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Nyheder2018august10

 

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Laziness helped lead to extinction of Homo erectus

New archaeological research has found that Homo erectus, an extinct species of primitive humans, went extinct in part because they were 'lazy'.

7h

Laziness led to extinction of Homo erectus

New archaeological research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found that Homo erectus, an extinct species of primitive humans, went extinct in part because they were 'lazy'.

10h

Just 10 streams carry 95% of all river-borne plastic into the ocean

Just ten rivers are responsible for up to 95% of all river-borne plastic trash that ends up in the sea. Silver lining: cleaning them up would have a huge positive impact. Read More

5h

LATEST

What if AI is coming for jobs faster than we thought?

The pool of things that "AI Can't Do" appears to be steadily shrinking. Read More

10min

Following sex, some men have unexpected feelings – study

A new study shows that some men's reaction to sex is not what you'd expect, resulting in a condition previously observed in women. Read More

10min

CRISPR Can Track Cellular History of a Mammalian Embryo

Researchers used the genome-editing technology to analyze the development of mouse tissues.

16min

The Atlantic Daily: Latent Power

What We’re Following Confronting Charlottesville: This weekend marks the one-year anniversary of the white-supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Since the event, the alt-right’s message has been championed by conservative media and Donald Trump’s White House. Meanwhile, the city and its citizens are still healing and the University of Virginia is working to confront its

18min

Are You Listening? Hear What Uninterrupted Silence Sounds Like

Inside the Hoh Rain Forest in Washington state, acoustics experts have attempted to preserve a location free of human-made noise. They call it One Square Inch of Silence. (Image credit: Samir S. Patel/Atlas Obscura)

18min

Hvorfor er 80 tons fisk i Jyllands næststørste sø døde?

Fisk med en samlet vægt på omkring 80 ton er døde i Jyllands næststørste sø, Filsø, efter iltsvind.

50min

Dealing with digital distraction

Our digital lives may be making us more distracted, distant and drained, according to new research.

58min

First particle accelerator beam measurement in six dimensions

The first full characterization measurement of an accelerator beam in six dimensions will advance the understanding and performance of current and planned accelerators around the world.

58min

Deep in the weeds: Using eDNA sequencing to survey pondweed diversity

Researchers have developed a protocol using environmental DNA (eDNA) to identify aquatic plant diversity, making ecological biodiversity surveys of these plant communities faster and less expensive. Their study on pondweeds — an important bioindicator of aquatic ecosystem health — allows researchers to overcome difficulties in monitoring and identification, and draw conclusions regarding plant d

58min

Studies Unable to Reproduce Results of Two Diabetes Papers

The original work found that an anti-malaria drug or the neurotransmitter GABA could increase the number of insulin-producing pancreatic cells in mice.

58min

Breaking down the Wiedemann-Franz law

A study exploring the coupling between heat and particle currents in a gas of strongly interacting atoms highlights the fundamental role of quantum correlations in transport phenomena, breaks the revered Wiedemann-Franz law, and should open up an experimental route to testing novel ideas for thermoelectric devices.

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Kobached Off

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders criticized a new book by former Trump aide Omarosa Manigault-Newman as “riddled with lies and false accusations.” In her book, Manigault-Newman claims President Trump was caught on tape using racial epithets, and that she was offered hush money after being fired from her job. Trump an

1h

Rescuing antibiotics' effectiveness in face of drug-resistant bacteria

Bacteria — especially Gram-negative strains — are becoming increasingly resistant to current antibiotic drugs, and the development of new classes of antibiotics has slowed. Faced with these challenges, investigators are studying the potential of combination therapy, in which two or more drugs are used together to increase or restore the efficacy of both drugs against a resistant bacterial pathog

1h

Making weight: Ensuring that micro preemies gain pounds and inches

A quality-improvement project to standardize feeding practices for micro preemies helped to boost their weight and nearly quadrupled the frequency of lactation consultations ordered in the neonatal intensive care unit, a multidisciplinary team finds.

1h

Fresh insight into invasive plant that blights UK rivers

New research into the behavior of an invasive plant seen on riverbanks across the UK could help improve the management of the problem, experts have found.

1h

Mechanism of fibrosis development discovered

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an incurable lung disease of unknown origin with limited treatment options. Research suggests that the signaling molecule WNT5A plays a key role in the pathogenic process. Now a group of scientists have taken a further step towards uncovering the mechanisms responsible for the development of fibrosis.

1h

Watch NASA’s Parker Solar Probe LaunchNASA Parker Solar Probe

There’s a lot we don’t know about the sun and its power, and this mission will help to fill in the blanks in the years to come.

1h

First RNAi Therapy Approved by FDA

Alnylam's patisiran interferes with the production of a mutated protein present in people with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis.

1h

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Florida Is Having a 10-Month Streak of Toxic Red Tide

Can clay particles, ozone, or phages stop the algae bloom that is killing wildlife and posing a health risk to humans?

1h

This Amazing Map Shows How California 'Breathes' Water Throughout the Year

Watch how the land in Southern California seems to breathe water.

1h

US wildlife officials eye ongoing Alaska seabird die-off

U.S. wildlife officials are documenting a seabird die-off stretching hundreds of miles along the coast of Alaska.

2h

New study provides next clue to prevent dangerous episodes of low blood sugar in diabetics

A new LSU Pennington Biomedical Research Center study reveals that a novel biomarker might give us new answers necessary to creating a diagnostic tool for hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF). No objective diagnostic tool currently exists for this condition which, if left untreated, can lead to ever-worsening and possibly life-threatening episodes of dangerously low blood sugar.

2h

The first gene-silencing drug wins FDA approval

The FDA just approved the first drug that works via RNA interference.

2h

Devastating toxic algae bloom plagues Florida's Gulf Coast

Tons of dead fish. A smell so awful you gag with one inhale. Empty beaches, empty roads, empty restaurants.

2h

NRL's sun imaging telescopes fly on NASA Parker Solar Probe

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's unique expertise in sun-viewing telescopes will be an integral part of the historic NASA Parker Solar Probe mission scheduled to launch Aug. 11 to better understand how the Sun affects our solar system.

2h

A small team of student AI coders beats Google’s machine-learning code

The success shows that advances in artificial intelligence aren’t the sole domain of elite programmers.

2h

Laziness May Have Driven Homo Erectus to Extinction

It turns out laziness existed long before couches and takeout.

2h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Samsung's Galaxy Note 9, and That Bizarre Smart Home Speaker

Samsung has gone all out with the new Galaxy Note 9. Why?

2h

Millions of Android Devices Are Vulnerable Out of the Box

Android smartphones from Asus, LG, Essential, and ZTE are the focus of a new analysis about risks from firmware bugs introduced by manufacturers and carriers.

3h

Crestron Touchscreens Could Spy on Hotel Rooms and Meetings

The technology company Crestron makes touchscreen panels and other equipment for places like conference rooms, which a researcher found can be turned into hidden microphones and webcams.

3h

Screens are killing your eyeballs, and now we know how

Technology The "blue screen of death" is taking on a whole new meaning. A new study shows the process by which blue light can lead to eye disease like macular degeneration. How will the consumer technology industry respond?

3h

Fly, My Pretties: Carrion-Eating Insects Bring Mammal Data to Researchers

Fly, My Pretties: Carrion-Eating Insects Bring Mammal Data to Researchers Blowflies serve as natural sampling instruments to learn what is pooping and dying in an area. LikeFliesOn.jpg Image credits: Katja Schulz via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Friday, August 10, 2018 – 14:45 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — To get genetic samples from wildlife, researchers could em

3h

NRL's sun imaging telescopes fly on NASA Parker Solar Probe

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's unique expertise in sun-viewing telescopes will be an integral part of the historic NASA Parker Solar Probe mission scheduled to launch Aug. 11, 2018 to better understand how the Sun affects our solar system.

3h

Is the Dinosaur-Apocalypse Story Wrong?

It’s a story we all learned as children: 66 million years ago, a six-mile-wide asteroid slammed into Earth with the force of 10 billion atomic bombs, unleashing giant fireballs, crushing tsunamis, continent-shaking earthquakes, and suffocating darkness—and driving dinosaurs extinct almost overnight. But is it true? In fact, some scientists argue that this is a false narrative. Instead, they prese

3h

USTC develops a family of bioinspired artificial woods by traditional resins

A research team from the University of Science and Technology of China demonstrates a novel strategy for large-scale fabrication of a family of bioinspired polymeric woods with similar polyphenol matrix materials, wood-like cellular microstructures, and outstanding comprehensive performance by a self-assembly and thermocuring process of traditional resins.

3h

Dealing with digital distraction

Our digital lives may be making us more distracted, distant and drained, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

3h

Space Force: everything you need to know about the White House proposal

Mike Pence announced on Thursday a new military branch dedicated to fighting wars in space – but what is Space Force? In a speech Thursday, the vice-president, Mike Pence, outlined plans to create Space Force, billed as a brand new branch of the US military dedicated to fighting wars in space. The idea has prompted plenty of enthusiasm from Star Wars fans and serious defense wonks alike, but also

3h

Gør dig klar til at se hundredvis af stjerneskud i weekenden

Hvis ikke skyerne ødelægger udsigten, er forholdene optimale, når ildkugler flyver over os søndag nat.

3h

How to curb the opioid epidemic? Tell doctors which of their patients died.

A new approach to fighting the opioid crisis involves sending letters to doctors after their patients overdose on prescription drugs. Read More

3h

Australians discover evidence of 25-million-year-old mega shark

This is an extremely rare find; only three similar fossils have been found in the world. Read More

3h

The lovely Perseids’ comet could end life on Earth

The Swift-Tuttle comet is the source of the lovely Perseid meteor shower each August. It’s also getting closer and closer, making it "the single most dangerous object known to humanity." Read More

3h

With launch looming, the Parker Solar Probe is ready for its star turn

The Parker Solar Probe is scheduled to launch on August 11 to become the first spacecraft to touch the sun.

4h

How young people choose their news impacts how they participate in politics

Today's news media landscape consists of more choices than ever before. How young people go about selecting the news they consume in this environment of "information overload" may make a difference in the way they participate in politics, according to new research by a sociology doctoral student at the University of Arizona.

4h

Five rad and random things I found this week

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 53. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

4h

Generating DNA sequence data in the developing world

Globally, biodiversity is concentrated around the equator, but the scientific institutions generating DNA sequence data to study that biodiversity tend to be clustered in developed countries toward the poles. However, the rapidly decreasing cost of DNA sequencing has the potential to change this dynamic and create a more equitable global distribution of genetic research. In research published in a

4h

NASA sees the wind knocked out of Tropical Storm John

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean on Aug. 10 and found that Tropical Storm John had the "wind knocked out of it" as a result of moving over cool waters.

4h

Deep in the weeds: Using eDNA sequencing to survey pondweed diversity

Ecological surveys of biodiversity provide fundamental baseline information on species occurrence and the health of an ecosystem, but can require significant labor and taxonomic expertise to conduct. However, as the cost of high-throughput DNA sequencing has plummeted in recent years, DNA from environmental samples (eDNA) has emerged as a cost-effective source of biodiversity data. In research rep

4h

Researcher reveal insights into brain circuitry

New research reveals novel molecular insights into how multiple cell types drive the formation and maturation of brain circuits.

4h

New water simulation captures small details even in large scenes

When designers select a method for simulating water and waves, they have to choose either fast computation or realistic effects; state-of-the-art methods are only able to optimize one or the other. Now, a new method bridges this gap. Their simulation method can reproduce complex interactions with the environment and tiny details over huge areas–all in real time.

4h

New study finds fake, low-quality medicines prevalent in the developing world

A new study found that substandard and falsified medicines, including medicines to treat malaria, are a serious problem in much of the world. In low- and middle-income countries, more than 13 percent of the essential medicines that satisfy the priority health care needs of the population fall in this category. When looking specifically at African countries, the portion of substandard and falsified

4h

An ion channel differentiates newborn and mature neurons in the adult brain

Newborn granule cells show high excitability that disappears as the cells mature. Little has been known about the mechanisms that create low excitability in mature cells or how excitability of the newborn granule cells changes over time. Now researchers have described key roles for G protein-mediated signaling and the late maturation of an ion channel during the differentiation of granule cells.

4h

Risk-taking, antisocial teens 5 times more likely to die young

Adolescents with serious conduct and substance use problems are five times more likely to die prematurely than their peers, with roughly one in 20 dying by their 30s, according to new research.

4h

Keto Diet Linked to a Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mice

Could this diet cause more harm than good?

4h

How young people choose their news impacts how they participate in politics

Young people who seek out news online on their own, rather than relying on conventional news media or news articles posted on social media, are more likely to participate in political activism and campaigning, according to research by a University of Arizona sociology graduate student.

4h

Team makes first particle accelerator beam measurement in six dimensions

The first full characterization measurement of an accelerator beam in six dimensions will advance the understanding and performance of current and planned accelerators around the world.

4h

A Conversation With: Maria Konnikova Shows Her Cards

The well regarded science writer took up poker while researching a book. Now she’s on the professional circuit.

4h

A U.S. Funding Review Is Hurting Aid Groups and Palestinians

In January, Donald Trump’s administration suspended the financial aid it provides Palestinians, pending what it said was a review. Seven months later, not only are there few indications the review is complete, but the freeze on tens of millions of dollars in mostly humanitarian aid has hobbled the aid agencies that receive the funds, and, more consequentially, crippled the lives of more than 1 mi

4h

Nanostring: BC360 Breast Cancer Classification

Classifying tumors for optimal therapeutic accuracy

4h

NASA eyes Tropical Storm Kristy's strong core

NASA's Aqua satellite found strong storms circling the center of Tropical Storm Kristy.

4h

Researchers Find Source of Strange 'Negative' Gravity

Sound has negative mass, which means it drifts upward very slowly, a new study shows.

4h

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Photos of the Week: Robot Cat, Purple Water, Tunnel of Love

Missiles fly between Israel and Gaza, dizzying views in Hong Kong, hot summer days in Europe, a migrant family is reunited in Guatemala, a boisterous rodeo in Australia, wildfires intensify in California, glass floors are installed in Seattle’s Space Needle, and much more.

4h

Why the Wildfires of 2018 Have Been So Ferocious

How bad is California’s current fire season? Numbers don’t seem to capture it. The Mendocino Complex Fire is the largest wildfire in the state’s history, with nearly 500 square miles burned. The Holy Fire has forced 20,000 people to leave their homes. Sixteen other blazes, requiring 14,000 firefighters , are devouring woodlands elsewhere in California. Some of the “smaller” fires this year would

4h

NASA sees the wind knocked out of Tropical Storm John

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean on Aug. 10, 2018 and found that Tropical Storm John had the 'wind knocked out of it' as a result of moving over cool waters.

4h

Making weight: Ensuring that micro preemies gain pounds and inches

A quality-improvement project to standardize feeding practices for micro preemies helped to boost their weight and nearly quadrupled the frequency of lactation consultations ordered in the neonatal intensive care unit, a multidisciplinary team from Children's National Health System finds.

4h

Generating DNA sequence data in the developing world

For many laboratories in the developing world, lack of funding and practical experience are hurdles to generating their own DNA sequence data. However, the financial, technical, and logistical burden of producing sequence data has dropped precipitously in recent years. Researchers compared methods for generating sequence data in a study in West Java, Indonesia, and present a practical workflow all

4h

NASA eyes Tropical Storm Kristy's strong core

NASA's Aqua satellite found strong storms circling the center of Tropical Storm Kristy. On Aug. 10, 2018, Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed strong storms.

4h

AI model 'learns' from patient data to make cancer treatment less toxic

Researchers are employing novel machine-learning techniques to improve the quality of life for patients by reducing toxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy dosing for glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer.

4h

Four million people in England are long-term users of antidepressants

Data obtained by the Guardian shows that one in six people in England were prescribed antidepressants in 2017 More than four million people in England are long-term users of antidepressants, new figures obtained by the Guardian show. Data released under the Freedom of Information Act shows that more than 7.3 million people were prescribed antidepressants in 2017-18, 4.4 million of whom also recei

4h

Predatory publishers: the journals that churn out fake science

A Guardian investigation, in collaboration with German broadcaster Norddeutscher Rundfunk, reveals the open-access publishers who accept any article submitted for a fee A vast ecosystem of predatory publishers is churning out “fake science” for profit, an investigation by the Guardian in collaboration with German broadcaster Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) has found. More than 175,000 scientific art

4h

Machine Learning Can Identify the Authors of Anonymous Code

Researchers have repeatedly shown that writing samples, even those in artificial languages, contain a unique fingerprint that's hard to hide.

5h

Deep in the weeds: Using eDNA sequencing to survey pondweed diversity

Researchers at the University of Guelph have developed a protocol using environmental DNA (eDNA) to identify aquatic plant diversity, making ecological biodiversity surveys of these plant communities faster and less expensive. Their study on pondweeds–an important bioindicator of aquatic ecosystem health–allows researchers to overcome difficulties in monitoring and identification, and draw concl

5h

Spike Lee Is at His Searing Best With 'BlacKkKlansman'

Lee's latest is his best in years, investigating how identity is weaponized for and against us.

5h

What ‘The Meg’ gets wrong — and right — about megalodon sharks

A paleobiologist helps Science News separate shark fact from fiction in the new Jason Statham film The Meg.

5h

The Common App Will Stop Asking About Students' Criminal Histories

The nonprofit organization behind the Common Application, a single form that students can fill out to apply to any college that uses it, announced this week that, starting next year, it will no longer ask students about their criminal history. The shift could alter the life course for many students with higher-education aspirations who have a misdemeanor or felony attached to their name. The move

5h

Trump Made Socialism Great Again

The election of Trump—and the populist upsurge he helped encourage—has confirmed that politics is no longer the art of the possible, but the improbable. If Trump can win the highest office in the land, then why can’t the rest of us run for something, too? Why shouldn’t a 33-year old Egyptian-American named Abdul run for Michigan governor? Why shouldn’t a 28-year old , who was only a bartender a y

5h

Professional designers explain why the Space Force logos are no good

Military You see stars. They see worrying signs of confusion. Design experts say the new Space Force logos are derivative, trendy, and confused, much like the Space Force itself.

5h

Why we're susceptible to fake news, how to defend against it

Thought processes and belief systems that people develop early in life to help protect against the anxiety and stress of an uncertain world may help explain why some individuals fall victim to what has come to be known as fake news, but psychologists can offer some strategies to defend against it.

5h

What Seven Dave Grohls Have to Say

Dave Grohl walks into the studio. Dave Grohl walks in behind him. Then another Dave Grohl, and another. Seven dudes of identical stringy hair and varying tees: This is the committee to evangelize rock and roll, or so goes one implication of Dave Grohl’s mildly baffling new project “Play.” Snark will inevitably greet the black-and-white mini-documentary that shows the lead Foo Fighter playing all

5h

Novel approach keeps liquids from freezing at very low temperatures for extended periods

Investigators have developed a simple method to maintain water and water-based solutions in a liquid state at temperatures far below the usual 'freezing point' for greatly extended periods of time.

5h

Kidney cancer's developmental source revealed

In the first experiment of its kind, scientists have revealed the precise identity of cancer cells of the most common childhood and adult kidney cancers. Researchers showed the cancer cells are versions of specific healthy cells from developing or adult kidneys. This study could lead to the development of completely new methods of treating kidney cancers.

5h

The first order of Space Force? Pick one of these logos designed by Trump’s PACMike Pence Space Force

The time has come for Space Force, Vice President Pence told an audience at the Pentagon on Thursday. Read More

5h

Novel blood test predicts kidney cancer risk and survival five years prior to diagnosis

In a new study published in Clinical Cancer Research, investigators explore whether a blood test can detect higher concentrations of KIM-1 in patients who will go on to develop kidney cancer up to five years later. Their results show that KIM-1 substantially helped distinguish between those who went on to develop kidney cancer from those who did not.

5h

24/7 work emails impact health, relationships for employees and significant others

Personal relationships and home life suffer for those tied to their work emails round-the-clock, according to a new study. The study is the first to test the relationship between organizational expectations to monitor work-related electronic communication during non-work hours and the health and relationship satisfaction of employees and their significant others. The study is co-authored by resear

5h

Research may help rescue antibiotics' effectiveness in the face of drug-resistant bacteria

Bacteria–especially Gram-negative strains–are becoming increasingly resistant to current antibiotic drugs, and the development of new classes of antibiotics has slowed. Faced with these challenges, investigators are studying the potential of combination therapy, in which two or more drugs are used together to increase or restore the efficacy of both drugs against a resistant bacterial pathogen.

5h

UT-ORNL team makes first particle accelerator beam measurement in six dimensions

The first full characterization measurement of an accelerator beam in six dimensions will advance the understanding and performance of current and planned accelerators around the world.

5h

Amazon welcomes first graduates of program to turn veterans into technologists

Mike Cooper and his four colleagues in Amazon's inaugural class of veterans-turned-technologists won't make a dent in the company's roughly 17,000 job openings.

5h

An Underwater Irish Canyon Is Sucking CO2 Out of the Atmosphere

A research expedition to a huge underwater canyon off the coast of Ireland has shed light on a hidden process that sucks carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the atmosphere.

5h

As Catholic Hospitals Expand, So Do Limits on Some Procedures

Many religious health care institutions do not make it clear up front what procedures they won’t perform, a New York Times analysis shows.

5h

Researchers discover 2 new non-native species in Great Lakes

Cornell University researchers have confirmed two new exotic species, both about the size of a flea, have established themselves in the Great Lakes, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

5h

These Are the Fastest Creatures on Earth But You'll Never Spot Them

Scientists have a plan to study the fastest creature in the world — and hope to use what they learn to build tiny robots.

6h

David Hosack, Revolutionary Nerd

The visionary scientist, physician to both Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, insisted that science “knows not party politics” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Doctors Prescribe Fewer Opioids after Learning of Patient Deaths

Clinicians were contacted about fatal overdoses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

AI model 'learns' from patient data to make cancer treatment less toxic

MIT researchers are employing novel machine-learning techniques to improve the quality of life for patients by reducing toxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy dosing for glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer.

6h

Risk-taking, antisocial teens 5 times more likely to die young

Adolescents with serious conduct and substance use problems are five times more likely to die prematurely than their peers, with roughly one in 20 dying by their 30s, according to new CU Boulder research.

6h

New study finds fake, low-quality medicines prevalent in the developing world

A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that substandard and falsified medicines, including medicines to treat malaria, are a serious problem in much of the world. In low- and middle-income countries, more than 13 percent of the essential medicines that satisfy the priority health care needs of the population fall in this category. When looking specifically at Africa

6h

Did red tide kill a 26-foot long whale shark in Florida?

What killed a 26-foot whale shark that washed up in southwest Florida?

6h

Pro-Abortion-Rights Activists Won in Ireland, But Not Argentina

When Ireland voted in its historic referendum in May to overturn its decades-old ban on abortion, it looked as if more change could follow. If Ireland voted to liberalize abortion access, maybe Northern Ireland would be next. And after that, who knows? The Irish referendum proved that even a Catholic-majority country was ready to have the debate. Perhaps it wouldn’t be long before others would do

6h

Over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements and their effect on lab test results

A new study reports on the results of a survey of patients in 18 European countries which shows that those taking OTC products and dietary supplements are not aware of the potential effects on laboratory test results they may have. In addition, patients do not believe that they need to disclose this use to medical and/or laboratory staff.

6h

Early type 1 diabetes shortens women's lives by 18 years

Women who developed type 1 diabetes before the age of ten years die an average of nearly 18 years earlier than women who do not have diabetes. Men in the corresponding situation lose almost 14 years of life. The lives of patients diagnosed at age 26-30 years are shortened by an average of ten years, according to new research.

6h

Ice sheets of the last ice age seeded the ocean with essential nutrient silica

New research led by glaciologists and isotope geochemists has found that melting ice sheets provide the surrounding oceans with the essential nutrient silica.

6h

An ion channel differentiates newborn and mature neurons in the adult brain

Newborn granule cells show high excitability that disappears as the cells mature. Little has been known about the mechanisms that create low excitability in mature cells or how excitability of the newborn granule cells changes over time. Now University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have described key roles for G protein-mediated signaling and the late maturation of an ion channel during the

6h

First effort of its kind to explore impact of plankton on Earth's carbon cycle

Four scientists from the University of Rhode Island are among 100 researchers from 30 institutions who shipped out of Seattle today to embark on a month-long expedition to study microscopic organisms that live deep in the ocean and play a critical role in removing carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere.

6h

Could Scientists Detect a 'Zombie' Virus Before an Outbreak Occurred?

Will scientists know when a zombie virus shows up, before it's too late?

6h

The Meg: the myth, the legend (the science)

What to we really know about the giant prehistoric shark reincarnated by Hollywood?

6h

Fresh insight into invasive plant that blights UK rivers

New research into the behaviour of an invasive plant seen on riverbanks across the UK could help improve the management of the problem, experts have found.

6h

Amazingly 'green' synthesis method for high-tech dyes

Dyes that are also of great interest for organic electronics have recently been prepared and crystallized. All that is required is just water, albeit under highly unusual conditions.

6h

Trump’s Secret War on Terror

President Donald Trump has dramatically expanded the War on Terror. But you—and perhaps he—would never know it. Since he came into office, Trump has reportedly abandoned Obama-era rules governing the use of drones in noncombat theaters such as Somalia and Libya. Whereas Obama operationally expanded but bureaucratically constrained drones’ use, from what we can tell, Trump’s new rules instead vest

6h

Tech giants still stumbling in the social world they created

Who knew connecting the world could get so complicated? Perhaps some of technology's brightest minds should have seen that coming.

6h

Global funding for adolescent health misses the target

Adolescents make up more than a quarter of the population in developing countries, but only 1.6 percent of global development assistance for health from 2003-2016 went to adolescent health.

6h

Adolescent health undervalued and under-invested across the globe

Adolescent health programs across the developing world receive only a tiny share of international aid, even though young people make up 30 percent of the population of low-income countries.

6h

Association of radiation therapy plus lumpectomy in reduced risk of dying in women with DCIS

Lumpectomy plus radiation was associated with a small clinical benefit in reduced risk of breast cancer death compared with lumpectomy or mastectomy alone in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a noninvasive early form of breast cancer.

6h

Why we're susceptible to fake news, how to defend against it

Thought processes and belief systems that people develop early in life to help protect against the anxiety and stress of an uncertain world may help explain why some individuals fall victim to what has come to be known as fake news, but psychologists can offer some strategies to defend against it, according to a series of presentations at the annual convention of the American Psychological Associa

6h

Researchers won't take dead orca calf away from mother as she carries it into a 17th day

As Tahlequah carries her deceased calf for a 17th straight day, and concerns mount about her health, taking the calf away is not an option because of the tight bond between Tahlequah and the rest of the pod to her baby—dead or alive, experts say.

6h

More than 40 percent of women with asthma may develop COPD, but risk may be reduced

More than four in 10 women with asthma may go on to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study conducted in Ontario, Canada.

6h

Glaucoma may be an autoimmune disease

A new study finds glaucoma may be an autoimmune disorder, mediated by T cells that target heat shock proteins in the retina. The discovery suggests it could be possible to develop new treatments for glaucoma by blocking this autoimmune activity.

6h

Improving air quality could prevent thousands of deaths in India

A new study shows more stringent emission controls are key to India's future health.

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The week in wildlife – in pictures

A Sumatran orangutan, fireflies mating and a sea lion cooling off in record-breaking Californian heat are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading…

6h

It’s Easier to Leave the Solar System Than to Reach the Sun

In a very short time, we human beings have seeded our corner of the universe with all kinds of signs of our existence. We have flung hundreds of satellites into the sky, cloaking the Earth in technology. We sent spacecraft to swing by planets and moons, to orbit them, to roam their surfaces. A few years ago, we reached the invisible line between the end of our solar system and the beginning of ev

7h

A step closer to sustainable energy from seawater

The research group led by Leiden chemist Marc Koper has discovered a catalyst that minimizes the production of chlorine gas during salt water electrolysis. The invention can enable the direct production of hydrogen from seawater. The article has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

7h

California Wildfire Survivors Are Building Back–at a Cost

Residents rebuilding after last year’s deadly Tubbs Fire are taking more precautions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

C-sections less likely after inducing new moms at 39 weeks

Inducing labor in healthy first-time mothers in the 39th week of pregnancy results in lower rates of cesarean sections compared with waiting for labor to begin naturally at full term, according to new research. Additionally, births to women who had inductions at 39 weeks were not more likely to result in stillbirths, newborn deaths, or other major health complications for the baby. “This study is

7h

Ice sheets of the last ice age seeded the ocean with silica

New research led by glaciologists and isotope geochemists from the University of Bristol has found that melting ice sheets provide the surrounding oceans with the essential nutrient silica.

7h

The Taj Mahal is wasting away, and it may soon hit the point of no return

The saying goes that the Taj Mahal is pinkish in the morning, milky white in the evening, and golden when the moon shines. Though this may once have been true for the famously pristine marble monument, a mixture of pollution and poor management has now burdened the Taj with a 24-hour layer of yellowy-brown. Condemning the "lethargy" of restoration efforts, India's Supreme Court recently told the g

7h

Does rain follow the plow?

There are many factors that play a role in whether or not it rains, and new research shows that human activity may be one of them.

7h

Mere expectation of checking work email after hours harms health of workers and families

The study demonstrates that employees do not need to spend actual time on work in their off-hours to experience harmful effects. The mere expectations of availability increase strain for employees and their significant others — even when employees do not engage in actual work during nonwork time.

7h

Soldrevne fly skal løse satellitternes opgaver

Airbus' første 'pseudo-satellit' landede i denne uge efter mere end 25 dage i luften. Målet er ture af flere måneders varighed.

7h

From breast implants to ice cube trays—how silicone took over our kitchens

One of my ice cube trays is a small, yellow novelty tray that, when placed in the freezer, molds water into little duck-shaped pieces of ice.

7h

Touching the SunNASA Parker Solar Probe

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will fly through the punishing heat of the sun’s outer atmosphere.

7h

New details in how sense of smell develops

Researchers have uncovered new details in how the olfactory epithelium develops. The new knowledge could help scientists prove that turbinates and the resulting larger surface area of the olfactory epithelium are one definitive reason dogs smell so well.

7h

2,000-year-old Roman library discovered in Germany

A "new" Roman library has been found in Germany, what might it have had in it? Read More

7h

From A Million Eggs, Putting Together Clues About Science's Past And Future

Egg collecting was once a popular pastime. Now, the pristine specimens in one collection are a key resource for research on a range of topics, from the climate change to changes in bird populations. (Image credit: Samir S. Patel/Atlas Obscura)

7h

What is causing Florida's algae crisis?

Two large-scale algae outbreaks in Florida are killing fish and threatening public health. Along the southwest coast, one of the longest-lasting red tide outbreaks in the state's history is affecting more than 100 miles of beaches. Meanwhile, discharges of polluted fresh water from Lake Okeechobee and polluted local runoff water from the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee watersheds have caused blooms o

7h

We’re at risk of toppling into a ‘hothouse Earth’ scenario

Even if we achieve the carbon emissions reductions that the Paris Agreement calls for, there is the risk of the planet entering “hothouse Earth” conditions. A “hothouse Earth” climate will in the long term stabilize at a global average of 4-5°C higher than pre-industrial temperatures with sea level 10-60 m higher than today. This warning appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scien

7h

Moral outrage online can backfire big time

When outcry against offensive behavior on social media goes viral, people may see those challenging the behavior less as noble heroes doing the right thing and more as bullies doling out excessive punishment, according to a new study. Through a series of laboratory studies, Benoît Monin, a professor of ethics, psychology, and leadership at the Graduate School of Business and professor of psycholo

7h

Precision public health method identifies clusters of respiratory disease in Uganda

A study led by researchers at Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Department of Medicine at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center reports on the use of a genetic sequencing method to identify viral pathogens behind unexplained respiratory illnesses in Uganda over a five-year period. The method, called VirCapSeq-VERT and d

7h

Climate change and wildfires–how do we know if there is a link?

Once again, the summer of 2018 in the Northern Hemisphere has brought us an epidemic of major wildfires.

7h

How 'story maps' redraw the world using people's real-life experiences

Maps are an important part of our everyday lives.

7h

Wearable ‘microbrewery’ tracks radiation exposure

Yeast “microbreweries” within disposable badges could help hospital lab workers track daily exposure to radiation, which would allow faster assessment of tissue damage that could lead to cancer. Made from freezer paper, aluminum, and tape, the patch works by simply adding a drop of water to activate the yeast to show radiation exposure, which an electronic device can read. On a commercial level,

7h

Gender differences at work: Relishing competence or seeking a challenge?

In Oceans 8, when Debbie Ocean is asked why she felt the need to organise a multi-million-dollar jewellery heist, she replies: "Because it's what I'm good at."

7h

NASA Named the Parker Solar Probe for Him. 60 Years Ago, No One Believed His Ideas About the Sun.NASA Parker Solar Probe

Eugene N. Parker predicted the existence of solar wind in 1958. The NASA spacecraft, scheduled to launch on Saturday, is the first named for a living person.

7h

Tick- and Mosquito-Borne Diseases Are Increasing Dramatically

Climate change is one significant reason — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Theoretical Physics Is Pointless without Experimental Tests

Our discipline is a dialogue with nature, not a monologue, as some theorists would prefer to believe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The Meg is a horror story, but our treatment of sharks is scarier

After 20 years of development hell, the film The Meg opens in Australia this week. The screenplay is based on the first of Steve Alten's six-book, horror sci-fi series. The film has been pitched as an action-packed thriller, centring on our hero, naval captain and diver Jonas Taylor (played by Jason Statham) and his monstrous fishy nemesis. The pre-launch trailer, featuring frightening scenes of t

8h

New study reveals proton hydration structures are asymmetric

How water solvates and transports protons is a fundamental question facing chemists and biologists alike and is vital to our understanding of processes such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration.

8h

Resistente bakterier: Landsbylaug er bekymret over nyt sønderjysk renseanlæg

Flere forskningsresultater har tydet på, at rensningsanlæg kan sprede antibiotikaresistente bakterier. Men forskningen kan hverken frikende eller anklage rensningsanlæg for at øge problemet med resistens.

8h

New water simulation captures small details even in large scenes

When designers select a method for simulating water and waves, they have to choose either fast computation or realistic effects; state-of-the-art methods are only able to optimize one or the other. Now, a new method bridges this gap. Their simulation method can reproduce complex interactions with the environment and tiny details over huge areas — all in real time. The authors will present their w

8h

Findings from Marshall University researcher reveal insights into brain circuitry

New research from a team led by Marshall University scientist W. Christopher Risher, Ph.D., reveals novel molecular insights into how multiple cell types drive the formation and maturation of brain circuits.

8h

Mechanism of fibrosis development discovered

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an incurable lung disease of unknown origin with limited treatment options. Research suggests that the signaling molecule WNT5A plays a key role in the pathogenic process. Now a group of scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München working with colleagues from the University of Denver have taken a further step towards uncovering the mechanisms responsible for th

8h

Initiation of potentially inappropriate drugs linked to higher fracture, mortality risk

A recent study published in The European Journal of Health Economics finds that the initiation of potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) is associated with a higher risk of fracture-specific hospitalizations and mortality.

8h

Fresh insight into invasive plant that blights UK rivers

New research into the behaviour of an invasive plant seen on riverbanks across the UK could help improve the management of the problem, experts have found.

8h

MSU scientists unraveled the influence of aging on kidneys regeneration ability

A group of researchers from MSU under the supervision of Professor Dmitry Zorov and Professor Egor Plotnikov studied the effect of aging on key cell processes, such as autophagy, the functions of mitochondria, and response to oxidative stress. The scientists also suggested advanced methods for treating kidney failure. The research was supported with a grant provided by Russian Science Foundation (

8h

Tough life in the savannah? Chimpanzee foods are mechanically more demanding than previously thought

A study led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has analysed the mechanical properties and the isotopic composition of plant foods eaten by chimpanzees living in the tropical rain forest and savannah woodland. They found that the savannah chimpanzees eat foods that are more mechanically challenging and therefore may place higher selective pressures on their c

8h

Amazingly 'green' synthesis method for high-tech dyes

Dyes that are also of great interest for organic electronics have recently been prepared and crystallised at Vienna University of Technology. All that is required is water, albeit under highly unusual conditions.

8h

Study finds flaw in emergent gravity

In recent years, some physicists have been investigating the possibility that gravity is not actually a fundamental force, but rather an emergent phenomenon that arises from the collective motion of small bits of information encoded on spacetime surfaces called holographic screens. The theory, called emergent gravity, hinges on the existence of a close connection between gravity and thermodynamics

8h

Why the Space Force Is Just Like Trump University

Late Thursday morning, after playing a round of golf and firing off an angry missive about the Russia investigation, Donald Trump wrote this: Space Force all the way! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 9, 2018 The tweet is a perfect synecdoche for the program in question: short, punchy, and memorable, but ultimately substance-free. The Space Force and the White House’s rollout for it are

8h

Radio Atlantic: Charlottesville, One Year Later

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play It’s been a year since the violence of the “Unite the Right” rally and the political turmoil of its aftermath. How did Charlottesville change the country? Has the alt-right withered under the new scrutiny or grown amidst the new visibility? And what responsibility do tech platforms have to stop the spread of hateful id

8h

Novel approach keeps liquids from freezing at very low temperatures for extended periods

Investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine (MGH-CEM) have developed a simple method to maintain water and water-based solutions in a liquid state at temperatures far below the usual "freezing point" for greatly extended periods of time. While they currently have accomplished this for volumes of only a few ounces, their approach—described in the journal

8h

The growing energy demand of leisure travel in later life

Once upon a time going to Majorca was considered an adventure to an exotic destination. Nowadays, many older people are traveling much further afield to more far-flung destinations.

8h

How to prevent distracting gadgets from ruining your vacation

DIY Disconnect and relax. You're heading into the wild blue yonder—and you don't want to take your work, social media, and communication responsibilities with you. Here's how to truly…

8h

'Mission to touch the sun': Nasa to launch Parker Solar Probe

On Saturday, the US space agency will launch the fastest object ever made on a journey to our nearest star In the early hours of Saturday morning Nasa mission controllers plan to light one of the most powerful rockets in the world and send their latest spacecraft thundering off to our nearest star. From its launch pad at Cape Canaveral in Florida, the Parker Solar Probe will blast off on a course

8h

Superconductivity above 10 K discovered in a novel quasi-one-dimensional compound K2Mo3As3

A research team led by Dr. Zhian Ren from Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a quasi-one-dimensional superconductor K2Mo3As3, with the Tc value exceeding 10 K for the first time. This newly synthesized K2Mo3As3 crystallizes in a noncentrosymmetric hexagonal structure containing of (Mo3As3)2- linear chains, with bulk superconductivity confirmed via physical property charac

8h

Francisella tularensis infections from foods unlikely

Francisella (F.) tularensis is a highly virulent bacterial pathogen that is resistant to environmental stresses and causes tularemia. This disease affects wild animals, especially small mammals like rodents and hares, and is colloquially known as rabbit fever. F. tularensis infections are associated with high mortality in these reservoir hosts. Humans can also suffer from tularemia, although the i

8h

A land model with groundwater lateral flow, water use, and soil freeze-thaw front dynamics

Scientists synchronously incorporated the schemes of anthropogenic water regulation, groundwater lateral flow and the movement of soil frost and thaw fronts into a land surface model, which is then named the Land Surface Model for Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS-LSM). Results suggested that CAS-LSM is a potential tool for studying land surface processes.

8h

Breastfeeding in Germany from a scientific viewpoint

Is breastfeeding really better? The intense debate on this question has been going on for decades — and is often controversial and emotionally discussed. Breastfeeding is more than just babies' nutrition. It is associated with physical and psychological changes in both mother and child. The challenge for research is to determine the different effects of breastfeeding for mothers and babies. The n

8h

The Best Shark Week Party Snacks

Need the perfect snack for your Shark Week party? The stars of The Food Network are cooking up all your favorite shark bites! Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery h

8h

Animation based on satellite data shows Southern California 'breathing' water

Using an unprecedented number of satellite radar images, geophysicists at Caltech have tracked how the ground in Southern California rises and falls as groundwater is pumped in and out of aquifers beneath the surface.

8h

Derfor gik Blume kold efter 50 meter

Selv topatleter har kun få sekunder, hvor de kan køre med kroppen i tophastighed, siger forsker.

8h

Memory questions for older adults need a revamp

The wording of questions health care providers use to detect patients at risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease may result in patients answering the same questions differently, for different reasons, according to a new study. “When we ask people questions, we assume that they see the questions the same way we do…” For example, when providers ask “Have you had problems with your memory recently?”

8h

The Fox Stands Alone, a Look at *Red Dead Redemption 2*, and the Rest of the Week in Games

There's more to gaming than the newest title—catch up with our weekly recap.

9h

Watch a Sporty AI Teach Itself to Dribble Better Than You

A simulated basketball player can teach itself through trial and error how to finely manipulate the ball, both while stationary and while running.

9h

The Irreplaceable Bee, an Epic Physics Experiment, and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Qualcomm settles vastly reduced Taiwan antitrust fine

US chipmaking giant Qualcomm on Friday agreed a sharply reduced fine with Taiwan after officials said it had harmed market competition and manipulated prices, as it faces a number of probes worldwide.

9h

Over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements and their effect on lab test results

The study reports on the results of a survey of patients in 18 European countries which shows that those taking OTC products and dietary supplements are not aware of the potential effects on laboratory test results they may have. In addition, patients do not believe that they need to disclose this use to medical and/or laboratory staff.

9h

Ice sheets of the last ice age seeded the ocean with silica

New research led by glaciologists and isotope geochemists from the University of Bristol has found that melting ice sheets provide the surrounding oceans with the essential nutrient silica.

9h

Early type 1 diabetes shortens women's lives by 18 years

Women who developed type 1 diabetes before the age of ten years die an average of nearly 18 years earlier than women who do not have diabetes. Men in the corresponding situation lose almost 14 years of life. The lives of patients diagnosed at age 26-30 years are shortened by an average of 10 years, according to research published in the British medical journal the Lancet.

9h

Biomimetic micro/nanoscale fiber reinforced composites

For the first time, through a programmed and consecutive 'brushing-and-laminating' assembly strategy, macroscopic 3D bulk biomimetic twisted plywood structural materials with comprehensive mimicry of structural and mechanical characteristics of their natural counterparts are successfully fabricated from 1D micro/nanoscale building blocks under mild conditions. As expected, they achieve excellent m

9h

Laziness helped lead to extinction of Homo erectus

New archaeological research from The Australian National University has found that Homo erectus, an extinct species of primitive humans, went extinct in part because they were 'lazy'.

9h

Amazingly 'green' synthesis method for high-tech dyes

Dyes that are also of great interest for organic electronics have recently been prepared and crystallized at TU Wien. All that is required is just water, albeit under highly unusual conditions.

9h

Does rain follow the plow?

There are many factors that play a role in whether or not it rains, and new research from the University of Arizona shows that human activity may be one of them.

9h

Palliative care may reduce suicide risk in veterans with lung cancer

New research finds patient care focused on relieving symptoms, stress reduces suicide risk by 81 percent

9h

Midtjylland dropper at udbrede talegenkendelse på kliniske afdelinger

For lange notater i patientjournalerne og for dyrt. Det er konklusionen fra Region Midtjylland, der har stoppet et projekt med talegenkendelse. I stedet vil regionen fokusere på kortfattet dokumentation.

9h

Regioner holder fast i udskydelse af nyt landspatientregister

Sundhedsministerens tilbud om at vende tilbage til den oprindelige tidsplan for overgangen til LPR3 bliver afvist af Danske Regioner.

9h

Students digging into data archive spot mysterious X-ray source

An enigmatic X-ray source revealed as part of a data-mining project for high-school students shows unexplored avenues hidden in the vast archive of ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray Observatory.

9h

Global warming increases risk of frost damage to trees

Climate change is bringing with it not only drier summers, but warmer springs too. This causes trees and shrubs to bud earlier, making them vulnerable to late frost, as ETH forest scientists have now proven.

9h

Scientists uncover new details in how sense of smell develops

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have uncovered new details in how the olfactory epithelium develops. The new knowledge could help scientists prove that turbinates and the resulting larger surface area of the olfactory epithelium are one definitive reason dogs smell so well.

9h

IEA warns easing oil supply concerns may only be temporary

Concerns about oil supplies have eased as major producers have stepped up output, but the respite may be only temporary as tough new US sanctions on Iran approach, the IEA warned on Friday.

9h

E.P.A. Staff Objected to Agency’s New Rules on Asbestos Use, Internal Emails Show

The clash over the proposal exposes the tensions within the E.P.A. over the Trump administration’s efforts to roll back environmental regulations.

9h

The Long Shadow of Racism at the University of Virginia: From 1817 to the Charlottesville Riots

In the 1800s, the University of Virginia rented human beings as a cost-saving measure. These people—mostly men—helped build the institution. Literally. They were mainly put to work constructing buildings on campus. Some of their names are in the university records. Willis, Warner, Gilbert, and so on. It was never a question that renting enslaved people was something that the university would do.

9h

Rise in wolf attacks alarms Dutch sheep farmers

After one wolf killed 26 sheep Dutch farmers worry about installing costly electric fencing.

9h

The rise of cyberlockers—how online piracy is fighting back

Illegal downloading is on its way out. A new report released by polling firm YouGov has found that only 10% of people in the UK now use illegal downloads to access music, down from 18% in 2013. And the recently released Global online piracy study from the University of Amsterdam argued that entertainment streaming services such as Spotify and Netflix mean that far fewer people are accessing copyri

9h

The Other Reason Mosquitoes Want to Suck Your Blood

Mosquitoes are more likely to bite hosts when they are thirsty, possibly increasing disease spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Efter bøvl med Sundheds­platformen: Gave til 200 kroner på vej til medarbejdere

En erkendtlighed fra regionsrådet skal præmiere medarbejderne i Region Sjælland for deres »særlige indsats« i forbindelse med implementeringen af Sundhedsplatformen. »Det er ikke mange basører til hver,« siger kritiker.

9h

The best National Parks for photographers

DIY Grab your camera and capture the beauty inside these natural wonders. You don’t have to travel far to create beautiful landscapes. These fifteen National Parks are visual playgrounds for photographers.

9h

Artificial glaciers in response to climate change?

Receding glaciers and dwindling snowfalls pose a threat to meltwater-dependent agriculture in large parts of the high mountain regions of South Asia. A research team led by Prof. Dr. Marcus Nüsser of Heidelberg University's South Asia Institute conducted a long-term study to determine how creating ice reservoirs, commonly called artificial glaciers, might help counteract seasonal water scarcity. T

9h

NASA counts down to launch of first spacecraft to 'touch Sun'

NASA counted down Friday to the launch of a $1.5 billion spacecraft that aims to plunge into the Sun's sizzling atmosphere and become humanity's first mission to explore a star.

9h

How to stretch for any type of workout

Health Let’s get straight to the science. We’ve compiled the best science-backed evidence out there on how to warm up your muscles, in order of your desired fitness level. Don’t worry, we know you are reading…

9h

Cancer Genome Atlas reveals ‘splicing’ weakness in tumors

Researchers have discovered cancer-specific molecular changes that could inform the development of new cancer treatments. Gunnar Rätsch, professor of biomedical informatics at ETH Zurich, led the research team as they evaluated the largest set of genetic data in cancer medicine: the Cancer Genome Atlas in the United States . The Atlas compiles genetic information on tumor cells from several thous

9h

Is CRISPR gene editing doomed, even as gene therapy enters the clinic?

Anyone watching the recent 60 Minutes segment on CRISPR would conclude that the gene editing technology is on the brink of pouring forth a cascade of cures. But a recent study reveals a mess of missing and moved chromosome parts in the wake of deploying the famed "molecular scissors."

9h

Mutated Gene Could Raise Marine Mammals’ Vulnerability to Pesticides

The resulting lost protein, PON1, breaks down organophosphates in land mammals.

9h

Image of the Day: Single Origin

Despite being made of different materials, zebrafishes’ and land animals’ scales form in a similar process.

10h

How NASA Will Watch the 2018 Perseid Meteor Shower

Every night, 17 video cameras scan the skies for meteors.

10h

Parker Solar Probe: Nasa's daring mission to unlock Sun's mysteriesNASA Parker Solar Probe

The US space agency is all set to launch one of the boldest missions in its history.

10h

Dude, She’s (Exactly 25 Percent) Out of Your League

You’re at a party and you see someone cute across the room. They glance at you, maybe even smile for a second, then carry on with their conversation. You feel the room shrink, your heart rate quicken, your face go red: You’re crushing on this stranger, hard . But then the sensible part of your brain tells you to forget it: That person’s way, way out of your league. Wait a second, you counter: Do

10h

Madeline’s Madeline Is a Bold, Jittery Film About the Creative Process

The act of creating something can be empowering, vampiric, exhilarating, and exhausting—sometimes all at once. It’s also a difficult process to dramatize without feeling tedious or precious, which is in part what makes Josephine Decker’s new film, Madeline’s Madeline, so impressive. A tense, loopy look at acting and writing, the movie is at times deliberately off-putting. But it’s anchored by a s

10h

The Nastiest Feud in Science

1. Gerta Keller was waiting for me at the Mumbai airport so we could catch a flight to Hyderabad and go hunt rocks. “You won’t die,” she told me cheerfully as soon as I’d said hello. “I’ll bring you back.” Death was not something I’d considered as a possible consequence of traveling with Keller, a 73-year-old paleontology and geology professor at Princeton University. She looked harmless enough:

10h

The U.S. plan for a Space Force risks escalating a 'space arms race'Mike Pence Space Force

,United States Vice President Mike Pence has confirmed overnight plans to create a "Space Force" as the sixth branch of the US military.

10h

First coronal mass ejection from a star other than the sun observed

A team of researchers led by Costanza Argiroffi, an astronomer at the University of Palermo in Italy, has found evidence of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from a star that was not our sun—the first ever observed. They reported their findings at this year's Cool Stars 20 meeting in Massachusetts.

10h

Diabetescenter i Odense sætter navn på klinikleder

Overlæge Michael E. Røder er tiltrådt som klinikleder og specialeansvarlig overlæge på Steno Diabetes Center Odense.

10h

Repairs in the basement membrane

Basement membrane (BM) is an evolutionarily ancient sheet-like scaffold that wraps around most animal tissues. BM protects and provides mechanical stiffness to tissues and regulates development, function, and repair. But how it is repaired after being damaged is poorly understood.

10h

When moral outrage goes viral, it can come across as bullying, study finds

On social media, people can be quick to call attention to racist, sexist or unpatriotic behavior they see. But when that outcry goes viral, those challenging the behavior may be perceived less as noble heroes doing the right thing and more like bullies doling out excessive punishment, say Stanford researchers in a new paper for Psychological Science.

10h

The cautionary tail of Comet Swift–Tuttle

Comet Swift–Tuttle, formally 109P/Swift–Tuttle, is an enormous, icy comet on a 133 year orbit around the Sun, and the reason for the spectacular annual Perseids meteor showers on Earth.

10h

Hospitalsenheden Vest finder ledende overlæge i egne rækker

En flytning og at få forskning integreret i hverdagen bliver nogle af opgaverne for Nikolai Hoffmann-Petersen, der er ny ledende overlæge på Medicinsk Afdeling på Hospitalsenheden Vest.

10h

In Photos: Ancient Tomb of Chinese Couple Discovered

A 700-year-old tomb has been discovered in Yangquan City, China, and dates to a time when the descendants of Genghis Khan ruled China. A couple was apparently buried inside.

10h

Ancient Octagon-Shaped Tomb Reveals Morbid Tales from Mongol-Ruled China

In one such tale, depicted in a tomb mural, parents try to bury their son alive.

10h

Research on homemade mosquito repellants finds interesting alternatives

What do burning coffee, eating bananas and drinking gin and tonic have in common? They are among the unconventional mosquito repellents people say they use.

10h

Millions exposed to potentially dangerous metals, new technology could help lower the risk

A unique system developed by Purdue University researchers may help reduce the number of people impacted by health problems associated with the accumulation of metals in the body.

10h

NASA finds Amazon drought leaves long legacy of damage

A single season of drought in the Amazon rainforest can reduce the forest's carbon dioxide absorption for years after the rains return, according to a new study published in the journal Nature. This is the first study to quantify the long-term legacy of an Amazon drought.

10h

Here's How to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower This Weekend

The Perseid meteor shower is expected to dazzle the night sky with hundreds of shooting stars on Saturday and Sunday night (Aug. 11 and 12).

10h

A London Chiropractor Gets His Undeserved Fifteen Minutes of Fame

Thanks to his anti-science and anti-medicine worldview, and a complete misunderstanding of evolution, a London chiropractor is getting some undeserved attention from the media

10h

How Big Is the Alt Right? Inside My Futile Quest to Count

This weekend the second annual Unite the Right rally will provide the best chance to gauge the scale of a group with unknown—but much discussed—strength.

11h

College Essentials (2018): Laptops, Headphones and Dorm Needs

Deck out your dorm, or just make class a cinch with our favorite gear.

11h

NASA's Parker Solar Probe Is Built to Survive a Brush With the Sun

Here’s how the Parker probe was engineered to withstand temperatures spiking to over a million degrees Fahrenheit.

11h

Maybe MoviePass Shouldn't Compare Itself to Uber

There are certain similarities between the two disrupting companies—like spending lots of money.

11h

A faint glow found between galaxies could be a beacon for dark matter

Intracluster light may help reveal where dark matter resides within galaxy clusters.

11h

Every Day Is August 12 in Charlottesville

Corey Long remembers reaching quickly for the aerosol can thrown forcefully in his direction. A man carrying a Confederate flag was yelling, and moving uncomfortably close to him. He began spraying the can, and used a lighter to turn it into a improvised flamethrower. “I was just pretty much trying to back them up, but they just kept coming,” he said. The moment was immortalized in a photograph,

11h

The Doctor Doesn’t Listen to Her. But the Media Is Starting To.

After a while, the true-life horror stories women tell about their struggles to get reproductive health care start to bleed together. They almost always feature some variation on the same character: the doctor who waves a hand and says, “You’ll be fine,” or “That’s just in your head,” or “Take a Tylenol.” They follow an ominous three-act structure, in which a woman expresses concern about a sexua

11h

New substrates make it possible to detect one molecule in a million

SERS, an extremely sensitive laboratory method of analysing chemical composition, is set to become widespread decades after its invention. The main obstacle preventing widespread deployment of this promising research technique has been the poor quality of the substrate on which samples are applied. Now, new substrates that guarantee repeatability of measurements and appropriate signal enhancement

11h

Methyl marks on RNA discovered to be key to brain cell connections

Methyl chemical groups dot lengths of DNA, helping to control when certain genes are accessible by a cell. In new research, UCLA scientists have shown that at the connections between brain cells—which often are located far from the central control centers of the cells—methyl groups also dot chains of RNA. This methyl markup of RNA molecules is likely key to brain cells' ability to quickly send sig

11h

Evolution is getting a rethink after scientists take a closer look at Earth's first animals

When did animals originate? In research published in the journal Palaeontology, we show that this question is answered by Cambrian period fossils of a frond-like sea creature called Stromatoveris psygmoglena.

11h

A new, highly effective and selective molecule to fight malaria

A novel laboratory-synthesized molecule, based on natural compounds known as marinoquinolines found in marine gliding bacteria, is a strong candidate for the development of a new antimalarial drug.

11h

Science of 'The Meg': How Scientists Know the World's Largest Shark Is Gone Forever

In the new movie, one, solitary Megalodon is still lurking in the depths of the Pacific Ocean. Is that possible?

11h

GRAFIK: Verdens længste undervandstunnel på over 135 km

En 135 kilometer lang ingeniørudfordring kan blive til virkelighed mellem Kina og Taiwan. Hvis landene kan enes.

11h

Effort to Diversify Medical Research Raises Thorny Questions of Race

A federal study aiming to collect the health information of one million U.S. residents is limited by the very problems it hopes to solve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Quantum chains in graphene nanoribbons

Empa researchers, together with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz and other partners, have achieved a breakthrough that could eventually be used for precise nanotransistors or, in the distant future, possibly even quantum computers, as the team reports in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature.

11h

Can Television Destroy Diet Culture?

This year marks the 100th anniversary of diet culture as we know it. Compared to the span of human activity and the arc of civilization, the propagation of the idea that fatness should be shamed is a relative blip on the historical calendar. Yes, diets have been around for millennia . Saint Augustine of Hippo dieted. Lord Byron dieted. But diet culture itself—the widespread dissemination of the i

11h

Tbx6 revealed as crucial to heart and skeleton formation from stem cells

Many studies have attempted to identify a single transcription factor that can induce formation of the mesoderm, an early layer in embryonic development, without help from other cellular proteins. None have been successful, until now.

11h

New steel to double service life of oil-field pipelines

The peculiarities of oil development technology in Russian oil fields have created demand for a new steel grade. Existing oil field pipes operate in conditions of constant contact with a corrosive water-emulsion mixture of oil and concentrated salt solutions. This leads to short operation periods (about two years) and unpredictable accidents, which are often accompanied by the pollution of large s

11h

Følg med live lørdag morgen: Nasa sender sonde mod Solen

Kl. 9.33 åbner opsendelsesvinduet for Nasas Parker Solar Probe, som skal i kredsløb om Solen for bl.a. at gøre os klogere på solstorme. Følg med i opsendelsen live her.

11h

Danske Medier om ePrivacy: Ansvarsfuldhed har erstattet paroler

Nyeste ePrivacy-udvikling på cookie-området er et væsentligt skridt mod at redde mediernes truede forretningsmodel, mener Danske Medier.

11h

Sårbarhed i smart city-enhed: Hackere kan potientielt åbne for oversvømmelse

To sikkerhedsforskere har fundet 17 sårbarheder i smart city-enheder

11h

En varm rejse: Lørdag sætter Nasa kurs mod Solen

Nasa-missionen Parker Solar Probe sætter kursen mod Solens korona for at løse en af astronomiens store gåder.

11h

Satellite measurements of the Earth's magnetosphere promise better space weather forecasts

Earth is constantly being hammered by charged particles emitted by the sun with enough power to make life on Earth almost impossible. Life is only possible because Earth's magnetic field traps and deflects these particles, preventing the vast majority of them from ever reaching the planet's surface. The trapped particles bounce back and forth between the North and South poles in complex, ever-chan

11h

Checking emails after work is bad for your partner as well as you

Always-on work culture causes an increase in stress levels for the partners of workers, says new research If your other half’s idea of a great night in is to sit on the sofa and check their work emails, the chances are that they are oblivious to how unpopular it makes them. People who constantly monitored office messages at home felt it did no harm to their closest relationships, but their spouse

11h

Platforms Are Not Publishers

Google, Facebook, Twitter, and the internet are not media. They are something new we do not yet fully understand. We are often doomed to see the future as the analog of the past. Journalists see screens that contain familiar text and images, and that serve what used to be their ads—and they call that media. Such a mediacentric and egocentric worldview brings too many presumptions and misses too m

12h

The Democrats’ Quest to Win the Senate

Few Democratic leaders in 2006 dared imagine they would capture the U.S. Senate in the midterm elections. Yet there they were on the morning of November 9, celebrating on the Capitol steps after ousting six Republican incumbents. President George W. Bush lamented, “It was a thumpin’,” and indeed it was. Many factors fueled the thumpin’—including broad grassroots opposition to the bloody Iraq quag

12h

How a 'Race-Class Narrative' Can Work for Democrats

Updated at 11:26 a.m. ET on August 10 Talking about race is bad, and campaigning on it makes voters feel bad. Or so the conventional wisdom has been in past election years. One progressive organization, though, says specifically invoking racial identity actually increases the efficacy of the Democrats’ message—if it’s done the right way. Demos, a liberal think tank that focuses on voting rights a

12h

Oregon’s Hard Road for a Moderate Republican

Republicans like Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker have campaigned as moderates and governed the same way. Others, like Bruce Rauner of Illinois, have campaigned from the center, then governed from the right. The political future of Oregon may hinge on whether state Representative Knute Buehler, the Republican gubernatorial candidate, is more a goateed Baker or another right-winger in centrist

12h

Meet Iceland’s Whaling Magnate. He Makes No Apologies.

Kristjan Loftsson’s company is the last one in the world still hunting fin whales. His credo: “If it’s sustainable, you hunt.”

12h

Study suggests glaucoma may be an autoimmune disease

A new study from MIT and Massachusetts Eye and Ear finds glaucoma may be an autoimmune disorder, mediated by T cells that target heat shock proteins in the retina. The discovery suggests it could be possible to develop new treatments for glaucoma by blocking this autoimmune activity.

12h

Autoimmune response drives vision loss in glaucoma

A research team from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and MIT has shown that immune cells in the eye that developed in response to early exposure to bacteria are a key contributor to progressive vision loss from glaucoma, the second leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. The findings, published online in Nature Communications, suggest that high pressure in the eye leads to vision loss by s

12h

Novel approach keeps liquids from freezing at very low temperatures for extended periods

Investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine have developed a simple method to maintain water and water-based solutions in a liquid state at temperatures far below the usual 'freezing point' for greatly extended periods of time.

12h

Efter nattens tordenbrag: Hvordan aflades den spredte ladning i en tordensky til et enkelt lyn?

Spørg Scientariet: En læser har undret sig over, hvad der forgår, når det lyner og tordner. Hvordan aflades den meget spredte ladning i en tordensky? Det svarer DTU Space på.

12h

Flertal bag uddannelsesloftet er væk

Liberal Alliance vil fjerne uddannelsesloftet efter næste folketingsvalg. Fordi Socialdemokraterne for nogle måneder siden også fortrød deres opbakning til loftet, betyder det, at flertallet bag uddannelsesloftet nu er væk.

12h

Families Choose Empathy Over 'Tough Love' To Rescue Loved Ones From Opioids

Families are starting to adopt an approach that stresses compassion instead of harsh consequences for loved ones with addiction. Their goal? Keep them alive long enough to recover. (Image credit: Robin Lubbbock/WBUR)

13h

The White Nationalists Are Winning

T he year since the white-supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, has been difficult for the rogues gallery of Nazis and pseudo-Nazis who championed it. Jason Kessler, one of the organizers, was practically run out of town and faces a lawsuit that could force him to name his funders and ideological comrades . Christopher Cantwell, who put on a tough-guy act for Vice camera

13h

French court orders Twitter to change smallprint after privacy case

A Paris court on Thursday ordered Twitter to change its smallprint, according to a consumer group which accused the tech giant of having "abusive" clauses in its terms and conditions.

15h

New Zealand to ban single-use plastic bags

New Zealand became the latest country Friday to outlaw single-use plastic shopping bags, with Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern saying they will be phased out over the next year as a "meaningful step" towards reducing pollution.

15h

Research shows that 'flexible work boundaries' often turn into 'work without boundaries'

Employer expectations of work email monitoring during nonwork hours are detrimental to the health and well-being of not only employees but their family members as well.

15h

Coral reefs 'weathered dinosaur extinction'

Researchers have found that the algae living in coral reefs may have evolved 160 million years ago.

15h

Sundhedsministeren undsiger regioners forklaring på forsinket ny Sundhedsplatform

For to dage siden påstod Region H og Region Sjælland at en ny version af Sundhedsplatformen måtte udskydes fra i år til næste år som følge af en forsinkelse af det nye Landspatientregister. Men det er faktuelt forkert, fastslår ministeren nu.

16h

DNA ancestry tests may look cheap. But your data is the price | Adam Rutherford

Do customers realise that genetic genealogy companies like 23andMe profit by amassing huge biological datasets? In 1884, at the International Health Exhibition in South Kensington, four million punters came to view the latest scientific marvels: drainage systems, flushing toilets and electrically illuminated fountains. There, the scientist Francis Galton set up the Anthropometric Laboratory, where

16h

Court Orders E.P.A. to Ban Chlorpyrifos, Pesticide Tied to Children’s Health Problems

The ruling by a federal appeals court was a major setback for the pesticide industry, which had successfully lobbied the Trump administration to reject a ban.

16h

Biomimicry: Does nature do it better? – podcast

In this special collaboration between the Guardian’s Science Weekly and Chips with Everything podcasts, we explore why it’s so hard to mimic nature

17h

Eksperter: Ferien er ikke løsningen på din stress

Langt de fleste stress-sygemeldinger sker efter ferien. Konsulenthus bekæmper post-ferie stress med bl.a. bøllehat og velkomstbrev.

17h

'Mars awaits': Trump supporters to vote on logo for space force

President’s re-election campaign team organises poll on best symbol for new military unit The Trump administration has announced a new space force to protect America from what Mike Pence has called “the growing security threats emerging in space”. But Trump supporters have been asked to put aside questions like “How much will this cost?” and “Isn’t the air force already doing this?” and instead f

17h

More than 40 percent of women with asthma may develop COPD, but risk may be reduced

More than four in 10 women with asthma may go on to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study conducted in Ontario, Canada, and published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

17h

Mere expectation of checking work email after hours harms health of workers and families

The study demonstrates that employees do not need to spend actual time on work in their off-hours to experience harmful effects. The mere expectations of availability increase strain for employees and their significant others — even when employees do not engage in actual work during nonwork time.

17h

The Academy just added a ‘popular film’ category to the Oscars

The Academy is trying to win back viewers with a reboot, one that brings a new ‘popular film’ category, a shorter broadcast time and an earlier date to the annual ceremony. Read More

18h

Doctors reduced opioid prescriptions after learning a patient overdosed

Doctors confronted with information about patient deaths by opioid overdose became more careful in prescribing the painkillers once they learned the risks first-hand. A new study shows many clinicians do not know about patient overdose deaths once they leave their care. Overcoming the disconnect by sharing news of losing a patient makes the opioid crisis more personal and leads doctors to reduce p

18h

For første gang er der håb for Europas vigtigste våben mod udledning af drivhusgasser

Prisen på CO2-kvoter er mere end tredoblet det seneste år. Den tørre sommer med mangel på vand- og vindkraft spiller lige nu en rolle, men på lang sigt har markedet fået tro på, at en reform af systemet kan virke.

18h

Better Data Could Mean Better Dating

Both men and women tended to pursue mates just 25 percent more desirable than themselves—suggesting they are "optimistic realists." Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Machine learning technique reconstructs images passing through a multimode fiber

Through innovative use of a neural network that mimics image processing by the human brain, a research team reports accurate reconstruction of images transmitted over optical fibers for distances of up to a kilometer.

20h

Penalty kick research hits the spot

New research has come up with the best way to practice penalty kicks if a player favors waiting for the goalkeeper to move rather than just deciding on a spot before taking their penalty.

20h

Pass the salt: Study finds average consumption safe for heart health

New research shows that for the vast majority of individuals, sodium consumption does not increase health risks except for those who eat more than five grams a day, the equivalent of 2.5 teaspoons of salt.

21h

The Arid West Moves East, With Big Implications For Agriculture

An imaginary map line dividing East and West illustrates a climate boundary that has influenced how and where people live and work. Its eastward shift could predict changes in farming and ranching. (Image credit: Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma)

21h

Young drinkers beware: Binge drinking may cause stroke, heart risks

New research has found that young adults who frequently binge drink were more likely to have specific cardiovascular risk factors such as higher blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar at a younger age than non-binge drinkers.

21h

Epigenetic reprogramming of human hearts found in congestive heart failure

Congestive heart failure is a terminal disease that affects nearly 6 million Americans. Yet its management is limited to symptomatic treatments because the causal mechanisms of congestive heart failure are not known. Researchers have now described an underlying mechanism that reprograms the hearts of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, a process that differs from patients with other forms of he

21h

New technology improves CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in mosquitoes, other species

A technology designed to improve CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in mosquitoes and other arthropods succeeds with a high degree of efficiency, while eliminating the need for difficult microinjection of genetic material, according to researchers.

21h

For UW physicists, the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride is full of surprises

Researchers report that the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride can undergo 'ferroelectric switching.' Materials with ferroelectric properties can have applications in memory storage, capacitors, RFID card technologies and even medical sensors — and tungsten ditelluride is the first exfoliated 2-D material known to undergo ferroelectric switching.

21h

How to protect yeast from damage in biofuel production

Some chemicals used to speed up the breakdown of plants for production of biofuels like ethanol are poison to the yeasts that turn the plant sugars into fuel. Researchers have identified two changes to a single gene that can make the yeast tolerate the pretreatment chemicals.

21h

A video game can change the brain, may improve empathy in middle schoolers

A fantastical scenario involving a space-exploring robot crashing on a distant planet is the premise of a video game developed for middle schoolers by researchers to study whether video games can boost kids' empathy, and to understand how learning such skills can change neural connections in the brain.

21h

The President Wants a Space Force. He Might Get One.Mike Pence Space Force

Vice President Mike Pence's speech at the Pentagon laid out what a new US Space Force would do. It’ll cost $8 billion to start.

22h

High rates of dementia in older adults after starting dialysis

Older adults who initiate dialysis for kidney failure face a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Certain risk factors were linked this higher risk. Older hemodialysis patients with a diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer's disease had a high risk of early death.

22h

Primate study offers clues to evolution of speech

New research examining the brains and vocal repertoires of primates offers important insight into the evolution of human speech.

22h

Wearable 'microbrewery' saves human body from radiation damage

The same way that yeast yields beer and bread can help hospital lab workers better track their daily radiation exposure, enabling a faster assessment of tissue damage that could lead to cancer.

22h

Why do some microbes live in your gut while others don't?

Researchers have developed a new computational approach to identify the genes that may be important to help microbes live successfully in the human gut.

22h

Ebola virus experts discover powerful, new approach for future therapeutics

A one-two punch of powerful antibodies may be the best way to stop Ebola virus, reports an international team of scientists.

22h

In apoptosis, cell death spreads through perpetuating waves

In a cell, death is akin to falling dominoes: One death-inducing molecule activates another, and so on, until the entire cell is shut down, a new Stanford study finds.

22h

Recording every cell's history in real-time with evolving genetic barcodes

A new method uses evolving genetic barcodes to actively record the process of cell division in developing mice, enabling the lineage of every cell in a mouse's body to be traced back to its single-celled origin. This approach enables scientists to pinpoint where and when different cells arise and how closely related different cell types are to each other, allowing unprecedented insight into the jo

22h

The pros and cons of NYC's ban on new Uber and Lyft cars

Technology These are the reasons behind the controversial move. No new vehicles will be able to join ride-hailing networks like Uber and Lyft in the country’s biggest city.

22h

Crowdsourced algorithms predict epilepsy seizures

Thanks to the crowdsourcing of more than 10,000 algorithms from around the world, epileptic seizure prediction is possible in a wider range of patients than previously thought, according to new research. In 2016, researchers ran the Seizure Prediction Challenge on the online data science competition platform Kaggle.com. The contest focused on seizure prediction using long-term electrical brain ac

22h

Tools in e-records fail to help patients on lots of meds

Giving patients tools via electronic health records to help them manage complex drug regimens didn’t improve medication adherence or lower blood pressure, a new study reports. “We are increasingly asking patients to do very complicated things with medications, and we don’t always build effective ways to support their successful use of medications,” says Stephen Persell, associate professor of med

22h

Bugs in Mobile Credit Card Readers Could Expose Buyers

Card readers used by popular companies like Square and PayPal have several security flaws that could result in customers getting majorly ripped off.

23h

Biomarker links fatigue from cancer and Parkinson’s disease

Researchers have discovered a link between biological markers responsible for extreme exhaustion in patients with cancer and fatigue in people with Parkinson’s disease. For a new study, which appears in Acta Neurologica Scandinavica , researchers examined blood samples from 47 patients with Parkinson’s disease, half of whom experienced high levels of fatigue—characterized by feeling severely tire

23h

Online daters seek someone out of their league

The majority of people who are online dating seek out partners who are more desirable than themselves, new research suggests. The analysis reveals that hierarchies of desirability—or “leagues”—emerge in anonymized data from online dating networks in four major US cities. “We have so many folk theories about how dating works that have not been scientifically tested.” The majority of people in thes

23h

To monitor soil, ‘listen’ to worms and roots

A new way to analyze soil “listens” to growing roots and burrowing worms. Healthy soil is alive—a principle that applies to both natural and cultivated soils. A large part of what happens underground, however, remains hidden to researchers. Greater awareness of the phenomena involved would be useful in order to better understand the interrelationships in this ecosystem. Researchers have been usin

23h

Pass the salt: Study finds average consumption safe for heart health

New research shows that for the vast majority of individuals, sodium consumption does not increase health risks except for those who eat more than five grams a day, the equivalent of 2.5 teaspoons of salt.The research, published in The Lancet, is by scientists of the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, along with their research colleague

23h

The Lancet: Early age of type 1 diabetes diagnosis linked to greater heart risks and shorter life expectancy, compared to later diagnosis

Peer reviewed / Observational study / PeopleLife-expectancy for individuals with younger-onset disease is on average 16 years shorter compared to people without diabetes, and 10 years shorter for those diagnosed at an older age.

23h

The Lancet: Sodium reduction programmes may only be appropriate for communities with very high salt intake

Peer reviewed / Observational Study / PeopleA new study shows that for the vast majority of communities, sodium consumption is not associated with an increase in health risks except for those whose average consumption exceeds 5g/day (equivalent to 12.5g of salt, or two and a half teaspoons). Communities with high average levels of sodium intake (above 5g/day) were mostly seen in China, with only a

23h

Tight underwear really is linked to lower sperm counts in men

Men who wear boxer shorts have higher sperm levels than men who wear tight underwear, although the difference shouldn't usually be enough to affect fertility

23h

Inducing labour at 39 weeks leads to fewer emergency Caesareans

It has been thought that inducing labour leads to more C-sections, but a study of over 6,100 women suggests this isn’t the case when induced at 39 weeks

23h

‘Hey’: short messages are the best dating site strategy, study says

An analysis of online dating has found most users hit on people who are 25 per cent more attractive than them, and that shorter messages have better reply rates

23h

Police can now track killers using relatives’ DNA – but should they?

Genetic genealogy services are rapidly become a key source of forensic evidence, but do we really want the police to have access to everyone's DNA?

23h

Ecstasy-like drugs might relieve social difficulties in autism

Mouse studies hint that social difficulties in autism might be caused by faulty serotonin signalling in the brain and can be helped with serotonin-boosting drugs

23h

Don’t give up, we can survive even a Hothouse Earth

Bad news on the climate should lead neither to despair nor unfounded optimism. Instead, we need to roll up our sleeves and prepare for life on a drastically changing planet

23h

The underwater drones that hunt for oil spills beneath the waves

Oil behaves strangely in water – now a combination of AI and super-expensive underwater vehicles are being used to track it. Joshua Howgego went along for the ride

23h

US Navy wants to fire a slime cannon at boats to stop them escaping

The US Navy wants to make super-expanding weaponised slime, inspired by the hagfish, that can trap boats in the water

23h

Allergy explosion: What causes allergies and how to avoid them

We've all heard that being too clean can cause allergies, or exposure can help you beat them. Most advice doesn't stand up, but there are things that do seem to work

23h

Allergy explosion: They are on the rise, and here’s why

Banning nuts on planes and in schools may seem like hysteria, but there's good reason: allergies are becoming more common. And you may not realise how you're affected

23h

California’s worst wildfire in history is now the size of Los Angeles

Firefighters are battling high winds and extreme heat as they try to slow the spread of the biggest wildfire ever recorded in California

23h

Neutron stars bend light so much we see their front and back at once

Ultra-compact neutron stars are so dense that the light bends around from the far side, making it possible to see all sides of them simultaneously

23h

New Scientist Live: dogs and people, a 40,000-year love story

In London this September, Juliane Kaminski will be arguing that dogs have spent so long living alongside humans that they have evolved to think just like us

23h

Exploring the Future webinar

Join our panel of experts discussing the emerging technologies that are set to change our lives by 2030

23h

Meet Bob the tame flamingo who has become a local superstar

Bob became a celebrity on the Caribbean island of Curaçao after injuring himself by flying into a window of the island's Hilton Hotel

23h

It took one brave doctor to expose the Flint water crisis. Here’s how

The people of Flint, Michigan, were drinking poisoned water, and the authorities were doing nothing. That’s when Mona Hanna-Attisha decided to take action

23h

Spying on whales: The shocking truth about humans and whales

Despite centuries of commercial whaling, we know astonishingly little about the largest creature that ever lived, argues a new book by a leading cetologist

23h

Time travel to Augusts past: cold cod, thawing mammoths, frozen nerves

Old Scientist returns to topics we covered in 1961, 1981 and 1994 and finds that heatwaves were definitely not on the agenda

23h

Don’t miss: Teen superheroes, upgraded dungeons and Naked Scientists

Listen to mind-expanding podcasts, discover the problem with disappearing sand – and watch a new film from the creators of Stranger Things

23h

There’s no escaping the internet, says artist James Bridle

In New Dark Age, James Bridle expends no little shoe leather mapping the current walls of our eerie futuristic home, in the real and the virtual realm

23h

New Scientist Live: how can we fix a problem like plastics?

Plastic is the material we love to hate, but can we do anything about it? That’s the subject of a major panel debate at this year’s New Scientist Live

23h

Marvel Powers United VR: I saw Captain America’s huge thighs under me

Want to be Black Panther from Wakanda? Or Captain America, Black Widow or Spider-Man? Now virtual reality is finally coming to domestic gaming PCs, you have the chance

23h

Feedback: Firefighters called in to deal with hot chips in Texas

Does anyone have some cool ranch dip? Plus: boxes that make the contents lighter, midnight sun in the UK, the original motion picture, and more

23h

Robot laws: 5 new rules that could save human lives (at least on TV)

From Battlestar Galactica to The Terminator, on-screen robots have never been above a little rule-breaking. Could our new laws of robotics keep them in line?

23h

New Scientist Live: are we about to uncover the dark universe?

Astrophysicists are coming to London this September to describe how we might be about to crack the greatest mysteries of the universe – dark matter and dark energy

23h

Robot laws: Why we need a code of conduct for AI – and fast

From election-rigging bots to potentially lethal autonomous cars, artificial intelligence is straining legal boundaries. Here's what we need to keep it in check

23h

Forgotten giants: Why the time is ripe to revisit Uranus and Neptune

A fleeting glimpse of the ice giants 30 years ago hinted at very weird science that could tell us a lot about exoplanets. Now we have a rare chance to go back

23h

Extreme heat: Why its origins could lie deep in the Atlantic

Swathes of the northern hemisphere are smashing temperature records. Could it be because we’ve broken the ocean currents that stabilise our weather?

23h

Biodiversity: Why the extinction crisis isn’t as bad as you thought

Earth’s life isn’t just beautiful, it ensures human survival. No one denies we’re harming it, but there’s grounds for optimism – and ways to turn things around

23h

From Ancillary Justice to Saga, savour the best sci-fi writing

We are in a new golden age of science fiction writing. Time to kick back and enjoy some of New Scientist's favourite new(ish) novels

23h

Clean up your act with a clock that knows when you last vacuumed

A Fitbit for your vacuum cleaner keeps track of when you last did the cleaning and lets you know when you’ve been slacking off

23h

Don’t miss: Latest Ant-Man film, exoplanets and a mind-blowing podcast

Enjoy the latest film in the Ant-Man franchise, find out what exoplanets can teach us about Earth and listen to an array of scientific marvels

23h

Lifting the lid on the unconscious

Some 95 per cent of thought happens below the radar – by understanding how that works, you can game the system to beat your bad habits and unconscious biases

23h

AI, reality and wildlife crime: All you need for a good read

Enjoy a bravura investigation of our troubled times, discover why aliens exist, and marvel at the bioheist of the century – all the best in holiday reading

23h

Iceman: Our human history is the real star of a film about Ötzi

Who needs visceral thrills when a new movie breathes scientifically grounded life to create a delicate portrait of the 5000-year-old man we know as Ötzi

23h

Medical cannabis: What you really need to know

The UK looks set to become the latest place to legalise medical cannabis. But with its use sweeping the world, many questions remain about what it does and how

23h

How to hack your unconscious… to find your inner creativity

Aha! moments of inspiration seem to come from nowhere – but the counterintuitive key to a creative brain is to defocus your thoughts

23h

How to hack your unconscious… to boost your memory and learn better

It seems like hard conscious work, but much of the learning process goes on deep in the mind. Here are the top tips to improve how you recall facts

23h

How to hack your unconscious… to conquer your fears

Fear helps us survive, but phobias ruin lives. Some simple tricks send signals to your brain to allow you to feel the right amount of fear

23h

Feedback: Paper on canine consent gives a journal paws for thought

Neutering? Bark once for yes and growl for no. Plus: it takes a lot of water to make drought-busting balls, happy world emoji day and more

23h

How to hack your unconscious… to take control of pain

You can determine the amount of pain you perceive – pleasant smells, loving touches and foul language can all be powerful pain-busters

23h

Salt not as damaging to health as previously thought, says study

New research reignites a row with scientists who want to reduce salt intake to near zero Salt may not be as damaging to health as is usually claimed, according to a controversial new study which suggests campaigns to persuade people to cut down may only be worthwhile in countries with very high sodium consumption, such as China. The World Health Organization recommends cutting sodium intake to no

23h

The Atlantic Daily: It Might Be Possible

What We’re Following The Power of a Tweet: On Tuesday, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey protected the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’s right to use the platform. That same day, Tesla’s share price rose after Elon Musk tweeted that the company might go private. The two unrelated events have raised questions about the social-publishing platform’s moral responsibility regarding empirical facts , as well as t

23h

Why the Perseid Meteor Shower Blazes Through the Sky Every Summer

Here's why you can expect a dazzling show in the night sky this weekend.

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Space Force Awakens

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines In a speech at the Pentagon, Vice President Mike Pence detailed the administration’s plan to establish a Space Force by 2020. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s lead over Governor Jeff Colyers in the state’s gubernatorial primary was cut nearly in ha

1d

Help us hear your voice! Take Big Think's survey for a chance to win!

Help us get to know you a little better! We want to keep bringing you the best, most relevant videos and articles. And in exchange, we'll enter you to win 1 of 3 Amazon gift cards worth $100 each. That's our way of saying thanks 🙂 Read More

1d

When Twitter Engineers Speak Out, @Jack Listens

Silicon Valley engineers have the power to shape products and companies—both of which have enormous impact on our society.

1d

You can set your watch to this glowing green worm orgy

Animals And boy is it beautiful. One of the Caribbean’s most engrossing natural spectacles happens every summer and autumn, just after sunset, when shallow waters transform into a fantastic green light…

1d

Penalty kick research hits the spot

New research from the University of Portsmouth could help UK Premiership footballers ahead of the new season, which starts tonight.

1d

Primate speech: How some species are 'wired' for talk

Primate brain study reveals a "wiring" key to our ability to talk.

1d

Cal Fire Chief Discusses How Firefighters Are Battling California Blazes

The Mendocino Complex Fire in California is now the state's largest wildfire ever recorded. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to Ken Pimlott, director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

1d

Epigenetic reprogramming of human hearts found in congestive heart failure

Congestive heart failure is a terminal disease that affects nearly 6 million Americans. Yet its management is limited to symptomatic treatments because the causal mechanisms of congestive heart failure are not known. Researchers have now described an underlying mechanism that reprograms the hearts of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, a process that differs from patients with other forms of he

1d

NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun

A new NASA probe will get closer to our sun than ever before, to try to solve mysteries like why its atmosphere is so much hotter than its surface. (Image credit: NASA)

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Trump Claims California Is Wasting Water That Could Be Used To Fight Wildfires

The president blamed the intensity of the fires on state environmental policies, incorrectly claiming water that could be used to fight the fires is being pumped into the Pacific Ocean. (Image credit: Noah Berger/AP)

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A Weird Water Behavior That Intrigued Da Vinci Finally Has an Explanation

You don't need to go far to see water behave this way.

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NASA Spotted a Vast, Glowing 'Hydrogen Wall' at the Edge of Our Solar System

There's a vast "hydrogen wall" at the edge of our solar system, and NASA scientists think their New Horizons spacecraft can see it.

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A video game can change the brain, may improve empathy in middle schoolers

A fantastical scenario involving a space-exploring robot crashing on a distant planet is the premise of a video game developed for middle schoolers by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers to study whether video games can boost kids' empathy, and to understand how learning such skills can change neural connections in the brain.

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Penalty kick research hits the spot

New research from the University of Portsmouth could help Premiership footballers ahead of the new season, which starts tonight (Aug. 10, 2018).

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Spacewatch: Firing up for a close encounter with the sun

After lift-off, set for Saturday, Nasa’s solar probe starts its six-year flight to within 3.8m miles of the sun – the nearest visit yet Nasa’s Parker Solar Probe is now on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Its launch window will open at 3.48am (eastern daylight time, or 7.48am Greenwich mean time) on Saturday 11 August. Protected by a sophisticated heat shield the probe is designed to go

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Community health centers can help boost rates of colorectal cancer screening

An innovative program in community health centers to mail free colorectal cancer screening tests to patients' homes led to a nearly 4 percentage point increase in CRC screening, compared to clinics without the program, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Kaiser Permanente Northern California's colorectal cancer screening program saves lives

Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California are 52 percent less likely to die from colorectal cancer since the health care system launched a comprehensive, organized screening program, according to a new study in the specialty's top journal, Gastroenterology.

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The Sinclair/Tribune Merger Is Dead. Here’s Why That Matters

It may seem strange to worry about the future of broadcast in this digital era, but the fact remains: that’s how many people get their news.

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Icelandic wildlife group calls for hybrid whale killing probe

Icelandic conservationists have asked prosecutors to probe whether the killing of a rare hybrid whale was illegal, a lawyer said on Thursday.

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Blue light from phone screens accelerates blindness, study finds

Light from digital devices triggers creation of toxic molecule in the retina that can cause macular degeneration Scientists say they have found how blue light from smartphones, laptops and other digital devices damages vision and can speed up blindness. Research by the University of Toledo in the US has revealed that prolonged exposure to blue light triggers poisonous molecules to be generated in

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Uber faces new roadblock in New York on its way to IPO

Uber will have to navigate around a new regulatory pothole in New York on an already bumpy road to its initial public offering of stock next year.

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VP Pence Unveils Plans For New Military Branch In Outer Space

Vice President Pence unveiled the Pentagon's plans for a branch of the military that could fight in space on Thursday.

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Machine learning technique reconstructs images passing through a multimode fiber

Through innovative use of a neural network that mimics image processing by the human brain, a research team reports accurate reconstruction of images transmitted over optical fibers for distances of up to a kilometer.

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Late effects of treatment hinder independence of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors

In the first study of its kind, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have found that more than half of pediatric central nervous system tumor survivors do not achieve complete independence as adults. Investigators looked at six aspects of independence in more than 300 survivors, including employment, independent living, marital status, assistance with routine or personal care needs,

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Tesla stock drops closer to pre-Musk tweet level

After two days of turmoil, Tesla shares have fallen back closer to the level they were trading at before CEO Elon Musk tweeted Tuesday that he may take the company private.

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Brazil wrestles with ban of controversial weed killer

Brazil's government is contesting a court suspension of licenses for products with glyphosate, one of the most common industrial weedkillers and the subject of a high-profile US case against agrochemical colossus Monsanto.

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