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Nyheder2018august09

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Mini antimatter accelerator could rival the likes of the Large Hadron Collider

Researchers have found a way to accelerate antimatter in a 1000x smaller space than current accelerators, boosting the science of exotic particles.

5h

200.000 fede natsværmere invaderer Danmark: Folk forveksler dem med fugle

Naturhistorisk Museum modtager hundredevis af opkald fra danskere, der har set en kolibri. Men i virkeligheden er der tale om store natsværmere, der nyder den danske varme.

6h

Japans bilskandale ruller videre: Mazda og Suzuki erkender snyd i test

Mazda og Suzuki er de seneste af flere japanske bilproducenter til at indrømme manipulation i test af udledninger og brændstoføkonomi, efter at afsløringer hos Nissan har udløst krav om interne undersøgelser.

10h

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Trump’s Space Force aims to create ‘American dominance in space’ by 2020

Space What the heck is a Space Force? We finally (sort of) know. In an announcement at the Pentagon on Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence, introduced by Defense Secretary James Mattis, outlined the basic structure of the…

now

White House Describes Military 'Space Force,' Aims To Create It By 2020

Vice President Pence said in a speech Thursday that the Space Force, which would be the military's sixth branch, will "prepare for the next battlefield" and "a new generation of threats." (Image credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

2min

Court orders ban on harmful pesticide, says EPA violated law

A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration endangered public health by keeping the widely used pesticide chlorpyrifos (clor-PEER-i-fos) on the market despite extensive scientific evidence that even tiny levels of exposure can harm babies' brains.

5min

Omega Centauri unlikely to harbor life

Searching for life in the vast universe is an overwhelming task, but scientists can cross one place off their list.

5min

Dutch court says Ryanair pilots' strike can go ahead

A Dutch court told Ryanair pilots in the Netherlands Thursday they could join a wave of strike action planned across Europe, set to plunge thousands of passengers into summer travel misery.

5min

Kids swapping outdoor play for TV as smoke chokes California

A dull haze and the faint smell of smoke from distant blazes have blanketed many California cities for two weeks, forcing summer campers to stay inside, obscuring normally bright skylines and leaving cars covered with ash.

11min

New technology improves CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in mosquitoes, other species

A technology designed to improve CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in mosquitoes and other arthropods succeeds with a high degree of efficiency, while eliminating the need for difficult microinjection of genetic material, according to researchers.

11min

Scientists discover how to protect yeast from damage in biofuel production

Some chemicals used to speed up the breakdown of plants for production of biofuels like ethanol are poison to the yeasts that turn the plant sugars into fuel.

11min

For UW physicists, the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride is full of surprises

The general public might think of the 21st century as an era of revolutionary technological platforms, such as smartphones or social media. But for many scientists, this century is the era of another type of platform: two-dimensional materials, and their unexpected secrets.

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Why security experts hate that “blockchain voting” will be used in the midterm elections

It’s too dangerous to conduct elections over the internet, they say, and West Virginia’s new plan to put votes on a blockchain doesn’t fix that.

15min

Wearable 'microbrewery' saves human body from radiation damage

The same way that yeast yields beer and bread can help hospital lab workers better track their daily radiation exposure, enabling a faster assessment of tissue damage that could lead to cancer.

17min

Trilobites: Fossils on an Australian Beach Reveal a Shark-Eat-Shark World

An amateur fossil hunter at first found a single shark tooth. It led to signs of a prehistoric shark feast.

17min

Pence Advances Plan to Create a Space ForceMike Pence Space Force

Vice President Mike Pence gave details about President Trump’s plan to create a military force for space. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is now onboard with the plan.

17min

Scientists discover how to protect yeast from damage in biofuel production

Some chemicals used to speed up the breakdown of plants for production of biofuels like ethanol are poison to the yeasts that turn the plant sugars into fuel. Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and several Department of Energy laboratories have identified two changes to a single gene that can make the yeast tolerate the pretreatment chemicals.

20min

The “beautiful mess” effect: other people view our vulnerability more positively than we do

Psychologists have found that, while we tend to judge our own vulnerability more harshly, we perceive vulnerability in others as courage. Read More

21min

NASA's Parker Solar Probe is launching Saturday. Its mission? 'Touch' the sun.

The Parker Solar Probe is the first time a spacecraft will ever get this close to the sun. Read More

21min

7 times U.S. presidents were almost assassinated—and 4 terrible times they were

Being an American President is a powerful but dangerous job, a fact shown by many assassination attempts. Read More

21min

Images From the Lombok Island Earthquake

On the night of August 5, a 6.9-magnitude earthquake struck the Indonesian island of Lombok and nearby Bali. The northern area of Lombok was badly affected, with thousands of buildings damaged or destroyed. Indonesian authorities are still working to evacuate and shelter those in need, and have issued varying updates, but at least 250 deaths have been reported so far, many hundreds of injuries, a

22min

Pregnant women’s use of opioids is on the rise

The rate of opioid use during pregnancy more than quadrupled in 28 U.S. states, prompting physicians to call for increased screening.

23min

Lunar Exploration Tech Tops NASA's "Tipping Point" Funding List

The agency awarded a total of $44 million to multiple firms developing crucial technologies for future space exploration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24min

Astrophysicists discover that ultrahot planets have starlike atmospheres

Recent observations by NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes of ultrahot Jupiter-like planets have perplexed theorists. The spectra of these planets have suggested they have exotic—and improbable—compositions.

29min

Time saving tooling rods used on NASA's Webb Telescope sunshield

Folding and refolding bed sheets to ensure they are squared can take a lot of time. It's the same with unfurling and folding up NASA's massive James Webb Space Telescope sunshield during testing. However, engineers found a way to make this process much faster by temporarily installing small pencil-sized rods that keep the silver-colored sunshield tidy during inspection and repair.

35min

Pairs of small colliding galaxies may seed future stars

A pair of dwarf galaxies closely circling the Milky Way, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, were in the throes of merging into one when they fell into our galaxy. The duo is thought to hold enough gas to replenish half of the Milky Way's supply of star-making fuel, and now, a study in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society offers new insights into how galaxies like ours are able

35min

NASA's Parker Solar Probe is about to lift off

At 3:33 a.m. EDT on Aug. 11, while most of the U.S. is asleep, NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida will be abuzz with excitement. At that moment, NASA's Parker Solar Probe, the agency's historic mission to touch the Sun, will have its first opportunity to lift off.

35min

Terra Satellite finds Shanshan's strength sapped

NASA's Terra satellite caught an infrared view of former typhoon Shanshan off the east coast of Japan and saw the storm fading.

41min

NASA sees Hector's large eye after passing Hawaii

Hurricane Hector continued to move west through the Central Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and saw the storm's large eye that was a result of eyewall replacement.

41min

Young drinkers beware: Binge drinking may cause stroke, heart risks

Research by Mariann Piano, senior associate dean of research at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, has found that young adults who frequently binge drink were more likely to have specific cardiovascular risk factors such as higher blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar at a younger age than non-binge drinkers.

41min

For UW physicists, the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride is full of surprises

In a paper published online July 23 in the journal Nature, a UW-led research team reports that the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride can undergo 'ferroelectric switching.' Materials with ferroelectric properties can have applications in memory storage, capacitors, RFID card technologies and even medical sensors — and tungsten ditelluride is the first exfoliated 2-D material known to undergo ferroe

41min

New technology improves CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in mosquitoes, other species

A technology designed to improve CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in mosquitoes and other arthropods succeeds with a high degree of efficiency, while eliminating the need for difficult microinjection of genetic material, according to researchers.

41min

Can psychedelic drugs heal?

Many people think of psychedelics as relics from the hippie generation or something taken by ravers and music festival-goers, but they may one day be used to treat disorders ranging from social anxiety to depression, according to new research.

42min

Elon Musk: Fem gange rigmanden har skabt furore

Elon Musk var i denne uge i vælten efter at have sluppet sine vilde idéer løs på Twitter – og det er bestemt ikke første gang.

46min

Men are still more likely than women to be perceived as leaders, study finds

Women hold just 26 percent of executive-level positions in S&P 500 companies — and sadly that is no accident, according to a new study.

57min

Pairs of small colliding galaxies may seed future stars

In a new study, astronomers show how gas expelled in the merger of two small galaxies can linger across vast distances for billions of years, where it may eventually feed gas to more massive galaxies to make new stars.

57min

Ultrahot planets have starlike atmospheres

An unusual kind of star-planet hybrid atmosphere is emerging from studies of ultrahot planets orbiting close to other stars.

57min

Study: Brain proteins, patterns reveal clues to understanding epilepsy

Researchers have identified which brain proteins might be most influential in controlling neural activity associated with epilepsy and anxiety, paving the way for better prevention and treatments someday.

57min

Scientists solve open theoretical problem on electron interactions

A new discovery explains what happens during the phase transition in Dirac materials, paving the way for engineering advanced electronics that perform significantly faster.

57min

Doctors reduced opioid prescriptions after learning a patient overdosed

Doctors confronted with information about patient deaths by opioid overdose became more careful in prescribing the painkillers once they learned the risks first-hand. A new USC study published in Science shows many clinicians do not know about patient overdose deaths once they leave their care. Overcoming the disconnect by sharing news of losing a patient makes the opioid crisis more personal and

1h

Study defines spending trends among dual-eligible beneficiaries

While there has been much effort to control spending for individuals eligible for both Medicaid and Medicare in the United States, for the first time a team of Vanderbilt University health policy researchers have analyzed spending trends for this population over a multiyear period in order to gain a much clearer understanding of exactly how much is being spent and by whom.

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Elderly patients on dialysis have a high risk of dementia

Older kidney disease patients who are sick enough to require the blood-filtering treatment known as dialysis are at high risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

1h

Despite ACA, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults still have trouble affording health care

Though rates of insurance since the Affordable Care Act's implementation are similar, LGB individuals avoid or delay medical treatment more frequently than their straight peers due to cost.

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Postnatal depression: fathers can suffer similar issues to women, say experts

Calls for new fathers as well as mothers to be screened for depression after the birth of a child The mental health of new fathers is being overlooked despite evidence suggesting men might experience similar rates of depression to mothers after the birth of a child, experts have warned. It is thought at least 10% of new mothers experience postnatal depression, although charities have said figures

1h

Here’s how fast cell death can strike

Scientists have measured how quickly the signal to commit form of cellular suicide called apoptosis travels.

1h

Sending Letters About Their Patients' Overdoses Changes Doctors' Prescribing Habits

Many doctors never find out when a patient dies from an overdose. A new study shows that when find out, it can alter the way they prescribe addictive drugs. (Image credit: WILL & DENI MCINTYRE/Getty Images)

1h

Why the brain system needs sleep

Sleep is essential for brain functionality and overall health but understanding how sleep delivers its beneficial effects remains largely unknown. Sleep researchers are exploring new and unbiased approaches that can take sleep to a systems level. In one such approach, referred to as 'systems genetics', inferences about biological phenomena can be made by linking together several levels of informat

1h

Changes in gut microbiome in only one subset of helminth-infected patients

Over the last decade, it's become clearer than ever that bacteria in the human gut– collectively termed the microbiome–play a key role in health and disease. Now, researchers have shown that a subset of people with soil-transmitted helminth infections have changes to their microbiome when treated for the infection.

1h

Single transplantation of therapeutic macrophages improves rare lung disease in mice

Hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (herPAP) is a rare disease characterized by the slow build-up of lipo-protein material in the lungs due to the failure of highly specialized cells called macrophages, which usually eat away this material from the pulmonary air-space. Researchers demonstrate that a single transplantation of murine macrophages into the lungs of mice suffering from herPAP can

1h

Popular encryption software: Researchers help close security hole

Cybersecurity researchers have helped close a security vulnerability that could have allowed hackers to steal encryption keys from a popular security package by briefly listening in on unintended 'side channel' signals from smartphones.

1h

Melanoma linked with CLL, close monitoring recommended

While studying a large group of individuals with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a research team made an important discovery: these patients had a sizable 600 percent higher risk of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.

1h

Potential target for developing obesity and diabetes treatment identified

A newly published study has identified a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and diabetes. The scientists studied the biological function of an epigenetic modifier known as histone deacetylase 11 (HDAC11), and determined that deleting it in mice stimulates the formation of brown adipose tissue.

1h

Are pet owners abusing animals to get opioids?

Veterinarians in Colorado are concerned that some of their clients may have intentionally hurt their pets in the hopes of receiving prescription painkillers, according to a recent survey.

1h

Dietary carbohydrates could lead to osteoarthritis, new study finds

Researchers have found that carbohydrate composition of diets increased the risk of osteoarthritis in laboratory mice — even when the animals didn't differ in weight.

1h

Nervous system control of leg movements: Research offers insights

New research gives unexpected insights into how the nervous system controls leg movements in walking. These findings could aid in directing rehabilitation in stroke patients as well as the design of artificial, or prosthetic, legs.

1h

Estrogen may protect against depression after heart attack

Estrogen may protect against heart failure-related depression by preventing the production of inflammation-causing chemicals in the brain.

1h

Supercomputer simulations show new target in HIV-1 replication

A new study has found naturally-occurring compound inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) promotes both assembly and maturation of HIV-1. NSF-XSEDE allocations on the Stampede2 supercomputing system at the Texas Advanced Computing Center and on Anton2 at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center simulated atomistic interactions of IP6 molecule with HIV structural proteins. The research opens door for developm

1h

North American diets require more land than we have, study finds

Researchers found that if the global population followed the United States Department of Agriculture's dietary guidelines, there would not be enough land to provide the food required.

1h

New Dads May Get Postpartum Depression As Often as New Moms

New Dads May Get Postpartum Depression As Often as New Moms Growing families would benefit from a robust network of support following a baby's birth, researchers say. BabyFamily.jpg Image credits: AndreyUG via Shutterstock Human Thursday, August 9, 2018 – 15:00 Tracy Staedter, Contributor (Inside Science) — Today, at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association in San Francisc

1h

Native Tribes Are Taking Fire Control Into Their Own Hands

On July 27, the US Forest Service signed a new plan for managing public forest lands that lets tribes like the Karuk continue their tradition of controlled burns.

1h

How a Warrior-Poindexter Helped Ethiopia and Eritrea Make Peace

On June 23 in Addis Ababa, a hand grenade exploded within earshot of Abiy Ahmed Ali, Ethiopia’s newly inaugurated, widely adored prime minister. Due to either good luck or ineptitude on behalf of the assailants (likely both), Abiy emerged unscathed. Regardless, this was no way to treat a strong contender for next year’s Nobel Peace Prize: The 42-year-old premier had just ended the two-decade-long

1h

Why Paul Manafort's Trial Is Going So Fast

There is no dillydallying in the trial of Paul Manafort. Jury selection lasted but a few hours. The federal judge presiding over the case has repeatedly reminded the lawyers of his impatience and routinely interrupts their questioning of witnesses to speed them up. The most dramatic part of the trial has quickly come and gone. The whole thing could be over in three weeks, leaving plenty of time b

1h

Trilobites: Friendly Foxes’ Genes Offer Hints to How Dogs Became Domesticated

A long-running experiment provides clues to genes that influence friendliness to humans.

1h

Ebola virus experts discover powerful, new approach for future therapeutics

A one-two punch of powerful antibodies may be the best way to stop Ebola virus, reports an international team of scientists in the journal Cell.

1h

Why do some microbes live in your gut while others don't?

A new study published in the scientific journal PLOS Computational Biology led by Patrick Bradley, a postdoctoral scholar in Katherine Pollard's laboratory at the Gladstone Institutes, found a new approach to identify the genes that may be important to help microbes live successfully in the human gut.

1h

American College of Rheumatology: CMS decision an affront to America's sickest Medicare patients

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) today expressed its extreme disappointment with a new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) decision to allow Medicare Advantage (MA) plans to implement step therapy for Part B drugs and cross-manage Part B and D drug utilization.

1h

New UNH research identifies need for Title IX tune up on college campuses

A mystery shopper approach uncovered a need for more education about Title IX regulations and sexual assault on college campuses, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. In particular, there is confusion about which individuals on campus are and are not confidential resources.

1h

Wearable 'microbrewery' saves human body from radiation damage

The same way that yeast yields beer and bread can help hospital lab workers better track their daily radiation exposure, enabling a faster assessment of tissue damage that could lead to cancer.

1h

When It Comes to Sexual Harassment, Academia Is Fundamentally Broken

Why everyone should read the National Academies’ sexual harassment report — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

See how much of California has burned in the last five years

Environment It's a lot. Most of California’s hottest fires have burned since 2000—13 out of 20 total—as higher temperatures have made wildfires increasingly likely and destructive.

1h

Study: Brain proteins, patterns reveal clues to understanding epilepsy

A team of UNLV, Tufts University, and international researchers has identified which brain proteins might be most influential in controlling neural activity associated with epilepsy and anxiety, paving the way for better prevention and treatments someday.

1h

Pairs of small colliding galaxies may seed future stars

In a new study, astronomers show how gas expelled in the merger of two small galaxies can linger across vast distances for billions of years, where it may eventually feed gas to more massive galaxies to make new stars.

1h

ASU astrophysicist helps discover that ultrahot planets have starlike atmospheres

An unusual kind of star-planet hybrid atmosphere is emerging from studies of ultrahot planets orbiting close to other stars.

1h

Marine mammals lack functional gene to defend against popular pesticide

As marine mammals evolved to make water their primary habitat, they lost the ability to make a protein that defends humans and other land-dwelling mammals from the neurotoxic effects of a popular human-made pesticide. The implications of this discovery led researchers to call for monitoring our waterways to learn more about the impact of pesticides and agricultural run-off on marine mammals, such

1h

Diverse symbionts of reef corals have endured since 'age of dinosaurs'

Coral-algal partnerships have endured numerous climate change events in their long history, and at least some are likely to survive modern-day global warming as well, suggests an international team of scientists.

1h

You're only as old as you think and do

Could increasing your physical activity or feeling more in control of your life be the secret to staying young? Employing these simple strategies may help older adults feel younger and that, in turn, could help improve their cognitive abilities, longevity and overall quality of life, according to new research.

1h

Viruses can trigger psychiatric disorders, research suggests

Can viruses trigger psychiatric disorders? A new study suggests yes. Accordingly, special disorders are associated with a high rate of infection of a specific herpesvirus.

1h

New theory may explain cause of depression and improve treatments

Researchers suggest dysfunction in mitochondria — the main source of energy for cells — may be the root cause of depression. The finding brings new insight to long-held theories of the causes of depression and could lead to the development of novel and more effective antidepressant drugs.

1h

Mini antimatter accelerator could rival the likes of the Large Hadron Collider

Researchers have found a way to accelerate antimatter in a thousand-times smaller space than current accelerators, boosting the science of exotic particles.

1h

Quantum chains in graphene nanoribbons

Researchers have achieved a breakthrough that could in future be used for precise nanotransistors or — in the distant future — possibly even quantum computers, as the team reports.

1h

The Saudi-Canada Crisis Will Damage People’s Health

It’s been less than a week since Canada urged Saudi Arabia to release peaceful human-rights activists held in detention, but already the kingdom has responded with several aggressive moves. It expelled the Canadian ambassador, summoned its own ambassador back home, froze all new trade and investments with Canada, suspended flights to and from Toronto, and recalled about 16,000 Saudi students. The

1h

Former Students Allege Mistreatment of Lab Animals at Calgary

The university is carrying out a review of animal handling in the now-closed lab of neuropsychologist Vedran Lovic.

1h

How ions gather water molecules around them

Charged particles in aqueous solutions are always surrounded by a shell of water molecules. However, much is still unknown about the nature of this so-called hydration shell. Using terahertz spectroscopy, chemists have gained new insights into how an ion affects the water molecules in its environment.

1h

Researchers call for comprehensive transformation of food systems

Agriculture and food systems policies should ensure more than just the supply of food. Decision-makers must make a paradigm shift to align policies about climate, agriculture and food with the United Nation's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, according to a group of international researchers.

1h

Targeting a brain mechanism could treat aggression

Neuroscientists have identified a brain mechanism that is linked to aggression and violent behavior, potentially forming the basis for treating aggression in several psychiatric disorders.

1h

Scientists design material that can store energy like an eagle's grip

What do a flea and an eagle have in common? They can store energy in their feet without having to continuously contract their muscles to then jump high or hold on to prey. Now scientists have created materials that can store energy this way, be squeezed repeatedly without damage, and even change shape if necessary.

1h

Biomarkers link fatigue in cancer, Parkinson's

Biological markers responsible for extreme exhaustion in patients with cancer have now been linked to fatigue in those with Parkinson's disease, according to new research.

1h

Potential solutions to drug shortages and the lack of competition in generic medicines

A new article highlights the issues and recommend potential solutions. The incentives, regulations and new drug developments that the authors recommend could help to enhance competition and provide patients with reliable access to vital drugs.

1h

Inducing Labor at 39 Weeks Lowers Risk of C-Section

Pregnant woman have long been advised to "wait it out" until 41 weeks before doctors will recommend inducing labor. But a new study suggests otherwise.

1h

Trophy Heads and Mummies Discovered in Ancient Peruvian Pits

The nearly 1,500-year-old remains of at least 60 people and six trophy heads have been discovered in deep pits in Vitor Valley in southern Peru.

1h

Men are still more likely than women to be perceived as leaders, study finds

Women hold just 26 percent of executive-level positions in S&P 500 companies — and sadly that is no accident, according to a new study by researchers in the University at Buffalo School of Management.

2h

NASA's Terra Satellite finds Shanshan's strength sapped

NASA's Terra satellite caught an infrared view of former typhoon Shanshan off the east coast of Japan and saw the storm fading.

2h

NASA sees Hector's large eye after passing Hawaii

Hurricane Hector continued to move west through the Central Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and saw the storm's large eye that was a result of eyewall replacement.

2h

Recording every cell's history in real-time with evolving genetic barcodes

A new method from the Wyss Institute uses evolving genetic barcodes to actively record the process of cell division in developing mice, enabling the lineage of every cell in a mouse's body to be traced back to its single-celled origin. This approach enables scientists to pinpoint where and when different cells arise and how closely related different cell types are to each other, allowing unprecede

2h

Kidney cancer's developmental source revealed

In the first experiment of its kind, scientists have revealed the precise identity of cancer cells of the most common childhood and adult kidney cancers. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators showed the cancer cells are versions of specific healthy cells from developing or adult kidneys. Reported in Science, this study could lead to the

2h

Yale-NUS scientist and collaborators solve open theoretical problem on electron interactions

New discovery published in Science explains what happens during the phase transition in Dirac materials, paving the way for engineering advanced electronics that perform significantly faster.

2h

In apoptosis, cell death spreads through perpetuating waves, Stanford study finds

In a cell, death is akin to falling dominoes: One death-inducing molecule activates another, and so on, until the entire cell is shut down, a new Stanford study finds.

2h

Cellular self-destruction at 30 micrometers per minute

Like a wildfire spreading through a dry field, for cells, death comes in an unrelenting wave.

2h

A way to block fat from entering tissues

Scientists have identified a way in which fat is transferred into tissues, finding that altering this mechanism stopped mice from becoming obese while on a high-fat diet.

2h

Loss of a gene long ago puts marine mammals at risk today, as environments change

Ancient loss of gene function across ancestral marine mammal lineages may now be putting modern marine mammals at risk, leaving them defenseless against toxic organophosphates.

2h

Learning of a patient's fatal overdose reduces opioid prescribing

A letter from a medical examiner to a physician notifying them of a recent patient's fatal overdose due to opioids may help inspire safer prescribing habits, a new San Diego-based study says.

2h

Marine mammals lack functional gene to defend against popular pesticide

As marine mammals evolved to make water their primary habitat, they lost the ability to make a protein that defends humans and other land-dwelling mammals from the neurotoxic effects of a popular man-made pesticide. The implications of this discovery, announced today in Science, led researchers to call for monitoring our waterways to learn more about the impact of pesticides and agricultural run-o

2h

New computational strategy reveals genes that may help microbes adapt to the gut

Microbes living in a person's gut can impact their health, but it is unclear why certain microbes colonize the gut and others do not. Specific genes may help microbes live in the gut but are difficult to identify because closely related species share many genes and tend to be present in the gut together. Thus, many genes that seem associated with living in the gut do not actually influence adaptat

2h

Changes in gut microbiome in only one subset of helminth-infected patients

Over the last decade, it's become clearer than ever that bacteria in the human gut– collectively termed the microbiome–play a key role in health and disease. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that a subset of people with soil-transmitted helminth infections have changes to their microbiome when treated for the infection.

2h

Why the system needs sleep

Sleep is essential for brain functionality and overall health but understanding how sleep delivers its beneficial effects remains largely unknown. In an article publishing on Aug. 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Shanaz Diessler and Maxime Jan at the University of Lausanne and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (Switzerland), sleep researchers are exploring new and unbiased approa

2h

The Mopeds Are Coming

When King Carlos III commissioned the Puerta de Alcalá in the 1770s, the city of Madrid was already almost a thousand years old. The gate, designed in the neoclassical style popular during that era, predates more well-known triumphal arches in Europe, like the Arc de Triomphe and the Brandenburg Gate. At the time, the gate connected to the city’s medieval walls, which still regulated passage to a

2h

An Ancient Genetic Quirk Could Doom Whales Today

Over the past 50 million years, a group of small, hoofed mammals gradually evolved into today’s whales and dolphins. In the process, they gained much: a watery, planet-wide habitat and bountiful sources of food. But they lost a lot, too. Surrounded by endless blue, they became color-blind. Immersed in water, their sense of smell disappeared. And for some reason, they lost a gene called PON1. PON1

2h

A conversation between plants' daily and aging clocks

Scientists have found out how the two clocks talk to each other genetically. Plants' circadian clock — the 24-hour cyclic rhythm — plays a critical role in regulating aging, in particular in timing the yellowing of the leaves. As aging plants recycle nutrients for the new leaves and seeds, uncovering these timekeeping mechanisms is important to understand plant productivity.

2h

PSD as a molecular platform for understanding synapse formation and plasticity

Scientists employed a biochemical reconstitution approach to show that, both in solution and on supported membrane bilayers, multivalent interaction networks formed by major excitatory postsynaptic density (PSD) scaffold proteins led to formation of PSD-like assemblies via phase separation.

2h

Dogs set to benefit from simple blood test to spot liver disease

A new blood test can quickly spots early signs of liver disease in dogs, a study suggests. The test means that fewer dogs will have to undergo invasive liver biopsies.

2h

Spinning heat shield for future spacecraft

A newly developed prototype flexible heat shield for spacecraft could reduce the cost of space travel and even aid future space missions to Mars.

2h

Effective method to control algae growth on Hawaiian coral reefs

Researchers have found a management approach that combining manual removal and outplanting native urchin was effective at reducing invasive, reef smothering macroalgae by 85 percent on a coral reef off O'ahu, Hawai'i.

2h

Hacking a Brand New Mac Remotely, Right Out of the Box

Researchers found a way to compromise a Mac the first time it connects to Wi-Fi, potentially putting scores of enterprise customers at risk.

2h

Fighting ISIS and Fake Facebook Accounts with Physics

Fighting ISIS and Fake Facebook Accounts with Physics Online extremist groups emerge like curdling milk, a dynamic that may also describe how the recently disclosed fake Facebook accounts attract followers. OnlineCommunities.jpg This graphic represents an online web of extremism and hate on social media (e.g. in support of ISIS) showing how individuals ‘gel’ together around particular extremist i

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US to Launch Space Force in 2020, Pence Says

The Vice President provided more details on the Trump administration’s controversial plans to create a new space-focused military branch — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Getting serious about plant intelligence

Plant cognitive ecologist Monica Gagliano talks about the challenges facing serious scientific research into plant intelligence. Read More

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Why Elon Musk thinks human-A.I. symbiosis can thwart “evil dictator A.I.”

"We don't have to worry about some evil dictator A.I. because we are the A.I. collectively. That seems like the best outcome I can think of," says Elon Musk. Read More

2h

New York City passes law limiting number of Uber, Lyft drivers

New York City passed legislation that caps new licenses for drivers with companies like Uber and Lyft in an effort to stop the erosion of the taxi industry and to study the effects the ride-sharing industry has on the city’s economy and traffic congestion. Read More

2h

What’s in all that space between the stars? Space gloop!

The vast emptiness of space isn't really so empty: It's filled with space goop made of greasy carbon molecules. Read More

2h

Organic solar cells set 'remarkable' energy record

Cheap, flexible solar panels could become a reality as organics achieve the same power efficiency as silicon.

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A ghost gene leaves ocean mammals vulnerable to some pesticides

Manatees, dolphins and other warm-blooded marine animals can't break down organophosphates due to genetic mutations that occurred long ago.

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Popping balloons with style (video)

Orange peels contain limonene, and this chemical is the key to a party trick in which you can pop a balloon with a twist. Limonene is an exceptionally good solvent for the rubber in balloons, but some other solvents can do it too. In this video, Reactions explains why only some chemicals can burst your bubble (or balloon).

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Matter: Marine Mammals Have Lost a Gene That Now They May Desperately Need

Dolphins, manatees, sea lions, elephant seals and other animals no longer produce an enzyme that protects land mammals against harmful chemicals, including some pesticides.

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In apoptosis, cell death spreads through perpetuating waves, study finds

Inside a cell, death often occurs like the wave at a baseball game.

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Scientists solve open theoretical problem on electron interactions

Yale-NUS Associate Professor of Science (Physics) Shaffique Adam is the lead author of a recent work that describes a model for electron interaction in Dirac materials, a class of materials that includes graphene and topological insulators, solving a 65-year-old open theoretical problem in the process. The discovery will help scientists better understand electron interaction in new materials, pavi

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Why do some microbes live in your gut while others don't?

Trillions of tiny microbes and bacteria live in your gut, each with their own set of genes. These gut microbes can have both beneficial and harmful effects on your health, from protecting you against inflammation to causing life-threatening infections. To keep out pathogens yet encourage the growth of beneficial microbes, scientists have been trying to find ways to target specific microbial genes.

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Recording every cell's history in real-time with evolving genetic barcodes

All humans begin life as a single cell that divides repeatedly to form two, then four, then eight cells, all the way up to the ~26 billion cells that make up a newborn. Tracing how and when those 26 billion cells arise from one zygote is the grand challenge of developmental biology, a field that has so far only been able to capture and analyze snapshots of the development process.

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Why the system needs sleep

Sleep is essential for brain functionality and overall health but understanding how sleep delivers its beneficial effects remains largely unknown. In an article publishing on August 9 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Shanaz Diessler and Maxime Jan at the University of Lausanne and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (Switzerland), sleep researchers are exploring new and unbiased appr

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Marine mammals lack functional gene to defend against popular pesticide

As marine mammals evolved to make water their primary habitat, they lost the ability to make a protein that defends humans and other land-dwelling mammals from the neurotoxic effects of a popular man-made pesticide, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

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Health of the Hajj

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News at a glance

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Control freaks

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Turn it up

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Lateral moves

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Response

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Going through a phase

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Zipping up obesity

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A responsive past

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The role of electron-electron interactions in two-dimensional Dirac fermions

The role of electron-electron interactions in two-dimensional Dirac fermion systems remains enigmatic. Using a combination of nonperturbative numerical and analytical techniques that incorporate both the contact and long-range parts of the Coulomb interaction, we identify the two previously discussed regimes: a Gross-Neveu transition to a strongly correlated Mott insulator and a semimetallic stat

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Experimental observation of high thermal conductivity in boron arsenide

Improving the thermal management of small-scale devices requires developing materials with high thermal conductivities. The semiconductor boron arsenide (BAs) is an attractive target because of ab initio calculation indicating that single crystals have an ultrahigh thermal conductivity. We synthesized BAs single crystals without detectable defects and measured a room-temperature thermal conductiv

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High thermal conductivity in cubic boron arsenide crystals

The high density of heat generated in power electronics and optoelectronic devices is a critical bottleneck in their application. New materials with high thermal conductivity are needed to effectively dissipate heat and thereby enable enhanced performance of power controls, solid-state lighting, communication, and security systems. We report the experimental discovery of high thermal conductivity

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Unusual high thermal conductivity in boron arsenide bulk crystals

Conventional theory predicts that ultrahigh lattice thermal conductivity can only occur in crystals composed of strongly bonded light elements, and that it is limited by anharmonic three-phonon processes. We report experimental evidence that departs from these long-held criteria. We measured a local room-temperature thermal conductivity exceeding 1000 watts per meter-kelvin and an average bulk va

2h

Global extent of rivers and streams

The turbulent surfaces of rivers and streams are natural hotspots of biogeochemical exchange with the atmosphere. At the global scale, the total river-atmosphere flux of trace gasses such as carbon dioxide depends on the proportion of Earth’s surface that is covered by the fluvial network, yet the total surface area of rivers and streams is poorly constrained. We used a global database of planfor

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Opioid prescribing decreases after learning of a patients fatal overdose

Most opioid prescription deaths occur among people with common conditions for which prescribing risks outweigh benefits. General psychological insights offer an explanation: People may judge risk to be low without available personal experiences, may be less careful than expected when not observed, and may falter without an injunction from authority. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a random

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Ancient convergent losses of Paraoxonase 1 yield potential risks for modern marine mammals

Mammals diversified by colonizing drastically different environments, with each transition yielding numerous molecular changes, including losses of protein function. Though not initially deleterious, these losses could subsequently carry deleterious pleiotropic consequences. We have used phylogenetic methods to identify convergent functional losses across independent marine mammal lineages. In on

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Single-cell transcriptomes from human kidneys reveal the cellular identity of renal tumors

Messenger RNA encodes cellular function and phenotype. In the context of human cancer, it defines the identities of malignant cells and the diversity of tumor tissue. We studied 72,501 single-cell transcriptomes of human renal tumors and normal tissue from fetal, pediatric, and adult kidneys. We matched childhood Wilms tumor with specific fetal cell types, thus providing evidence for the hypothes

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Lacteal junction zippering protects against diet-induced obesity

Excess dietary lipid uptake causes obesity, a major global health problem. Enterocyte-absorbed lipids are packaged into chylomicrons, which enter the bloodstream through intestinal lymphatic vessels called lacteals. Here, we show that preventing lacteal chylomicron uptake by inducible endothelial genetic deletion of Neuropilin1 ( Nrp1 ) and Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 ( Vegfr1 ;

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A liquid phase of synapsin and lipid vesicles

Neurotransmitter-containing synaptic vesicles (SVs) form tight clusters at synapses. These clusters act as a reservoir from which SVs are drawn for exocytosis during sustained activity. Several components associated with SVs that are likely to help form such clusters have been reported, including synapsin. Here we found that synapsin can form a distinct liquid phase in an aqueous environment. Oth

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Apoptosis propagates through the cytoplasm as trigger waves

Apoptosis is an evolutionarily conserved form of programmed cell death critical for development and tissue homeostasis in animals. The apoptotic control network includes several positive feedback loops that may allow apoptosis to spread through the cytoplasm in self-regenerating trigger waves. We tested this possibility in cell-free Xenopus laevis egg extracts and observed apoptotic trigger waves

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New Products

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Comment on "Unexpected reversal of C3 versus C4 grass response to elevated CO2 during a 20-year field experiment"

Reich et al . (Reports, 20 April 2018, p. 317) assert that the responses of C 3 and C 4 grass biomass to elevated CO 2 "challenge the current C 3 -C 4 [elevated CO 2 ] paradigm," but these responses can be explained by the natural history of the experimental plants and soils without challenging this paradigm.

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Response to Comment on "Unexpected reversal of C3 versus C4 grass response to elevated CO2 during a 20-year field experiment"

Wolf and Ziska suggest that soil and species attributes can explain an unexpected 20-year reversal of C 3 -C 4 grass responses to elevated CO 2 . This is consistent with our original interpretation; however, we disagree with the assertion that such explanations somehow render our results irrelevant for questioning a long-standing paradigm of plant response to CO 2 based on C 3 -C 4 differences in

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Mapping the dark space of chemical reactions with extended nanomole synthesis and MALDI-TOF MS

Understanding the practical limitations of chemical reactions is critically important for efficiently planning the synthesis of compounds in pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and specialty chemical research and development. However, literature reports of the scope of new reactions are often cursory and biased toward successful results, severely limiting the ability to predict reaction outcomes for un

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Dissipative Kerr solitons in optical microresonators

The development of compact, chip-scale optical frequency comb sources (microcombs) based on parametric frequency conversion in microresonators has seen applications in terabit optical coherent communications, atomic clocks, ultrafast distance measurements, dual-comb spectroscopy, and the calibration of astophysical spectrometers and have enabled the creation of photonic-chip integrated frequency

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Structural basis for the recognition of Sonic Hedgehog by human Patched1

The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway involved in development and regeneration is activated by the extracellular binding of Hh to the membrane receptor Patched (Ptch). We report the structures of human Ptch1 alone and in complex with the N-terminal domain of human Sonic hedgehog (ShhN) at resolutions of 3.9 and 3.6 angstroms, respectively, as determined by cryo–electron microscopy. Ptch1 comprises two intera

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Genetic mutation underlying severe childhood brain disorder identified

Medical researchers have discovered a genetic mutation and the faulty development process it triggers, causing a debilitating brain-based disorder in children.

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Most teens do have, and use, behavioral brakes

Children who struggle with weak cognitive control at an early age are at most risk for trouble in adulthood following their engagement in risk-taking activities in adolescence, according to new research.

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Back to the future of climate change

Researchers are looking to the geologic past to make future projections about climate change. Their research focuses on the ancient Tethys Ocean (site of the present-day Mediterranean Sea) and provides a benchmark for present and future climate and ocean models.

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Viewing cancer treatment as a game to find strategies that improve patient outcomes

Game theory can be utilized to identify potential flaws in current cancer treatment approaches and suggest new strategies to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic cancer, according to a new article. The study challenges the decades old standard of treatment for metastatic cancers in which drugs are typically administered continuously at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) until the tumor progr

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Tbx6 revealed as crucial to heart and skeleton formation from stem cells

In a study of over 50 transcription factors, Tbx6 alone was able to stimulate mesoderm formation in laboratory-grown stem cells, and could cause those stem cells to become cardiovascular or musculoskeletal cells. Researchers found that this essential role of Tbx6 in mesoderm and cardiovascular specification is conserved from lower organisms to mammals. This research report validated a new direct r

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Bribing bacteria to play nicely is good for everyone

Researchers report that giving mice dietary iron supplements enabled them to survive a normally lethal bacterial infection and resulted in later generations of those bacteria being less virulent. The approach demonstrates in preclinical studies that non-antibiotic-based strategies — such as nutritional interventions — can shift the relationship between the patient and pathogens away from antagon

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Key role found for enzymes in DNA replication and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs

A new study shows that the TLK1 and TLK2 enzymes are critical for ensuring the copying of DNA. The research is based on previous studies that pointed to TLK1/2 as potential candidate targets in cancer therapy, and it provides new molecular details on their key functions in cancer cell proliferation.

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Exercise can help beat cocaine addiction, study finds

Exercise can help prevent relapses into cocaine addiction, according to new research.

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Crowdsourcing algorithms to predict epileptic seizures

A study reveals clinically relevant epileptic seizure prediction is possible in a wider range of patients than previously thought, thanks to the crowdsourcing of more than 10,000 algorithms worldwide.

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Common skin cancer can signal increased risk of other cancers

People who develop abnormally frequent cases of a skin cancer known as basal cell carcinoma appear to be at significantly increased risk for the development of other cancers, including blood, breast, colon and prostate cancers, according to a preliminary study.

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Finally, a potential new approach against KRAS-driven lung cancer

A new study shows KRAS-driven lung cancers are also marked by high levels of 'gel-forming mucins,' as seen in some forms of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. The study also pinpoints a cause of increased mucin production, namely the gene MUC5AC.

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Higher alcohol taxes are cost-effective in reducing alcohol harms

Increasing taxes on alcohol is one of the most cost-effective methods of reducing the harms caused by alcohol consumption, according to new research.

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Models may help reduce bycatch from longline fishing

Hundreds of thousands of sharks, sea birds and other marine species are accidentally killed each year after becoming snagged or entangled in longline fishing gear. New models may help reduce the threat by giving regulatory agencies a new tool to predict the month-by-month movements of longline fleets on the high seas and determine where and when by-catch risks are greatest.

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Politics this week

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Saudi Arabia Rejects Human-Rights Criticism, Then Crucifies Someone

Even as it excoriated Canada for scolding it over human rights, Saudi Arabia beheaded a man Wednesday in Mecca, then put his body on public display, for allegedly stabbing a woman to death. The method of punishment is known in Saudi Arabia as a crucifixion, which the government says is sanctioned by Islamic law, and is reserved for only the most severe crimes in the kingdom. The suspect in this c

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Killer whale still carrying dead baby after 16 days

A mother whale is still carrying her baby's body more than two weeks after it died.

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The Message of a Scorching 2018: We’re Not Prepared for Global Warming

It’s hot. But it may not be the new normal yet. Temperatures are still rising.

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The Power of Neuroscience Compels You!

[En español] Last February the Vatican announced that it was offering an exorcism training course* for priests. At first I thought it was a great way to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the release of the wonderful horror classic The Exorcist, but as it turned out, this initiative was in response to an alarming rise in […]

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Evolutionary changes in the human brain may have led to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

The same aspects of relatively recent evolutionary changes that make us prone to bad backs and impacted third molars may have generated long, noncoding stretches of DNA that predispose individuals to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other neuropsychiatric diseases. A study identifies an unusually lengthy array of tandem repeats found only within the human version of a gene governing calcium tr

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The physician's white coat: Iconic and comforting or likely covered in germs?

A new study has found that although the physicians' white coat is one of the most iconic symbols of the trade, whether or not they wear it, doesn't impact patients' satisfaction.

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New study views cancer treatment as a game to find strategies that improve patient outcomes

Game theory can be utilized to identify potential flaws in current cancer treatment approaches and suggest new strategies to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic cancer, according to a new article. The study challenges the decades old standard of treatment for metastatic cancers in which drugs are typically administered continuously at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) until the tumor progr

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More than half of drivers don't look for cyclists and pedestrians before turning right

Researchers studied the eye movements of drivers at busy Toronto intersections and found that more than half failed to make necessary scans for pedestrians or cyclists at right turns. This is the first study to date that used eye-tracking equipment to accurately assess where drivers were looking when turning at an intersection.

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Discovery could lead to better treatment for leukemia

Scientists report on how a certain mutation helps improve sensitivity to chemotherapy.

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Roles of emotional support animals examined

Airlines are not the only organizations grappling with the complexities surrounding emotional support animals. Colleges and courts are also questioning the need for these animals and the effects they may have on students and juries, respectively, according to new research.

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Inducing labor at 39 weeks decreases need for cesarean section, study finds

Inducing labor in healthy women at 39 weeks into their pregnancy reduces the need for cesarean section and is at least as safe for mother and baby as waiting for spontaneous labor. Choosing to induce could also reduce the risk that mothers will develop preeclampsia and that newborns will need respiratory support after delivery, according to a new study.

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Nordic nations, North Americans and Antipodeans rank top in navigation skills

People in Nordic countries, North America, Australia, and New Zealand have the best spatial navigational abilities, according to a new study.

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Proof-of-concept technique makes nanoparticles attractive for new medications

Researchers have developed a proof-of-concept technology using nanoparticles that could offer a new approach for oral medications.

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A Toxic Substance Has Been Found in Crayons Again

Crayons are generally an innocuous children’s product, but a consumer-advocacy group has discovered a dangerous substance in one brand. In a newly released report on 27 back-to-school products, the United States Public Interest Research Group, or PIRG, revealed that some green crayons in packs by Playskool, available at Dollar Tree, Amazon, and eBay, contained a toxic chemical with a deadly histo

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You're only as old as you think and do

Could increasing your physical activity or feeling more in control of your life be the secret to staying young? Employing these simple strategies may help older adults feel younger and that, in turn, could help improve their cognitive abilities, longevity and overall quality of life, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

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Laser ranging can 'see' 3D objects melting in fires

Researchers have used a laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system to image three-dimensional (3D) objects melting in flames. The method could offer a precise, safe and compact way to measure structures as they collapse in fires.

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The unpleasant reason men navigate better than women

Scientists show innate ability is not the explanation for men navigating better than women.

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The U.S. Sanctions Russia for Skripal Poisoning—Five Months Later

Five months after a deadly nerve agent threatened the life of a former Russian spy and his daughter in Britain, Donald Trump’s administration announced Wednesday that it will be imposing new sanctions on Russia for its alleged involvement in the attack. The announcement was made after the United States formally concluded this week that Russia’s alleged use of the Novichok nerve agent in the attem

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‘It’s Not About Sex; It’s About Power’

Oregon State Senator Sara Gelser was working on a bill related to domestic worker rights when she alleges she was sexually harassed by another member of the state legislature. In an interview at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival, Gelser described to The Atlantic how the incident was recorded on video. “Another member actually came up behind him and said very loudly, ‘Get your hands off Senator Gelser

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When the Reality of Addiction Meets the Fantasies of Pop Stardom

“What I’ve learned is that this illness is not something that disappears or fades with time,” Demi Lovato recently said in a statement after being hospitalized for a drug overdose. “It is something I must continue to overcome and have not done yet.” Read that last sentence again: It is something I must continue to overcome and have not done yet . What tense are we in? What is being said? Continue

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The physician's white coat: Iconic and comforting or likely covered in germs?

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has found that although the physicians' white coat is one of the most iconic symbols of the trade, whether or not they wear it, doesn't impact patients' satisfaction. The findings are available in the American Journal of Perinatology.

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Relaxed Fuel Standards Could Jeopardize Arizona's Air Quality

The state is opposing the Trump administration’s proposed changes over ozone pollution concerns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smartphone Voting Is Happening, but No One Knows if It's Safe

Online voting has major security flaws, and experts are concerned that Voatz, the platform West Virginia will use this midterm election, doesn't solve them.

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Space Force: Mike Pence launches plans for sixth military service

Vice-president announced plans to create force by 2020, but any proposal to create a new branch requires congressional action Mike Pence has announced plans for a new, separate US Space Force as a sixth military service by 2020. The US vice-president said the development is needed to ensure America’s dominance in space amid heightened competition and threats from China and Russia. Continue readin

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4 ud af 10 mænd har oplevet tristhed efter sex

Undersøgelse blandt 1.200 mænd viser, at 41 procent har oplevet at være nedtrykte eller irritable efter sex.

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Team uses ancient marine sediment as benchmark for present, future climate models

Researchers at Syracuse University are looking to the geologic past to make future projections about climate change.

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Need a job? Get a tattoo

Tattoos in the workplace are here to stay and may even give job candidates an advantage in competitive labor markets, according to new research from faculty at the University of Miami Business School and the University of Western Australia. Published in Human Relations, one of the Financial Times Top 50 business outlets, the study provides a much-needed update to research that showed the contrary,

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A New Pacemaker Hack Puts Malware Directly On the Device

Researchers at the Black Hat security conference will demonstrate a new pacemaker-hacking technique that can add or withhold shocks at will.

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The Spanish Ghost Towns Left By the 2008 Financial Crisis

An estimated 3.4 million homes are currently unoccupied in Spain thanks to the country's great housing bust.

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Neuroscientists get at the roots of pessimism

Neuroscientists have shown that stimulating the caudate nucleus can generate negative moods that lead to irrational decision-making. Stimulating the caudate nucleus causes animals to give far more weight to the anticipated drawback of a situation than its potential benefit.

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Drugs in development for cancer may also fight brain diseases, including ALS

A class of cancer drugs called PARP inhibitors could be useful for treating and preventing brain disorders, including ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and some forms of frontotemporal degeneration, by halting the misplacement of specific proteins that affect nerve cells.

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Nuclear gatekeeper could block undruggable prostate cancer targets

Blocking nuclear gateways that traffic cancer-promoting molecules to nucleus, could offer a new way to target aggressive cancer.

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Tiny tunnels inside garnets appear to be the result of boring microorganisms

Complex systems of microscopic tunnels found inside garnet crystals from Thailand are most likely the result of microorganisms making their homes inside these minerals, according to a new study.

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Back to the future of climate change

Researchers at Syracuse University are looking to the geologic past to make future projections about climate change. Their research focuses on the ancient Tethys Ocean (site of the present-day Mediterranean Sea) and provides a benchmark for present and future climate and ocean models.

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New study shows that most teens do have, and use, behavioral brakes

Children who struggle with weak cognitive control at an early age are at most risk for trouble in adulthood following their engagement in risk-taking activities in adolescence, according to new research.

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Genetic mutation underlying severe childhood brain disorder identified

Ashleigh Schaffer, Ph.D., assistant professor of genetics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and a team of global genetics experts have discovered a genetic mutation and the faulty development process it triggers, causing a debilitating brain-based disorder in children.

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Environmental regulations drove steep declines in US factory pollution

A new study by economists shows that between 1990 and 2008, air pollution levels plummeted. The evidence shows that environmental regulation and the associated cleanup of production processes played important roles in those steep declines. Manufacturers are producing the same types of goods, but they've taken significant steps to clean up their production processes, the authors say.

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NASA satellites assist states in estimating abundance of key wildlife species

Climate and land-use change are shrinking natural wildlife habitats around the world. Yet despite their importance to rural economies and natural ecosystems, remarkably little is known about the geographic distribution of most wild species — especially those that migrate seasonally over large areas.

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Synapses of the reward system at stake in autistic disorders

Autism spectrum disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders, one of the main characteristics of which is impaired social communication. But what happens in patients' brains that disrupts their social skills? According to scientists, a malfunction of the synaptic activity of neurons present in the reward system seems to be at stake. They established a link between a genetic mutation, a di

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Scientists squeeze nanocrystals in a liquid droplet into a solid-like state and back again

A team led by scientists found a way to make a liquid-like state behave more like a solid, and then to reverse the process.

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Cancer cells send out 'drones' to battle immune system from afar

Checkpoint inhibitor therapies have made metastatic melanoma and other cancers a survivable condition for 20 to 30 percent of treated patients, but clinicians have had very limited ways of knowing which patients will respond. Researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism by which tumors suppress the immune system. Their findings also usher in the possibility that a straightforward blood test could

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New method to monitor cellular decision making

Scientists have designed a way to monitor cellular decision making by measuring the rate of RNA change over time. The method quantifies changes in various RNA markers — the molecular footprints of a cell's past and present and an indicator of its future, providing clues about what the cell is trying to become.

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Hotter temperatures extend growing season for peatland plants

A new study reveals that turning up the heat accelerates spring greening in mature trees, shrubs and mosses and delays fall color change.

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Using big data to predict immunotherapy responses

In the age of Big Data, cancer researchers are discovering new ways to monitor the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments.

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Pence outlines plan for new Space Force by 2020Mike Pence Space Force

Faced with growing competition and threats from Russia and China, the White House on Thursday said it will create the U.S. Space Force as a sixth, separate military service by 2020.

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More than half of drivers don't look for cyclists and pedestrians before turning right, study finds

U of T Engineering researchers studied the eye movements of drivers at busy Toronto intersections and found that more than half failed to make necessary scans for pedestrians or cyclists at right turns.

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The Wonder Plant That Could Slash Fertilizer Use

For thousands of years, people from Sierra Mixe, a mountainous region in southern Mexico, have been cultivating an unusual variety of giant corn. They grow the crop on soils that are poor in nitrogen—an essential nutrient—and they barely use any additional fertilizer. And yet, their corn towers over conventional varieties, reaching heights of more than 16 feet. A team of researchers led by Alan B

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Need a job? Get a tattoo

New study out of the University of Miami Business School shows that discriminating against workers with tattoos puts hiring managers at a competitive disadvantage.

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Americans may have outgrown traditional advice of having a varied diet

When it comes to diet in the Western world of overconsumption where cheap convenience food rules, the age-old adage 'everything in moderation' has been put to the test, prompting the American Heart Association (AHA) to issue a science advisory led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

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Discovery could lead to better treatment for leukemia

Scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago report on how a certain mutation helps improve sensitivity to chemotherapy in patients in the journal JCI Insight.

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Productivity one year after brain injury

Model system researchers have examined the factors that influence productive activity one year after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

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London calling! Travelers seek 'trust' in holiday destinations

Tourists considering overseas travel 'trust' a destination like London would provide a positive experience, says new research. Consumer behavior experts investigated the effectiveness of the official tourism website, Visit London, for tourists choosing the city as a destination to explore. Their findings have implications for the travel industry in Australia and overseas amid an emerging trend to

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Carbon dioxide levels on flight deck affect airline pilot performance

Commercial airline pilots were significantly better at performing advanced maneuvers in a flight simulator when carbon dioxide levels on the flight deck were 700 ppm and 1500 ppm than when they were 2,500 ppm, according to new research. The study indicates that carbon dioxide levels directly affect pilots' flight performance.

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Scientists Discover The Secret Weapon Of Stomach Viruses

New research finds that stomach infections, like norovirus and rotavirus, have a special way to get to us hard — and fast. That knowledge could lead to new, more effective treatments. (Image credit: Dr. Gopal Murti/Science Source)

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War Zone Complicates Ebola Vaccine Rollout in Latest Outbreak

Health workers must plan vaccination effort amidst fighting in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brief Announcement: SkepDoc’s Website

Just a brief note to announce that my website, www.skepdoc.info, has been completely re-vamped. The old site was a Do-It-Yourself list of my writings with links to most of what was available online. The new site is professionally designed and has the complete text of everything I have written since I first began in 2002, more than 720 articles, including magazine articles, book chapters, […]

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An AI camera and a bigger battery: what to know about the Samsung Note9

Technology Plus “flaw detection.” The standout features are an artificial intelligence component to the camera, a bigger battery, and a beefed up S Pen stylus.

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SERSitive: New substrates make it possible to routinely detect one molecule in a million

SERS, an extremely sensitive laboratory method of analysing chemical composition, is set to become widespread decades after its invention. The main obstacle that has been slowing down the development of this promising research technique, the poor quality of the substrate on which samples are applied, is now disappearing. New substrates, guaranteeing repeatability of measurements and the appropriat

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More than half of drivers don't look for cyclists and pedestrians before turning right

U of T Engineering researchers studied the eye movements of drivers at busy Toronto intersections and found that more than half failed to make necessary scans for pedestrians or cyclists at right turns. This is the first study to date that used eye-tracking equipment to accurately assess where drivers were looking when turning at an intersection.

4h

Dark Energy May Be Incompatible With String Theory

On June 25, Timm Wrase awoke in Vienna and groggily scrolled through an online repository of newly posted physics papers. One title startled him into full consciousness. The paper , by the prominent string theorist Cumrun Vafa of Harvard University and collaborators, conjectured a simple formula dictating which kinds of universes are allowed to exist and which are forbidden, according to string t

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Samsung Galaxy Note 9: Price, Specs, Release Date

The newest version of the oversized Samsung Galaxy Note smartphone has arrived, stylus and all.

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Study helps solve mystery under Jupiter's coloured bands

Scientists from Australia and the United States have helped to solve the mystery underlying Jupiter's coloured bands in a new study on the interaction between atmospheres and magnetic fields.

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Brain tumors aren’t so rare in kids with common syndrome

The frequency of brain tumors in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a common genetic syndrome, is three times higher than what scientists had estimated. Neurologists previously estimated that only 15 to 20 percent of kids with NF1, which is characterized by birthmarks and benign nerve tumors that develop in or on the skin, develop brain tumors. Of these, the vast majority are in the op

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No early dementia in 21 past NHL, NFL players

In a new study, researchers found no evidence of early onset dementia in a small sample of retired professional hockey and football players. The new research adds important information to the body of knowledge about the cognitive and behavioral status of retired athletes who spent their careers in contact sports. “We don’t deny that CTE exists in some former athletes… The larger question is, how

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Finding the happy medium of black holes

This image shows data from a massive observing campaign that includes NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These Chandra data have provided strong evidence for the existence of so-called intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). Combined with a separate study also using Chandra data, these results may allow astronomers to better understand how the very largest black holes in the early Universe formed, a

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Nordic nations, North Americans and Antipodeans rank top in navigation skills

People in Nordic countries, North America, Australia, and New Zealand have the best spatial navigational abilities, according to a new study led by UCL and the University of East Anglia.

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New study views cancer treatment as a game to find strategies that improve patient outcomes

Game theory can be utilized to identify potential flaws in current cancer treatment approaches and suggest new strategies to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic cancer, according to a new article published online today by JAMA Oncology. The study from Moffitt Cancer Center and Maastricht University, challenges the decades old standard of treatment for metastatic cancers in which drugs are

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Only 36.5 percent of Russian companies now pursuing intensive intangible strategy

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have developed an approach towards analyzing strategies for employing intangibles. In the study, which was published in the journal Management Decision, they discovered that only 36.5 percent of Russian companies are pursuing an intensive intellectual capital strategy.

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North American diets require more land than we have: Study

University of Guelph researchers found that if the global population followed the United States Department of Agriculture's dietary guidelines, there would not be enough land to provide the food required.

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Nordic nations, North Americans and Antipodeans rank top in navigation skills

People in Nordic countries, North America, Australia, and New Zealand have the best spatial navigational abilities, according to a new study led by UCL and the University of East Anglia.

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Bribing bacteria to play nicely is good for everyone

Salk Institute researchers report that giving mice dietary iron supplements enabled them to survive a normally lethal bacterial infection and resulted in later generations of those bacteria being less virulent. The approach, which appears in the journal Cell on Aug. 9, 2018, demonstrates in preclinical studies that non-antibiotic-based strategies–such as nutritional interventions–can shift the r

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Tbx6 revealed as crucial to heart and skeleton formation from stem cells

In a study of over 50 transcription factors, Tbx6 alone was able to stimulate mesoderm formation in laboratory-grown stem cells, and could cause those stem cells to become cardiovascular or musculoskeletal cells; the University of Tsukuba-led research team found that this essential role of Tbx6 in mesoderm and cardiovascular specification is conserved from lower organisms to mammals. This research

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Drugs in development for cancer may also fight brain diseases, including ALS

A class of cancer drugs called PARP inhibitors could be useful for treating and preventing brain disorders, including ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and some forms of frontotemporal degeneration, by halting the misplacement of specific proteins that affect nerve cells.

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Reef corals have endured since 'age of dinosaurs' and may survive global warming

The relationship between corals and the micro-algae that enable them to build reefs is considerably older and more diverse than previously assumed, according to an international team of scientists.

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Neuroscientists get at the roots of pessimism

MIT neuroscientists have shown that stimulating the caudate nucleus can generate negative moods that lead to irrational decision-making. Stimulating the caudate nucleus causes animals to give far more weight to the anticipated drawback of a situation than its potential benefit.

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Corals and algae go back further than previously thought, all the way to Jurassic Period

Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought.

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Scientists identify genetic marker for gastric cancer prognosis

Although immunotherapy is seen as a very promising treatment for cancer, currently only 20 to 30 percent of patients respond positively. Being able to identify the people most likely to benefit from the costly therapy is a Holy Grail for oncologists.

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Diverse symbionts of reef corals have endured since 'age of dinosaurs'

Coral-algal partnerships have endured numerous climate change events in their long history, and at least some are likely to survive modern-day global warming as well, suggests an international team of scientists.

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Genes drive aging, making normal processes damaging

Aging in worms mainly results from the direct action of genes and not from random wear and tear/loss of function, and the same is likely to be true in humans.Normal biological processes useful in early life, continue to 'run-on' pointlessly in later life causing age-related diseases. This does not mean that aging is programmed but it is a continuation of developmental growth driven by genetic path

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Single transplantation of therapeutic macrophages improves rare lung disease in mice

Hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (herPAP) is a rare disease characterized by the slow build-up of lipo-protein material in the lungs due to the failure of highly specialized cells called macrophages, which usually eat away this material from the pulmonary air-space. On Aug. 9 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, researchers in Germany demonstrate that a single transplantation of murine macro

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Nuclear gatekeeper could block undruggable prostate cancer targets

Blocking nuclear gateways that traffic cancer-promoting molecules to nucleus, could offer a new way to target aggressive cancer.

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Evolutionary changes in the human brain may have led to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

The same aspects of relatively recent evolutionary changes that make us prone to bad backs and impacted third molars may have generated long, noncoding stretches of DNA that predispose individuals to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other neuropsychiatric diseases. A study publishing Aug. 9 in the American Journal of Human Genetics identifies an unusually lengthy array of tandem repeats found

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Can psychedelic drugs heal?

Many people think of psychedelics as relics from the hippie generation or something taken by ravers and music festival-goers, but they may one day be used to treat disorders ranging from social anxiety to depression, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

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Roles of emotional support animals examined

Airlines are not the only organizations grappling with the complexities surrounding emotional support animals. Colleges and courts are also questioning the need for these animals and the effects they may have on students and juries, respectively, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

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Student Journalism in the Age of Media Distrust

There was a president with an energizing message, then a sharp, seemingly instant, political shift. The new president kept an enemies list that included a number of reporters. And he was knee-deep in controversy—though that only led some people to support him more fervently. It was the 1970s. President Richard Nixon had been undone by a pair of young reporters at The Washington Post , Hollywood h

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The EPA’s latest news on asbestos has a lot of people nervous

Health The carcinogen is banned in 55 countries, but not here. The toxic construction material recently made the news amidst fears that the EPA is easing the way for an uptick in asbestos manufacturing.

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Scientist begins developing instrument for finding extraterrestrial bacteria

A NASA scientist wants to create a planetary robot that would mimic what biologists do every day in terrestrial laboratories: look through microscopes to visually identify microbial life living in samples.

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The world of plastics, in numbers

From its early beginnings during and after World War II, the commercial industry for polymers – long chain synthetic molecules of which "plastics" are a common misnomer – has grown rapidly. In 2015, over 320 million tons of polymers, excluding fibers, were manufactured across the globe.

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North American diets require more land than we have, study says

If the global population adopted recommended North American dietary guidelines, there wouldn't be enough land to provide the food required, according to a new study co-authored by University of Guelph researchers.

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Scientists reveal submarine canyon on edge of Ireland's continental shelf

A group of scientists from across the globe have revealed the stunning details of a submarine canyon on the edge of the country's continental shelf, after mapping an area twice the size of Malta.

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'Untranslatable' words tell us more about English speakers than other cultures

When the word "hygge" became popular outside Denmark a few years ago, it seemed the perfect way to express the feeling of wrapping yourself up in a crocheted blanket with a cosy jumper, a cup of tea and back-to-back episodes of The Bridge. But is it really only the Danes, with their cold Scandinavian evenings, who could have come up with a word for such a specific concept? And is it only the Swede

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Før dødsulykke: Uber slukkede sikkerhedssystem i selvkørende testbil

Dødsulykken i marts kunne have været undgået, hvis Uber ikke havde slukket for den selvkørende Volvos egen autonome sikkerhedsteknologi. Det fremgår af en ny rapport.

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Satellite measurements of the Earth's magnetosphere promise better space weather forecasts

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University equipped the Arase satellite with sensors to study the convoluted interactions between high-energy particles in the inner magnetosphere and the Earth's electric and magnetic field. They have collected their first set of data from the satellite and from ground-based sensors, which they will soon analyze. Their approach promises to provide bette

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Discovery presents treatment hope for Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases

There is new hope for the treatment of Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases following a ground-breaking discovery.

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Exercise linked to improved mental health, but more may not always be better

A study of 1.2 million people in the USA has found that people who exercise report having 1.5 fewer days of poor mental health a month, compared to people who do not exercise. The study found that team sports, cycling, aerobics and going to the gym are associated with the biggest reductions, according to the largest observational study of its kind.

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Best of both worlds: Combining two skeleton-building chemical reactions

The method could speed the discovery of new drugs and other products by offering the ability to simply and efficiently build a wide variety of molecular architectures.

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Could computers help close partisan divides?

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are using computers in new ways to develop a comprehensive picture of how people communicate about politics, and how those conversations can be shaped by media, social networks and personal interactions.

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Scientists design material that can store energy like an eagle's grip

What do a flea and an eagle have in common? They can store energy in their feet without having to continuously contract their muscles to then jump high or hold on to prey. Now scientists at Queen Mary University of London and University of Cambridge have created materials that can store energy this way, be squeezed repeatedly without damage, and even change shape if necessary.

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Researchers call for comprehensive transformation of food systems

Agriculture and food systems policies should ensure more than just the supply of food. Decision-makers must make a paradigm shift to align policies about climate, agriculture and food with the United Nation's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This is according to a group of international researchers in a review article in the journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development, which is published

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Dogs set to benefit from simple blood test to spot liver disease

Vets have developed a blood test that quickly spots early signs of liver disease in dogs, a study suggests.

5h

The Oscars’ Terrible Idea

In March, some 26.5 million people tuned in to watch the 2018 Academy Awards—a record low for a ceremony that’s been losing viewers lately. In 2017, nearly 33 million people watched the Oscars, again down from 34.4 million the year before. There’s another popular, once-a-year TV event that’s recently seen a decline in ratings: the Super Bowl . Downward ratings trends are clear across the board fo

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Antidepressants are changing animal behaviour – we're using technology to find out how

Antidepressants don't just affect human libidos. New research shows that female starlings fed food spiked with the antidepressant fluxoxetine (Prozac), were less "attractive" to males and so less likely to mate. This is the latest evidence highlighting the potential harm of the drugs that we are releasing into the environment.

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Corals and algae go back further than previously thought, all the way to Jurassic Period

Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought, according to new research led by scientists at Oregon State University and Penn State.

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Genes drive aging, making normal processes damaging

Ageing in worms mainly results from the direct action of genes and not from random wear and tear or loss of function, and the same is likely to be true in humans, according to research by UCL, Lancaster University and Queen Mary University of London scientists.

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Samsung's new phone shows how hardware innovation has slowed

Samsung's new smartphone illustrates the limits of innovation at time when hardware advances have slowed.

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US forecasts even fewer hurricanes in Atlantic for 2018

US forecasters on Thursday downgraded their hurricane season predictions, saying that ocean conditions suggest it's now likely that a below-average number of storms will strike the Atlantic and Caribbean this year.

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How new fathers use social media to make sense of their roles

A lawyer in Bermuda became internet-famous for dancing ballet alongside his two-year-old daughter, comforting her stage fright by being there and doing the dance moves right with her. He knew the part because he had practiced ballet with his children before – and said it was just a normal part of fathering daughters.

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Supercomputer simulations show new target in HIV-1 replication

Nature study found naturally-occurring compound inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) promotes both assembly and maturation of HIV-1. NSF-XSEDE allocations on the Stampede2 supercomputing system at the Texas Advanced Computing Center and on Anton2 at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center simulated atomistic interactions of IP6 molecule with HIV structural proteins. Research opens door for development of

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Are pet owners abusing animals to get opioids?

Veterinarians in Colorado are concerned that some of their clients may have intentionally hurt their pets in the hopes of receiving prescription painkillers, according to a recent survey conducted by the Center for Health, Work & Environment at the Colorado School of Public Health and a local veterinary association.

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Estrogen may protect against depression after heart attack

Estrogen may protect against heart failure-related depression by preventing the production of inflammation-causing chemicals in the brain. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology – Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

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Marshall University research offers insights into nervous system control of leg movements

New research from a team at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine gives unexpected insights into how the nervous system controls leg movements in walking. These findings could aid in directing rehabilitation in stroke patients as well as the design of artificial, or prosthetic, legs.

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Dietary carbohydrates could lead to osteoarthritis, new study finds

In a study led by Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist Tim Griffin, Ph.D., researchers found that the carbohydrate composition of diets increased the risk of osteoarthritis in laboratory mice — even when the animals didn't differ in weight.

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Inducing Labor at 39 Weeks Safe, Linked to Lower C-Section Risk

The big study finding upends conventional thinking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Biological passport' to monitor Earth's largest fish

Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, roam less than previously thought. This new study used stable isotope analysis to demonstrate that whale sharks feeding at three disparate sites in the Western Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf rarely swim more than a few hundred kilometers north or south from these areas according to researchers.

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Prehistoric peopling in southeast Asia: Genomics of Jomon and other ancient skeletons

Current evidence suggests that Southeast Asia was occupied by Hoabinhian hunter-gatherers until about 4000 years ago, but the human occupation history thereafter with farming economies remains unsettled. By sequencing 26 ancient human genomes (25 Southeast Asians, 1 Japanese Jomon), the history is shown to be more complex than previously thought; both Hoabinhian hunter-gatherers and East Asian far

5h

How ions gather water molecules around them

Charged particles in aqueous solutions are always surrounded by a shell of water molecules. However, much is still unknown about the nature of this so-called hydration shell. Using terahertz spectroscopy, chemists from Bochum have gained new insights into how an ion affects the water molecules in its environment. Prof Dr. Martina Havenith, Dr. Gerhard Schwaab and Dr. Federico Sebastiani from the C

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Why hospital architects need to talk to nurses

Many of us pay close attention to how our taxes are spent, and how well governments invest in infrastructure projects such as roads, schools and hospitals. Value for money is key. Yet horror stories of waste, lateness and poor quality are common.

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Belo Monte: There is nothing green or sustainable about these mega-dams

There are few dams in the world that capture the imagination as much as Belo Monte, built on the "Big Bend" of the Xingu river in the Brazilian Amazon. Its construction has involved an army of 25,000 workers working round the clock since 2011 to excavate over 240m cubic metres of soil and rock, pour three million cubic metres of concrete, and divert 80% of the river's flow through 24 turbines.

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Video: Popping balloons with style

Orange peels contain limonene, and this chemical is the key to a party trick in which you can pop a balloon with a twist.

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New cyberattacks against urban water services possible, warn researchers

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) cyber security researchers warn of a potential distributed attack against urban water services that uses a botnet of smart irrigation systems that water simultaneously. A botnet is a large network of computers or devices controlled by a command and control server without the owner's knowledge.

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Huge variance found in aspirations of school-leavers, depending on where they study

Schools can be hugely influential in students' choices about higher education, irrespective of the grades they achieve, research has found.

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Diamond-based sensors enable spintronics and next-generation MRI

Sensors developed under the DIADEMS project and capable of measuring magnetic fields with unprecedented accuracy are on the path to commercialisation. The technology has already spurred the creation of four start-ups.

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Foam could offer greener option for petroleum drillers

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, provides critical energy for society, but also uses large amounts of fresh water while producing corresponding amounts of wastewater. Water-based foams, which use about 90 percent less water than fracking fluids, provide an alternative, but the mechanism for foam-driven fracture in such drilling is not well understood.

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CU researchers identify potential target for developing obesity and diabetes treatment

A newly published study by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has identified a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and diabetes. The scientists studied the biological function of an epigenetic modifier known as histone deacetylase 11 (HDAC11), and determined that deleting it in mice stimulates the formation of brown adipose tissue.

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A new, highly effective and selective molecule is developed to fight malaria

In tests with mice and in vivo culture, molecule designed in Brazil was capable of killing Plasmodium resistant strains and reducing the number of parasites in the bloodstream by 62 percent without attacking cells of the host organism.

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Melanoma linked with CLL, close monitoring recommended

While studying a large group of individuals with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a Wilmot Cancer Institute scientific team made an important discovery — these patients had a sizable 600 percent higher risk of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.

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There can be no sustainable development without profound changes in food systems

An international group of experts, including researchers from CIRAD, is calling for profound changes in food systems in order to meet the sustainable development goals (SDGs) set by the UN in 2015, and the terms of the Paris Agreement on climate. The authors propose a four-pillar strategy.

5h

Researchers help close security hole in popular encryption software

Cybersecurity researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have helped close a security vulnerability that could have allowed hackers to steal encryption keys from a popular security package by briefly listening in on unintended 'side channel' signals from smartphones.

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CU School of Medicine's Kenneth Tyler article in New England Journal of Medicine

Kenneth Tyler, M.D., the Louise Baum Endowed Chair in Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, is author of a review article about acute viral encephalitis in the current issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

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Democratic Socialism Threatens Minorities

Last week, the leftist magazine Jacobin published an article arguing that “the spectacular rehabilitation of socialism as a legitimate position within American politics, particularly among young people , is one of the most significant developments for the socialist movement in decades.” I maintain that those young people aren’t being told the whole story. When I first responded last week, my focu

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A conversation between plants' daily and aging clocks

Every day you get a day older. So do plants. While the biological daily clock ticks, time passes also for the aging clock. Scientists at the Center for Plant Aging Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), have found how the two clocks talk to each other genetically. Plants' circadian clock—the 24-hour cyclic rhythm—plays a critical role in regulating aging, in particular, in timing

5h

Impact of a stellar intruder on our solar system

The solar system was formed from a protoplanetary disk consisting of gas and dust. Since the cumulative mass of all objects beyond Neptune is much smaller than expected and the bodies there mostly have inclined, eccentric orbits, it is likely that some process restructured the outer solar system after its formation. Susanne Pfalzner from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, German

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Mind: Psychologists’ Group Maintains Ban on Work at Military Detention Facilities

Members of the American Psychological Association voted against allowing psychologists to resume work at certain detention centers like the one in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

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The U.S. is Cow Country, and other lessons from this land use map

America's corn syrup fields are big enough to cover all its airports and railroads, and other surprising lessons from a 'tidied-up' map of America's land use zones Read More

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Your mind isn't deep at all. In fact, it's flat.

In his new book, Nick Chater writes that what we see is what we get. Read More

5h

Does rain follow the plow?

What makes it rain? Many people joke it only takes washing the car or forgetting an umbrella to make rain fall, though in reality, those things are two of many rain-making myths that have been perpetuated throughout the years.

5h

Half of London car crashes take place in 5% of the city's junctions

The location of road accidents is not random and they tend to be highly concentrated in urban areas, according to a new UCL study.

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No defense for some plants in the eat-or-be-eaten world of grasslands

If you're a gardener, you may not be too thrilled when insects, rabbits, fungi and other plant-eaters nibble their way through your world. But in two recent papers published in the journals Ecology and Ecology Letters, University of Minnesota researchers are showing the important role such plant-eating consumers play in an ecosystem's ability carry out key jobs like storing carbon—and, in turn, th

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The underestimated cooling effect on the planet from historic fires

Historic levels of particles in the atmosphere released from pre-industrial era fires, and their cooling effect on the planet, may have been significantly underestimated according to a new study.

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Trees are made of human breath

Outside my office window, two skilled workers complete a hard and dirty job. They're cutting the felled trunk of a tree into small enough pieces to be thrown into the back of a truck with the rest of the chipped remains. I know that this act was ultimately for my own safety. I, like tens of thousands of others over the past 50 years, regularly walked beneath the canopy of that tree.

6h

New, greener prospects for steel waste gases

In a new steel plant under construction, the waste gases generated in steelmaking will be used to produce an eco-friendly transport fuel.

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Environmental regulations drove steep declines in US factory pollution

The federal Clean Air Act and associated environmental regulations have driven steep declines in air pollution emissions over the past several decades, even as U.S. manufacturers increased production, a study by two University of California, Berkeley, economists has shown.

6h

Scientists design material that can store energy like an eagle's grip

What do a flea and an eagle have in common? They can store energy in their feet without having to continuously contract their muscles to then jump high or hold on to prey. Now scientists at Queen Mary University of London and University of Cambridge have created materials that can store energy this way, be squeezed repeatedly without damage, and even change shape if necessary.

6h

Targeting a brain mechanism could treat aggression

EPFL neuroscientists have identified a brain mechanism that is linked to aggression and violent behavior, potentially forming the basis for treating aggression in several psychiatric disorders.

6h

Quantum chains in graphene nanoribbons

Empa researchers, together with researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz and other partners, have achieved a breakthrough that could in future be used for precise nanotransistors or — in the distant future — possibly even quantum computers, as the team reports in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature.

6h

New online tool provides more efficient way for professionals to monitor diet

Research carried out to prove the validity of the new myfood24 online diet monitoring tool has shown it is as effective as similar tools already available to health care practitioners, researchers and educators, and more efficient to use.

6h

New cyberattacks against urban water services possible warn Ben-Gurion University researchers

The researchers analyzed and found vulnerabilities in a number of commercial smart irrigation systems, which enable attackers to remotely turn watering systems on and off at will. The researchers tested three of the most widely sold smart irrigation systems: GreenIQ, BlueSpray, and RainMachine smart irrigation systems.

6h

Mini antimatter accelerator could rival the likes of the Large Hadron Collider

Researchers have found a way to accelerate antimatter in a 1,000x smaller space than current accelerators, boosting the science of exotic particles.

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New theory may explain cause of depression and improve treatments

Researchers suggest dysfunction in mitochondria — the main source of energy for cells — may be the root cause of depression. The finding brings new insight to long-held theories of the causes of depression and could lead to the development of novel and more effective antidepressant drugs.

6h

Surprise finding in neurons

Do viruses trigger psychiatric disorders? A new Würzburg study suggests this conclusion. Accordingly, special disorders are associated with a high rate of infection of a specific herpesvirus.

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This small molecule could hold the key to promising HIV treatments

New research provides details of how the structure of the HIV-1 virus is assembled, findings that offer potential new targets for treatment.

6h

Largest study yet shows type of underwear is linked to men's semen quality

Men who wear boxer shorts have higher sperm concentrations than men who wear tighter fitting underwear, according to new research. The study differs from previous research on this topic because it includes a larger number of men (656) than previous studies, and because it is the first to go beyond the traditional, narrow focus on semen quality and include information on a variety of indicators of

6h

London calling! Travelers seek 'trust' in holiday destinations

Tourists considering overseas travel 'trust' a destination like London would provide a positive experience, says new research from QUT researchers.

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Snail kites must do more than move to thrive

Among its many useful traits, the federally endangered snail kite helps wildlife managers gauge whether the Florida Everglades has sufficient water. That's one reason University of Florida scientists closely monitor the birds' activity – and to make sure it's surviving.

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Mazda afviser snyd, men erkender fejl i testprocedurer

Mazda har som den seneste af flere japanske bilproducenter fundet uregelmæssigheder i sine test af brændstoføkonomi og emissioner, men afviser at have snydt eller manipuleret med data.

6h

Vindmølledirektør: Landmølle-loft modarbejder udskiftning af gamle vindmøller

Gamle landvindmøller lever langt længere end tidligere antaget. Hvis levetiden kommer op på 31 år, levner energiforligets landmølleloft kun plads til 7 nye vindmøller frem mod 2030, har Danmarks Vindmølleforening beregnet.

6h

Elusive nightjar back at RSPB Sandy reserve

A pair have been spotted breeding at the Bedfordshire site for the first time in 45 years.

6h

Researchers find intermolecular forces stabilize clusters, promote aerosol production

One enigma that has perplexed scientists is how new particles form in the atmosphere. They know how aerosols can grow into sizes large enough to seed cloud droplets, but those same theories fail to explain how the initial particle core develops. Researchers have chipped away at the nucleation mystery – far enough to identify small clusters of certain types of molecules as the key step. Yet, the un

6h

Diamond capsules improve performance of laser fusion

Osaka University-led researchers demonstrated that the perturbation of laser imprinting on a capsule for nuclear fusion fuel made from stiff and heavy materials was mitigated. Using the latest chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, they also produced high-precision diamond fuel capsules, a key technology applicable for fusion fuel.

6h

Hairy robot

The University of Texas at Arlington has patented a smart skin, created by a UTA researcher, that will give robots more sensitive tactile feeling than humans.

6h

Anthropocene vs Meghalayan—why geologists are fighting over whether humans are a force of nature

The Earth discovered it was living in a new slice of time called the Meghalayan Age in July 2018. But the announcement by the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) confused and angered scientists all around the world.

6h

When roots crack and worms crunch

Roots can be "listened to" while growing – and worms when burrowing. Researchers from ETH Zurich and the French National Institute for Agricultural Research present a new method for soil analysis.

6h

Discord's Not Just for Chat Anymore—It's for Buying Games, TooDiscord Steam Nitro

By selling games to its millions of users, the chat app moves into a new position against rivals like Steam.

6h

Baby snails are riding bigger waves (and mostly dying)

A new study clarifies how snail larvae feel—and perhaps even hear—whether the water is turbulent or wavy, and improve their odds of being carried to a good habitat where they can settle down as adults. The warming ocean may cause the larvae of bottom-dwelling snails to hatch earlier in the spring when waves are larger, the research suggests. This could potentially affect their ability to survive

6h

Potential solutions to drug shortages and the lack of competition in generic medicines

Physicians at BWH published a new article to highlight the issues and recommend potential solutions. The incentives, regulations and new drug developments that the authors recommend could help to enhance competition and provide patients with reliable access to vital drugs.

6h

Biomarkers link fatigue in cancer, Parkinson's

Biological markers responsible for extreme exhaustion in patients with cancer have now been linked to fatigue in those with Parkinson's disease, according to new research from Rice University.

6h

Researchers call for comprehensive transformation of food systems

Agriculture and food systems policies should ensure more than just the supply of food. Decision-makers must make a paradigm shift to align policies about climate, agriculture and food with the United Nation's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This is according to a group of international researchers in a review article in the journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development, which is published

6h

Dogs set to benefit from simple blood test to spot liver disease

Vets have developed a blood test that quickly spots early signs of liver disease in dogs, a study suggests.

6h

PSD as a molecular platform for understanding synapse formation and plasticity

A group of scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology employed a biochemical reconstitution approach to show that, both in solution and on supported membrane bilayers, multivalent interaction networks formed by major excitatory postsynaptic density (PSD) scaffold proteins led to formation of PSD-like assemblies via phase separation.

6h

How ions gather water molecules around them

Charged particles in aqueous solutions are always surrounded by a shell of water molecules. However, much is still unknown about the nature of this so-called hydration shell. Using terahertz spectroscopy, chemists from Bochum have gained new insights into how an ion affects the water molecules in its environment.

6h

Building more flexible barriers to save lives on country roads

Each year in Victoria around 75 people are killed—and more than 500 hospitalised—after running off the road or having a head-on crash on high-speed country roads. Many of these are country Victorians, with 47 per cent of fatal and serious injury crashes occurring within 20 kilometres of the person's home postcode.

6h

Revolutionary new view of how living cells make energy

Researchers at The University of Western Australia and Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research have made a fundamental discovery about of the atomic structure and function of the biological 'factories' in cells that make energy, providing a new means to target the 'machines' within factories for drug treatments.

6h

Highly infectious vehicle for virus transmission among humans

Researchers have found that a group of viruses that cause severe stomach illness — including the one famous for widespread outbreaks on cruise ships — get transmitted to humans through membrane-cloaked 'virus clusters' that exacerbate the spread and severity of disease. Previously, it was believed that these viruses only spread through individual virus particles. The discovery of these clusters,

6h

Human microbiome influences rotavirus vaccine response

In a proof-of-concept study in healthy adult men, scientists in the Netherlands found that microbiome manipulation with antibiotics influenced response to oral rotavirus vaccine. They found higher levels of viral shedding in those receiving antibiotic treatment prior to vaccination compared with controls receiving no antibiotic treatment prior to vaccination. The study demonstrates that altering t

6h

A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

Tafenoquine could help prevent the recurring form of malaria, but the drug may also be dangerous for people who have a certain genetic mutation.

6h

World's densest, totally silent solid state drive

Fast disappearing from data centers are power-hungry spinning hard disk drives that hum, buzz, run warm (or even hot), require fans and expensive cooling systems, and can crash unexpectedly.

6h

A conversation between plants' daily and aging clocks

IBS Scientists have found out how the two clocks talk to each other genetically. Plants' circadian clock — the 24-hour cyclic rhythm — plays a critical role in regulating aging, in particular in timing the yellowing of the leaves. As aging plants recycle nutrients for the new leaves and seeds, uncovering these timekeeping mechanisms is important to understand plant productivity.

6h

Ph.D. student develops spinning heat shield for future spacecraft

A University of Manchester Ph.D. student has developed a prototype flexible heat shield for spacecraft that could reduce the cost of space travel and even aid future space missions to Mars.

6h

Key role found for enzymes in DNA replication and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs

Published in Science Advances, the study shows that the TLK1 and TLK2 enzymes are critical for ensuring the copying of DNA.

6h

'Tic'-tock

Scientists in Japan have found a potential marker to identify which people with abnormally fast heartbeats are at high risk of developing heart failure.

6h

Skills and learning improved by closed-loop electrical brain stimulation during sleep

HRL Laboratories publish the first study using closed-loop slow-wave transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) of the brain during sleep to increase human subjects' ability to generalize experience in a target detection task, improving overnight performance change for novel situations by about 48 percent. Developed for the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), the technique i

6h

How to find free Wi-Fi when you really need it

DIY Without compromising your security. Free Wi-Fi is everywhere, yet it’s hard to actually find a hotspot when you really need one. Here’s how to do just that—without compromising your privacy.

6h

Is fire the new normal in the American West?

The summer of 1988 was unusually hot, dry and windy in the American West, and 30 years ago this year, those conditions combined at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming to create what were among the largest and most severe fires the park had ever seen.

6h

Texts and tablets more than double time parents spend reading to kids

The Behavioral Insights and Parenting Lab at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy recently published in the Journal of Human Resources results from a study showing that using text messages to help parents set goals for reading to their children and to remind parents of their goals can double the amount of time that parents of Head Start children spend reading to their children

6h

Here's How People First Arrived in the New World … Maybe

If you were one of the first people to reach America after traveling over the Bering Strait land bridge during the last ice age, would you travel along the coast, or would you make the trip farther inland, between two massive ice sheets?

6h

Avanceret billedanalyse skal spotte fejl i TDC's teknikskabe

Samarbejde mellem TDC’s teknikere og data science-hold skal få neuralt net til at spotte kabler, der sidder forkert.

6h

No Jack Dorsey, Twitter Fact-Checking Won't Free Us From Our Baseless Convictions

Today is the day—finally—to stop being surprised that human beings espouse beliefs contrary to fact.

6h

Digital gig economy is bad for your wellbeing, new research suggests

The poor quality working conditions associated with the digital gig economy may have consequences for employees' wellbeing, according to new Oxford University research.

6h

To understand working memory, scientists must resolve this debate

In dueling papers, researchers tackle key questions about working memory such as, how we hold and juggle multiple pieces of information in mind.

6h

SNS completes full neutron production cycle at record power level

The Spallation Neutron Source at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has reached a new milestone by operating a complete neutron production run cycle at 1.3 megawatts.

7h

Team that claimed to have fixed gene mutation in human embryo offers new evidence; others still not convinced

The team of researchers who last year published a paper claiming to have genetically repaired a mutation in an embryo has published another paper offering more evidence of their success in the journal Nature. Meanwhile, two other groups of researchers have published papers in the same journal issue calling into question the new evidence.

7h

Religion-free church lifts your spirits

Congregational meet-ups without the worship can boost wellbeing in the same way as going to church or attending other religious groups, a new study suggests.

7h

The Secret Network of Black Teachers Behind the Fight for Desegregation

For 25 years, the Emory University professor Vanessa Siddle Walker has studied and written about the segregated schooling of black children. In her latest book , The Lost Education of Horace Tate: Uncovering the Hidden Heroes Who Fought for Justice in Schools , Walker tells the little-known story of how black educators in the South—courageously and covertly—laid the groundwork for 1954’s Brown v.

7h

The Mystery of the Ancient Volcano That May Have Inspired Atlantis

The latest controversy in a bitter archaeological dispute involves—I kid you not—a literal olive branch. The olive branch comes from the Greek island of Santorini, where a volcano erupted more than three millennia ago, spewing gas, ash, pumice, and boulders into the sky. Once depleted, the volcano collapsed in on itself. So violent was the eruption, some have speculated, that it ended the once pr

7h

Hybrid catalyst with high enantiomer selectivity

A group of Japanese researchers has developed a technology to create a hybrid catalyst from simple-structured, commercially available rhodium and organic catalysts, which reduces chemical waste and produces molecules with high selectivity of an enantiomer, a pair of molecular structures that are non-superimposable mirror images of each other. This technology is expected to assist in rapid and low-

7h

Discovery presents treatment hope for Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases

There is new hope for the treatment of Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases following a ground-breaking discovery made by an Australian-Chinese research collaboration.

7h

MRI may facilitate the diagnosis and evaluation of the treatment outcomes of depression

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could identify morphological and functional brain changes of major depressive disorder (MDD). These alterations may potentially serve as MRI biomarkers that are clinically useful for the early diagnosis and evaluation of the treatment outcomes of MDD.

7h

SNS completes full neutron production cycle at record power level

The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has reached a new milestone by operating a complete neutron production run cycle at 1.3 megawatts. Achieving the record power level with a remarkable 94 percent accelerator beam availability establishes a new baseline of operation as well as a path to operate reliably at higher powers. Increased power offers researchers the ability to

7h

Research brief: New 3D-printed device could help treat spinal cord injuries

Engineers and medical researchers at the University of Minnesota have teamed up to create a groundbreaking 3D-printed device that could someday help patients with long-term spinal cord injuries regain some function.

7h

Finally, a potential new approach against KRAS-driven lung cancer

University of Colorado Cancer Center and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center study shows KRAS-driven lung cancers are also marked by high levels of 'gel-forming mucins,' as seen in some forms of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. The study, published Aug. 9 in the journal JCI Insight, also pinpoints a cause of increased mucin production, namely the gene MUC5AC.

7h

Common skin cancer can signal increased risk of other cancers, Stanford researchers say

People who develop abnormally frequent cases of a skin cancer known as basal cell carcinoma appear to be at significantly increased risk for the development of other cancers, including blood, breast, colon and prostate cancers, according to a preliminary study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

7h

Two new UTA School of Social Work professors win international award

Two professors joining The University of Texas at Arlington this fall were announced as the winners of the Best Human Services App Idea Award at the Education and Social Development Conference in Dublin, Ireland, in July.Kathy Lee and Rebecca Mauldin, who will start in the fall semester as assistant professors in the School of Social Work, began developing the SageServe app for aging-related servi

7h

Environmental regulations drove steep declines in US factory pollution

A new study by UC Berkeley economists shows that between 1990 and 2008, air pollution levels plummeted. The evidence shows that environmental regulation and the associated cleanup of production processes played important roles in those steep declines. Manufacturers are producing the same types of goods, but they've taken significant steps to clean up their production processes, the authors say.

7h

London calling! Travelers seek 'trust' in holiday destinations

Tourists considering overseas travel 'trust' a destination like London would provide a positive experience, says new research from QUT researchers.Consumer behaviour experts from QUT Business School investigated the effectiveness of the official tourism website, Visit London, for tourists choosing the city as a destination to explore.Their findings, published in the Journal of Strategic Marketing,

7h

Three problems with the debate around screen time

The cycle of moral panic around screen time and technology use feels endless. Here are three issues we need to address before we can move the debate on The debate about children and technology has increasingly captured public interest over the past year, and has been raging for many more. As with anything of this nature, the public conversations about screen time have gradually become more heated

7h

New satellite map shows ground deformation after Indonesian quake

Scientists with NASA/Caltech's Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis project (ARIA) used new satellite data to produce a map of ground deformation on the resort island of Lombok, Indonesia, following a deadly 6.9-magnitude earthquake on August 5.

7h

Sundhedsminister nedskyder forklaring på forsinkelse af Sundhedsplatformen

Sundhedsministeren kalder det »faktuelt forkert«, når Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland forklarer, at de er nødt til at udskyde opdateringen af Sundhedsplatformen, fordi den nye opdatering af landspatientregisteret er forsinket. LPR3 er klar til november, hvis regionerne ønsker det, siger Ellen Trane Nørby.

7h

Rudkjøbing: Afskaffelse af regionerne er et virkelighedsfjernt forslag

Forslaget fra DF om at nedlægge regionerne skaber hovedrysten hos Lægeforeningens formand. Han mener ikke, at det vil løse sundhedsvæsenets nuværende problemer.

7h

PhD student develops spinning heat shield for future spacecraft

A University of Manchester Ph.D. student has developed a prototype flexible heat shield for spacecraft that could reduce the cost of space travel and even aid future space missions to Mars.

7h

Scientists call for more eyes in the sky amidst alarming climate change

In the midst of a record-breaking global heat wave, a recent international study presented a terrifying worst-case scenario: that "hothouse Earth" conditions are likely to prevail even if the world meets the carbon reduction levels of the Paris Agreement. Lead author Will Steffen from the Australian National University and Stockholm Resilience Centre said, "Human emissions of greenhouse gas are no

7h

Team develops simple hydrogel modification method toward stretchable and transparent electronics

Scientists from the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have proposed a novel method for the fabrication of highly transparent, electrically conductive, stretchable tough hydrogels modified by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The results of the study have been published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

7h

Rethinking planetary climate controls

Yale researchers have provided a new explanation for why Earth's early climate was more stable and warmer than it is today.

7h

Pressure on British Muslim parents to counter extremism is damaging

Pressure on British Muslim parents to counter extremism in their own families is having a detrimental effect, according to new research by Manchester academic Madeline-Sophie Abbas.

7h

Researchers develop a method to detoxify water with chlorine and ultraviolet radiation

Purdue University researchers have developed a method to detoxify water with chlorine and ultraviolet radiation, which may provide new hope for water-stressed areas and help promote the reuse of wastewater.

7h

Vibrationer gør bilister søvnige allerede efter 15 minutter

Ifølge et australsk eksperiment gør de små vibrationer, der opstår under kørslen, chaufførerne søvnige efter kort tids kørsel. Nyt sædedesign kan måske modvirke effekten.

7h

How to run a race: emotions may be more crucial than training says study

New research shows that those who can identify and regulate their emotions keep pushing when the going gets tough In tests of endurance, some people push harder than others. These aren’t necessarily the people who collapse at the finish, who may simply have sprinted harder in the final straightaway. (Or have a flair for the dramatic.) During the long, lonely middle miles of a race, you make a tho

7h

Study shows global forest loss over past 35 years has been more than offset by new forest growth

A team of researchers from the University of Maryland, the State University of New York and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has found that new global tree growth over the past 35 years has more than offset global tree cover losses. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes using satellite data to track forest growth and loss over the past 35 years and what they found b

7h

Eksperter: Solceller kan dække 70 procent af Danmarks energibehov

På trods af rekordår for de danske solceller dækker de kun to procent af forsyningen til elnettet. Det kan blive 35 gange bedre ifølge DTU.

7h

HBO Takes A Radical Leap Forward With 'Random Acts of Flyness'

The variety show seeks no destination, instead finding joy in the rigor of exploring black life in America.

7h

What Termites Teach Us About Robot Cooperation

We imagine that the future of autonomous swarms is machinelike perfection, but moments of unpredictable, Three Stooges–like chaos are also likely to emerge.

7h

Prosthetic Limb Restores a Sense of Body Position

New device gives an amputee the ability to feel the location of his foot — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Cities Need to Prepare for Water Day Zero

Cape Town's recent water crisis highlights the need for better urban planning and management — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Traffic Noise Makes Caterpillars' Hearts Beat Faster

The ongoing racket may interfere with the larvae’s response to stress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Satellite measurements of the Earth's magnetosphere promise better space weather forecasts

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University equipped the Arase satellite with sensors to study the convoluted interactions between high-energy particles in the inner magnetosphere and the Earth's electric and magnetic field. They have collected their first set of data from the satellite and from ground-based sensors, which they will soon analyze. Their approach promises to provide bette

7h

UBC study: Kidney transplant chains more effective in saving lives

New research from the UBC Sauder School of the Business has found that transplant societies which prioritize kidney transplant chains over kidney exchanges can increase the total number of transplants, thereby saving more lives.

7h

Prehistoric peopling in southeast Asia — genomics of Jomon and other ancient skeletons

Current evidence suggests that Southeast Asia was occupied by Hoabinhian hunter-gatherers until ~4,000 years ago, but the human occupation history thereafter with farming economies remains unsettled. By sequencing 26 ancient human genomes (25 Southeast Asians, one Japanese Jomon), the history is shown to be more complex than previously thought; both Hoabinhian hunter-gatherers and East Asian farme

7h

Crowdsourcing algorithms to predict epileptic seizures

A study by University of Melbourne researchers reveals clinically relevant epileptic seizure prediction is possible in a wider range of patients than previously thought, thanks to the crowdsourcing of more than 10,000 algorithms worldwide.

7h

This small molecule could hold the key to promising HIV treatments

New research provides details of how the structure of the HIV-1 virus is assembled, findings that offer potential new targets for treatment.

7h

Why house sparrows lay both big and small eggs

Why does the egg size of house sparrows vary so much? Isn't it always an advantage to be big?

7h

Problem of local news deserts is widespread, study finds

Research from Duke University provides comprehensive new evidence of the magnitude of the problem of "news deserts"– communities where news and information about critical local issues is nonexistent or severely limited.

7h

Sundhedsstyrelsen: Fagligheden skal styrkes i psykiatrien

Der skal sættes tidligere ind og den faglige kvalitet skal være højere, mener Sundhedsstyrelsen, der har leveret sine input til en samlet plan for psykiatrien. Se alle styrelsens anbefalinger her.

7h

Hybrid catalyst with high enantiomer selectivity

A group of Japanese researchers has developed a technology to create a hybrid catalyst from simple-structured, commercially available rhodium and organic catalysts, which reduces chemical waste and produces molecules with high selectivity of an enantiomer, a pair of molecular structures that are non-superimposable mirror images of each other. This technology is expected to assist in rapid and low-

7h

Sapphire secrets—they aren't all blue, and mining them requires luck plus labour

I first remember seeing sapphires as a teenager in a jeweller's shop in Silver Street in pre-Khmer Rouge Phnom Penh – the deep saturated blues of the gems from Palin on the border with Thailand were captivating. The sapphires my father bought that day are still in the family long after any trace of Silver Street has disappeared.

7h

Aerobic exercise may prevent cocaine relapse

Exercise can help prevent relapses into cocaine addiction, researchers report. “Cocaine addiction is often characterized by cycles of recovery and relapse, with stress and negative emotions, often caused by withdrawal itself, among the major causes of relapse,” says Panayotis (Peter) Thanos, senior research scientist in the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions and the pharmacolo

7h

Strong aftershock rattles survivors of deadly Indonesian quake

A strong aftershock struck Indonesia's Lombok Thursday, causing panic among evacuees already traumatised by a devastating earthquake that killed more than 160 on the holiday island four days earlier.

7h

Review of current evidence suggests both interior and coastal routes viable path for first migrations into North America

A team of researchers with members from the U.S., Canada, Australia and Germany has found after studying available evidence that both interior and coastal routes were viable pathways for the first human migrations into North America. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the researchers describe their analyses of current data and their interpretations of it.

7h

Thick smoke clouds southern Portugal beaches as fires rage

Smoke from raging wildfires billowed above popular tourist beaches in Portugal's Algarve Thursday after authorities ordered a fresh wave of urgent evacuations as the flames drew closer to a historic town in the region.

7h

UK watchdog fines child care company for selling data

Britain's information watchdog has fined a firm that offers advice on pregnancy and child care 140,000 pounds ($180,000) for illegally collecting and selling personal information that ended up being used in a database for the Labour Party.

7h

Apple to lawmakers: Siri doesn't listen until prompted

Apple does not eavesdrop on iPhone users, the company said Tuesday in response to an inquiry by a congressional committee about the company's privacy practices.

8h

Laura Ingraham Doesn’t Love Her Country Anymore

The Fox News commentator Laura Ingraham declared on a recent episode of her cable-television show that “in some parts of the country, it does seem like the America that we know and love doesn’t exist anymore.” What ended it? “Massive demographic changes have been foisted upon the American people,” she continued, “and they’re changes that none of us ever voted for and most of us don’t like. From V

8h

Who Gets to Claim Kafka?

An admirer of Franz Kafka’s once presented him with a specially bound volume of three of his stories. Kafka’s reaction was vehement: “My scribbling … is nothing more than my own materialization of horror,” he replied. “It shouldn’t be printed at all. It should be burnt.” At the same time, Kafka believed that he had no purpose in life other than writing: “I am made of literature,” he said, “and ca

8h

For the Love of Dogs

One of my favorite Twitter accounts these days is Thoughts of Dog . The account—straightforward handle: @dog_feelings—is an extension of the delightful @ dog_rates , which offers always positive “reviews” of people’s furry friends (“ This is Finley. His tongue flutters when he’s hungry. 13/10 ”). Thoughts of Dog, as a complement, goes inside the canine mind to offer a flow of dog-oriented fan fic

8h

Ny enhed skal sikre sundhedsvæsenets cybersikkerhed

Sundhedsdatastyrelsen etablerer afdeling dedikeret til cybersikkerhed. Først skal chefen for afdelingen findes.

8h

Geoengineering med partikler redder ikke afgrøder fra global opvarmning

Forskning skyder tanken om at blokere Solens indstråling på Jorden til hjørne. Det kan sænke temperatur og hedestress, men også ødelægge fotosyntesen.

8h

Beastie joys: Photographer's love of Scottish bug life

A woman passionate about insects and photography shares images of some of Scotland's colourful bug life.

8h

Wearing boxer shorts boosts sperm count, scientists say

Looser fitting underpants keep testicles cool, resulting in 25% more sperm being produced Men who want to boost their sperm counts may want to swap their tight-fitting underpants for more roomy boxers which are better suited to keeping testicles cool, scientists say. A major study into the impact of underwear on sperm quality found that men who favoured airy boxer shorts made significantly more s

8h

The Strange David and Goliath Saga of Radio Frequencies

The wireless mic systems used by countless schools, churches, theaters, and other venues, are about to become obsolete, all because the telecom companies muscled in.

8h

Chicago's 'Wild Mile' Is a Habitat Made Almost Entirely From Scratch

The city's manmade North Branch Canal is polluted and lacks natural habitat. Enter 80 coconut-fiber “islands” that host wildlife and filter the water.

8h

Image of the Day: Electrify

Researchers have identified what makes synapses strong or weak in fruit flies.

8h

National Book Lovers Day

Enjoy your copy of Cerebrum poolside. Available for purchase on Amazon. Maybe it’s from years of school-encouraged summer reading lists, but this season always ignites a desire in me to read more books and to ask friends for recommendations. And it just so happens that August celebrates National Book Lovers Day–today! For fellow book lovers, and particularly those who want to learn more about the

8h

Forget Doorframes: Expert Advice on Earthquake Survival Strategies

Indonesia’s Lombok quake revives the question of taking cover versus running outside — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

In ‘news deserts,’ local stories are scarce

New research provides comprehensive evidence of the magnitude of the problem of “news deserts”—communities where news and information about critical local issues is nonexistent or severely limited. “…when traditional local news outlets go away, they are being replaced by highly partisan outlets focused on promoting specific political agendas…” The researchers analyzed more than 16,000 news storie

8h

Anne-Marie Sandler obituary

Psychoanalyst who influenced generations of practitioners and had a deep understanding of the mind of a child The analyst Anne-Marie Sandler, who has died aged 92, was the clinician’s clinician. Technically adept and unafraid of the difficult states of mind and feelings psychoanalysis can uncover, she influenced several generations of practitioners, returning them to the interest in minds, hearts

8h

Whale sharks feeding in the western Indian Ocean – in pictures

The world’s largest fish roams less than previously thought, new research has found. Using a ‘biological passport’, results show that whale sharks in the western Indian Ocean and the Arabian Gulf rarely swim more than a few hundred kilometres from their feeding grounds, making local action vital to their conservation Continue reading…

8h

Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

We wander about the unknown terrains of life, complacent about what we know and oblivious to what we miss — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Researchers use 'biological passport' to monitor Earth's largest fish

Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, roam less than previously thought. This new study, published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series, used stable isotope analysis to demonstrate that whale sharks feeding at three disparate sites in the Western Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf rarely swim more than a few hundred kilometres north or south from these areas according to researchers from the

9h

#46 Udsendt del 1

Stetoskopet møder fødselslæge Annelie Ginze i det første program af to om at være udsendt som læge i verdens brændpunkter.

9h

#45 Roskildesyge

Stetoskopet er taget på Roskilde Festival for at blive klogere på, hvordan leveren bliver påvirket af en uge med en masse alkohol.

9h

New Horizons may have seen a glow at the solar system’s edge

New Horizons may have seen a hydrogen wall just past the edge of the solar system, where the solar wind meets the stuff of interstellar space.

9h

How Does a Poppy Seed Bagel Trigger a Positive Drug Test?

A mother in Maryland says that eating a poppy seed bagel caused her to test positive for opiates while she was giving birth, according to news reports. But how does this happen?

9h

Most People Don't Know This: Not Getting Enough Exercise Ups Your Cancer Risk

Getting too little exercise is tied to an increased risk of cancer — but according to a new study, most people in the U.S. don't know this.

9h

Weird, 570-Million-Year-Old 'Leaf' Fossil Is Actually from an Animal

No it's not a leaf or a long-lost kingdom of life. It's a funny, leaf-like animal.

9h

Researchers use 'biological passport' to monitor Earth's largest fish

Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, roam less than previously thought. Local and regional actions are vital for the conservation of this globally endangered species moving forward, according to a new study by researchers from the Marine Megafauna Foundation, University of Southampton, and Sharkwatch Arabia. Their findings are published today in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series.

9h

The 20-Year Journey of 'The Meg'—the Movie the Internet Wouldn't Let Die

For decades, fans of the 1997 book kept the movie version afloat.

9h

Open thread: The floor is yours

What topics do you want to see addressed by SBM's contributors? The floor is yours today.

9h

Mission to the Nearest Star: Fastest Spacecraft Ever Will Dare to Sample the Sun's Corona

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will launch August 11 to explore the extreme environment of our star’s mysteriously superheated atmosphere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Missouri’s Labor Victory Won’t Reverse the Decline of Unions

On Tuesday night, as it became clear that voters in Missouri had—by a two-to-one margin—rejected a state law meant to reduce unions’ power, the president of the AFL-CIO, Richard Trumka, declared , “The defeat of this poisonous anti-worker legislation is a victory for all workers across the country.” He added, “Tonight is the latest act of working people changing a rigged system that for decades h

9h

Nanoparticle therapy could deliver double blow to cancer

A new cancer therapy using nanoparticles to deliver a combination therapy direct to cancer cells could be on the horizon, thanks to research from the University of East Anglia.

9h

End of the Rainbow? New Map Scale is More Readable by People Who Are Color Blind

The improved palette also avoids some of the problems existing data visualization schemes pose for people with typical vision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Efter fatal plejehjemsbrand: Kommune tjekker alle sine bygninger

Norddjurs Kommune vil tjekke brandsikkerheden i samtlige kommunale bygninger og ældreboliger efter voldsom plejehjemsbrand kostede tre menneskeliv.

9h

School-Security Companies Are Thriving in the Era of Mass Shootings

In late June, inside an underground meeting room attached to the U.S. Capitol, past guards and metal detectors, lawmakers and representatives from multiple large security companies discussed the threat of mass school shootings and the need to, in their words, “harden” campuses before someone else gets killed. “If you think this cannot happen to you, I’m here to tell you I used to think the same e

10h

How a Blue Wave Could Crash Far Beyond Washington

O ne of the first things that Anna Eskamani did when she decided to run for the Florida state House of Representatives was write her concession speech. It was a way of grappling with her own hesitation about becoming a candidate. Upset by the results of the 2016 election, Eskamani was convinced that more women needed to run for office, but she didn’t think that was her calling: She was an organiz

10h

The Sensors That Power Smart Cities Are a Hacker's Dream

The IoT security crisis is playing out on a macro scale too, putting critical infrastructure at risk.

10h

A PhD should be about improving society, not chasing academic kudos | Julian Kircherr

Too much research is aimed at insular academic circles rather than the real world. Let’s fix this broken system When you look at the stats, it’s hard not to conclude that the current PhD system is fundamentally broken. Mental health issues are rife: approximately one-third of PhD students are at risk of having or developing a psychiatric disorder like depression . The high level of dropouts is si

10h

Surprise slow electrons are produced when intense lasers hit clusters of atoms

Scientists found that relatively slow electrons are produced when intense lasers interact with small clusters of atoms, upturning current theories.

10h

The Umov Effect—space dust clouds and the mysteries of the universe

FEFU scientists are developing a methodology to calculate the ratio of dust and gas in comas and tails of comets. This will reveal more about the history of the solar system and its development, as well as to understand the processes that took part on different stages of universal evolution.

10h

Hybridization boosts evolution

Animals that have either migrated to or been introduced in Central Europe, such as the Asian bush mosquito or the Asian ladybeetle, have adapted well to their new homes due to changing climatic conditions. If these newcomers are genetically compatible with local species, they may crossbreed and produce hybrids, which can continue to evolve under local environmental conditions—a process shown to ha

10h

World's fastest 3-D tomographic images reported at BESSY II

An HZB team has developed an ingenious precision rotary table at the EDDI beamline at BESSY II and combined it with particularly fast optics. This enabled them to document the formation of pores in grains of metal during foaming processes at 25 tomographic images per second—a world record.

10h

For the first time, scientists put extinct mammals on the map

Researchers from Aarhus University and University of Gothenburg have produced the most comprehensive family tree and atlas of mammals to date, connecting all living and recently extinct mammal species—nearly 6,000 in total—and overturning many previous ideas about global patterns of biodiversity.

10h

Novel approach to coherent control of a three-level quantum system

For the first time, researchers were able to study quantum interference in a three-level quantum system and thereby control the behavior of individual electron spins. To this end, they used a novel nanostructure in which a quantum system is integrated into a nanoscale mechanical oscillator in form of a diamond cantilever. Nature Physics has published the study, which was conducted at the Universit

10h

Scientists discover fat-blocking effect of nanofibers

Tiny balls of nano-sized cellulose fibres added to food reduced fat absorption by up to half in laboratory and animal experiments, report scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Harvard University, United States. This discovery could aid in the global battle against obesity, as experiments done in a simulated gastrointestinal tract showed that nanocellulose

10h

Apple til Kongressen: Vi aflytter ikke vores brugere

Apples enheder lytter ikke med uden samtykke og tillader heller ikke tredjeparter at gøre det. Det meddelte Apple i tirsdags til amerikanske lovgivere.

10h

Solens radius er både en konstant og en variabel størrelse

Astronomerne har defineret en nominel størrelse for Solens radius, men i virkeligheden er Solens størrelse forskellig under solmaksimum og solminimum.

10h

The underestimated cooling effect on the planet from historic fires

Historic levels of particles in the atmosphere released from pre-industrial era fires, and their cooling effect on the planet, may have been significantly underestimated according to a new study.

11h

Arsenic in combination with an existing drug could combat cancer

Investigators have discovered that arsenic in combination with an existing leukemia drug work together to target a master cancer regulator. The team, led by researchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), is hopeful that the discovery could lead to new treatment strategies for diverse types of cancer. Their findings were published today online in Nature Communicat

11h

A diverse diet may not be the healthiest one

Scientific evidence to date does not support the notion that eating a diverse diet is healthy or promotes a healthy weight. Some studies suggest that a diverse diet may increase food consumption and the prevalence of obesity.

11h

Synapses of the reward system at stake in autistic disorders

Autism spectrum disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders, one of the main characteristics of which is impaired social communication. But what happens in patients' brains that disrupts their social skills? According to scientists from UNIGE and UNIBAS, a malfunction of the synaptic activity of neurons present in the reward system seems to be at stake. They established a link between a

11h

A new wave of satellites in orbit: Cheap and tiny, with short lifespans

It's one of the most recognizable images in aerospace: Highly specialized workers clad in gowns, hair nets and shoe coverings crawl over a one-of-a-kind satellite the size of a school bus. The months-long process is so delicate that even workers' metal rings must be covered with a translucent tape to prevent static transfer.

11h

Why the Left Is So Afraid of Jordan Peterson

Two years ago, I walked downstairs and saw one of my teenage sons watching a strange YouTube video on the television. “What is that?” I asked. He turned to me earnestly and explained, “It’s a psychology professor at the University of Toronto talking about Canadian law.” “Huh?” I said, but he had already turned back to the screen. I figured he had finally gotten to the end of the internet, and thi

11h

Brugte batterier fra elbiler sikrer strøm til storstadion

Et batterianlæg med en kapacitet svarende til 148 Nissan Leaf kan holde Johan Cruyff Arena kørende i op til tre timer.

11h

The underestimated cooling effect on the planet from historic fires

Historic levels of particles in the atmosphere released from pre-industrial era fires, and their cooling effect on the planet, may have been significantly underestimated according to a new study.

11h

Want to work for Amazon? Now you can do it from home as company seeks 200 virtual workers

Want to work for Amazon without moving to Seattle—or its yet unnamed second U.S. headquarters? The online retailing giant is looking to fill more than 200 "virtual" jobs that let you work from home.

11h

Elon Musk: Tesla's next software update to have 'classic' Atari games built in

As if driving a Tesla wasn't different enough already from the cars and trucks we have been wheeling around on the road for decades, how about adding some "Asteroids" to the mix?

11h

Omfattende forurening standser Lundbeck-udvidelse

Omfattende forurening på fabriksgrund stopper medicinalfirmaet Lundbecks planer om udvidelse af produktionsfaciliteter på Vestsjælland.

11h

Google makes up for years of allowing scammers top spots in search results with new system

The way to shop for home services in Dallas-Fort Worth and beyond has changed for the better. Google has stepped up with a new service that's supposed to separate professional, reliable companies from scammers.

11h

US juveniles with conduct problems face high risk of premature death

We already know that adolescents with conduct and/or substance use problems are at increased risk for premature death. This prospective study of more than 3,700 US juveniles discovered that there is an independent association between conduct disorder and mortality hazard. In other words, the connection between conduct disorder and risk of early death appears to exist even when other contributing f

12h

To stop mosquitoes, target their young

Bacterial larvicide, not standard insecticides, are the best solution for mosquito control, according to new research by Florida International University biologist Philip Stoddard.

12h

San Jose airport shows off facial recognition for international flights

Mineta San Jose International Airport demonstrated a facial recognition system that will make it the first West Coast airport to launch, for all international flights, a technology that officials said has already slashed the processing time for travelers.

12h

Samsung looks to go bigger than ever with Note 9

Samsung's new Note 9 phone, expected to be unveiled at a big bash in Brooklyn on Thursday morning, looks to be the biggest one yet, but it could be the last in the lineup.

12h

Livsfarlige revlehuller udstiller dilemma mellem psyke og fysik

Bliver du fanget i strømmen fra et revlehul, råder danske livredningstjenester dig til at svømme til siden. Forskning viser dog, at revlehuller fungerer markant anderledes end antaget, hvorfor det i de fleste tilfælde er mest fordelagtigt at lade sig drive med strømmen.

12h

Magic Leap, the $2 billion 3D software startup, is finally live. It doesn't come cheap.

Magic Leap, the secretive Plantation, Fla.-based tech company that has raised more than $2 billion in venture capital to build sophisticated 3-D software, has finally gone live.

12h

Criminal case filed against BMW over S. Korea car fires

A group of BMW owners in South Korea filed a criminal complaint against the German automaker Thursday over alleged delays in recalling more than 100,000 cars after a spate of engine fires, their lawyer said.

13h

Boeing says 737 production woes will last through year's end

US aerospace giant Boeing on Wednesday admitted supply chain hold-ups would affect production of its bestselling 737 jetliner until the end of the year, and could hamper third-quarter deliveries.

13h

Crop-destroying Armyworm caterpillar detected in Asia

A caterpillar native to the Americas that has devastated crops across Africa has made its way to Asia, scientists in India said Thursday, warning of a threat to food security.

13h

Rare teeth from ancient mega-shark found on Australia beach

A rare set of teeth from a giant prehistoric mega-shark twice the size of the great white have been found on an Australian beach by a keen-eyed amateur enthusiast, scientists said Thursday.

13h

Ack! Distant fires leave California's capital city in a haze

No major wildfires are burning near Sacramento but for two weeks a dull haze and the faint smell of smoke from distant blazes has blanketed California's capital region, forcing summer campers to stay inside, obscuring normally bright skylines and leaving ash on cars.

13h

Tesla CEO's buyout bid raises eyebrows, legal concerns

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is seeking relief from the pressures of running a publicly held company with a $72 billion buyout of the electric car maker, but he may be acquiring new headaches with his peculiar handling of the proposed deal.

13h

Typhoon Shanshan clips Japan coast, sparing Tokyo

Typhoon Shanshan clipped Japan's eastern coast on Thursday morning, sparing Tokyo but bringing heavy rain, strong winds and high waves to some areas along the Pacific coast.

13h

Three Japan automakers admit false emissions data

Japan's Suzuki Motor, Mazda and Yamaha have admitted using false emissions data for some vehicles, the transport ministry said Thursday, in the latest product quality scandal to hit the country's auto sector.

13h

Following federal guidelines may help acceptance of police use of body-worn cameras

Thousands of police departments have adopted body-worn cameras over the last few years. Previous research on acceptance of the cameras has yielded mixed findings. A new study that examined how Tempe, Arizona, planned and carried out a body-worn camera program found that adhering to federal guidelines helped ensure integration and acceptance among police, citizens, and other stakeholders.

13h

Lichen is losing to wildfire, years after flames are gone

As increasingly hot and severe wildfires scorch the West, some lichen communities integral to conifer forests aren't returning, even years after the flames have been extinguished, according to a study from scientists at the University of California, Davis.

13h

Lichen is losing to wildfire, years after flames are gone

As increasingly hot and severe wildfires scorch the West, some lichen communities integral to conifer forests aren't returning, even years after the flames have been extinguished, according to a study from scientists at the University of California, Davis.

14h

Udbud: Skat vil købe nyt indkomstregister for 325 millioner kroner

Skat vil købe nyt indkomstregister, det såkaldte eIndkomst, der modtager cirka 10 millioner indberetninger om måneden om indkomst på alle danske skattepligtige.

14h

NASA satellites assist states in estimating abundance of key wildlife species

Climate and land-use change are shrinking natural wildlife habitats around the world. Yet despite their importance to rural economies and natural ecosystems, remarkably little is known about the geographic distribution of most wild species — especially those that migrate seasonally over large areas.

15h

NASA satellites assist states in estimating abundance of key wildlife species

Climate and land-use change are shrinking natural wildlife habitats around the world. Yet despite their importance to rural economies and natural ecosystems, remarkably little is known about the geographic distribution of most wild species—especially those that migrate seasonally over large areas. By combining NASA satellite imagery with wildlife surveys conducted by state natural resources agenci

15h

Can rare lymphocytes combat rheumatoid arthritis?

Immunologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have demonstrated that ILC2, a group of rare lymphoid cells, play a key role in the development of inflammatory arthritis. ILCs have several functional similarities to T-cells and are important agents of our congenital immune system. The FAU researchers' findings could form the basis for new approaches for treating rheumatoid arthr

15h

Why house sparrows lay both big and small eggs

Bigger isn't always better, as biologists who spent six years looking at the egg sizes of an insular population of house sparrows on Hestmannoy in Norway discovered. Having different sized eggs allowed the sparrows to raise successful nestlings, no matter the weather, the researchers found.

15h

Higher alcohol taxes are cost-effective in reducing alcohol harms

Increasing taxes on alcohol is one of the most cost-effective methods of reducing the harms caused by alcohol consumption, according to research in the new issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

15h

Following federal guidelines may help acceptance of police use of body-worn cameras

A new study that examined how Tempe, Ariz., planned and carried out a body-worn camera program found that adhering to federal guidelines helped ensure integration and acceptance among police, citizens, and other stakeholders.

15h

Samsung Galaxy Note 9: Watch Live Stream, Date, Start Time

Samsung's big summer show, Galaxy Unpacked, kicks off today. Here's how to tune in.

16h

Apples nye datacenter vil anvende overskudsvarmen – måske

Ingeniøren har besøgt Apples nye datacenter, som er under opførelse ved Viborg. Der er endnu intet fysisk tegn på, at man har planer om at udnytte overskudsvarmen fra det enorme datacenter.

16h

Ketogenic diets may lead to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes

New research published in the Journal of Physiology indicates that ketogenic diets, which are low carbohydrate high fat eating plans that are known to lead to weight loss, may cause an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in the early stage of the diet.

19h

New York City Limits the Number of Ubers and Lyfts on Its Streets

The Big Apple deals the ride-hail companies with their first set of serious American regulations. Which city will impose regulations next?

19h

To Evolve Baleen, Lose Your Teeth First

Whale ancestors probably never had teeth and baleen at the same time, and only developed baleen after trying toothlessness and sucking in prey. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Parker Solar Probe: How Nasa is trying to 'touch' the Sun

Nasa's Parker Solar Probe will get closer to our star than any other in history.

20h

YouTube now displays facts below conspiracy theory videos

Global warming, the MMR vaccine, UFOs, and more are in the spotlight so far. But will it work? Read More

20h

Female doctors boost women’s survival after heart attack

Women who have had a heart attack have a significantly higher survival rate when a female doctor treats them in the emergency room, a new study of nearly 582,000 cases shows. In fact, in the sample, 1,500 fewer women would have died—women male doctors treated—if their survival rate was the same as women female physicians treated. Further, women had a better survival rate with male doctors who hav

20h

See over 300 artworks in the Uffizi without going to Italy

You can now see some of the world’s most admired ancient artifacts and sculptures in 3D from home. A new website contains over 300 digitized sculptures and fragments from the collection of the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. The Uffizi Gallery, adjacent to the Piazza della Signoria in central Florence, houses some of the world’s finest masterpieces, including works by Botticelli, Caravaggio, d

20h

'Believing you're a winner' gives men a testosterone boost and promiscuous disposition

New findings suggest that the male body tries to 'optimize' self-perceived improvements in social status through hormonal shifts that promote 'short-term mating.'

21h

Soy may strengthen bones before and after menopause

Soy protein in food might be a way to counter the negative effects of menopause on bone health—and may also have benefits for women who haven’t yet reached menopause, a study with rats shows. Osteoporosis, decreased physical activity, and weight gain are serious health concerns for postmenopausal women, researchers say. “The findings suggest that all women might see improved bone strength by addi

21h

Blocking 1 gene curbs lung cancer’s growth

In a new study, reducing or inhibiting a gene called NOVA1 in turn reduced or prevented human non-small lung cancer tumors from growing, researchers report. When researchers injected mice with non-small cell lung cancer cells that contained the gene NOVA1, three of four mice formed tumors. When they injected the mice with cancer cells without NOVA1, three of four mice remained tumor-free. “Non-sm

21h

The Lancet Psychiatry: Exercise linked to improved mental health, but more may not always be better

Peer-reviewed / Observational study / PeopleA study of 1.2 million people in the USA has found that people who exercise report having 1.5 fewer days of poor mental health a month, compared to people who do not exercise. The study found that team sports, cycling, aerobics and going to the gym are associated with the biggest reductions, according to the largest observational study of its kind publis

21h

Beloved Baby Eaglet In D.C. Euthanized After Suffering West Nile Disease

Valor was one of two young eaglets in a nest at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C. The tree is monitored 24/7 by a popular webcam. He fell from the nest late last month, and died on Tuesday. (Image credit: American Eagle Foundation, EAGLES.ORG; Screenshot by Flickr user heights.18145)

21h

Boxers or briefs? Loose-fitting underwear may benefit sperm production

Men who most frequently wore boxers had significantly higher sperm concentrations and total sperm counts when compared with men who did not usually wear boxers, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

22h

Largest study yet shows type of underwear is linked to men's semen quality

Men who wear boxer shorts have higher sperm concentrations than men who wear tighter fitting underwear, according to new research published in Human Reproduction. The study differs from previous research on this topic because it includes a larger number of men (656) than previous studies, and because it is the first to go beyond the traditional, narrow focus on semen quality and include informatio

22h

The Most Powerful Publishers in the World Don’t Give a Damn

There is a meme you maybe won’t remember, from a different internet epic, that goes like this: Are bloggers journalists? It was a real question that became a joke because it’s the kind of thing someone would ask now only with a wink of nostalgia for the naiveté of an earlier time, when terms like hyperlocal and blogosphere were used in earnest. The web itself was different then, and the way peopl

22h

Trilobites: Give a Cow a Brush, and Watch It Scratch That Itch

Some researchers think mechanical brushes aren’t just some spa amenity for dairy cows — they’re important to the animal’s well-being.

22h

Asbestos in a Crayon, Benzene in a Marker: A School Supply Study’s Toxic Results

A public interest group tested 27 back-to-school products and found dangerous chemicals in four of them.

22h

Are Tighty-Whities Bad for a Man's Sperm Count?

Deciding between boxers and briefs may be about more than just comfort. Men's underwear choices may affect their sperm health, a new study suggests.

22h

Boxers Or Briefs? Experts Disagree Over Tight Underwear's Effect On Male Fertility

The jury's still out on whether underwear preference matters to male fertility, but men who wear briefs, or other tight options, were found to have slightly lower sperm counts in a new study. (Image credit: Michael Cogliantry/Getty Images)

22h

Is There A Better Way To Fight Massive Wildfires?

Massive wildfires in Western states are rapidly depleting funds set aside to fight fires. At the same time, many experts argue our priorities are wrong — we should be spending more on prescribed burns, and less on fighting fires in unpopulated areas.

22h

Explore 1 Of The World's Largest Collections Of Bird Eggs And Nests

The Western Foundation for Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo, Calif., houses one of the largest collections of birds eggs and nests in the world. As part of our summer road trip collaboration with Atlas Obscura, we explore the collection and meet the scientists who run the foundation.

22h

Itsy bitsy spider robots might crawl around inside you one day

Health They're the smallest soft robots of their kind. Harvard University's new peacock spider robot is less than an inch long, and it has some amazing properties.

22h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Collins His Lawyer

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Republican Representative Chris Collins of New York was indicted on insider trading charges and subsequently removed from the House Energy and Commerce Committee by Speaker Paul Ryan. Senator Rand Paul said he delivered a letter from President Trump to the administration of Russian President

22h

This Meteor 'Exploded' Over Greenland, But Nobody Saw It. Here's Why It Matters.

A fireball that streaked across the sky above the Thule Air Base in Greenland on July 25 was notable for not only the 2.1 kilotons of energy it released but also the stir it caused on social media.

22h

Invasive species: How the tegu lizard could invade the southern U.S.

With the tegu’s successful occupation of Florida’s ecosystems, a new study predicts that this invasive species could potentially spread across the southern U.S. and into Mexico. But these voracious lizards are just another incident in our devastating history of invasive species. Read More

22h

Sorry, men, there’s no such thing as ‘dirt blindness’ – you just need to do more housework

While the gender gap is narrowing, women still do seven hours more housework per week than men (and that doesn’t include the child-caring). Read More

22h

Dying groundskeeper battles chemical giant Monsanto

Cancer-stricken Dewayne Johnson vowed to fight to his death in a David versus Goliath court battle against agrochemical giant Monsanto, whose weed killer he blames for robbing him of his future.

22h

New York moves to cap Uber, app-ride vehiclesNYC City Cap Uber Lyft

New York's city council on Wednesday dealt a blow to Uber and other car-for-hire companies, passing a bill to cap the number of vehicles they operate and impose minimum pay standards on drivers.

22h

New York City has hit Uber with a cap on new carsNYC City Cap Uber Lyft

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22h

The Atlantic Daily: Nebulous Chatter

What We’re Following As Goes Ohio … : The closely watched special election in Ohio’s reliably red 12th district went to Troy Balderson, the Republican candidate, by a slim margin Tuesday night. That tight race might point to a chance for Democrats to win House seats in suburban districts this fall. At the recent Netroots Nation conference, however, progressive Democrats were less concerned with w

22h

Best of both worlds: Combining two skeleton-building chemical reactions

Scripps Research scientists have developed a powerful new strategy for synthesizing molecular skeletons of chemicals used in drugs and other important products, a technique that provides unprecedented flexibility and control over chemical synthesis, according to a paper published July 30 in Nature.

22h

GPM passes over weakening Hurricane John

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite provided very good coverage of hurricane John when it passed above the eye of the tropical cyclone on August 8, 2018. GPM found heavy rainfall within the large hurricane.

22h

Exercise can help beat cocaine addiction, study finds

Exercise can help prevent relapses into cocaine addiction, according to new research led by the University at Buffalo.

22h

Inducing labor can help prevent cesarean births

A new national study has found that inducing labor in first-time mothers at 39 weeks can help prevent cesarean births and high blood pressure. The University of Texas Medical Branch participated in the study and Dr. George Saade, chief of obstetrics and the principal investigator at UTMB, said that babies born to women induced at 39 weeks did not have worse outcomes compared to those who were not

22h

As Medicaid work requirements gain traction, experts propose ways to reduce potential harm

Before Medicaid work requirements get into full gear, a team of Medicaid researchers is offering specific recommendations to help states ensure that they don't harm the health of people enrolled in Medicaid. They recommend focusing on adults under 50 in expansion plans, clearly guiding physicians on certifications, offering services to support working and job-seeking enrollees, and spacing out rep

22h

Inducing labor at 39 weeks reduces likelihood of C-sections

Inducing labor in healthy first-time mothers in the 39th week of pregnancy results in lower rates of cesarean sections compared with waiting for labor to begin naturally at full term, according to a multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).Additionally, infants born to women induced at 39 weeks did not experience more stillbirths, newborn deaths or other major health com

22h

Inducing labor at 39 weeks decreases need for cesarean section

Inducing labor in healthy women at 39 weeks into their pregnancy reduces the need for cesarean section and is at least as safe for mother and baby as waiting for spontaneous labor. Choosing to induce could also reduce the risk that mothers will develop preeclampsia and that newborns will need respiratory support after delivery, according to a study publishing in the New England Journal of Medicine

22h

Induced labor at 39 weeks reduces cesarean births

For many years, obstetricians counseled women that inducing labor increased the likelihood of a cesarean birth, although there was no solid evidence in clinical trials to support that. Now, a large national study shows electively inducing labor at 39 weeks actually reduces the rate of cesarean deliveries and decreases maternal and fetal complications. Newborns have fewer respiratory problems. Wome

22h

Why This Little Boy's Cough Sounds Like a Squeaky Toy

While most coughs sound hoarse or hacky, one young boy in India had a cough that squeaked.

23h

More young footballers dying of heart problems than thought, FA study finds

FA increases number of screenings for youth players after study finds several players died of heart problems not spotted by tests Young footballers are dying from heart problems at a higher rate than was previously thought, according to doctors who oversee the cardiac screening programme for the Football Association. Their evaluation of 20 years of screening young footballers at the age of 16 who

23h

CVS-Brand Nasal Spray Recalled for Potential Bacterial Contamination

A CVS-brand nasal spray is being voluntarily recalled due to potential bacterial contamination, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today (Aug. 8).

23h

Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not?

Young women with simple pregnancies can safely ask a doctor to induce labor, a study finds. It doesn't increase their risk of needing a C-section after all and can even offer potential benefits. (Image credit: Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images)

23h

Best of both worlds: Combining two skeleton-building chemical reactions

The method could speed the discovery of new drugs and other products by offering the ability to simply and efficiently build a wide variety of molecular architectures.

23h

Sexy Sea Worms Light Up Bermuda in One-of-a-Kind Mating Ritual

There's a bioluminescent marine worm party off Bermuda, and everyone's invited.

23h

Genetic mutations of appendix cancer identified, may impact treatment

To understand why some patients with appendix cancer respond to standard treatment while others do not, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with Foundation Medicine, performed genetic profiling on 703 appendiceal tumors — the largest such study of this disease to date — to compare mutations present in both cancer types.

23h

What It Would Take for Iran to Talk to Trump

On August 6, Donald Trump’s administration reimposed economic sanctions on Iran that Barack Obama’s administration had lifted when it signed the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) in 2015, the anticipated next step following Trump’s decision to leave the deal in May. Since then, the Trump administration has talked about bringing more economic pressure on Tehran not only to end its nuclear

23h

23h

Ten ways climate change can make wildfires worse

As out-of-control wildfires ravage large swathes of Portugal, Spain and northern California, AFP talked to scientists about the ways in which global warming can amplify the problem.

23h

Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s Disease?

Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s Disease? Instead of trying to fight the disease, researchers are focusing on beefing up the brain cells to live alongside the disease. Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s Disease? Video of Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s Disease? Human Wednesday, August 8, 2018 – 16:30 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — I have a friend whose grandmother died of Alzheimer’s di

23h

23h

Doubts Arise Again About CRISPR'd Human Embryos

One lab finds that a similar method produces large genetic deletions when performed in mouse embryos.

1d

By turning its back on Wall Street, Tesla could avoid market pressures

Exiting US stock markets, a possibility raised Tuesday by Tesla CEO Elon Musk, could ease some of the pressure on the electric automaker but will come at a hefty cost.

1d

New York Times to pass 4 million subscribers 'soon'

The New York Times, the most prestigious newspaper in the United States, announced Wednesday that it expects to "soon" cross the threshold of four million subscribers, even if growth is slowing.

1d

Support increases when opioid 'safe consumption sites' called 'overdose prevention sites'

'Safe consumption sites,' where people can use pre-obtained drugs with medically trained personnel on hand to treat overdoses, garner higher public support when they are called 'overdose prevention sites,' according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

1d

NASA's GPM passes over weakening Hurricane John

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite provided very good coverage of hurricane John when it passed above the eye of the tropical cyclone on Aug. 8, 2018. GPM found heavy rainfall within the large hurricane.

1d

New RNA & DNA-sequencing platform matches thousands of drugs to late-stage cancer patients

A comprehensive RNA and DNA sequencing platform benefits late-stage and drug-resistant multiple myeloma patients by determining which drugs would work best for them, according to results from a clinical trial published in JCO Precision Oncology in August.

1d

New guideline released for managing vegetative and minimally conscious states

For people in a vegetative or minimally conscious state caused by brain injury, an accurate diagnosis and ongoing medical and rehabilitative care based on the latest scientific evidence could mean a better chance for recovery, according to a new guideline by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the National Institute on Disability, Independent L

1d

California Company Reaches $119.5 Million Settlement Over Massive Gas Leak

For months, starting in late 2015, a gas leak in Los Angeles spewed methane into the air. The Southern California Gas Company has agreed to reimburse local governments and mitigate the damage. (Image credit: Ted Soqui/Corbis via Getty Images)

1d

Suomi NPP satellite find Typhoon Shanshan near Japan's coast

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite caught up with Typhoon Shanahan and provided forecasters with a visible picture of the storm on Aug. 8. The satellite image revealed the storm still maintained an eye, although now cloud-filled.

1d

NASA sees wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Yagi

Tropical Storm Yagi was experiencing wind shear when NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and analyzed the storm.

1d

Bad policing, bad law, not 'bad apples,' behind disproportionate killing of black men

Killings of unarmed black men by white police officers across the nation have garnered massive media attention in recent years, raising the question: Do white law enforcement officers target minority suspects?

1d

Scientists 'squeeze' nanocrystals in a liquid droplet into a solid-like state – and back again

A team led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) found a way to make a liquid-like state behave more like a solid, and then to reverse the process.

1d

Online Stock Trading Has Serious Security Holes

An analysis of dozens of trading platforms reveals a range of cybersecurity concerns across mobile, desktop, and the web.

1d

Research reveals effective method to control algae growth on Hawaiian coral reefs

Researchers with the State of Hawai'i Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) and the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa found a management approach that combining manual removal and outplanting native urchin was effective at reducing invasive, reef smothering macroalgae by 85% on a coral reef off O'ahu, Hawai'i.

1d

Study illuminates genes behind beautiful 'glow' of Bermuda fireworms

A new study looks at the genes behind an incredible, luminous seasonal mating display produced by swarms of bioluminescent marine Bermuda fireworms. The new research confirms that the enzymes responsible for the fireworms' glow are unique among bioluminescent animals and entirely unlike those seen in fireflies. The study also examines genes associated with some of the dramatic — and reversible —

1d

New discovery sheds light on proteins critical in mood and behavior disorders

Researchers have found new evidence of how certain transport proteins are working at the molecular level, paving the way for new, improved drugs to treat psychiatric disorders.

1d

Specific brain circuit tied to sociability in mice

Social behavior in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder normalized when investigators triggered the release of a specific signaling substance, serotonin, in a single part of the animals' brains, according to a new study.

1d

World record: Fastest 3-D tomographic images at BESSY II

A team has developed an ingenious precision rotary table at the EDDI beamline at BESSY II and combined it with particularly fast optics. This enabled them to document the formation of pores in grains of metal during foaming processes at 25 tomographic images per second — a world record.

1d

Seed coats could lead to strong, tough, yet flexible materials

Inspired by elements found in nature, researchers say the puzzle-like wavy structure of the delicate seed coat, found in plants like succulents and some grasses, could hold the secret to creating new smart materials strong enough to be used in items like body armor, screens, and airplane panels.

1d

Salk Institute Settles Two Gender Discrimination Suits

A third case against the biomedical institute will be heard in court.

1d

China is using robotic doves to spy on citizens

China has for years been using robotic doves—drones that look and fly like real birds—to surveil the skies over its provinces, marking one of the most peculiar parts of the nation’s widespread civilian surveillance program. Read More

1d

The true costs of the Afghan war, America's longest and most invisible war

The costs of the War in Afghanistan are astounding and without end, with the war about to enter its 17th year. Read More

1d

Researchers link residential characteristics with productivity one year after brain injury

Model system researchers have examined the factors that influence productive activity one year after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

1d

Research reveals effective method to control algae growth on Hawaiian coral reefs

Researchers with the State of Hawai'i Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) and the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa found a management approach that combining manual removal and outplanting native urchin was effective at reducing invasive, reef smothering macroalgae by 85 percent on a coral reef off O'ahu, Hawai'i.

1d

Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets

Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of this material changes in an unusual way under very high magnetic fields — a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperature.

1d

Mom still matters, psychologists report

If you're a parent who feels your college-age children would choose their friends over you, a new UCLA psychology study has a reassuring message: You're probably underestimating their loyalty to you. The psychologists demonstrated for the first time that when forced to make a decision that benefits either a parent or a close friend, young adults are more likely to choose the parent.

1d

For the first time, scientists are putting extinct mammals on the map

Researchers have produced the most comprehensive family tree and atlas of mammals to date, connecting all living and recently extinct mammal species (nearly 6,000 in total) and overturning many previous ideas about global patterns of biodiversity. The atlas shows where species occur today as well as where they would occur, if they had not been driven away or extinct.

1d

Harmful bacteria thrived in post-Hurricane Harvey floodwaters

Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017, bringing more than 50 inches of rain and extreme flooding to the city of Houston. In addition to wreaking havoc on buildings and infrastructure, urban floodwaters harbor hidden menaces in the form of bacteria that can cause disease. Now, researchers have surveyed the microbes that lurked in Houston floodwaters, both inside and outside of

1d

The weirdest things we learned this week: skin-peeling soup, secret drug toilets, and a chlorinated ocean

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

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NASA sees wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Yagi

Tropical Storm Yagi was experiencing wind shear when NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and analyzed the storm.

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Big feature update from KrzysztofKruk for Scouts+

KrzysztofKruk has been hard at work building player-requested features into his addon scripts. Today we’re pleased to launch them Eyewire-wide! Here’s a list of the awesome new features which are available to Eyewirers ranked Scout or higher. Utilities – Option for compacted Scout’s Log – Regrow Seed and Remove Duplicates buttons added – Dataset borders – Shortcut (“G”) to inspect and exit a cube

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Alan Rabinowitz, Conservationist of Wild Cats, Dies at 64

Mr. Rabinowitz made it his life’s mission to preserve lions, tigers, leopards and cheetahs after childhood encounters with a jaguar at the Bronx Zoo

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Introducing the latest in textiles: Soft hardware

Researchers have incorporated electronic devices into soft fabrics, potentially making it possible to produce clothing that communicates optically with other devices.

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There and back again: Mantle xenon has a story to tell

Volatiles — such as water, carbon dioxide and the noble gases — come out of the earth's interior through volcanism and may be injected into the mantle from the atmosphere, a pair of processes called mantle degassing and regassing. The exchange controls the habitability of the planet. This transport could not have begun much before 2.5 billion years ago, according to new research that also establ

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Wild Cat Conservationist Alan Rabinowitz Dies

The “Indiana Jones of Wildlife Protection” helped established nature preserves around the world.

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Inside Trump’s Voter-Fraud Crusade

Donald Trump doesn’t like witch hunts. He’s made that abundantly clear on Twitter and in press conferences, thundering against a Russia investigation that he claims is based on nothing but hot air. Let the president tell it, and the entire endeavor is a product of cooperation between partisan elements and biased media designed to undermine him, all without any evidence. Of course, until early thi

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Bad policing, bad law, not 'bad apples,' behind disproportionate killing of black men

Killings of unarmed black men by white police officers across the nation have garnered massive media attention in recent years, raising the question: do white law enforcement officers target minority suspects? A recent study says no.

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NASA sees major Hurricane Hector moving south of Hawaii

Hurricane Hector maintained its major hurricane status on Aug. 8 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with cloud top temperatures in Hector so they could pinpoint the strongest part of the storm.

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PCR: Amplified to the End Point

Download this eBook from The Scientist, made possible by an educational grant from Canon BioMedical, to learn more about the history of polymerase chain reaction, applications for PCR, how to overcome common PCR obstacles, and increasing throughput to record speeds.

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Historic Cat Photos on International Cat Day

Earlier this century, the International Fund for Animal Welfare declared August 8 to be International Cat Day, a day set aside to celebrate our feline friends, which apparently just can’t get enough attention. To honor this day, I’ve gathered a small collection of archival images of cats and kittens below. Fashions and technologies may change over time, but cats never go out of style.

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A Disappointing New Problem With Geo-Engineering

Over the past few years, I’ve heard dozens of scientists talk about solar geo-engineering, the once outlandish idea that humanity should counteract climate change by releasing special gases into the stratosphere to reflect away sunlight and cool the planet. But I’ve never heard it discussed in quite the terms of Jonathan Proctor , an agricultural economist at UC Berkeley. “You’re in an arena with

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Team shows laser ranging can 'see' 3-D objects melting in fires

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used a laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system to image three-dimensional (3-D) objects melting in flames. The method could offer a precise, safe and compact way to measure structures as they collapse in fires.

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