bioluminescent marine Bermuda fireworms. The new research confirms that the enzymes responsible for the fireworms' glow are unique among bioluminescent animals and entirely unlike those seen in fireflies. The study also examines genes associated with some of the dramatic — and reversible —

12h

New discovery sheds light on proteins critical in mood and behavior disorders

Researchers have found new evidence of how certain transport proteins are working at the molecular level, paving the way for new, improved drugs to treat psychiatric disorders.

12h

Specific brain circuit tied to sociability in mice

Social behavior in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder normalized when investigators triggered the release of a specific signaling substance, serotonin, in a single part of the animals' brains, according to a new study.

12h

World record: Fastest 3-D tomographic images at BESSY II

A team has developed an ingenious precision rotary table at the EDDI beamline at BESSY II and combined it with particularly fast optics. This enabled them to document the formation of pores in grains of metal during foaming processes at 25 tomographic images per second — a world record.

12h

Seed coats could lead to strong, tough, yet flexible materials

Inspired by elements found in nature, researchers say the puzzle-like wavy structure of the delicate seed coat, found in plants like succulents and some grasses, could hold the secret to creating new smart materials strong enough to be used in items like body armor, screens, and airplane panels.

12h

Salk Institute Settles Two Gender Discrimination Suits

A third case against the biomedical institute will be heard in court.

12h

China is using robotic doves to spy on citizens

China has for years been using robotic doves—drones that look and fly like real birds—to surveil the skies over its provinces, marking one of the most peculiar parts of the nation’s widespread civilian surveillance program. Read More

12h

The true costs of the Afghan war, America's longest and most invisible war

The costs of the War in Afghanistan are astounding and without end, with the war about to enter its 17th year. Read More

12h

Researchers link residential characteristics with productivity one year after brain injury

Model system researchers have examined the factors that influence productive activity one year after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

12h

Research reveals effective method to control algae growth on Hawaiian coral reefs

Researchers with the State of Hawai'i Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) and the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa found a management approach that combining manual removal and outplanting native urchin was effective at reducing invasive, reef smothering macroalgae by 85 percent on a coral reef off O'ahu, Hawai'i.

12h

Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets

Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of this material changes in an unusual way under very high magnetic fields — a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperature.

12h

Mom still matters, psychologists report

If you're a parent who feels your college-age children would choose their friends over you, a new UCLA psychology study has a reassuring message: You're probably underestimating their loyalty to you. The psychologists demonstrated for the first time that when forced to make a decision that benefits either a parent or a close friend, young adults are more likely to choose the parent.

12h

For the first time, scientists are putting extinct mammals on the map

Researchers have produced the most comprehensive family tree and atlas of mammals to date, connecting all living and recently extinct mammal species (nearly 6,000 in total) and overturning many previous ideas about global patterns of biodiversity. The atlas shows where species occur today as well as where they would occur, if they had not been driven away or extinct.

12h

Harmful bacteria thrived in post-Hurricane Harvey floodwaters

Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017, bringing more than 50 inches of rain and extreme flooding to the city of Houston. In addition to wreaking havoc on buildings and infrastructure, urban floodwaters harbor hidden menaces in the form of bacteria that can cause disease. Now, researchers have surveyed the microbes that lurked in Houston floodwaters, both inside and outside of

12h

The weirdest things we learned this week: skin-peeling soup, secret drug toilets, and a chlorinated ocean

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

12h

NASA sees wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Yagi

Tropical Storm Yagi was experiencing wind shear when NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and analyzed the storm.

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Big feature update from KrzysztofKruk for Scouts+

KrzysztofKruk has been hard at work building player-requested features into his addon scripts. Today we’re pleased to launch them Eyewire-wide! Here’s a list of the awesome new features which are available to Eyewirers ranked Scout or higher. Utilities – Option for compacted Scout’s Log – Regrow Seed and Remove Duplicates buttons added – Dataset borders – Shortcut (“G”) to insect and exit a cube

13h

Alan Rabinowitz, Conservationist of Wild Cats, Dies at 64

Mr. Rabinowitz made it his life’s mission to preserve lions, tigers, leopards and cheetahs after childhood encounters with a jaguar at the Bronx Zoo

13h

Introducing the latest in textiles: Soft hardware

Researchers have incorporated electronic devices into soft fabrics, potentially making it possible to produce clothing that communicates optically with other devices.

13h

There and back again: Mantle xenon has a story to tell

Volatiles — such as water, carbon dioxide and the noble gases — come out of the earth's interior through volcanism and may be injected into the mantle from the atmosphere, a pair of processes called mantle degassing and regassing. The exchange controls the habitability of the planet. This transport could not have begun much before 2.5 billion years ago, according to new research that also establ

13h

Wild Cat Conservationist Alan Rabinowitz Dies

The “Indiana Jones of Wildlife Protection” helped established nature preserves around the world.

13h

Inside Trump’s Voter-Fraud Crusade

Donald Trump doesn’t like witch hunts. He’s made that abundantly clear on Twitter and in press conferences, thundering against a Russia investigation that he claims is based on nothing but hot air. Let the president tell it, and the entire endeavor is a product of cooperation between partisan elements and biased media designed to undermine him, all without any evidence. Of course, until early thi

13h

Bad policing, bad law, not 'bad apples,' behind disproportionate killing of black men

Killings of unarmed black men by white police officers across the nation have garnered massive media attention in recent years, raising the question: do white law enforcement officers target minority suspects? A recent study says no.

13h

NASA sees major Hurricane Hector moving south of Hawaii

Hurricane Hector maintained its major hurricane status on Aug. 8 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with cloud top temperatures in Hector so they could pinpoint the strongest part of the storm.

13h

PCR: Amplified to the End Point

Download this eBook from The Scientist, made possible by an educational grant from Canon BioMedical, to learn more about the history of polymerase chain reaction, applications for PCR, how to overcome common PCR obstacles, and increasing throughput to record speeds.

13h

Historic Cat Photos on International Cat Day

Earlier this century, the International Fund for Animal Welfare declared August 8 to be International Cat Day, a day set aside to celebrate our feline friends, which apparently just can’t get enough attention. To honor this day, I’ve gathered a small collection of archival images of cats and kittens below. Fashions and technologies may change over time, but cats never go out of style.

13h

A Disappointing New Problem With Geo-Engineering

Over the past few years, I’ve heard dozens of scientists talk about solar geo-engineering, the once outlandish idea that humanity should counteract climate change by releasing special gases into the stratosphere to reflect away sunlight and cool the planet. But I’ve never heard it discussed in quite the terms of Jonathan Proctor , an agricultural economist at UC Berkeley. “You’re in an arena with

13h

Team shows laser ranging can 'see' 3-D objects melting in fires

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used a laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system to image three-dimensional (3-D) objects melting in flames. The method could offer a precise, safe and compact way to measure structures as they collapse in fires.

13h

13h

You have questions about the Perseid meteor shower. We have answers.

Space Shower your friends with meteor facts. This weekend, if you head outside after sunset and it happens to be a clear night, look up. The sky will be putting on its annual production of the Perseids, and here at…

13h

Researchers say CRISPR edits to a human embryo worked. But critics still doubt it

Researchers say that they have confirmed CRISPR/Cas9 edits of a heart disease–causing version of a gene, but critics still have doubts.

13h

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite find Typhoon Shanshan near Japan's coast

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite caught up with Typhoon Shanahan and provided forecasters with a visible picture of the storm on Aug. 8. The satellite image revealed the storm still maintained an eye, although now cloud-filled.

14h

Scientists squeeze nanocrystals in a liquid droplet into a solid-like state and back again

A team led by scientists at Berkeley Lab found a way to make a liquid-like state behave more like a solid, and then to reverse the process.

14h

NASA sees major Hurricane Hector moving south of Hawaii

Hurricane Hector maintained its major hurricane status on Aug. 8 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with cloud top temperatures in Hector so they could pinpoint the strongest part of the storm.

14h

NIST shows laser ranging can 'see' 3D objects melting in fires

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have used a laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system to image three-dimensional (3D) objects melting in flames. The method could offer a precise, safe and compact way to measure structures as they collapse in fires.

14h

Researchers say high seas fisheries play limited role in feeding the world

Fishing fleets operating outside of national waters contribute less than 3 percent to the world's seafood supply. This finding goes against the common assertion that high seas fisheries are important for food security.

14h

Models may help reduce bycatch from longline fishing

Hundreds of thousands of sharks, sea birds and other marine species are accidentally killed each year after becoming snagged or entangled in longline fishing gear. Models developed by a Duke-led research team may help reduce the threat by giving regulatory agencies a new tool to predict the month-by-month movements of longline fleets on the high seas and determine where and when by-catch risks are

14h

Tracking the trends of online dating in major US Cities

People tend to pursue mates that are 'out of their league,' according to a new study that analyzed social interactions between users of a large online dating website in four major US cities.

14h

Computational platform optimizes multiple myeloma treatments

Masturah Bte Mohd Abdul Rashid and colleagues have developed a new platform that optimizes drug combinations for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable blood cancer.

14h

Out of your league? Study shows most online daters seek more desirable mates

Big-data analysis of popular online dating website shows users seek 25 percent more desirable mates, even though the chances of getting a response are lower.

14h

Study illuminates genes behind beautiful 'glow' of Bermuda fireworms

A new study led by researchers at the American Museum of Natural History looks at the genes behind an incredible, luminous seasonal mating display produced by swarms of bioluminescent marine Bermuda fireworms. The new research confirms that the enzymes responsible for the fireworms' glow are unique among bioluminescent animals and entirely unlike those seen in fireflies. The study also examines ge

14h

'Citizen science' yields updated predicted distributions for rare species

Online 'citizen science' data initiatives may be able to help map the distribution of rare species in the wild, according to a study published Aug. 8 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Yifu Wang of McGill University and colleagues.

14h

Tiny tunnels inside garnets appear to be the result of boring microorganisms

Complex systems of microscopic tunnels found inside garnet crystals from Thailand are most likely the result of microorganisms making their homes inside these minerals, according to a study published Aug. 8, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Magnus Ivarsson of the University of Southern Denmark and colleagues.

14h

Out of your league? Study shows online daters message more desirable people

The majority of people using dating websites chase potential partners who are significantly more desirable than themselves, study shows Men and women searching for a mate on online dating sites are hoping Cupid’s arrow will strike high, according to a new study that suggests users tend to chase potential partners who are more desirable than themselves. The study, based on data from a free online

14h

Fishing bans protect wildlife without harming fishers

Fishing bans don’t have to hurt fishing communities in favor of environmental and wildlife protection, according to a new study. “…the challenge remains where conservation and socioeconomic goals conflict…” Researchers tracked vessels during a short-lived trawling moratorium in the Adriatic Sea and found that fishers maintained their catch levels by fishing elsewhere. The findings suggest that su

14h

Novel approach to coherent control of a three-level quantum system

For the first time, researchers were able to study quantum interference in a three-level quantum system and thereby control the behavior of individual electron spins. To this end, they used a novel nanostructure, in which a quantum system is integrated into a nanoscale mechanical oscillator in form of a diamond cantilever.

14h

New species of rare ancient 'worm' discovered in fossil hotspot

Scientists have discovered a new species of lobopodian, an ancient relative of modern-day velvet worms, in 430 million-years-old Silurian rocks in Herefordshire, UK.

14h

A Levee That Saves One Town Could Imperil Another

Communities hit by devastating floods grapple with how to protect themselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Online dating: Aim high, keep it brief, and be patient

Researchers say that contacting people "out of your league", can be a successful online dating strategy.

14h

Elon Musk says he’s ‘considering taking Tesla private’

Tesla CEO Elon Musk shocked the markets on Tuesday with a series of tweets outlining the mercurial entrepreneur’s desire to take the company private. Read More

14h

The debate over people’s pathway into the Americas heats up

Defenders of an ice-free inland passage for early Americans make their case.

14h

Trilobites: Something Digs Intricate Tunnels in Garnets. Is It Alive?

The deep red gems have long been found marred with internal markings. Researchers propose a new explanation involving fungal microorganisms who have found a nice place to live.

14h

Researchers say high seas fisheries play limited role in feeding the world

According to a recent study undertaken by a team of fisheries and social scientists from Dalhousie University, New York University, and National Geographic, fishing fleets operating outside of national waters contribute less than 3% to the world's seafood supply. This finding goes against the common assertion that high seas fisheries are important for food security.

14h

'Citizen science' yields updated predicted distributions for rare species

Online "citizen science" data initiatives may be able to help map the distribution of rare species in the wild, according to a study published August 8 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Yifu Wang of McGill University and colleagues.

14h

Models may help reduce bycatch from longline fishing

Hundreds of thousands of sharks, sea birds and other marine species are accidentally killed each year after they become snagged or entangled in longline fishing gear.

14h

Tiny tunnels inside garnets appear to be the result of boring microorganisms

Complex systems of microscopic tunnels found inside garnet crystals from Thailand are most likely the result of microorganisms making their homes inside these minerals, according to a study published August 8, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Magnus Ivarsson of the University of Southern Denmark and colleagues.

14h

Out of your league? Study shows most online daters seek more desirable mates

The notion that an attractive person is "out of your league" doesn't often dissuade dating hopefuls—at least online. In fact, the majority of online daters seek out partners who are more desirable than themselves, suggests a new large-scale analysis published in Science Advances.

14h

Study illuminates genes behind beautiful 'glow' of Bermuda fireworms

A new study led by researchers at the American Museum of Natural History looks at the genes behind an incredible, luminous seasonal mating display produced by swarms of bioluminescent marine Bermuda fireworms. The new research, published today in the journal PLOS ONE, confirms that the enzymes responsible for the fireworms' glow are unique among bioluminescent animals and entirely unlike those see

14h

Why our devices make the sounds they make

Technology Every click, clack, and whoosh serves a specific purpose. Every beep and boop our devices make was produced by a team of user experience designers, software and hardware engineers, and sound designers.

14h

New discovery sheds light on proteins critical in mood and behavior disorders

Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center have found new evidence of how certain transport proteins are working at the molecular level, paving the way for new, improved drugs to treat psychiatric disorders.

14h

Chemists discover how blue light from digital devices speeds blindness

Blue light from digital devices and the sun transforms vital molecules in the eye's retina into cell killers, according to optical chemistry research.

14h

QIAGEN: Human Gene Mutation Database

One-click access to a gene-variant database

14h

Global dimming may mitigate warming, but could hurt crop yields

Injecting a veil of tiny particles into the atmosphere might reduce global warming, but it could also lower crop yields.

15h

Volatile visionary: Tesla's Musk divides Wall Street

"Boring bonehead questions are not cool. Next?" Tesla chief Elon Musk complained in May, shortly before shutting down questions from Wall Street.

15h

Tying down electrons with nanoribbons

Nanoribbons are promising topological materials displaying novel electronic properties. UC Berkeley chemists and physicists have found a way to join two different types of nanoribbon to create a topological insulator that confines single electrons to the junction between them. Alternating nanoribbon types create a chain of interacting electrons that act as metals, insulators or interacting spins –

15h

Blocking sunlight to cool Earth won't reduce crop damage from global warming

Proposals to inject sulfate aerosols into the upper atmosphere to block and scatter sunlight and reduce global temperatures could, some say, also increase crop yields because of reduced heat stress on plants. A UC Berkeley study shows that other effects counterbalance the positive effects of reduced heat stress. Specifically, blocking sunlight reduces photosynthesis, which offsets any improvement

15h

There and back again: Mantle xenon has a story to tell

Volatiles — such as water, carbon dioxide and the noble gases — come out of the earth's interior through volcanism and may be injected into the mantle from the atmosphere, a pair of processes called mantle degassing and regassing. The exchange controls the habitability of the planet. This transport could not have begun much before 2.5 billion years ago, according to new research that also establ

15h

Hotter temperatures extend growing season for peatland plants

A study published today in Nature revealed that turning up the heat accelerates spring greening in mature trees, shrubs and mosses and delays fall color change. The research team used direct observation and digital repeat photography to measure plant greenness over three years at the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Changing Environments study, a unique ecosystem-scale experiment constructed an

15h

Scientists develop a way to monitor cellular decision making

Scientists have designed a way to monitor cellular decision making by measuring the rate of RNA change over time. The method quantifies changes in various RNA markers — the molecular footprints of a cell's past and present and an indicator of its future, providing clues about what the cell is trying to become.

15h

Cancer cells send out 'drones' to battle immune system from afar

Checkpoint inhibitor therapies have made metastatic melanoma and other cancers a survivable condition for 20 to 30 percent of treated patients, but clinicians have had very limited ways of knowing which patients will respond. Researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism by which tumors suppress the immune system. Their findings also usher in the possibility that a straightforward blood test could

15h

Introducing the latest in textiles: Soft hardware

MIT researchers have incorporated electronic devices into soft fabrics, potentially making it possible to produce clothing that communicates optically with other devices.

15h

Stanford scientists tie specific brain circuit to sociability in mice

Social behavior in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder normalized when investigators triggered the release of a specific signaling substance, serotonin, in a single part of the animals' brains, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

15h

To understand working memory, scientists must resolve this debate

'Dual Perspectives' debate tackles key questions about working memory such as, how we hold and juggle multiple pieces of information in mind.

15h

Patreon Makes a Move as Tech Giants Encroach on Its Territory

Patreon’s acquisition of Memberful comes a few months after YouTube and Facebook started rolling out similar subscription services to creators.

15h

Vermont city employs goats to get rid of poison ivy

Vermont's capital city is trying a natural way to get rid of poison ivy—grazing goats.

15h

Reflecting sun's rays would cause crops to fail, scientists warn

Research shows geoengineering method intended to combat climate change would have adverse effect on agriculture Proposals to combat climate change by reflecting the sun’s rays back into space would cause widespread crop failure, cancelling out any benefits to farming from the reduction in warming, according to new research. By examining the effects of volcanic eruptions on agriculture – which has

15h

Scientists map a complicated ballet performed in our cells

For years, scientists have looked at human chromosomes, and the DNA they carried, poring over the genetic code that makes up every cell for clues about everything from our eye color to congenital diseases. In a new study, however, scientists have demonstrated the movement of chromosomes within cells also may play a role in human traits and health.

15h

A ‘Generationally Perpetuated’ Pattern: Daughters Do More Chores

They also earn less allowance, suggesting that the gender inequality in pay begins at home, and early in life. But there are signs the gap is narrowing.

15h

Bizarre Rogue 'Planet' with Incredible Auroras Puzzles Scientists

A rogue, planet-size object 20 light-years away from Earth has stunned astronomers with its incredibly powerful magnetic field.

15h

Scientists Take a Harder Look at Genetic Engineering of Human Embryos

A year ago, a cell biologist announced that he had successfully used Crispr to edit human embryos for the first time in the US—but plenty of scientists didn't buy it.

15h

How Engineering the Climate Could Mess With Our Food

Scientists look at the eruptions of Mount Pinatubo and El Chichón to give us a glimpse at how geoengineering might affect a critical global system: agriculture.

15h

US scientist who edited human embryos with CRISPR responds to critics

Can we safely fix the DNA of human embryos in a lab dish?

15h

New antibody analysis accelerates rational vaccine design

"We can now watch antibody responses evolve almost in real time," says Lars Hangartner, Ph.D., a Scripps Research associate professor.

15h

Surviving large carnivores have far-reaching impact

Anywhere large-bodied mammalian carnivore species are present, other, smaller carnivores are less likely to occur, according to an international team of researchers that conducted the first global assessment of carnivore interactions using camera trap data.

15h

There and back again: Mantle xenon has a story to tell

The Earth has been through a lot of changes in its 4.5 billion year history, including a shift to start incorporating and retaining volatile compounds from the atmosphere in the mantle before spewing them out again through volcanic eruptions.

15h

Geoengineering: Blocking sunlight to cool Earth won't reduce crop damage from global warming

Injecting particles into the atmosphere to cool the planet and counter the warming effects of climate change would do nothing to offset the crop damage from rising global temperatures, according to a new analysis by University of California, Berkeley, researchers.

15h

'Topological' graphene nanoribbons trap electrons for new quantum materials

Scientists are experimenting with narrow strips of graphene, called nanoribbons, in hopes of making cool new electronic devices, but University of California, Berkeley scientists have discovered another possible role for them: as nanoscale electron traps with potential applications in quantum computers.

15h

Hotter temperatures extend growing season for peatland plants

A futuristic experiment simulating warmer environmental conditions has shown that peatland vegetation responds to higher temperatures with an earlier and longer growth period. A study published today in Nature revealed that turning up the heat accelerates spring greening in mature trees, shrubs and mosses and delays fall color change.

15h

Scientists develop a way to monitor cellular decision making

The healthy function, or disease-fueling dysfunction, of any given organ stems from the behavior, or misbehavior, of the individual cells that make up that organ.

15h

Will Dimming the Sun Cool the Planet and Help Crops?

Solar geoengineering would ease heat stress, but also block vital sunlight for plants — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

NASA sees Debby transitioned into a tropical storm

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean and looked at cloud top temperatures in Debby, revealing the storm had transitioned from subtropical to tropical.

15h

The Ohio Results Point to Democratic Strength in 2018—And a Showdown in 2020

The results in Ohio’s special House election Tuesday night reinforced the electoral trends that have driven American politics since Donald Trump’s election—and underscored the precarious political trade the president is imposing on his party. The Republican Troy Balderson’s slim advantage over the Democrat Danny O’Connor in a district Republicans have held without much drama since the 1980s reaff

16h

Mæt af sociale medier: Snapchat taber millioner af brugere

Vi er ved at være trætte af den ekstreme brug af sociale medier, siger analytiker.

16h

Star-Swallowing Black Holes Reveal Secrets in Exotic Light Shows

Black holes, befitting their name and general vibe, are hard to find and harder to study. You can eavesdrop on small ones from the gravitational waves that echo through space when they collide — but that technique is new, and still rare. You can produce laborious maps of stars flitting around the black hole at the center of the Milky Way or nearby galaxies. Or you can watch them gulp down gas clo

16h

Learning to ask older adults better questions about their memory

Healthcare providers and researchers rely on screening questions to detect patients who may be at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and other aging-related problems, but how these questions are worded may be confusing or trigger emotional responses. According to Penn State researchers, this may result in patients who answer the same questions differently, and for different reasons.

16h

Disaster relief: How can AI improve humanitarian assistance?

The unique topic of artificial intelligence (AI) for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HA/DR) was in the spotlight last week, as leading minds from academia, industry and the federal government met to discuss how modern technology can help victims of disasters around the globe.

16h

Research tip: Caregivers lack medications, knowledge to manage Baltimore children's asthma

In a new study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that fewer than half of interviewed caregivers for Baltimore preschool children with asthma were prepared to administer medication for routine management or emergency response to a child's chronic condition.

16h

Mom still matters, UCLA psychologists report

If you're a parent who feels your college-age children would choose their friends over you, a new UCLA psychology study has a reassuring message: You're probably underestimating their loyalty to you. The psychologists demonstrated for the first time that when forced to make a decision that benefits either a parent or a close friend, young adults are more likely to choose the parent.

16h

Hand-sanitizer resistant bacteria strains are developing

How worried should we be about bacteria with an alcohol tolerance? Be afraid, be very afraid. Read More

16h

The EPA Is Making It Easier to Use Asbestos Again. Why Is It Dangerous?

Asbestos may be making a comeback, thanks to new moves from the EPA. Here's why it was banned in the first place.

16h

Being middle-aged is like taking a warm bath – if you remember not to care | Zoe Williams

I turned 45 this week, but I have no intention of ‘acting my age’. In this respect, my latest birthday was just like all the others The middle-aged have pulled off an almighty swizz on the world: 40 is no longer old and only a really old person would remark upon your advancing age, while 50 is a fait accompli; of course you are middle-aged and if anyone wanted to mention it they should have done

16h

The Truth Sometimes Hurts

We scientists need help to communicate in a post-truth world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

The Umov Effect: Space dust clouds and the mysteries of the universe

FEFU scientists are developing a methodology to calculate the ratio of dust and gas in comas and tails of comets. This will help learn more about the history of the Solar System and its development, as well as understand the processes that took part on different stages of universal evolution.

16h

Pennsylvania's youth more accepting of marijuana, but not using it more, report shows

A report by the Pennsylvania State Epidemiological Outcomes Workgroup, which is chaired by a Drexel University professor, found that attitudes toward marijuana became more of its use in recent years as the state legalized it for medical usage.

16h

New law may force small businesses to reveal data practices

A Rhode Island software company that sells primarily to businesses is nonetheless making sure it complies with a strict California law about consumers' privacy.

16h

Print and probe—how 3-D printers could improve access to technologies essential for scientific discovery

3-D printers can make just about anything these days, from a pair of running shoes to chocolate, wood, and aircraft parts. And it turns out—even complex scientific gadgets used in cancer research.

16h

Your Brain Contains Magnetic Particles, and Scientists Want to Know Why

Researchers explore magnetism in human brains deep inside a remote forest.

17h

Surviving large carnivores have far-reaching impact

Anywhere large-bodied mammalian carnivore species are present, other, smaller carnivores are less likely to occur, according to an international team of researchers that conducted the first global assessment of carnivore interactions using camera trap data.

17h

Is your lung cancer really ROS1-negative?

CU Cancer Center study shows that three common laboratory tests used to determine ROS1 status may return false-negative results, meaning that some patients who could benefit from ROS1-directed therapy may be slipping through the cracks.

17h

NASA sees Debby transitioned into a tropical storm

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean and looked at cloud top temperatures in Debby, revealing the storm had transitioned from subtropical to tropical.

17h

New NYUAD research finds 3D printers offer alternate method to create microfluidic probes

Biomedical engineers at NYU Abu Dhabi are using 3D printers to create new technologies that may help biologists make important discoveries pertaining to cancer research.

17h

Battling 18 blazes, California may face worst fire season

The largest wildfire ever recorded in California needed just 11 days to blacken an area nearly the size of Los Angeles—and it's only one of many enormous blazes that could make this the worst fire season in state history.

17h

Tesla board says it will evaluate Musk proposal to go private

Tesla's board of directors said Wednesday it will evaluate chief executive Elon Musk's proposal to take the electric car maker private.

17h

How to Make Students Care About Writing

Editor’s Note: In the next five years, most of America’s most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just five years leading a classroom. The Atlantic ’s “On Teaching” project is crisscrossing the country to talk to vete

17h

Tornadoes on the East Coast May Be a Sign of Things to Come

Is climate change making tornadoes more common in places where they once were infrequent?

17h

Expedition probes ocean's smallest organisms for climate answers

Satellite images of phytoplankton blooms on the surface of the ocean often dazzle with their diverse colors, shades and shapes. But phytoplankton are more than just nature's watercolors: They play a key role in Earth's climate by removing heat-trapping carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through photosynthesis.

17h

My host is my castle—bats as hosts

Despite researchers having little fondness for them, a large fraction of the world's biodiversity consists of parasites. Natural populations of organisms are often strongly affected by factors of their environment, most notably the effect of predators. Yet, the most outstanding arms race, produced by millions of years of coevolution, is seen between parasites and their hosts. Bats, the second-most

17h

Compounds in 'monster' radish could help tame cardiovascular disease

Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that compounds found in the Sakurajima Daikon, or "monster," radish could help protect coronary blood vessels and potentially prevent heart disease and stroke. The finding could lead to the

17h

A new earless pygmy toad discovered on one of Angola's most underexplored mountains

A new species of African pygmy toad was discovered during an expedition in 2016 to Angola's second highest peak, the Serra da Neve Inselberg.

17h

EPA could change how it calculates the financial effects of regulations

The way that the Environmental Protections Agency determines the costs and benefits of regulations is under scrutiny and could soon change, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

17h

Top 43 reasons why men remain single—according to Reddit

In the past, forced or arranged marriages meant that socially inept, unattractive men did not have to acquire social skills in order to find a long-term love interest. Today, men must be able to turn on the charm if they want to find a partner. Those men who have difficulty flirting, or are unable to impress the opposite sex may remain single because their social skills have not evolved to meet to

17h

Taming defects in nanoporous materials to put them to a good use

The word "defect" universally evokes some negative, undesirable feature, but researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University have a different opinion: in the realm of nanoporous materials, defects can be put to a good use, if one knows how to tame them.

17h

Drug makes rats less likely to imbibe alcohol

Alcohol use disorders can have devastating effects on a person's health, relationships and finances. Yet for some, the feeling they get when taking a drink temporarily outweighs these other concerns. Now, researchers have developed a new drug that could dampen alcohol's effects on the brain's "reward system," causing rats to self-administer the beverage less frequently. They report their results i

17h

The value of seagrass in securing a sustainable planet

Researchers believe that improving knowledge of how seagrasses are important for biodiversity, fisheries and our global carbon cycle in turn needs to be reflected with greater protection for these sensitive habitats.

17h

My host is my castle

Bat flies have been studied in a variety of contexts, including host associations and specificity, how bat ecology and roosting biology affects parasitism, and how fly morphology functions to allow coexistence of species on bat individuals and populations. Laboulbeniales associated with bat flies have been recently rediscovered. Studies since 2015 have revealed many new hosts, host associations, a

17h

Expedition probes ocean's smallest organisms for climate answers

In August a team of scientists is sailing 200 miles to the northeastern Pacific Ocean with advanced robotics and other instruments on a month-long quest to investigate plankton and their impact on the carbon cycle.

17h

Was brief dermatologist intervention associated with patient behavior, satisfaction?

A short intervention by dermatologists to assess patients' risk of sun exposure, discuss their motivations and barriers regarding sun protection, and offer advice on sun protection options was associated with better sun protection behavior reported by patients and more satisfaction communicating with their dermatologist.

17h

Is parental belief in importance of religion associated with lower risk of suicidal behavior in kids?

Parents' belief in the importance of religion was associated with a lower risk for suicidal behavior by their children regardless of a child's own belief about the importance of religion and other known risk factors such as parental depression, suicidal behavior and divorce.

17h

Carbon dioxide levels on flight deck affect airline pilot performance

Commercial airline pilots were significantly better at performing advanced maneuvers in a flight simulator when carbon dioxide levels on the flight deck were 700 ppm and 1500 ppm than when they were 2,500 ppm, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. School of Public Health. The study indicates that CO2 levels directly affect pilots' flight performance.

17h

Human microbiome influences rotavirus vaccine response

In a proof-of-concept study in healthy adult men, scientists in the Netherlands found that microbiome manipulation with antibiotics influenced response to oral rotavirus vaccine. They found higher levels of viral shedding in those receiving antibiotic treatment prior to vaccination compared with controls receiving no antibiotic treatment prior to vaccination. The study demonstrates that altering t

17h

NIH researchers discover highly infectious vehicle for virus transmission among humans

Researchers have found that a group of viruses that cause severe stomach illness — including the one famous for widespread outbreaks on cruise ships — get transmitted to humans through membrane-cloaked 'virus clusters' that exacerbate the spread and severity of disease. Previously, it was believed that these viruses only spread through individual virus particles. The discovery of these clusters,

17h

All the battles being waged against fossil fuel infrastructure are following a single strategy

The activists holding a growing number of protests against oil pipelines and other fossil fuel infrastructure projects from coast to coast are winning some courtroom victories.

17h

How parched states like California fight wildfires

Environment You can battle a record-breaking blaze even while trying to conserve water. Twin blazes sparked almost two weeks ago in Northern California have flared into the Mendocino Complex Fire, largest wildfire the Golden State has seen in past 100…

17h

Portable solar energy system powers rural development

Photovoltaic energy is a clean, renewable and economical source of energy that can help reduce consumption of fossil fuels to mitigate global warming. It provides energy off-grid to remote communities with no electricity or as part of a hybrid energy generation system.

17h

New weathering analysis accurately traces the geochemical flux beneath the Earth's surface

Weathering, by which rock becomes soil, has implications for the Earth's climate, metal ore management, pollution detection and food production. Using a new isotope method, the IsoNose project successfully followed the journey of chemical elements from rock to plants.

17h

New species of rare ancient 'worm' discovered in fossil hotspot

Scientists have discovered a new species of lobopodian, an ancient relative of modern-day velvet worms, in 430 million-years-old Silurian rocks in Herefordshire, U.K.

17h

We researched Russian trolls and figured out exactly how they neutralise certain news

Russian "troll factories" have been making headlines for some time. First, as the Kremlin's digital guardians in the Russian blogosphere. Then, as subversive cyber-squads meddling with US elections.

17h

Why stealthy viruses are making you ill

Newly discovered trick used by viruses makes them more dangerous.

17h

Automated vehicles will create a shift in workforce demands

Despite concerns that a rise in automated vehicles, or AVs, will displace significant numbers of truck drivers in the United States, only a modest number of truck driver jobs, if any, will be affected, according to a new report commissioned by the American Center for Mobility, led by Michigan State University and supported by Texas A&M Transportation Institute.

17h

New study predicts warming climate will drive thousands to ER for heat illness

The heat is rising. As California battles another round of wildfires, and 2018 continues toward becoming one of the hottest years on record, a new study predicts that in the coming decades the United States' heat problem will grow more dangerous and expensive.

17h

Unique pollen signatures in Australian honey could help tackle a counterfeit industry

Australian honey, produced from domesticated European honey bees mostly foraging in native vegetation, is unique. Under the microscope, most Australian honey samples can be distinguished from honey produced in other countries.

17h

When temperatures rise, so do crime rates: evidence from South Africa

Over the past few decades there has been a growing worldwide interest in examining the relationship between weather and various types of crime. Most research in this area has however produced inconsistent and often paradoxical results. For example, some studies have found no seasonal fluctuations in crime. Others have however found an increase in crimes during either the colder winter months or wa

17h

Rotavirus Vaccine's Success Influenced By Gut Microbes

Antibiotics boost men's responses to the oral rotavirus vaccine.

17h

An Unsatisfying End to the Buzziest Part of Paul Manafort’s Trial

ALEXANDRIA , Va.—The air in the courtroom had gone stale by early afternoon. It was day six of Paul Manafort’s trial, the first grand event launched by Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. The mood had been buoyant and expectant at the start of Tuesday. With people gathering outside the courthouse as early as 6:30 a.m., some women—private citizens—took it upon themselves to police a lo

17h

Nasty stomach viruses can travel in packs

Contained clusters of rotavirus and norovirus caused more severe infections in mice than the same viruses working solo.

17h

Drug identified that could reverse pulmonary arterial hypertension

Scientists identify a safe drug that for the first time could treat — and possibly reverse — the thickening of lung artery walls in pulmonary arterial hypertension; clinical trial is expected in 2019.

17h

Earth now and 2.5 billion years ago: New study of air helps understanding both

An international collaboration of USTC and UCSD revealed surprising information about both the origins of life on Earth and modern sources of air pollution in China from sulfur isotope.

17h

Improvements in offshore wind turbine support structures to help tackle climate change impact

Scientists are conducting large-scale hydraulic experiments to better adapt to consequences of global warming.

17h

Astroethics and Cosmocentrism

As astronomers forge ahead in their search for alien life, the ethical questions a discovery would raise are becoming more urgent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Slow Down, Reader

submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]

17h

How business cycles damage learning

New research finds doing both well is particularly difficult when firms operate in cycles, an environment that is more common than we realize.

17h

For songbird conservation, it's not the size that matters

University of Manitoba researchers have published new findings that can help us save grassland birds, whose populations have declined more severely than species of any other Canadian ecosystem.

17h

Academic probation, public praise both improve performance, study finds

College students who receive dean's list recognition and those put on academic probation both improve their academic performance in subsequent semesters, according to a working paper by Georgia State University economist Nicholas Wright.

17h

New Compact Refrigerators Designed for Secure and Sustainable Clinical Storage

A new series of compact refrigerators has been specifically developed to address the need of clinical laboratories and patient care facilities for cold storage equipment that enable secure and energy-efficient storage of vaccines, medicines, lab kits and breast milk, while offering quiet operation and a small footprint.

17h

New Canadian radio telescope is detecting fast radio bursts

Since they were first detected in 2007, fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been a source of mystery to astronomers. In radio astronomy, this phenomenon refers to transient radio pulses coming from distant sources that typically last a few milliseconds on average. Despite the detection of dozens of events since 2007, scientists are still not sure what causes them – though theories range from exploding s

17h

Turning your health data into a "wellness score" might not be good for you

Cameras watch us almost everywhere we go. We know the internet tracks our searches and purchases, and our smartphones can be used to monitor our activities too. As sociologist David Lyon points out, "this is a culture of surveillance."

17h

Astronomers report the most distant radio galaxy ever discovered

After nearly 20 years, the record of the most distant radio galaxy ever discovered has been broken. A team led by Ph.D. student Aayush Saxena (Leiden Observatory, the Netherlands) has found a radio galaxy from a time when the universe was only 7 percent of its current age, at a distance of 12 billion light-years.

17h

What elephants' unique brain structures suggest about their mental abilities

Conservationists have designated August 12 as World Elephant Day to raise awareness about conserving these majestic animals. Elephants have many engaging features, from their incredibly dexterous trunks to their memory abilities and complex social lives.

17h

New 25 ml divided reservoir offers lowest dead volume on the market

INTEGRA has expanded its Clear Advantage™ product family to include a divided reservoir, offering 5 and 10 ml volumes side-by-side, while still nesting comfortably in the company’s standard 25 ml reusable, sturdy base. A combination of design and innovation offers a pipetting experience with less reagent and plastic waste, and the lowest dead volume on the market.

18h

Protected areas could help boost Brazil's national economy, study finds

Brazil's protected areas (Pas) such as the Amazon and Caatinga are known globally for the incredible biodiversity treasures they hold. In 2016, there were approximately 17 million visitors in Brazilian protected areas and according to a new study published this week, greater investment in the environmental management of these areas could help yield even more economic gains for the country.

18h

China Just Tested a Hypersonic Weapon That Could Launch Nukes at 6 Times the Speed of Sound

The successful launch puts China "shoulder to shoulder" with the U.S. and Russia in the hypersonic nuke race.

18h

The Wisconsin Governor’s Race Might Be Decided by Education

Voters think about a lot of things at the polls: immigration, the economy, health care, gun policy, and—more cynically—party affiliation. But education is an issue that doesn’t typically poll near the top of the list, even though it’s often thought of as a bedrock of society. Tony Evers, Wisconsin’s public-schools chief, and the most likely Democratic candidate to take on Governor Scott Walker in

18h

A new earless pygmy toad discovered on one of Angola's most underexplored mountains

Due to many years of conflict, the biodiversity of Angola remains one of the least known in Africa. Recently, scientists from Angola, Portugal, and the United States conducted a series of field expeditions to document this country's amphibian and reptile species. One newly discovered species is a pygmy toad from the isolated Serra da Neve, the second highest peak in Angola. It differs from all clo

18h

Compounds in 'monster' radish could help tame cardiovascular disease

Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that compounds found in the Sakurajima Daikon, or 'monster,' radish could help protect coronary blood vessels and potentially prevent heart disease and stroke. The finding could lead to the

18h

Hybridization boosts evolution

International collaboration between researchers from the University of Konstanz, the University of Graz, Graz University of Technology and Florida State University sheds new light on animal speciation.

18h

How P. juliflora shrub roots scavenge and immobilize arsenic from toxic mine tailings

Working in collaboration with scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers at the University of Arizona have identified details of how certain plants scavenge and accumulate pollutants in contaminated soil. Their work revealed that plant roots effectively "lock up" toxic arsenic found loose in mine tailings—piles

18h

Graphene enters the stratosphere

The Centre for Advanced Two-Dimensional Materials (CA2DM) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has teamed up with US-based aerospace company Boreal Space to test the properties of graphene after it has been launched into the stratosphere. The results could provide insights into how graphene could be used for space and satellite technologies.

18h

Balloon-borne telescope looks for cosmic gamma rays

Cosmic gamma rays can provide us with important insights into high-energy phenomena in our universe. The GRAINE (Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) collaboration aims to record high-energy cosmic gamma rays at a high-resolution using a balloon-borne nuclear emulsion telescope. In April 2018 the team successfully completed another balloon flight test.

18h

Well-being of 'left behind' children in Kyrgyzstan focus of study

Growing up can be hard no matter what a family's circumstances, but it is often more so for children living in the Kyrgyz Republic in Central Asia, one of the poorest countries in the world, known for its dry environment, high mountains, nomadic culture and animal-husbandry heritage.

18h

Early mediation leads to better outcomes, study says

A new study from researchers at Singapore Management University (SMU) has identified three crucial factors that influence the likelihood of a case being settled through mediation. According to the study, to be published in the Spring 2018 issue of the Harvard Negotiation Law Review, the courts should consider the timing of referral, the stage of litigation and the level of contentiousness between

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Regionsrådsformand efter besøg på supersygehus: Bedre natkøling og solafskærmning burde være nok mod varmen

Varme sengeafsnit på supersygehus skal løses ved justeringer på solafskærmning og natkøling, siger regionsrådsformand for Region Midtjylland.

18h

Energiens organisationer efterlyser handling frem for snak

Politikerne har ikke handlet på størsteparten af de anbefalinger, et vækstteam for energi og klima kom med i 2013. Nu skal en ny gruppe erhvervsledere så igen komme med gode råd.

18h

Venture capitalists' reputations take a hit when publicly listed companies they once endorsed fail, study says

An initial public offering (IPO) is usually seen as the start of a company's independence from its venture capitalist (VC) backers. But new research published in the Academy of Management Journal suggests that even after companies have been listed on the stock exchange, their failures can still negatively impact the reputations of VCs that once endorsed them.

18h

Good news for fishermen—'browning' impacts fish less than expected

Water color is getting darker in lakes across the planet. This phenomenon, known as "browning," was anticipated to cause widespread declines in fish populations. A new study by researchers from Umeå University finds that the number of fish populations impacted by browning is smaller than previously believed.

18h

World's fastest creature may also be one of the smallest

Ask most people to identify the fastest animal on Earth and they'll suggest a cheetah, falcon or even a sailfish. To that list of speedy animals, Georgia Institute of Technology assistant professor Saad Bhamla would like to add the Spirostomum ambiguum, a tiny single-celled protozoan that achieves blazing-fast acceleration while contracting its worm-like body.

18h

NASA reveals the latest winning ideas for buildings on Mars

NASA announced the five winners of the latest phase of its 3D-Printing Habitat Competition for designing the structures to be used by humans on Mars. Read More

18h

Harmful bacteria thrived in post-Hurricane Harvey floodwaters

Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017, bringing more than 50 inches of rain and extreme flooding to the city of Houston. In addition to wreaking havoc on buildings and infrastructure, urban floodwaters harbor hidden menaces in the form of bacteria that can cause disease. Now, researchers have surveyed the microbes that lurked in Houston floodwaters, both inside and outside of

18h

Screening women veterans with fibromyalgia for childhood abuse may improve treatment

A new study has shown that women Veterans being treated for fibromyalgia exhibit high rates of childhood abuse.

18h

Scientists create biodegradable, paper-based biobatteries

The batteries of the future may be made out of paper. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York have created a biodegradable, paper-based battery that is more efficient than previously possible.

18h

Drug makes rats less likely to imbibe alcohol

Alcohol use disorders can have devastating effects on a person's health, relationships and finances. Yet for some, the feeling they get when taking a drink temporarily outweighs these other concerns. Now, researchers have developed a new drug that could dampen alcohol's effects on the brain's "reward system," causing rats to self-administer the beverage less frequently. They report their results i

18h

World record: Fastest 3-D tomographic images at BESSY II

An HZB team has developed an ingenious precision rotary table at the EDDI beamline at BESSY II and combined it with particularly fast optics. This enabled them to document the formation of pores in grains of metal during foaming processes at 25 tomographic images per second — a world record.

18h

A fatal helicopter crash exposes the complexities—and risks—of influencer marketing

Aviation There are federal guidelines for social media brand ambassadors—but several responding to five deaths didn't get the memo. As the public descended on FlyNYON’s social media feeds—seeking information and refunds—something disturbing unfolded on Instagram. The company’s paid influencers began…

18h

Digestibility of grain milling and oilseed co-products determined in young pigs

Co-products from the grain milling and oilseed industries are sometimes included in diets for pigs, but limited data exist on the digestibility of protein in these ingredients when fed to younger pigs. Research at the University of Illinois is giving producers more information about the feeding value of grain and oilseed co-products fed to young growing pigs.

18h

Where do crows go in winter?

'Partial migration' — where some individuals within a population migrate and some don't — is common among birds, but scientists know very little about how it actually works. A new study tracks where American Crows go during the winter and shows that while individuals are consistent in whether they migrate or stay put, partial migration might give them enough flexibility to adapt to changing envi

18h

How to trigger innate fear response?

There are two types of fear: learned versus innate. The latter is known to be induced without any prior experience and is thus naturally encoded in the brain. A research team has now identified the brain circuit responsible for regulating the innate fear response.

18h

Hidden signs in cancer tissue

When scientists analyzed huge amounts of genetic cancer data, they found previously unresearched molecular changes. These could help in developing new personalized cancer treatments.

18h

Good news for fishermen: Browning impacts fish less than expected

Water color is getting darker in lakes across the planet. This phenomenon, known as 'browning,' was anticipated to cause widespread declines in fish populations. A new study finds that the number of fish populations impacted by browning is smaller than previously believed.

18h

Hijacking hormones for plant growth

Hormones designed in the lab through a technique combining chemistry, biology, and engineering might be used to manipulate plant growth in numerous ways, according to a new study.

18h

Pathways Ebola virus uses to enter cells

A new study is shedding light on the role of specific proteins that trigger a mechanism allowing Ebola virus to enter cells to establish replication.

18h

California Wildfires Rage in Astronaut Photos from the Space Station

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station have taken dramatic new photos of the fires that are blackening huge swaths of the Golden State and throwing off smoke that billows far to the east.

18h

Roaming-regning får EU-Kommissionen til at vende på en tallerken

Kommissionen siger nu, at det er helt i orden, når de danske selskaber har hævet deres priser, samtidig med at roaming i EU blev gratis. Kommissionen mener ikke, at prisstigningerne har noget med roaming-forordningen at gøre. Branchen selv er uenige.

18h

New species of rare ancient 'worm' discovered in fossil hotspot

Scientists have discovered a new species of lobopodian, an ancient relative of modern-day velvet worms, in 430 million-years-old Silurian rocks in Herefordshire, UK.

18h

Taming defects in nanoporous materials to put them to a good use

Modification of defective nanoporous materials has unique effects on their properties. Swansea University scientists are seeking to master this method to make new materials to capture CO2.

18h

Scientists reduced the weight of optics for satellite observation by 100 times

IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing (IEEE) published the article of the group of scientists of Samara National Research University. It describes the work on the creation and use of ultralight diffraction optics for obtaining high-resolution images.

18h

Balloon-borne telescope looks for cosmic gamma rays

Cosmic gamma rays can provide us with important insights into the high-energy phenomena in our universe. The GRAINE (Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) collaboration aims to high resolution record high-energy cosmic gamma rays using a balloon-borne nuclear emulsion telescope. In April 2018 the team successfully completed another balloon flight test.

18h

Top 43 reasons why men remain single — according to Reddit

In the past, forced or arranged marriages meant that socially inept, unattractive men did not have to acquire social skills in order to find a long-term love interest. Today, men must be able to turn on the charm if they want to find a partner. Those men who have difficulty flirting, or are unable to impress the opposite sex may remain single because their social skills have not evolved to meet to

18h

NTU and Harvard scientists discover fat-blocking effect of nanofibers

Tiny balls of nano-sized cellulose fibers added to food reduced fat absorption by up to half in laboratory and animal experiments, report scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Harvard University, United States.

18h

DF vil nedlægge regionerne

Regionerne skal nedlægges i en ny sundhedsreform. Det mener formand for DF Kristian Thulesen Dahl, som ønsker at genopfinde nærheden i det danske sundhedsvæsen.

18h

The Tight-Lipped Drivers Steering Tokyo's Taxis

Oleg Tolstoy photographed the men and women who suit up to ferry passengers around Shibuya and Shinjuku.

18h

Half-degree less warming can avoid precipitation extremes

Just a half-degree Celsius could make a major difference when it comes to global warming, according to a new paper published by a collaborative research team based in China.

18h

Humanity confronts a defining question: How will AI change us?

What will happen when we've built machines as intelligent as us? According to the experts this incredible feat will be achieved in the year 2062 – a mere 44 years away – which certainly begs the question: what will the world, our jobs, the economy, politics, war, and everyday life and death, look like then?

18h

Site-specific technology aids nematode control when cotton fields turn to soybeans

Thousands of acres of soybeans in eastern Arkansas are under attack from a tiny pest against which they have little or no natural defenses, said John Rupe, professor of plant pathology for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture.

18h

Tailoring a large area pseudo-magnetic field in graphene on a crystal with different symmetry

National University of Singapore researchers have discovered a simple and effective method to produce a large area pseudo-magnetic field (PMF) on graphene, and demonstrated how it can be tuned with desired spatial distribution and intensity for data storage and logic applications ("Tailoring sample-wide pseudo-magnetic fields on a graphene-black phosphorus heterostructure").

18h

Matchmaking for sweet potato? It's complicated

Field history matters when trying to apply the optimal amount of nitrogen for sweet potato crops. Cover crops grown in the same plots prior to sweet potato crops affected how much nitrogen was needed.

18h

Lost Norse of Greenland fueled the medieval ivory trade, ancient walrus DNA suggests

New DNA analysis reveals that, before their mysterious disappearance, the Norse colonies of Greenland had a 'near monopoly' on Europe's walrus ivory supply. An overreliance on this trade may have contributed to Norse Greenland's collapse when the medieval market declined.

18h

Getting more out of microbes—studying Shewanella in microgravity

While cities, towns, and spaceships operated entirely from energy generated by microbial sources are still the stuff of science fiction, scientific knowledge needed for such a future can build from studies like the latest microbial investigation to arrive at the International Space Station. An experiment called Investigating the Physiology and Fitness of an Exoelectrogenic Organism under Micrograv

18h

World of change: Columbia Glacier, Alaska

The Columbia Glacier descends from an ice field 10,000 feet (3,050 meters) above sea level, down the flanks of the Chugach Mountains, and into a narrow inlet that leads into Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska. It is one of the most rapidly changing glaciers in the world. Changes to the Columbia Glacier were tracked over more than 30 years using data from Landsat 4, 5, 7, and 8 data.

18h

Obesity in kindergarten doesn’t necessarily stick

One-third of US children with obesity in kindergarten have a lower weight status at least once through childhood, research finds. The findings also show that 22 percent of these kids experience persistent remission of obesity—getting to and maintaining a lower weight status—by 8th grade. Katherine Bauer, assistant professor in the nutritional sciences department of the University of Michigan Scho

18h

Metallic foams could soak up sound in high pressure, high temperature environments such as jet engines

Superalloy foams could make ship and aircraft engines much quieter, new research suggests.

18h

Archaeologists found traces of submerged Stone Age settlement in Southeast Finland

A prehistoric settlement submerged under Lake Kuolimojarvi provides researchers with a clearer picture of the human occupation in South Karelia during the Mesolithic and Early Neolithic Stone Age (about 10,000—6,000 years ago) and opens up a new research path in Finnish archaeology.

18h

Novel approach to coherent control of a three-level quantum system

For the first time, researchers were able to study quantum interference in a three-level quantum system and thereby control the behavior of individual electron spins. To this end, they used a novel nanostructure, in which a quantum system is integrated into a nanoscale mechanical oscillator in form of a diamond cantilever. Nature Physics has published the study that was conducted at the University

19h

Machine learning could predict medication response in patients with complex mood disorders

In a collaborative study by Lawson Health Research Institute, The Mind Research Network and Brainnetome Center, researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm that analyzes brain scans to better classify illness in patients with a complex mood disorder and help predict their response to medication.

19h

For the first time, scientists are putting extinct mammals on the map

Researchers from Aarhus University and University of Gothenburg have produced the most comprehensive family tree and atlas of mammals to date, connecting all living and recently extinct mammal species (nearly 6,000 in total) and overturning many previous ideas about global patterns of biodiversity. The atlas shows where species occur today as well as where they would occur, if they had not been dr

19h

Good news for fishermen: Browning impacts fish less than expected

Water color is getting darker in lakes across the planet. This phenomenon, known as 'browning,' was anticipated to cause widespread declines in fish populations. A new study by researchers from Umeå University, Sweden, finds that the number of fish populations impacted by browning is smaller than previously believed.

19h

The value of seagrass in securing a sustainable planet

Researchers believe that improving knowledge of how seagrasses are important for biodiversity, fisheries and our global carbon cycle in turn needs to be reflected with greater protection for these sensitive habitats.

19h

Surfing bacteria reveal new insights into the ocean's health

Australian scientists have recorded more than 175,000 tiny microbes dwelling in our ocean waters for the first time, providing an unprecedented baseline against which to measure the effects of climate change and human activities.

19h

Scientists tag bass in bid to explain falling stock numbers

Marine scientists at the University of Plymouth have embarked on an ambitious project to tag juvenile bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) in a bid to explain why populations are dwindling.

19h

Ready for its day in the sun—the SWEAP investigation

When NASA's Parker Solar Probe launches into space from the Kennedy Space Center, it will begin its journey to the Sun, our nearest star. The Parker Solar Probe will travel almost 90 million miles and eventually enter through the Sun's outer atmosphere to encounter a dangerous environment of intense heat and solar radiation. During this harrowing journey, it will fly closer to the Sun than any oth

19h

Nanostructured gate dielectric boosts stability of organic thin-film transistors

A nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and simultaneously protects the organic semiconductor – which had previously been vulnerable to damage fr

19h

Nordsjællands Hospital finder direktør til at udvikle sundhedsløsninger

Lisbeth Juhl Christensen er ansat som direktør på nyt lab på Nordsjællands Hospital, der skal udvikle fremtidens sundhedsløsninger frem mod det nye superhospital i Nordsjælland.

19h

Dansk hedebølge medvirker til 250 flere dødsfald end ventet

De varme temperaturer denne sommer har medført en øget dødelighed i Danmark, viser tal fra Statens Serum Institut. Det gælder især blandt ældre.

19h

Is Your Gut Making You Depressed or Anxious?

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen goes straight for the gut with three surprising mind-gut connections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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I Don’t Believe in Aliens Anymore

Ever since the Renaissance, the sciences have dealt human beings a steady stream of humiliations. The Copernican revolution dismantled the idea that humanity stood at the center of the universe. A cascade of discoveries from the late-18th to the early-20th century showed that humanity was a lot less significant than some had imagined. The revelation of the geological timescale stacked millions an

19h

Hidden signs in cancer tissue

When scientists at ETH Zurich analysed huge amounts of genetic cancer data, they found previously unresearched molecular changes. These could help in developing new personalised cancer treatments.

19h

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers using big data to predict immunotherapy responses

In the age of Big Data, cancer researchers are discovering new ways to monitor the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments.

19h

Where do crows go in winter?

'Partial migration' — where some individuals within a population migrate and some don't — is common among birds, but scientists know very little about how it actually works. A new study tracks where American crows go during the winter and shows that while individuals are consistent in whether they migrate or stay put, partial migration might give them enough flexibility to adapt to changing envi

19h

How to trigger innate fear response?

There are two types of fear: learned versus innate. The latter is known to be induced without any prior experience and is thus naturally encoded in the brain. A research team under Professor Jin-Hee Han in the Department of Biological Sciences identified the brain circuit responsible for regulating the innate fear response.

19h

Nature’s ‘time machine’ reveals clues to mysterious star blast

A prolonged stellar brawl among three rowdy sibling stars may have triggered a mysterious eruption by the brightest known star in our galaxy, according to new research. About 170 years ago, the blast unleashed almost as much energy as a standard supernova explosion. Yet, Eta Carinae—a star that’s part of a system 7,500 light-years away inside the Carina nebula, a vast star-forming region seen in

19h

How to Become an American Bullfighter

Jump into the ring with Tim Kennedy as heads to Texas to learn about the ridiculously dangerous job of the American bullfighter. Joined by Champion bullfighter Rob Smets, find out exactly what it takes to make a 1,500 pound bull your enemy. Stream Full Episodes of Hard to Kill: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/hard-to-kill/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Fac

19h

The Weird Reason Roman Emperors Were Assassinated

Ancient Rome was a dangerous place to be an emperor. During its more than 500-year run, about 20 percent of Rome's 82 emperors were assassinated while in power. So, what led to their downfalls?

19h

Short orbital-period binary star detected at the heart of the planetary nebula M 3-1

European astronomers have discovered a new binary star at the center of the planetary nebula M 3-1. The newly found binary has an extraordinary short orbital period of slightly more than three hours, which makes it one of the shortest orbital-period binary central stars known to date. The detection is detailed in a paper published July 30 on arXiv.org.

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Where do crows go in winter?

"Partial migration"—where some individuals within a population migrate and some don't—is common among birds and is speculated to be a step on the evolutionary path to complete, long-distance migration, but scientists know very little about how it actually works. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances tracks where American Crows go during the winter and shows that while individuals are c

19h

Politiet: Fatal plejecenterbrand opstod i sofa. Brandårsagen er uopklaret

Politiets teknikere er kommet frem til, at fredagens brand på Plejecenter Farsøhthus i Allingåbro opstod i en sofa. Men brandårsagen er stadig et mysterium.

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When Bots Teach Themselves to Cheat

Even with logical parameters, AI programs can develop shortcuts and workarounds that humans didn’t think to deem off-­limits.

19h

Anki’s New Home Robot, Vector, Sure Is Cute. But Can It Survive?

It’s charming, it’s (relatively) smart, and it’s mobile. The question is: Can Vector succeed where other home robots have failed?

19h

Researchers find seed coats could lead to strong, tough, yet flexible materials

Inspired by elements found in nature, researchers at the University of New Hampshire say the puzzle-like wavy structure of the delicate seed coat, found in plants like succulents and some grasses, could hold the secret to creating new smart materials strong enough to be used in items like body armor, screens, and airplane panels.

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Army's new 3-D printed shape-shifting soft robots crawl, jump, grab

New 3-D printed robotic structures can squeeze in tight spaces like a crack in the wall of a cave, jump over trip wire or crawl under a vehicle—all complex Army-relevant functions impossible for humans to perform safely.

19h

IKEA-Building Robot Conquers Touchy-Feely Challenge

The Swedish company’s furniture has become something of a benchmark for robotics engineers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Older adults who get physical can lower their heart disease risk

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. The results from increased physical activity were found to be particularly good among women.

19h

Elliptical elegance in glittering host of galaxies

A glittering host of galaxies populate this rich image taken with ESO's VLT Survey Telescope, a state-of-the-art 2.6-m telescope designed for surveying the sky in visible light. The features of the multitude of galaxies strewn across the image allow astronomers to uncover the most delicate details of galactic structure.

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Women and men experience different benefits from low-calorie diets

A low-calorie diet causes different metabolic effects in women than in men, a new study suggests.

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Do mothers' parenting attitudes & behaviors change with their first- and second-born?

New research reveals that mothers hold similar views and attitudes when parenting their first and second children, but their parenting behaviors with their two children differ.

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Shock treatment as Sri Lanka battles wild elephants

Sri Lanka Wednesday announced plans to substantially extend electric fencing after marauding elephants killed 375 people in the past five years and villagers retaliated by slaughtering nearly 1,200 of the beasts.

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Portugal steps up battle against spreading Algarve wildfire

Wildfires scorched a path towards more villages in Portugal's southern Algarve region Wednesday as a reprieve from the country's sweltering heatwave saw firefighters intensify their battle against the blaze menacing one of Europe's top tourist destinations.

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UNH researchers find seed coats could lead to strong, tough, yet flexible materials

Inspired by elements found in nature, researchers at the University of New Hampshire say the puzzle-like wavy structure of the delicate seed coat, found in plants like succulents and some grasses, could hold the secret to creating new smart materials strong enough to be used in items like body armor, screens, and airplane panels.

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Red-hot voyage to sun will bring us closer to our star

A red-hot voyage to the sun is going to bring us closer to our star than ever before.

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Researchers find flaw in WhatsApp

Researchers at Israeli cybersecurity firm said Wednesday they had found a flaw in WhatsApp that could allow hackers to modify and send fake messages in the popular social messaging app.

20h

Cows found to be willing to work hard to gain access to a grooming brush

A team of researchers from the University of British Columbia and Warsaw University of Life Sciences has found that dairy cows are willing to expend energy to gain access to a grooming brush. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes experiments they carried out with dairy cows and a large grooming brush and what they found.

20h

Chemists discover how blue light speeds blindness

Blue light from digital devices and the sun transforms vital molecules in the eye's retina into cell killers, according to optical chemistry research at The University of Toledo.

20h

Recording the birth of a nanoplasma

An international team of researchers has successfully recorded the birth of a nanoplasma for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes how they pulled off this feat and what they learned from it.

20h

Ny professor i hjertesygdomme ved Syddansk Universitet

Forskning i forebyggelse af hjertekarsygdomme er helt essentiel for den nyansatte professor i hjertesygdomme ved Axel Diederichsen.

20h

UToledo chemists discover how blue light speeds blindness

Blue light from digital devices and the sun transforms vital molecules in the eye's retina into cell killers, according to optical chemistry research at The University of Toledo.

20h

Anticancer drugs delivered by a new drug delivery system reduce tumor size

A joint group of researchers from Osaka University and Tokyo Institute of Technology created a drug delivery system (DDS) using a poly (ethylene glycol)-poly(lysine) block copolymer-ubenimex conjugate (PEG-b-PLys(Ube)). The use of this DDS has enabled an increase in the concentration of ubenimex in target CSCs. In addition, combined use of standard anticancer drugs significantly decreased CSCs.

20h

Proof-of-concept technique makes nanoparticles attractive for new medications

Researchers at University of Utah Health developed a proof-of-concept technology using nanoparticles that could offer a new approach for oral medications.

20h

Designer polymers on demand

When jewelers create a necklace, they control the order and number of each bead or jewel they use to form a desired pattern. It's been challenging for scientists to do the same thing when designing polymers — until now. In ACS Central Science, researchers report a new method using light and chemical reactions to control how subunits come together to form polymers with precise properties.

20h

Oral delivery of nanoparticles

Nanoparticles show great promise as diagnostic tools and drug delivery agents. The tiny particles, which scientists can modify with drugs, dyes or targeting molecules, can travel in the circulation and squeeze through small spaces into cells and tissues. But until now, most nanoparticles had to be injected into the bloodstream because they weren't absorbed well orally. Now, researchers reporting i

20h

The Unlikely Harmony Between Iggy Pop and Underworld

Their intention was to make some music for T2 , the sequel to Danny Boyle’s Trainspotting . Despite his condition of semiretiredness, Iggy Pop met Underworld, the puckish elders of British electronic music, in a room in London’s Savoy hotel. They all knew each other from the original film’s soundtrack—Iggy’s rave-up “Lust for Life” was featured near the beginning of the movie, while Underworld’s

20h

What It’s Like to Wallow in Your Own Facebook Data

Nicolas Ortega I found my way to the Download Your Information tool in late March, soon after a whistle-blower revealed that the political-consulting firm Cambridge Analytica had gathered information about tens of millions of Facebook users. The tool, which Mark Zuckerberg referenced several times in his testimony to Congress in April , is tucked away in Facebook’s account settings. It allows use

20h

Why chocolate milk is a great post-workout snack (but maybe not the best)

Health We asked experts what you should eat to get those sweet gains. In a post-workout haze, it can be hard to come up with a good snack. That means if you want to refuel properly, you’ll want to prepare in advance.

20h

Magic Leap’s headset is real, but that may not be enoughMagic Leap AR Headset RA

It’s taken years of work and billions of dollars in venture funding to build a working mixed-reality headset for developers. Now what?

20h

Machine learning: Snart kan forstyrrende baggrundsstøj være fortid for hørehæmmede

En dansk forsker har brugt machine learning til at udvikle et program til høreapparater, der er endnu bedre til at skelne mellem stemmer og støj end hidtil.

20h

You Can Learn Everything Online Except for the Things You Can't

College is like a chocolate chip cookie, and courses—online or not—are the chocolate chips.

20h

Magic Leap Is Remaking Itself as an Ordinary Company (With a Real Augmented-Reality Product)Magic Leap AR Headset RA

Over the past few years, Magic Leap's supporters have grown skeptical of the company's mythical augmented-reality product. Now that it has released a headset, the Magic Leap One Creator Edition, can it make naysayers care?

20h

Designer polymers on demand

When jewelers create a necklace, they control the order and number of each bead or jewel they use to form a desired pattern. It's been challenging for scientists to do the same thing when designing polymers—until now. In ACS Central Science, researchers report a new method using light and chemical reactions to control how subunits come together to form polymers with precise properties.

20h

Proof-of-concept technique makes nanoparticles attractive for new medications

Since the development of insulin to manage diabetes, pharmacists have longed to create an insulin pill. Past attempts have failed because insulin does not survive the harsh conditions of the gastro-intestinal (GI) system and cannot easily cross the GI wall. Researchers at University of Utah Health developed a proof-of-concept technology using nanoparticles that could offer a new approach for oral

20h

Image of the Day: Watering Hole

A new study describes an unusual water harvesting method in plants.

20h

No Benefit from Fish Oil

A new systematic review of clinical trials shows no clear benefit to consuming omega-3 fatty acids in food or supplements.

20h

German Ryanair pilots to join European strikes on Friday

Germany's Ryanair pilots will join an unprecedented wave of strikes against the no-frills carrier across Europe on Friday, escalating a row over pay and conditions at the height of the summer season.

21h

Twitter CEO defends decision not to ban Alex Jones, Infowars

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey defended his company's decision not to ban right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his "Infowars" show, as many other social media platforms have done, saying he did not break any rules.

21h

Why drunk college students go for salty, greasy food

After a night of heavy drinking, college students often get a case of the “drunchies”—drunk munchies—where only fatty, salty, unhealthy foods will do, a new study shows. “Given the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are

21h

3-Year-Old Killer Whale Is Starving, and Biologists Don't Know Why

Can an unconventional solution help save this orca's life?

21h

How NASA will shield its solar probe from crazy heat

A heat shield you can scorch with a blowtorch until it glows red on one side and still comfortably touch on the other will protect a NASA probe flying to within 4 million miles of the sun’s surface. The shield is the culmination of years of work by engineers to solve what they call the “thermal problem” of the soon-to-launch Parker Solar Probe. “Thermal problem” is a shorthand way of referring to

21h

Semiautonomous Cars Have Flaws. That's Why They Need Tests

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety tested features in cars from Tesla, BMW, Mercedes, and Volvo and found they all had issues. Here’s where safety rankings would come in handy.

21h

Lenovo Smart Display Review: Google Shows Off

Google Assistant finally gets a screen, making it an ideal kitchen companion. Our full review of the 8-inch and 10-inch models.

21h

Save Sarah Jeong! And Kevin Williamson, Quinn Norton, and Joy Reid Too

If you write polemics, you make enemies; you lose friends; you get trolled. But it’s the job.

21h

Are Japan's Part-Time Employees Working Themselves to Death?

On a sunny morning in June, a middle-aged lawyer named Yoshimasa Obayashi heard his telephone ring once, and nearly ring again, before he rushed to snatch the phone’s receiver from its cradle. It was an unexpected call, from an unknown caller, who confessed that he feared he was working himself to death. In Japan, this sentiment can be expressed using a single word: Karōshi , or “death from overw

21h

How Can We Promote Cooperation in an Uncooperative Society?

A branch of mathematics known as evolutionary graph theory has some promising answers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

First "Photos" of Ocean Carbon Molecules Hold Clues to Future Warming

The remains of tiny phytoplankton hold more carbon than all plants and animals. Will it be released? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

With BlacKkKlansman, Spike Lee Sounds the Alarm About America’s Past and Present

On August 11, 2017, about a year before the release of Spike Lee’s new film BlacKkKlansman , various white-nationalist groups gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia, to kick off their so-called Unite the Right rally. Racist demonstrators marched proudly in support of white supremacy, resulting in violence and the death of a counter-protestor . At the time, Lee was getting ready to make his next fi

22h

Data bekræfter: 'Kold' sygehus-kælder over 20 grader varm

På stue- og kælderetagerne i det nye supersygehus i Aarhus har ansatte den seneste tid oplevet kulde. Aflæsninger fra supersygehusets building mangement-system viser, at temperaturen ikke har været under 20 grader. I stedet får træk skyld for kuldeproblemerne.

22h

Individuel datakontrol beriger også virksomheder og stat

Der er mange fordele at hente for virksomheder ved at overlade datakontrollen til kunden, skriver Berit Skjernaa og Pernille Tranberg.

22h

Immigrants use little health care, subsidize care of non-immigrants: Harvard/Tufts study

A study in the International Journal of Health Services finds that immigrants use far less health care than non-immigrants, and may actually subsidize the care of US citizens. Immigrants' utilization was only one-half to two-thirds as high as that of the US-born population. Researchers concluded that immigrants effectively subsidize private and public insurance programs (such as Medicare) because

22h

Elliptical elegance

A glittering host of galaxies populate this rich image taken with ESO's VLT Survey Telescope, a state-of-the-art 2.6-m telescope designed for surveying the sky in visible light. The features of the multitude of galaxies strewn across the image allow astronomers to uncover the most delicate details of galactic structure.

22h

Pentagon vil forhindre fitness-apps i at afsløre amerikanske tropper

Amerikanske tropper har modtaget nye instrukser i, hvordan applikationer med GPS-tracking bør bruges i militære områder. Det sker, otte måneder efter GPS-tracking fra Stravas fitness-app afslørede amerikanske troppers placering.

22h

Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan bliver DMI’s tørkeindeks beregnet?

En læser undrer sig over, hvordan DMI’s tørkeindeks er blevet til. Det svarer klimatologen bag indekset på.

22h

Fire grader varmere: Pluk din egen kiwi i baghaven

Varmere og mere ekstremt vejr vil ændre landbruget i Danmark.

22h

Elliptical elegance

A glittering host of galaxies populate this rich image taken with ESO's VLT Survey Telescope, a state-of-the-art 2.6-m telescope designed for surveying the sky in visible light. The features of the multitude of galaxies strewn across the image allow astronomers to uncover the most delicate details of galactic structure.

22h

Largest haul of extrasolar planets for Japan

Forty-four planets in solar systems beyond our own have been discovered in one go, dwarfing the usual number of confirmations from extrasolar surveys, which is typically a dozen or less. The findings will improve existing models of solar systems, and may help researchers investigate exoplanet atmospheres. Novel techniques developed to validate the find could accelerate the confirmation of more ext

23h

Matematisk model forudsiger skader på fodboldspillere

Italienske forskere har i samarbejde med bl.a. FC Barcelona udviklet en simpel model, der med høj præcision kan bruges til at forhindre overanstrengelsesskader på fodboldspillere.

23h

Half a degree less warming can avoid precipitation extremes

The scientists found that by reducing the global warming limit by 0.5°C, a significant number of extreme precipitation events and their impacts could be avoided.

23h

Older adults who get physical can lower their heart disease risk

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. The results from increased physical activity were found to be particularly good among women.

23h

For Berlin, Invasive Crustaceans Are A Tough Catch And A Tough Sell

Louisiana crawfish have invaded waterways in Germany's capital. Wildlife officials licensed a fisherman to catch them for chefs, hoping a taste for "Berlin Lobster" might control the invasive species. (Image credit: Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

23h

Cybersikkerhedschef: Password på op til 64 tegn kan være nødvendige

Kravet om komplekse passwords, regelmæssig udskiftning og sikring har faktisk vist sig ikke at have den ønskede effekt, hvilket kræver nye anbefalinger, der gør op med den nuværende best practice, lyder det fra DKCert-chef Henrik Larsen.

23h

Jurors mull 'day of reckoning' in Roundup cancer trial

The lawyer for a California groundskeeper dying of cancer urged jurors Tuesday to make Monsanto pay hundreds of millions of dollars for failing to warn about the health risks of weed killer Roundup.

23h

Ford celebrates 10 millionth Mustang while banking on car's draw

The Ford Mustang—an iconic American brand and a symbol of cool—will reach a major milestone Wednesday as the 10 millionth vehicle rolls off an assembly line at a Detroit-area plant.

23h

Canadian start-up seeks French testing ground for hyperloop train

A Canadian company hoping to build what it bills as the future of public transportation will seek permits this week to set up a testing centre in central France for developing super-fast "hyperloop" trains.

1d

Tesla CEO drops latest bombshell with $72B buyout proposal

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is gearing up to lead a buyout of the electric car maker in a stunning move that would end the maverick company's eight-year history trading on the stock market.

1d

Elektriske racerbiler bliver opladet med glycerin

Formula-E-løbserien anvender en alternativ opladningsmetode, som ophavsmanden erklærer er et mindre mirakel. Dieselgeneratorer med glycerin som brændstof leverer strøm til de lynhurtige biler.

1d

Samsung plans $22 billion for artificial intelligence, autos

Samsung Electronics plans to spend $22 billion over the next three years on artificial intelligence, auto components and other future businesses as the company maps out its strategy under the restored leadership of Vice Chairman Lee Jae-yong after he was freed from prison.

1d

Twitter chief defends not booting Infowars

Twitter chief Jack Dorsey defended Tuesday his company's decision to allow far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones to use the platform to spread his message, saying he hasn't broken user rules.

1d

Despair as crippling drought hammers Australian farmers

A crippling drought is ravaging vast tracts of Australia's pastoral heartlands, decimating herds and putting desperate farmers under intense financial and emotional strain, with little relief in sight.

1d

Strong typhoon churns towards Japan

A powerful typhoon was churning towards Japan on Wednesday, prompting the weather agency to warn of heavy rain and strong winds and forcing airlines to cancel scores of flights.

1d

State-owned China Tower trades flat on Hong Kong debut

State-owned China Tower—the world's largest operator of telecommunications towers—made its trading debut in Hong Kong Wednesday in the latest high-profile listing in the city.

1d

NASA poised to launch first Sun-skimming spaceship

NASA is poised to launch a $1.5 billion spacecraft on a brutally hot journey toward the Sun, offering scientists the closest-ever view of our strange and mysterious star.

1d

Corncob ethanol may help cut China's greenhouse gas emissions

A new Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining study has found that using ethanol from corncobs for energy production may help reduce greenhouse gas emissions in China, if used instead of starch-based ethanol.

1d

Hijacking hormones for plant growth

Hormones designed in the lab through a technique combining chemistry, biology, and engineering might be used to manipulate plant growth in numerous ways, according to a New Phytologist study.

1d

Matchmaking for sweet potato? It's complicated

Some relationships can be complicated. Take the one between sweet potato crops and soil nitrogen, for example.

1d

Kom med på rundtur i Danmarks største datacenter

Vi har været på besøg i Apples Datacenter ved Viborg: det bliver enormt, kommer til at behandle data for hele Europa, og er prestigeprojekt for den nuværende regering. Men mange tekiniske fakta vil Apple ikke oplyse.

1d

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?

submitted by /u/everwonderedyt [link] [comments]

1d

Landbruget er ramt af tørkekrise: Hvad skal vi så dyrke?

Høsten slår fejl for flere landmænd på grund af tørken. Det kræver en gentænkning af de danske afgrøder, mener landbrugsekspert.

1d

Matchmaking for sweet potato? It's complicated

Field history matters when trying to apply the optimal amount of nitrogen for sweet potato crops. Cover crops grown in the same plots prior to sweet potato crops affected how much nitrogen was needed.

1d

New research pinpoints pathways Ebola virus uses to enter cells

A new study at Texas Biomedical Research Institute is shedding light on the role of specific proteins that trigger a mechanism allowing Ebola virus to enter cells to establish replication.

1d

Eye conditions provide new lens screening for Alzheimer's disease

A study of 3,877 randomly selected patients found a significant link between three degenerative eye diseases — age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma — and Alzheimer' disease.

1d

Hijacking hormones for plant growth

Hormones designed in the lab through a technique combining chemistry, biology, and engineering might be used to manipulate plant growth in numerous ways, according to a New Phytologist study.

1d

Corncob ethanol may help cut China's greenhouse gas emissions

A new Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining study has found that using ethanol from corncobs for energy production may help reduce greenhouse gas emissions in China, if used instead of starch-based ethanol.

1d

Do mothers' parenting attitudes & behaviors change with their first- and second-born?

New research reveals that mothers hold similar views and attitudes when parenting their first and second children, but their parenting behaviors with their two children differ.

1d

Military sexual assault linked to PTSD and depression in LGB veterans

In a Journal of Traumatic Stress study of military veterans, lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) veterans were twice as likely to have experienced sexual assault while in the military compared with non-LGB veterans. In addition, the experience of military sexual assault was directly linked to the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among LGB veterans.

1d

Study examines for risk factors associated with initiation of substance use

Not all individuals who initiate use of a substance such as nicotine, alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine eventually develop a substance use disorder, indicating that the risk factors for substance use and for substance use disorder (SUD) differ to some extent. A new study has evaluated the overlap in risk factors for substance initiation and SUD, which may be useful for developing interventions to red

1d

Can community exercise prevent bone loss from weight loss in older adults?

In a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of older adults with obesity who were cutting calories, an intervention that incorporated resistance training, aerobic training, or neither did not prevent bone loss associated with active weight loss. The study's results suggested that resistance training may help minimize long-term hip bone loss, however.

1d

Can manipulating gut microbes improve cardiac function in patients with heart failure?

A clinical study called the GutHeart Trial is poised to examine the potential relationship between the bacterial composition of the gut and inflammatory and metabolic pathways in the cardiovascular system

1d

Can medical marijuana help treat intractable epilepsy?

A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology review examines the potential of medicinal cannabis — or medical marijuana — for helping patients with intractable epilepsy, in which seizures fail to come under control with standard anticonvulsant treatment.

1d

Women and men experience different benefits from low-calorie diets

A low-calorie diet causes different metabolic effects in women than in men, a new Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism study suggests.

1d

Parents' smoking and depression linked to increased ADHD risk in children

A new study has identified adults' smoking and depression as family environmental factors associated with the development of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.The findings, which are published in Asia Pacific Psychiatry, come from an analysis of information on 23,561 children in Korea.

1d

Dental care may benefit patients scheduled for cancer surgery

Preoperative oral care by a dentist may help reduce postoperative complications in patients who undergo cancer surgery, according to a new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study.

1d

Holding law enforcement accountable for electronic surveillance

AUDIT is a cryptographic system aimed at improving government accountability for surveillance while still maintaining enough confidentiality for police to do their jobs.AUDIT involves a public ledger in which officials share information about data requests through so-called 'cryptographic commitments.' If the courts decide to release the data they requested, the public can be assured that the corr

1d

Ohio's Special Election Is a Blue-Wave Red Alert

Republicans look poised to eke out a victory in the last major congressional bellwether before the November midterm elections. But a razor-thin margin in a suburban Ohio district the GOP has held comfortably for decades confirms that the party’s grip on control of Congress is shaky. Troy Balderson, a Republican state legislator who secured a late push from Donald Trump, appeared to hold off the D

1d

Ændring i produktionsproces kan have gjort vigtig medicin kræftfremkaldende

Et uønsket stof, muligvis fra et opløsningsmiddel, er havnet i en række blodtrykspræparater, som nu er trukket tilbage fra markedet. Det kan føre til ændringer i analysemetoderne.

1d

Injection of vasoactive intestinal peptide into the eye improves corneal transplant survival

A new study reports for the first time that injection of neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) directly into the eye of mice enhanced corneal graft survival.

1d

Former Congresswoman, HHS Secretary Margaret Heckler Dies

Appointed by Ronald Reagan, Heckler led the agency from 1983 to 1985, and helped promote research into AIDS.

1d

Altered images: New research shows that what we see is distorted by what we expect to see

New research led by the University of Plymouth shows that humans 'see' the actions of others not quite as they really are, but slightly distorted by their expectations.

1d

Aboard the ISS, researchers investigate complex dust behavior in plasmas

400 kilometers above Earth, researchers examined waves in complex plasma under microgravity conditions and found that the microparticles behaved in nonuniform ways in the presence of varying electrical fields. They report some of the first findings from the Plasma-Kristall 4 experiment.

1d

Unwise opioids for wisdom teeth: Study shows link to long-term use in teens and young adults

Getting wisdom teeth removed may be a rite of passage for many teens and young adults, but the opioid painkiller prescriptions that many receive could set them on a path to long-term opioid use, a new study finds. Young people ages 13 to 30 who filled an opioid prescription immediately before or after they had their wisdom teeth out were nearly 2.7 times as likely as peers to still be filling opio

1d

Hawaii Volcano Quiets After Months-Long Eruption

Over more than three months, lava from Kilauea inundated two seaside communities and reshaped the island's southeast coast. But while activity has lessened, it doesn't mean the eruption has ended. (Image credit: U.S. Geological Survey/AP)

1d

Catch-up HPV vaccine effective for women aged up to 20 years, US study suggests

US study confirms effectiveness of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in women aged up to 20 years who receive all three doses, but more research is needed in women aged 21-26 years.

1d

ADHD medications: Of all available drugs, methylphenidate should be first option for short-term treatment in children

Study includes 133 double-blind randomized controlled trials with data from more than 14,000 children and adolescents and 10,000 adults.

1d

Likelihood of dementia higher among black ethnic groups

Rates of dementia diagnosis are higher among black ethnic groups compared to white and Asian groups in the UK, a new UCL-led study has found.

1d

Lost Norse of Greenland fueled the medieval ivory trade, ancient walrus DNA suggests

New DNA analysis reveals that, before their mysterious disappearance, the Norse colonies of Greenland had a 'near monopoly' on Europe's walrus ivory supply. An overreliance on this trade may have contributed to Norse Greenland's collapse when the medieval market declined.

1d

Genetic 'toolkit' helps periwinkles gain advantage on the seashore

Periwinkles, struggling to survive the seashore battleground, have developed a genetic 'toolkit' to help them adapt to different environments, a new study shows.

1d

How Alexa could be better at responding to toddlers

A new study shows that children often respond to voice-activated technologies by treating the device, such as Alexa, Siri, or Google Assistant, as a conversation partner. The study suggests that devices could be more responsive to children by prompting and filling in gaps in communication. For such popular household technology, that’s a missed opportunity to reach every member of the family, the

1d

Artificial intelligence can now help write Wikipedia pages for overlooked scientists

Technology The tech could be used to increase the representation of women scientists on Wikipedia AI does the research and writes the first draft for you.

1d

Of Course Twitter Loves Elon Musk

Back in 2010, when the most controversial question about Twitter was whether it was too frivolous , the CEO at the time, Evan Williams, said , “We’re just realizing the promise of the Internet—the democratizing of information. Anyone can share something with the world with little barrier, and that’s a really big deal.” This was an uncontroversial point at the time, one that would soon become a fa

1d

Women need more realistic data on egg-freezing success, say experts

Clinics should release information on pregnancy rates based on age, says the RCOG Women who opt to freeze their eggs need to be made aware of how realistic their chances of pregnancy are, experts have warned, as more turn to the procedure. Egg freezing in the UK is funded by the NHS for girls and women for medical reasons, such as undergoing cancer treatments. However, women can elect to freeze t

1d

Wrist sensor is like a Fitbit that monitors your blood

A new wristband with a wireless connection to smartphones could offer a better way to monitor personal health and environmental exposure. The researchers describe the technology, which companies that make watches and other wearable devices to monitor heart rates and physical activity could incorporate into their products, in the journal Microsystems & Nanoengineering . “It’s like a Fitbit but has

1d

Alabama Beachgoers May Have Killed Hundreds of Protected Birds

Human visitors scared away least terns, which are considered a threatened species in the state, and used their eggs to decorate the sand.

1d

Lost Norse of Greenland fueled the medieval ivory trade, ancient walrus DNA suggests

The Icelandic Sagas tell of Erik the Red: exiled for murder in the late 10th century he fled to southwest Greenland, establishing its first Norse settlement.

1d

Best for teens to avoid opioids after wisdom teeth removal

Having wisdom teeth removed may be a rite of passage for many teens and young adults, but the opioid painkiller prescriptions they receive can set them on a path to long-term opioid use, a new study finds. “…a sizable number go on to fill opioid prescriptions long after we would expect they would need [them] for recovery…” Young people ages 13 to 30 who filled an opioid prescription immediately b

1d

Teens who get funding for abortion face more barriers

Teenagers who received funding to help pay for an abortion experienced greater hardships that affected abortion access compared to adult abortion-fund patients, report researchers. Using the National Network of Abortion Fund’s (NNAF) Tiller Memorial Fund data from 2010 to 2015, Gretchen Ely, an associate professor in University at Buffalo School of Social Work found that adolescents (defined roug

1d

Short meditation boosts how students do on simple tasks

College students who listen to a 10-minute meditation tape complete simple cognitive tasks more quickly and accurately than peers who listen to a “control” recording on a generic subject, according to a new study. “…you don’t have to spend weeks practicing to see improvement…” The study shows that the benefits of a short meditation practice even extend to people who have never meditated before. “

1d

A scientific dating game: Biologists play RNA-protein matchmakers

Virtually all functions in our bodies require precise interactions between radically different types of molecules. The vast majority of the time, these encounters yield nothing, but a special few sustain life as we know it. Researchers are pursuing what differentiates a fruitful encounter from a dud. Their ultimate goal is to prevent the relationships that become toxic and result in disease.

1d

New technique for modeling turbulence in the atmosphere

Researchers have designed a computer model that more effectively calculates the behavior of atmospheric turbulence in complex environments, including cities, forests, deserts and mountainous regions.

1d

Early mediation leads to better outcomes

The sooner a case is referred to mediation the better, according to the first empirical analysis of mediation in Singapore's courts.

1d

Oregon has its share of fire storms

Oregon, one state above California, is also having its share of fire storms and weather concerns. Five large fires/complexes are alight in the southwest corner of the state and all started on the same day with a region-wide lightning storm.

1d

Science discoveries, but not false starts, appear in the news

News reports cast most scientific findings as a quest that leads to discovery, report researchers. According to their report , news stories are likely to note the process that led to the scientific finding, likely to include words such as discovery, breakthrough, and advance, and likely to mention unanswered questions or next steps. But news stories were unlikely to feature a key element in the p

1d

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Catch-up HPV vaccine effective for women aged up to 20 years, US study suggests

US study confirms effectiveness of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in women aged up to 20 years who receive all three doses, but more research is needed in women aged 21-26 years.

1d

The Lancet Psychiatry: ADHD medications: Of all available drugs, methylphenidate should be first option for short-term treatment in children

Peer-reviewed / Meta-analysis / PeopleStudy includes 133 double-blind randomised controlled trials with data from more than 14,000 children and adolescents and 10,000 adults.

1d

Strictly regulate sale of semi-automatics, accessories, and ammo, urge US trauma doctors

The sale of semi-automatic magazine-fed rifles, their booster accessories, and high volume ammunition, should be strictly regulated, to halt the 'senseless' firearms violence that plagues the United States, say trauma surgeons in their manifesto for curbing gun injury, published online in the journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open.

1d

'Rape kit' evidence released to police in less than third of cases

Even when sexual assault evidence kits, known as a 'rape kit' are available in hospitals, less than a third of those assaulted go through with the full procedure and release the forensic evidence to the police, reveals research published online in Emergency Medicine Journal.

1d

This plan to tackle sepsis in hospitals saves lives

A plan to standardize sepsis care that facilitates early recognition and prompt treatment in a cancer hospital is delivering significant benefits and saving lives, according to a new study. If the patient doesn’t receive prompt and optimal treatment for sepsis, it can lead to organ-failure and possibly death. You might know a family member or friend who arrived at hospital with the flu, a headach

1d

Ritalin-type drugs best to treat ADHD in children, shows study

Methylphenidate drugs safest and most effective while adults do better on amphetamines Ritalin and other drugs of the same class are the most effective and safest medications to prescribe for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a major scientific review. The review of ADHD drugs shows that they work, and work well, in spite of concerns among the public and

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Corn variety gets nutrients from bacteria, potentially reducing need for fertilizer

Is it possible to grow cereal crops without having to rely on energy-requiring commercial fertilizers? Researchers now describe a newly identified corn variety which acquires nitrogen — an essential nutrient for plants — by feeding its sugars to beneficial bacteria, which can in turn take up nitrogen from the air and pass it back to the plant in a usable form.

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Benzodiazepine and related drug prescriptions have increased among young people in Sweden

The prevalence rate of prescriptions for benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-related drugs (BZD) — medications used to treat anxiety, insomnia, epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric conditions — increased by 22 percent between 2006 and 2013 among individuals aged 0-24 years in Sweden, according to a new study.

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Ability to taste RNA speeds the growth and increases survival of fruit fly larvae

Fruit fly larvae can taste ribonucleosides, the building blocks of gene transcripts, according to a new study.

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Potential indicator for the early detection of dementia, Parkinson's

Researchers have discovered a factor that could support the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. This cytokine is induced by cellular stress reactions after disturbances of the mitochondria, the 'cell's power plants,' as neuropathologists write.

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Observing the mechanism of metastasis for the first time

The exact mechanisms for how broken cellular function appears in cells far removed from a cancer's primary tumor remain an area of ongoing research. Scientists have now confirmed a link between healthy-tumor hybrid cells and metastatic tumors for the first time in live animals. They discuss how they studied the distinct, heterogenous gene expression profiles found in human hybrid cells and how hyb

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Genetic factors contributing to 'strabismus' — or misaligned eyes

Researchers have discovered a key gene for generating eye movements. Using zebrafish, they developed a compelling model system to analyze the brain-eye muscle connections, and found that the brain neurons use repulsive forces mediated by a protein encoded by the protocadherin 17 gene to position properly and reach the target eye muscle. The findings potentially contribute to treatment of congenita

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The genes that turn wild animals into pets

Animals A 60-year fox study could explain how dogs got domesticated. A wise man once asked, what does the fox say? A thing or two about how canines acquiesce to domestication, apparently.

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The Atlantic Daily: Bare-Knuckle Style

What We’re Following U.S. versus Iran: Donald Trump declared on Twitter that “anyone doing business with Iran will NOT be doing business with the United States,” ratcheting up diplomatic tensions between the U.S. and European countries that have remained in the Iran deal. The tweet came a day after new American sanctions on Iran went into effect, putting heavy pressure on an economy that’s alread

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