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Nyheder2018august12

 

 

Specialized delivery methods to help treat cancer, other disorders

More than 100 years ago, German Nobel laureate Paul Ehrlich popularized the 'magic bullet' concept — a method that clinicians might one day use to target invading microbes without harming other parts of the body. Although chemotherapies have been highly useful as targeted treatments for cancer, unwanted side effects still plague patients. Now, researchers have demonstrated that specialized nuclei

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How to get the best possible gas mileage

Technology The price of gas is creeping up, here's how to cut your bill. Save cash and gas by understanding your ride.

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Scientists Calculate the Speed of Death in Cells, and It's Surprisingly Slow

As death takes over, killing waves wash over a darkening cell.

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Why Are Hundreds of Weird, Heart-Shaped 'Sea Potatoes' Washing Ashore in England?

Hundreds of bizarre, tennis-ball-size critters washed up on a beach in Cornwall, England, this past weekend, surprising beachgoers, who didn't know what to make of the creatures, according to news sources.

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WPSI says screen all women annually for urinary incontinence

All women should be screened annually for urinary incontinence, according to new guidelines from the Women's Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI). Screening should assess whether women experience urinary incontinence and whether it affects their activities and quality of life. If treatment is indicated, women should be referred for further evaluation. The clinical guideline and evidence review ar

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Programming Languages May Finally Be Reaching a Status Quo

In new rankings from analyst firm RedMonk, Apple’s programming language Swift and Android favorite Kotlin saw their meteoric growth slightly slow down.

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Hackers discover way to hijack Amazon Echo and spy on unsuspecting users

Chinese hackers at DEFCON have demonstrated how they were able to hack an Amazon Echo unit, enabling them to listen and record unsuspecting targets. Read More

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Why are some people left-handed? Here's what science has discovered

Why is only 10% of the population left-handed? There are a few new scientific clues pointing to the answer. Read More

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FDA Approves Oral Drug for Fabry Disease

The medicine increases the activity of a deficient enzyme in certain patients with the condition.

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Jury Finds Monsanto's Roundup Responsible for Man's Cancer

A San Francisco court levels $289 million in damages against the pesticide maker.

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Ancient natural nuclear reactors show how to store radioactive waste

Billions of years ago, uranium in the Earth’s crust underwent nuclear reactions on its own, and the remnants demonstrate a way to keep nuclear waste under control

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NASA's IMERG estimates heavy rainfall over the eastern US

Most of the Eastern half of the United States had rainfall during the past week. Some parts of the country experienced heavy rainfall that resulted in flash floods and various other problems. NASA added up that rainfall using satellite data and a program called IMERG to provide a look at the amount of rainfall along the eastern U.S.

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Researchers create specialized delivery methods to help treat cancer, other disorders

More than 100 years ago, German Nobel laureate Paul Ehrlich popularized the 'magic bullet' concept — a method that clinicians might one day use to target invading microbes without harming other parts of the body. Although chemotherapies have been highly useful as targeted treatments for cancer, unwanted side effects still plague patients. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have demons

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People of Easter Island Weren't Driven to Warfare and Cannibalism. They Actually Got Along.

Stone tools found around Easter Island's famous moai statues contradict the popular narrative of social collapse.

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Online forum may provide specialized suicide prevention support for males

An analysis of posts made by males to a subreddit for individuals experiencing suicidal thoughts suggests that the online forum may function, for some males, as a safe space to anonymously share vulnerabilities and receive gender-specific support. University of Arizona sociology graduate student Darla Still presented the work today at the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting.

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Cannabis link to relieving intestinal inflammation explained

Reports from cannabis users that the drug reduces the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may finally be explained by new research from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Bath showing that endocannabinoids help control and prevent intestinal inflammation in mice.

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Fierce and Unpredictable: How Wildfires Became Infernos

A division of the U.S. Forest Service is studying fire behavior as the blazes in the West become hotter and spread faster than ever before.

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First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments

Giant cancer cells are much larger and stiffer than other cancer cells and move further, study shows.

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Shrinking Protected Areas Can Hurt Genetic Diversity

Shrinking Protected Areas Can Hurt Genetic Diversity Populations with a variety of genes can help a species adapt to threats like diseases and climate change. Grand-Staircase.jpg Valley in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah, USA. Image credits: amadeustx via Shutterstock Creature Monday, August 13, 2018 – 15:45 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — Protected areas like natio

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Community-based conservation ups wildlife populations

Putting land management in the hands of local communities helps the wildlife within, according to new research. A new paper in the Journal of Wildlife Management demonstrates the positive ecological impacts of a community-based wildlife conservation area in Tanzania. “Community-based natural resource management has become one of the dominant paradigms of natural resource conservation worldwide,”

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NASA’s sun-kissing spacecraft will go 250 times faster than a bullet when it hits its stride

Space The Parker Solar Probe is finally on its way. Witnessing the launch of the Parker Solar Probe was Eugene Parker. The mission is the only one in NASA history to be named after a researcher while they were still…

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NASA's IMERG estimates heavy rainfall over the eastern US

Most of the Eastern half of the United States had rainfall during the past week. Some parts of the country experienced heavy rainfall that resulted in flash floods and various other problems.

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Glacier wildfire forces evacuations, Yosemite to reopen

A wildfire destroyed structures and forced evacuations Monday from the busiest area of Montana's Glacier National Park, as officials in California prepared to reopen Yosemite National Park following a two-week closure.

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Live salmon released for ailing orca but she doesn't eat

Researchers carrying out unprecedented efforts to save an ailing young killer whale in the U.S. Northwest released live salmon into waters in front of the free-swimming orca but didn't see her take any of the fish.

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Scarlet macaw DNA points to ancient breeding operation in Southwest

Somewhere in the American Southwest or northern Mexico, there are probably the ruins of a scarlet macaw breeding operation dating to between 900 and 1200 C.E., according to a team of archaeologists who sequenced the mitochondrial DNA of bird remains found in the Chaco Canyon and Mimbres areas of New Mexico.

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Mathematicians solve age-old spaghetti mystery

If you happen to have a box of spaghetti in your pantry, try this experiment: Pull out a single spaghetti stick and hold it at both ends. Now bend it until it breaks. How many fragments did you make? If the answer is three or more, pull out another stick and try again. Can you break the noodle in two? If not, you're in very good company.

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New technology can detect hundreds of proteins in a single sample

New technology developed by a team of McGill University scientists shows potential to streamline the analysis of proteins, offering a quick, high volume and cost-effective tool to hospitals and research labs alike.

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New technology can detect hundreds of proteins in a single sample

New technology developed by a team of McGill University scientists shows potential to streamline the analysis of proteins, offering a quick, high volume and cost-effective tool to hospitals and research labs alike.

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Racial and ethnic minority patients have lower rates of Medicare preventive care visits — income and education partially explain the difference

Medicare patients nationwide have low rates of preventive care visits — with the lowest rates found in older adults of minority race/ethnicity, reports a study in the September issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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MIT mathematicians solve age-old spaghetti mystery

It's nearly impossible to break a dry spaghetti noodle into only two pieces. A new MIT study shows how and why it can be done.

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Scarlet macaw DNA points to ancient breeding operation in Southwest

Somewhere in the American Southwest or northern Mexico, there are probably the ruins of a scarlet macaw breeding operation dating to between 900 and 1200 C.E., according to a team of archaeologists who sequenced the mitochondrial DNA of bird remains found in the Chaco Canyon and Mimbres areas of New Mexico.

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A computational method for designing a new type of 2D carbons

Scientists from EPFL and Berkeley have developed a computational method for designing a new type of two-dimensional carbon materials called Schwarzites.

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Collaborate, but only intermittently, says new study

Technologies and organizations should be redesigned to intermittently isolate people from each other's work for best collective performance in solving complex problems.

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When it comes to regrowing tails, neural stem cells are the key

It's a longstanding mystery why salamanders can perfectly regenerate their tails whereas lizard tails grow back all wrong. By transplanting neural stem cells between species, Pitt researchers have discovered that the lizard's native stem cells are the primary factor hampering tail regeneration.

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New study reveals evidence of how Neolithic people adapted to climate change

Research led by the University of Bristol has uncovered evidence that early farmers were adapting to climate change 8,200 years ago.

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Long-sought carbon structure joins graphene, fullerene family

Scientists have been playing with pure carbon compounds for centuries, starting with diamond and graphite and now with fullerenes, nanotubes and graphene. One type of 3D geometry has been missing, however: a negatively curved carbon-cage surface called schwarzite. UC Berkeley chemists have now shown that serendipitously produced materials called zeolite-templated carbons are in fact the long-sough

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How attitudes on race, immigration, gender will affect the 2018 midterm elections

Cornell researchers are taking a new approach to understanding how voters' attitudes about immigration, race and gender influence contemporary U.S. politics.

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NASA tracks a fragmented, weaker Tropical Storm Hector into Northwestern Pacific

Tropical Storm Hector moved out of the Central Pacific Ocean and into the Northwestern Pacific Ocean in a much weaker state. NASA's Aqua satellite looked at cloud top temperatures in Hector, revealing fragmented thunderstorms within.

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Did an 11-year-old kid hack the Florida Secretary Of State voting website?

The short answer is that an exact copy of the website was hacked, yes. In just 10 minutes. By an 11-year-old kid. Read More

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The top 10 reasons single guys think they're single

Reddit can reveal a lot, depending on how you interpret the data. Read More

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Omarosa’s Situation Room tapes spark security alarms, fury from Trump

Omarosa Manigault Newman, a former senior aide to President Donald Trump, says she’s recorded multiple secret audio tapes at the White House, including one of her firing by Chief of Staff John Kelly. Read More

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Your Chicken’s Salmonella Problem Is Worse Than You Think

And cooking it to kingdom come won't necessarily protect you.

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What homebody island birds could tell us about adaptation and evolution

In nature, organisms are constantly adapting to their surroundings. It's why animal or plant populations with the same set of genes will do different things in different environments.

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The road to November: New poll monitors public attitudes on race, immigration leading up to midterms

A new study developed by Cornell University researchers will use three waves of surveys to show how voters' views on issues that include race, immigration and gender will influence the 2018 midterm elections in November and whether those attitudes shift leading up to the elections.

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Rethinking the stroke rule 'time is brain'

In 1993, neurologist Camilo Gomez, M.D., coined a phrase that for a quarter century has been a fundamental rule of stroke care: 'Time is brain!' The longer therapy is delayed, the less chance it will be successful. But the 'time is brain' rule is not as simple as it once seemed, Dr. Gomez now reports in a study published in the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases.

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Why zebrafish (almost) always have stripes

One of the most remarkable things about the iconic yellow and blue stripes of zebrafish is that they reliably appear at all.

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The march toward always-on technology may hinder groups' ability to solve complex problems: study

More than a decade after the introduction of the first smartphone, we are now awash in always-on technologies—email, IM, social media, Slack, Yammer, and so on. All that connectivity means we are constantly sharing our ideas, knowledge, thinking, and answers. Surely that "wisdom of the crowd" is good for problem solving at work, right?

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When it comes to regrowing tails, neural stem cells are the key

Cut off a salamander's tail and, in a few weeks, a near-perfect replacement grows. Do the same to a lizard and a new tail will regrow, but it won't be the same as the original. By comparing tail regeneration between the two animals, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found that stem cells in the spinal cord are the ultimate limiting factor.

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New study reveals evidence of how Neolithic people adapted to climate change

Research led by the University of Bristol has uncovered evidence that early farmers were adapting to climate change 8,200 years ago.

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Schwarzites: Long-sought carbon structure joins graphene, fullerene family

The discovery of buckyballs surprised and delighted chemists in the 1980s, nanotubes jazzed physicists in the 1990s, and graphene charged up materials scientists in the 2000s, but one nanoscale carbon structure—a negatively curved surface called a schwarzite—has eluded everyone. Until now.

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From office windows to Mars: Scientists debut super-insulating gel

A new, super-insulating gel developed by researchers at CU Boulder could dramatically increase the energy efficiency of skyscrapers and other buildings, and might one day help scientists build greenhouse-like habitats for colonists on Mars.

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Amish nemaline myopathy natural history study finds promise for gene therapy treatment

A new comprehensive natural history study about Amish nemaline myopathy (ANM) in the Old Order Amish population focuses on the promise of gene therapy for this lethal disorder. Amish nemaline myopathy (ANM) is an infantile-onset muscle disease linked to a mutation of the TNNT1 gene. The study summarizes genealogical records, clinical data, and molecular reports of one hundred and six ANM patients

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Policy changes can help ease roadblocks to a healthy diet

Diet modification can be a vital step to prevent cardiovascular disease. While various biological, economical, physical, social and psychological factors influence food choices, interventions targeting these factors can lead to meaningful improvements in long-term eating habits.

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Netflix CFO leaving TV streaming titan

Netflix chief financial officer David Wells on Monday announced plans to hand his job off to a successor and then focus on philanthropy.

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Wearables can track your UV exposure, but preventing skin cancer isn’t so simple

Health Scientists still haven't figured out what a safe level of sun exposure is. In the past few years, a wave of UV-detection wearables, apps, and stickers designed to alert users to dangerous levels of sun exposure have been making headlines.

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Giant Pterosaur Sported 110 Teeth (and 4 Wicked Fangs)

A little more than 200 million years ago, a four-fanged pterosaur flew over the vast desert of Triassic Utah snagging other reptiles with its toothy mouth, until it met its untimely end on the banks of a dried-up oasis, new research finds.

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Amish nemaline myopathy natural history study finds promise for gene therapy treatment

A new comprehensive natural history study about Amish nemaline myopathy (ANM) in the Old Order Amish population focuses on the promise of gene therapy for this lethal disorder. Amish nemaline myopathy (ANM) is an infantile-onset muscle disease linked to a mutation of the TNNT1 gene. The study summarizes genealogical records, clinical data, and molecular reports of one hundred and six ANM patients

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Drop the C-word to reduce anxiety and overtreatment, say experts

Medical researchers are calling for the word 'cancer' to be dropped from some doctor-patient conversations in a bid to reduce patient anxiety and harm from over treatment.The appeal in today's BMJ follows mounting evidence that patients who are told they have 'cancer' for low risk conditions more often choose surgery than those whose condition is described with terms such as 'lesions' or 'abnormal

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Erdoğan Tilts at Windmills as Lira’s Decline Continues

Turkey’s central bank moved on Monday to shore up the declining lira, as the trouble with the country’s currency threatened to spread to the broader economy—and the global financial system. But it took no steps to address the issue of interest rates, which economists say must be raised to deal with the crisis. The central bank announced it was lowering the amount of funds maintained by commercial

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French Theme Park Asks: Crows Can Pick Up Trash, Why Can't You?

A team of six trained birds — rooks, actually — is collecting paper and cigarette stubs at the Puy du Fou park in western France. They drop the trash into a container in exchange for food. (Image credit: Courtesy of Pou du Fuy theme park)

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Thermal switch discovered in engineered squid-based biomaterials

Tuning materials for optimal optical and electrical properties is becoming commonplace. Now, researchers and manufacturers may be able to tune materials for thermal conductivity by using a squid-inspired protein made of multiple DNA repeats.

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Amputees feel as though their prosthetic limb belongs to their own body

In a breakthrough approach that combines virtual reality and artificial tactile sensations, two amputees feel as though their prosthetic hand belongs to their own body. Moreover, the scientists show that the phantom limb actually grows into the prosthetic hand.

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Scientists trace atmospheric rise in CO2 during deglaciation to deep Pacific Ocean

How carbon made it out of the ocean and into the atmosphere has remained one of the most important mysteries of science. A new study, provides some of the most compelling evidence for how it happened — a 'flushing' of the deep Pacific Ocean caused by the acceleration of water circulation patterns that begin around Antarctica.

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NASA tracks a fragmented, weaker Tropical Storm Hector into Northwestern Pacific

Tropical Storm Hector moved out of the Central Pacific Ocean and into the Northwestern Pacific Ocean in a much weaker state. NASA's Aqua satellite looked at cloud top temperatures in Hector, revealing fragmented thunderstorms within.

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Policy changes can help ease roadblocks to a healthy diet

Diet modification can be a vital step to prevent cardiovascular disease. While various biological, economical, physical, social and psychological factors influence food choices, interventions targeting these factors can lead to meaningful improvements in long-term eating habits, according to a review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Tiny bits of RNA can trigger pain and itchiness

Two microRNAs may shed light on the causes of nerve pain and itch.

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Broad 'genetic architectures' of traits and diseases

Scientists have developed a powerful method for characterizing the broad patterns of genetic contributions to traits and diseases.

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Why zebrafish (almost) always have stripes

A mathematical model helps explain the key role that one pigment cells plays in making sure that each stripe on a zebrafish ends up exactly where it belongs.

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Feature: The Scientist Who Scrambled Darwin’s Tree of Life

How the microbiologist Carl Woese fundamentally changed the way we think about evolution and the origins of life.

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Brainy Crows Trained to Pick Up Trash at Theme Park

A new cleaning crew at a French theme park has something to crow about.

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Photos: 15 Years Since the 2003 Northeast Blackout

On August 14, 2003, a series of faults caused by tree branches touching power lines in Ohio, which were then complicated by human error, software issues, and equipment failures, led to the most widespread blackout in North American history. More than 50 million people across eight northeastern U.S. states and parts of Canada were left without power for at least 24 hours, and many of them were in

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Swim Caps Are Keeping Black Women Out of Pools

Noelle Singleton challenges any swim-cap maker who claims a swimmer’s hair won’t get wet with their caps to send her one. She’ll post a review on social media of her swimming a 100-meter individual medley in it. Swim caps matter for Singleton, a 30-year-old black swim coach in Georgia with a thick, full-moon-shaped afro. Known on her AfroSwimmers Instagram account as Coach With the Fro, she has b

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A record number of Americans watched the 2017 solar eclipse—and sought science afterward

The 2017 total solar eclipse spurred a flurry of interest about solar eclipses, according to the final report of a survey led by the University of Michigan.

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Last Week in Tech: Samsung Galaxy Note 9, Super Smash Bros., and Jeopardy! is finally streaming

Technology The big phone gets slightly bigger. A big week for Android users and people who love to gloat about their knowledge of trivia facts.

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Adult-child conversations strengthen language regions of developing brain

Young children who are regularly engaged in conversation by adults may have stronger connections between two developing brain regions critical for language, according to a study of healthy young children that confirms a hypothesis registered with the Open Science Framework. This finding was independent of parental income and education, suggesting that talking with children from an early age could

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Potential biomarker for autism in infancy

A study of young children with autism spectrum disorder reveals altered brain waves compared to typically developing children during a motor control task. The non-invasive neuroimaging technique used in this study could be employed to detect autism symptoms as early as infancy.

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How the brain biases beliefs

People's motivation to cling to desirable notions about future outlooks results from interactions between prefrontal cortex regions, according to a human neuroimaging study.

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Tdap vaccination for pregnant women does not increase risk of autism

A newstudy of more than 80,000 children born over a 4-year period showed that the prenatal Tdap vaccination (tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis) was not associated with increased risk of autism spectrum disorder in children.

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The danger of coronary artery compression in children is more common than we think

The incidence of coronary artery compression in children fitted with epicardial pacemakers may be slightly more common than previously believed, say noted cardiologists.

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Experts highlight new concepts and approaches to the rehabilitation of stroke

Stroke remains a leading cause of adult disability, and the global burden of stroke continues to grow with devastating consequences for patients, families, and caregivers. In this special issue of NeuroRehabilitation leading international experts on stroke rehabilitation provide theoretical and practical insights into the steps necessary to push beyond merely compensatory training and onto a level

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Higher omega-3 index associated with better brain function in children

New research published in the July edition of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, has established a strong correlation between blood levels of omega-3s, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and better brain function in children two to six years old.

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Researchers make meth in their lab for drug-test device

A University of North Texas professor and one of his graduate students have spent the last nine years making meth, fentanyl and PCP in a lab.

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How to Stop Google From Tracking Your LocationGoogle Location History

A new report shows that Google still tracks your location even if you thought you opted out.

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University of Minnesota reports breakthrough in 3-D printing for spinal cord repair

University of Minnesota researchers have broken new ground in the rapidly advancing field of 3-D printing: Creating stem cell-infused scaffolds that could be implanted in spinal cords to repair nerve damage.

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Amazon is no longer a Seattle company. Here's what that will mean for future workers and its second headquarters

Amazon isn't just a Seattle company anymore, and a visit to its offices in this university city explains why.

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Terahertz technology creates new insight into how semiconductor lasers work

Pioneering engineers working with terahertz frequency technology have been researching how individual frequencies are selected when a laser is turned on, and how quickly the selection is made.

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Missing immune cells that could fight lethal brain tumors

Researchers have tracked the missing T-cells in glioblastoma patients. They found them in abundance in the bone marrow, locked away and unable to function because of a process the brain stimulates in response to glioblastoma, to other tumors that metastasize in the brain and even to injury.

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During HIV infection, antibody can block B cells from fighting pathogens

For the first time, scientists have shown that in certain people living with HIV, a type of antibody called immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) stops the immune system's B cells from doing their normal job of fighting pathogens. This phenomenon appears to be one way the body tries to reduce the potentially damaging effects of immune-system hyperactivity caused by the presence of HIV, according to the investi

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Europe needs coastal adaptation measures to avoid catastrophic flooding by the end of the century

Coastal floods could impact up to 3.65 million people every year in Europe by 2100, according to a new study.

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Algorithm provides early warning system for tracking groundwater contamination

Scientists have developed a low-cost method for real-time monitoring of pollutants using commonly available sensors.

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When these flies want to sniff out food and mates, they wing it

Fruit flies don't appear to use their tiny, translucent wings for optimal flight, as one might expect. The speedy appendages seem to be doing double duty, helping the insect sniff out food, mates and other important scents, according to new research.

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Peripheral nerve block provides some with long-lasting pain relief for severe facial pain

A new study has shown that use of peripheral nerve blocks in the treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) may produce long-term pain relief.

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EU households waste over 17 billion kg of fresh fruit and vegetables a year

A recent article finds that EU households generate about 35.3 kg of fresh fruit and vegetable waste per person per year, 14.2 kg of which is avoidable.

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Disrupted nitrogen metabolism might spell cancer

Researchers have now shown that in many cancers, the patient's nitrogen metabolism is altered, producing detectable changes in the body fluids and contributing to the emergence of new mutations in cancerous tissue.

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Artificial intelligence platform screens for acute neurological illnesses

An artificial intelligence platform designed to identify a broad range of acute neurological illnesses, such as stroke, hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus, was shown to identify disease in CT scans in 1.2 seconds, faster than human diagnosis.

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'Undruggable' cancers slowed by targeting growth signals

As many as 50 percent of human cancer cases — across a wide variety of tissues — involve defects in a common cellular growth signaling pathway. These defects have so far defied most attempts to develop targeted therapies. Now researchers have identified a new strategy for potentially treating intractable cancers by decoupling the entire RAS/MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway from external growt

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Doctor-patient discussions neglect potential harms of lung cancer screening, study finds

Although national guidelines advise doctors to discuss the benefits and harms of lung cancer screening with high-risk patients because of a high rate of false positives and other factors, those conversations aren't happening the way they should be, according to a new study.

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NASA finds powerful storms over south China from Tropical Storm Bebinca

Tropical Storm Bebinca formed quickly in the northern part of the South China Sea. Warnings were in effect as NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the storm located off the coast of southern China near Hainan Island and found powerful storms capable of dropping heavy rainfall.

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Are US cities getting more or less violent? New database offers mixed picture

Violence has fallen in nearly all major U.S. cities since 1991, according to a new analysis by researchers at New York University. However, recent fluctuations in violence in selected cities point to temporary disruptions in this 17-year decline.

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Thermal switch discovered in engineered squid-based biomaterials

Tuning materials for optimal optical and electrical properties is becoming commonplace. Now, researchers and manufacturers may be able to tune materials for thermal conductivity by using a squid-inspired protein made of multiple DNA repeats.

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Amputees feel as though their prosthetic limb belongs to their own body

In a breakthrough approach that combines virtual reality and artificial tactile sensations, two amputees feel as though their prosthetic hand belongs to their own body. Moreover, the scientists show that the phantom limb actually grows into the prosthetic hand.

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Why zebrafish (almost) always have stripes

A mathematical model helps explain the key role that one pigment cells plays in making sure that each stripe on a zebrafish ends up exactly where it belongs.

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NASA sees Tropical Storm Yagi after China landfall

After Tropical Storm Yagi made landfall in China, NASA's Aqua satellite saw the storm was moving inland and dropping heavy rainfall.

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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite finds a weaker Tropical Storm Leepi

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite caught up with Typhoon Leepi in the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image that showed the bulk of clouds were northeast of the center.

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Adult-child conversations strengthen language regions of developing brain

Young children who are regularly engaged in conversation by adults may have stronger connections between two developing brain regions critical for language, according to a study of healthy young children that confirms a hypothesis registered with the Open Science Framework. This finding, published in JNeurosci, was independent of parental income and education, suggesting that talking with children

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Potential biomarker for autism

A study of young children with autism spectrum disorder published in JNeurosci reveals altered brain waves compared to typically developing children during a motor control task. The non-invasive neuroimaging technique used in this study could be employed to detect autism symptoms as early as infancy.

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How the brain biases beliefs

People's motivation to cling to desirable notions about future outlooks results from interactions between prefrontal cortex regions, according to a human neuroimaging study published in JNeurosci.

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Why Robert Nozick was a libertarian

Why do great minds argue for positions we find repulsive? Today, we find out why Robert Nozick was a libertarian. Read More

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Sleep deprived? This study finds you shouldn't be asking for advice

We know not getting enough sleep is bad for us, this study gives us yet another reason to get a few more hours in. Read More

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Buy more books than you ever read? The Japanese have a word for that.

Sometimes lacking proper language is just a failure of imagination. Read More

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How to get Google to stop tracking your location for realGoogle Location History

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Universal Method to Sort Complex Information Found

If you were opening a coffee shop, there’s a question you’d want answered: Where’s the next closest cafe? This information would help you understand your competition. This scenario is an example of a type of problem widely studied in computer science called “nearest neighbor” search. It asks, given a data set and a new data point, which point in your existing data is closest to your new point? It

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Algorithm provides early warning system for tracking groundwater contamination

Groundwater contamination is increasingly recognized as a widespread environmental problem. The most important course of action often involves long-term monitoring. But what is the most cost-effective way to monitor when the contaminant plumes are large, complex, and long-term, or an unexpected event such as a storm could cause sudden changes in contaminant levels that may be missed by periodic sa

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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite finds a weaker Tropical Storm Leepi

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite caught up with Typhoon Leepi in the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image that showed the bulk of clouds were northeast of the center.

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NASA sees Tropical Storm Yagi after China landfall

After Tropical Storm Yagi made landfall in China, NASA's Aqua satellite saw the storm was moving inland and dropping heavy rainfall. Yagi made landfall at 11:35 p.m. local time, Sunday, Aug. 12 in Wenling County, east China's Zhejiang Province.

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When these flies want to sniff out food and mates, they wing it

Fruit flies don't appear to use their tiny, translucent wings for optimal flight, as one might expect. The speedy appendages seem to be doing double duty, helping the insect sniff out food, mates and other important scents, according to new research from The Ohio State University.

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EU households waste over 17 billion kg of fresh fruit and vegetables a year

A recently published JRC article finds that EU households generate about 35.3 kg of fresh fruit and vegetable waste per person per year, 14.2 kg of which is avoidable.

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Woman Dies After Getting Nipped by Her New Puppy

A simple nip from a puppy may have led to a fatal infection for a Wisconsin woman, according to news reports.

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Thermal switch discovered in engineered squid-based biomaterials

Tuning materials for optimal optical and electrical properties is becoming commonplace. Now, researchers and manufacturers may be able to tune materials for thermal conductivity by using a squid-inspired protein made of multiple DNA repeats.

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Study reveals broad 'genetic architectures' of traits and diseases

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a powerful method for characterizing the broad patterns of genetic contributions to traits and diseases.

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Brief interventions during routine care reduce alcohol use among men with HIV

Brown-led study finds that motivational interviewing with personalized feedback and booster sessions produced substantial reductions in alcohol use among heavy-drinking men who have sex with men who are living with HIV.

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Injection of novel gene therapy vector prolonged survival in mouse model of Pompe disease

A new study has shown that a single injection of a novel adeno-associated vector (AAV)-based therapy can result in improved enzyme activity and glycogen clearance as well as prolonged survival in a mouse model of Pompe disease.

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NASA finds powerful storms over south China from Tropical Storm Bebinca

Tropical Storm Bebinca formed quickly in the northern part of the South China Sea. Warnings were in effect as NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the storm located off the coast of southern China near Hainan Island and found powerful storms capable of dropping heavy rainfall.

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Advances in Treating Hep C Lead to New Option for Transplant Patients

People infected with the once-deadly virus can now be donors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Historic space weather could clarify what's next

Scientists have discovered an underlying repeatable pattern in how space weather activity changes with the solar cycle – having analysed solar activity for the last half century.

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'Building up' stretchable electronics to be as multipurpose as your smartphone

By stacking and connecting layers of stretchable circuits on top of one another, engineers have developed an approach to build soft, pliable '3D stretchable electronics' that can pack a lot of functions while staying thin and small in size.

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Researchers predict risk for common deadly diseases from millions of genetic variants

A research team reports a new kind of genome analysis that could identify large fractions of the population who have a much higher risk of developing serious common diseases, including coronary artery disease, breast cancer, or type 2 diabetes. These tests, which use information from millions of places in the genome to ascertain risk for five diseases, can flag greater likelihood of developing the

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How cannabis and cannabis-based drugs harm the brain

A new study shows that the long-term use of either cannabis or cannabis-based drugs impairs memory.

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The medicine of the future against infection and inflammation?

Researchers have mapped how the body's own peptides act to reduce infection and inflammation by deactivating the toxic substances formed in the process. The researchers believe their discovery could lead to new drugs against infection and inflammation, for example in wound healing.

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Earth mini-moons: Potential for exciting scientific and commercial opportunities

The detection of 'mini-moons' — small asteroids temporarily captured in orbit around Earth — will vastly improve our scientific understanding of asteroids and the Earth-moon system. Small and fast-moving, they have evaded detection by existing technology, with only one confirmed mini-moon discovery to date. The advent of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope could verify their existence and track

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Easter Island's society might not have collapsed

A new study of the tools used to create Easter Island's giant statues hints at a society in which people collaborated and shared information.

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Terahertz technology creates new insight into how semiconductor lasers work

Lasers are widely used as high power sources of light operating at a specific frequency. But how does this frequency get selected when a laser is turned on, and how quickly?

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Europe needs coastal adaptation measures to avoid catastrophic flooding by the end of the century

Without increased investment in coastal adaptation, the expected annual damage caused by coastal floods in Europe could increase from €1.25 billion today to between €93 billion and €961 billion by the end of the century.

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200-million year old Pterosaur 'built for flying'

Scientists on Monday unveiled a previously unknown species of giant pterosaur, the first creatures with a backbone to fly under their own power.

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Algorithm provides early warning system for tracking groundwater contamination

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory have developed a low-cost method for real-time monitoring of pollutants using commonly available sensors.

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Cellular escape artists help explain why some women present with advanced ovarian cancer

In a new study published recently in The Journal of Pathology, BWH investigators conducted an exhaustive analysis of 'normal' fallopian tubes from patients with HGSC. Their analysis indicates that normal appearing tubes can contain pre-cancerous cells may escape the tubes, later progressing to cancer in the pelvic or abdominal cavity.

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Europe needs coastal adaptation measures to avoid catastrophic flooding by the end of the century

Coastal floods could impact up to 3.65 million people every year in Europe by 2100, according to a study from the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service.

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With Short, Intense Sessions, Some Patients Finish Therapy in Just Weeks

The new psychological approach targets anxiety, PTSD and other mental disorders. Fewer people drop out with short-term treatment, and relief is quicker.

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Gene-Silencing Technology Gets First Drug Approval after 20-Year Wait

The U.S. FDA decision comes after fits and stops for RNA-interference therapies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The behavior of water: scientists find new properties of H2O

A team of scientists has uncovered new molecular properties of water — a discovery of a phenomenon that had previously gone unnoticed.

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Platelet-rich plasma does not promote stem cell-mediated cartilage repair

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is believed to provide pain relief and help improve joint function in degenerative joint disease, but a new study has shown that it does not act by promoting stem cell proliferation or enhance the cartilage formation capabilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs).

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During HIV infection, antibody can block B cells from fighting pathogens

For the first time, scientists have shown that in certain people living with HIV, a type of antibody called immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) stops the immune system's B cells from doing their normal job of fighting pathogens. This phenomenon appears to be one way the body tries to reduce the potentially damaging effects of immune-system hyperactivity caused by the presence of HIV, according to the investi

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Duke team finds missing immune cells that could fight lethal brain tumors

Researchers at Duke Cancer Institute have tracked the missing T-cells in glioblastoma patients. They found them in abundance in the bone marrow, locked away and unable to function because of a process the brain stimulates in response to glioblastoma, to other tumors that metastasize in the brain and even to injury.

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Terahertz technology creates new insight into how semiconductor lasers work

Pioneering engineers working with terahertz frequency technology have been researching how individual frequencies are selected when a laser is turned on, and how quickly the selection is made.

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Unexpected results with light-gated chloride channel GtACR2 lead to improved technique

Characterization of light-gated chloride channel GtACR2 in mouse cortical neurons revealed that GtACR2 activation inhibited the soma, but unexpectedly depolarized the presynaptic terminals resulting in neurotransmitter release.

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MSU astronomers discovered supermassive black hole in an ultracompact dwarf galaxy

A team of scientists from the Faculty of Physics and Sternberg State Astronomical Institute, MSU leading an international collaboration with members from Europe, Chile, United States, and Australia discovered a supermassive black hole in the center of the Fornax galaxy. The results of the research were published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society journal. The report will be prese

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Peripheral nerve block provides some with long-lasting pain relief for severe facial pain

A new study has shown that use of peripheral nerve blocks in the treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) may produce long-term pain relief.

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