Search Posts

Nyheder2018august13

 

 

Video-based ethics program increases moral awareness, study finds

Ethics Unwrapped, a video-based behavioral ethics curriculum created at The University of Texas at Austin and adopted by educational institutions around the world, effectively increases student understanding of ethics and human behavior, according to a study published today in the Journal of Business Law and Ethics Pedagogy. The study was based on a two-year survey of approximately 8,600 UT underg

1d

 

‘Lessons’ From the Internet’s Most Violent Videos

Every day, John Correia combs through dozens of violent attacks caught on mobile phones, security cameras, CCTV, and police body cameras. The videos are sent to him by a legion of fans across the globe who seek his advice. After carefully analyzing each one, Correia breaks down lessons in self-defense videos, which he posts to his YouTube channel . A former evangelical minister, Correia is on a m

1d

 

Wearable devices and mobile health technology: One step towards better health

With increasing efforts being made to address the current global obesity epidemic, wearable devices and mobile health ('mHealth') technology have emerged as promising tools for promoting physical activity. However, current literature seems to indicate that these new technologies may serve best as part of a larger overall health plan, rather than working alone to encourage weight loss.

1d

 

Toward a universal quantum computer

Researchers have demonstrated holonomic quantum gates under zero-magnetic field at room temperature, which will enable the realization of fast and fault-tolerant universal quantum computers.

1d

 

Environmental concerns stronger among younger religious Americans

Younger generations of religious Americans tend to closely harbor concerns for the environment via stewardship more so than older parishioners, according to a new study.

1d

 

Coming Soon: Acting EPA Administrator's First Big Moves on Science

Critics are watching to see how closely Andrew Wheeler follows in Scott Pruitt’s footsteps — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Did you solve it? The mystery of Cherry's lottery ball

The solution to today’s puzzle Update: Several readers spotted a mistake in the setting of the puzzle. Apologies. (Prem, who set the puzzle, responds below the line). This is the first time in more than three years that I’ve set a puzzle with such an issue. In order to stop this happening again, if anyone would like to be a ‘puzzle-tester’ for this blog please get in touch with me on the email ad

1d

 

In neutron stars, protons may do the heavy lifting

A new study suggests that the positively charged particles may have an outsize influence on the properties of neutron stars and other neutron-rich objects.

1d

 

Melt-rate of West Antarctic Ice Sheet highly sensitive to changes in ocean temperatures

Melting of ice shelves in West Antarctica speeds up and slows down in response to changes in deep ocean temperature, and is far more variable than previously thought, according to new research.

1d

 

New soft bioelectronic mesh tested on human wrist and pulsating pig's heart

Scientists have succeeded in developing a wearable and implantable device, that measures electrophysiological signals and applies electrical and thermal stimulations. It provides information on muscle and cardiac dysfunctions, and thus could be implemented for pain relief, rehabilitation, and prosthetic motor control. Being the first soft implant able to record the cardiac activity in multiple poi

1d

 

We’ve identified the brain cells that let you control urination

We’ve all been there – desperately holding on for a toilet. Now the brain cells that help us do it have been identified, which may lead to new incontinence treatments

1d

 

Asteroid strike may have forged the oldest rocks ever found on Earth

The oldest rocks ever found are over four billion years old and we don’t know how they formed – but a massive asteroid bombardment may be responsible

1d

 

Orca who carried her dead infant is not alone – many animals grieve

A female orca has been seen carrying the body of her dead calf for 17 days, apparently grieving. Such displays of grief are remarkably common in nature

1d

 

Wearable devices and mobile health technology: one step towards better health

With increasing efforts being made to address the current global obesity epidemic, wearable devices and mobile health ('mHealth') technology have emerged as promising tools for promoting physical activity. However, current literature seems to indicate that these new technologies may serve best as part of a larger overall health plan, rather than working alone to encourage weight loss.

1d

 

When these flies want to sniff out food and mates, they wing it

Fruit flies don't appear to use their tiny, translucent wings for optimal flight, as one might expect. The speedy appendages seem to be doing double duty, helping the insect sniff out food, mates and other important scents, according to new research from The Ohio State University.

1d

 

Preliminary analysis of the influence of reinforced mortar coating

This work presents an extensive characterisation of materials and components used in non-structural masonry constructions in the region of Pernambuco, Brazil.

1d

 

Multimodel ensemble prediction of summer droughts over the Yellow River Basin

The ensemble prediction will provide invaluable information for drought adaptation over the Yellow River basin.

1d

 

EU households waste over 17 billion kg of fresh fruit and vegetables a year

A recently published article from the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, finds that EU households generate about 35.3 kg of fresh fruit and vegetable waste per person per year, 14.2 kg of which is avoidable.

1d

 

Video-based ethics program increases moral awareness, study finds

Ethics Unwrapped, a video-based behavioral ethics curriculum created at The University of Texas at Austin and adopted by educational institutions around the world, effectively increases student understanding of ethics and human behavior, according to a study published today in the Journal of Business Law and Ethics Pedagogy. The study was based on a two-year survey of approximately 8,600 UT underg

1d

 

Blood test could detect kidney cancer up to 5 years earlier

Scientists have discovered that a marker in the blood could help predict the risk that a person will develop kidney cancer.

1d

 

Lobachevsky University scientists develop an effective approach to optimizing medicinal molecules

The search for new medicinal molecules with predetermined properties is a rather complex, expensive and time-consuming process, especially in oncology. Modern science allows us to accelerate this search through the use of computer technology and the introduction of automated processes. In the development of biologically active molecules, there are two basic concepts — a medicinal molecule and a t

1d

 

Community-based conservation management has positive effect on wildlife

Putting land management in the hands of local communities helps the wildlife within, according to new research by a Penn State scientist. A new study demonstrates the positive ecological impacts of a community-based wildlife conservation area in Tanzania. The research is summarized in a paper that appears online [date] in the Journal of Wildlife Management.

1d

 

Melt-rate of West Antarctic Ice Sheet highly sensitive to changes in ocean temperatures

Melting of ice shelves in West Antarctica speeds up and slows down in response to changes in deep ocean temperature, and is far more variable than previously thought, according to new research published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience.

1d

 

A man, a van, a GPS tracker: This Brit is writing 'STOP BREXIT' across Europe

Englishman Andy Pardy is traveling 18,000 miles (30,000 km) across Europe this summer to make a continent-sized political statement Read More

1d

 

Earth mini-moons: Potential for exciting scientific and commercial opportunities

The detection of "mini-moons"—small asteroids temporarily captured in orbit around Earth—will vastly improve our scientific understanding of asteroids and the Earth-Moon system, says a new review published in Frontiers in Astronomy and Space Science. These small and fast-moving visitors have so-far evaded detection by existing technology, with only one confirmed mini-moon discovery to date. The ad

1d

 

New app for nature lovers helps create biodiversity network

A new University of Alberta app is encouraging Albertans to get back to nature and talk about it.

1d

 

Winged reptiles thrived before dinosaurs

A newly discovered species of pterosaur that lived about 210 million years ago has been found in the Utah desert.

1d

 

Melt-rate of West Antarctic Ice Sheet highly sensitive to changes in ocean temperatures

Melting of ice shelves in West Antarctica speeds up and slows down in response to changes in deep ocean temperature, and is far more variable than previously thought, according to new research published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience.

1d

 

New soft bioelectronic mesh tested on human wrist and pulsating pig's heart

IBS scientists have succeeded in developing a wearable and implantable device, that measures electrophysiological signals and applies electrical and thermal stimulations. It provides information on muscle and cardiac dysfunctions, and thus could be implemented for pain relief, rehabilitation, and prosthetic motor control. Being the first soft implant able to record the cardiac activity in multiple

1d

 

Scientists trace atmospheric rise in CO2 during deglaciation to deep Pacific Ocean

How carbon made it out of the ocean and into the atmosphere has remained one of the most important mysteries of science. A new study, provides some of the most compelling evidence for how it happened — a 'flushing' of the deep Pacific Ocean caused by the acceleration of water circulation patterns that begin around Antarctica.

1d

 

Researchers predict risk for common deadly diseases from millions of genetic variants

A research team reports a new kind of genome analysis that could identify large fractions of the population who have a much higher risk of developing serious common diseases, including coronary artery disease, breast cancer, or type 2 diabetes. These tests, which use information from millions of places in the genome to ascertain risk for five diseases, can flag greater likelihood of developing the

1d

 

Protons get zippier in neutron-rich nuclei

A new study carried out at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has confirmed that increasing the number of neutrons as compared to protons in the atom's nucleus also increases the average momentum of its protons. The nuclear physics result, which has implications for the dynamics of neutron stars, has been published in the journal Nature.

1d

 

Meteorite bombardment likely to have created the Earth's oldest rocks

Scientists have found that 4.02 billion year old silica-rich felsic rocks from the Acasta River, Canada — the oldest rock formation known on Earth — probably formed at high temperatures and at a surprisingly shallow depth of the planet's nascent crust. The high temperatures needed to melt the shallow crust were likely caused by a meteorite bombardment around half a billion years after the planet

1d

 

Intervention for young transgender women to reduce risk of HIV

Young transgender women who took part in an intervention to reduce HIV transmission and acquisition had a greater reduction in condomless sex acts than young transgender women who received standard preventive care with testing for HIV/sexually transmitted infections and counseling in a randomized clinical trial.

1d

 

'Building up' stretchable electronics to be as multipurpose as your smartphone

By stacking and connecting layers of stretchable circuits on top of one another, engineers have developed an approach to build soft, pliable '3D stretchable electronics' that can pack a lot of functions while staying thin and small in size. The work is published in the Aug. 13 issue of Nature Electronics.

1d

 

In neutron stars, protons may do the heavy lifting

In neutron stars, protons may do the heavy lifting, according to MIT researchers. Their new study suggests that the positively charged particles may have an outsize influence on the properties of neutron stars and other neutron-rich objects.

1d

 

Doctor-patient discussions neglect potential harms of lung cancer screening, study finds

Although national guidelines advise doctors to discuss the benefits and harms of lung cancer screening with high-risk patients because of a high rate of false positives and other factors, those conversations aren't happening the way they should be, according to a study by researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

1d

 

Novel optics for ultrafast cameras create new possibilities for imaging

Researchers from the Camera Culture Group at the MIT Media Lab have reinvented photography optics to capture images based on the timing of reflecting light inside the optics, which opens doors to new capabilities for ultrafast time- or depth-sensitive cameras.

1d

 

'Undruggable' cancers slowed by targeting growth signals

As many as 50 percent of human cancer cases — across a wide variety of tissues — involve defects in a common cellular growth signaling pathway. These defects have so far defied most attempts to develop targeted therapies. Now researchers at UCSF and Redwood City-based Revolution Medicines Inc. have identified a new strategy for potentially treating intractable cancers by decoupling the entire RA

1d

 

Links between tax havens, deforestation and illegal fishing exposed

On average 68 percent of all investigated foreign capital to sectors associated with deforestation of the Amazon rainforest was transferred through tax havens. And 70 percent of the known fishing vessels involved in illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing are, or have been, registered in tax havens.

1d

 

Artificial intelligence platform screens for acute neurological illnesses at Mount Sinai

An artificial intelligence platform designed to identify a broad range of acute neurological illnesses, such as stroke, hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus, was shown to identify disease in CT scans in 1.2 seconds, faster than human diagnosis.

1d

 

The Gun Guru of YouTube

Andy Friedman Someday John Correia will meet Jesus. As an ordained pastor, he has thought about how their first conversation will go. That is why he keeps his Heckler & Koch VP9 loaded with a 9-mm magazine in pristine condition. “You’re only going to draw a gun on the worst day of your life,” Correia told me. “You want to make sure the equipment works. I treat these mags like babies.” If he drops

1d

 

Artificial intelligence tool 'as good as experts' at detecting eye problems

Machine-learning system can identify more than 50 different eye diseases and could speed up diagnosis and treatment A new machine-learning system is as good as the best human experts at detecting eye problems and referring patients for treatment, say scientists. The groundbreaking artificial intelligence system, developed by the AI-outfit DeepMind with Moorfields eye hospital NHS foundation trust

1d

 

A new method of transporting ions through cell membranes based on a single amino acid

Researchers from A*STAR's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) have successfully developed a unique family of pore-forming monopeptides based on a single amino acid. Other pore-forming peptides typically consist of up to fifty amino acids. The research team, led by IBN Team Leader and Principal Research Scientist Dr Huaqiang Zeng, has created a new paradigm for the efficient transp

1d

 

Heat's on for boron nitride

Research from Deakin's Institute for Frontier Materials could lead to the development of faster computers and overcome some of the safety issues caused by the overheating of electronic devices such as batteries.

1d

 

Printed electronics breakthrough could lead to flexible electronics revolution

A new form of electronics manufacturing which embeds silicon nanowires into flexible surfaces could lead to radical new forms of bendable electronics, scientists say.

1d

 

Wildfire temperatures key to better understanding air quality

When wildfires burn, they don't only damage land, homes, and businesses. Wildfire emissions, which can be transported over long distances, can be toxic and contribute to the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and fine particles in the atmosphere. Those emissions affect human health and the environment, so scientists want to know what's in wildfire smoke. According to new research from

1d

 

The behavior of water—scientists find new properties of H2O

A team of scientists has uncovered new molecular properties of water—a discovery of a phenomenon that had previously gone unnoticed.

1d

 

Community-based conservation management has positive effect on wildlife

Putting land management in the hands of local communities helps the wildlife within, according to new research. A new study demonstrates the positive ecological impacts of a community-based wildlife conservation area in Tanzania.

1d

 

Link between common 'harmless' virus and cardiovascular damage

Researchers have found an unexpectedly close link between a herpes virus and the occurrence of immune cells damaging cardiovascular tissue.

1d

 

Federal judges finally just order the EPA to ban a dangerous pesticide

Environment The agency concluded it might be unsafe back in 2016. Federal judges last week ordered the agency to ban chlorpyrifos, a widespread pesticide derived from chemicals first used to develop World War II nerve agents.

1d

 

Clues to Your Health Are Hidden at 6.6 Million Spots in Your DNA

With a sophisticated new algorithm, scientists have found a way to forecast an individual’s risks for five deadly diseases.

1d

 

They Thought Hemophilia Was a ‘Lifelong Thing.’ They May Be Wrong.

Experimental gene therapies have yielded promising results in early trials. But the drugs have left some patients wary, worried that success will not last.

1d

 

For songbirds, 1 way to learn is best for generalizing

While zebra finches may learn faster through observing other birds, they’re more able to generalize that knowledge when they acquire it through trial and error, according to new research. Children are constantly learning new things, but whether they find it easy or hard to generalize what they have learned and apply it to new situations can depend on how they learned it. It is much the same for s

1d

 

Tax haven link to rainforest destruction and illegal fishing

Deforestation of the Amazon and illegal fishing have both been linked to tax havens according to a new study.

1d

 

Orca Mother, Who Pushed Her Dead Calf for 1,000 Miles and 17 Days, Moves On

Seventeen days have passed since the grieving orca mother known as Tahlequah began pushing her dead calf around the waters in Puget Sound. And now, after doing so for 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers), she's let go.

1d

 

Analyse: Nej, Roundup bliver ikke forbudt i Danmark, men…

Ikke blot Monsanto, men en hel industri, har fået et chok af den dom, der tildeler en amerikansk pedel 1,9 milliarder kroner i erstatning for at have sprøjtet med Roundup, også selv om dommen ikke umiddelbart får konsekvenser i Europa.

1d

 

Meteorite bombardment likely to have created the Earth's oldest rocks

Scientists have found that 4.02 billion year old silica-rich felsic rocks from the Acasta River, Canada—the oldest rock formation known on Earth—probably formed at high temperatures and at a surprisingly shallow depth of the planet's nascent crust. The high temperatures needed to melt the shallow crust were likely caused by a meteorite bombardment around half a billion years after the planet forme

1d

 

Protons may have an outsize influence on the properties of neutron stars and other neutron-rich objects

Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars in the universe, born out of the gravitational collapse of extremely massive stars. True to their name, neutron stars are composed almost entirely of neutrons—neutral subatomic particles that have been compressed into a small, incredibly dense celestial package.

1d

 

Scientists trace atmospheric rise in CO2 during deglaciation to deep Pacific Ocean

Long before humans started injecting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels like oil, gas, and coal, the level of atmospheric CO2 rose significantly as the Earth came out of its last ice age. Many scientists have long suspected that the source of that carbon was from the deep sea.

1d

 

Novel optics for ultrafast cameras create new possibilities for imaging

MIT researchers have developed novel photography optics that capture images based on the timing of reflecting light inside the optics, instead of the traditional approach that relies on the arrangement of optical components. These new principles, the researchers say, open doors to new capabilities for time- or depth-sensitive cameras, which are not possible with conventional photography optics.

1d

 

Links between tax havens, deforestation and illegal fishing exposed

The release of the "Paradise Papers" and "Panama Papers" exposed how multinationals, politicians and the wealthy use offshore tax havens to conceal their wealth and money flows, and reduce their exposure to tax. Now, a team of researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre (SRC) at Stockholm University and the Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere (GEDB), Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences,

1d

 

Historic space weather could clarify what's next

Historic space weather may help us understand what's coming next, according to new research by the University of Warwick.

1d

 

Blood test could detect kidney cancer up to 5 years earlier

Scientists have discovered that a marker in the blood could help predict the risk that a person will develop kidney cancer, according to research published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.

1d

 

Disrupted nitrogen metabolism might spell cancer

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science, in collaboration with colleagues from the National Cancer Institute and elsewhere, have now shown that in many cancers, the patient's nitrogen metabolism is altered, producing detectable changes in the body fluids and contributing to the emergence of new mutations in cancerous tissue.

1d

 

How AI can save our humanity | Kai-Fu Lee

AI is massively transforming our world, but there's one thing it cannot do: love. In a visionary talk, computer scientist Kai-Fu Lee details how the US and China are driving a deep learning revolution — and shares a blueprint for how humans can thrive in the age of AI by harnessing compassion and creativity. "AI is serendipity," Lee says. "It is here to liberate us from routine jobs, and it is he

1d

 

How Freely Should Scientists Share Their Data?

The Open Science movement champions transparency, but how much and how quickly is a matter of dispute — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Flexible drug delivery microdevice to advance precision medicine

A research team has developed a flexible drug delivery device with controlled release for personalized medicine, blazing the path toward theragnosis. They fabricated a device on a rigid substrate and transferred an active drug delivery layer to the flexible substrate via inorganic laser lift off. The fabricated device shows mechanical flexibility while maintaining the capability of precise adminis

1d

 

Benzodiazepines are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease

The use of benzodiazepines and related drugs (Z drugs) is associated with a modestly increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study.

1d

 

Thirty percent increase in risk of fracture after gastric bypass

A study shows that the risk of fractures increases by about 30 percent after a gastric bypass operation. It was also discovered that falls increase after these operations.

1d

 

Major new vulnerability of childhood leukemia uncovered

A team of researchers has recently uncovered a major new vulnerability of mixed lineage leukemia. Their findings demonstrate that a protein called LEDGF/p75 is regulated by phosphorylation, a molecular modification that changes the electrical charge of the LEDGF/p75 protein.

1d

 

Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have almost double the rate of repeat pregnancy

Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have nearly double the rate of having another baby within a year of delivering compared to women without such disabilities, according to a new study.

1d

 

Young salmon may leap to 'oust the louse'

A study by Simon Fraser University aquatic ecologists Emma Atkinson and John Reynolds reveals that young salmon may jump out of water to remove sea lice.

1d

 

Sea stars critical to kelp forest resilience

A study by Simon Fraser University resource and environmental management researcher Jenn Burt reveals that sunflower sea stars play a critical role in the resilience of B.C.'s kelp forests, which are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Similar to land-based forests, kelp forests provide essential habitat for species and also help remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

1d

 

A new artificial quantum material essential in developing high-efficiency computers

Scientists at Tsinghua University and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing have demonstrated the ability to control the states of matter, thus controlling internal resistance, within multilayered magnetically doped semiconductors using the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect.

1d

 

Community-based conservation management has positive effect on wildlife

Putting land management in the hands of local communities helps the wildlife within, according to new research by a Penn State scientist. A new study demonstrates the positive ecological impacts of a community-based wildlife conservation area in Tanzania.

1d

 

How cannabis and cannabis-based drugs harm the brain

A new study led by Ana Sebastião, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes and Professor of Faculdade de Medicina of Universidade de Lisboa (iMM, FMUL; Portugal) and her team in collaboration with researchers from the University of Lancaster (UK), shows that the long-term use of either cannabis or cannabis-based drugs impairs memory.

1d

 

Earth mini-moons: Potential for exciting scientific and commercial opportunities

The detection of 'mini-moons' — small asteroids temporarily captured in orbit around Earth — will vastly improve our scientific understanding of asteroids and the Earth-moon system. Small and fast-moving, they have evaded detection by existing technology, with only one confirmed mini-moon discovery to date. The advent of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope could verify their existence and track

1d

 

Research shows that cystic fibrosis impacts growth in the womb

New research, published in Thorax, funded by the Cystic Fibrosis Trust has shown that babies with cystic fibrosis (CF) are born weighing less than babies without the condition, even allowing that they are more likely to be born prematurely.

1d

 

Link between common 'harmless' virus and cardiovascular damage

Researchers from Brighton and Sussex Medical School have found an unexpectedly close link between a herpes virus and the occurrence of immune cells damaging cardiovascular tissue.

1d

 

Turning the tide on mussel conservation

Echyridella menziesii and E. aucklandica are freshwater mussels, which live in soft-sediment habitats in New Zealand's rivers and lakes. Both species are known as kākahi throughout the lower North Island. They are tāonga species to Māori, valued both as a traditional food source and for providing tools.

1d

 

1d

 

Saudis in talks to take Tesla private: Elon Musk

Tesla chief executive Elon Musk disclosed Monday he was in talks with Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund and other investors to take the electric automaker private.

1d

 

Image: Partial solar eclipse from space

Thanks to a quirk of our cosmos, the Moon's average distance from Earth is just right for it to appear as the same size in the sky as the significantly larger Sun. Once in a while the Moon slides directly between Earth and the Sun such that it appears to cover our star completely, temporarily blocking out its light and creating a total solar eclipse for those along the narrow path cast by the Moon

1d

 

Magnetic vortices observed in haematite

Vortices are common in nature, but their formation can be hampered by long range forces. In work recently published in Nature Materials, an international team of researchers has used mapped X-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy to observe magnetic vortices in thin films of antiferromagnetic haematite, and their transfer to an overlaying ferromagnetic sample

1d

 

Creation and selective functionalization of virus-like polymer particles

Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan have collaborated with others to develop a simple way to create and functionalize virus-like polymer particles that have various nanostructures. The collaboration includes researchers from Michigan University in the USA and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany.

1d

 

Zapping a new approach to solar cells

A simple and fast microwave experiment with the common chemical element phosphorus at Flinders University has opened the prospect of more affordable and effective super-thin solar cells.

1d

 

Morgendagens artilleri er bevæbnet med en 100 kW kraftlig laser

Lockheed og Raytheon er ved at designe et kraftigt laservåben, som USA's hær vil teste på sine lettere køretøjer inden for fire år.

1d

 

Researchers explore new 'smart' approach to metabolic engineering.

Researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering have developed a new genetic "smart circuit" that could signal an important advance in the field of metabolic engineering. They outline their findings in a study published this month in the journal Nature Communications.

1d

 

Is there such a thing as an objectively 'bad' song?

Everyone has a song which irritates the hell out of them – but Achy Breaky Heart by Billy Ray Cyrus was found by one 2005 study to have been nominated most often as "the worst song ever". The authors, academics from New Zealand and the US, listed a few reasons: awful lyrics, an overly simple melody, negative personal associations, but they also found that their respondents "wrestled – unsuccessful

1d

 

Despite olympic gymnastics' woes, sport is mostly positive for teen girls

The sexual assault conviction of Larry Nassar, former doctor for the USA Gymnastics Women's National Team and Michigan State University, has renewed criticism of a culture of abuse in women's elite gymnastics.

1d

 

World's first optical instrument to observe cancer cells in 4-D

A new optical instrument to help scientists observe live cells in 4-D and understand what triggers them to mutate and spread disease around the human body has received close to £1m in funding.

1d

 

How birds learn

Songbirds can acquire new abilities both through observation and through trial and error. However, skills acquired with the latter method are more easily adapted to new situations, as scientists at ETH and the University of Zurich have been able to demonstrate. The researchers also see parallels to how children learn.

1d

 

Five ways that natural nanotechnology could inspire human design

Though nanotechnology is portrayed as a fairly recent human invention, nature is actually full of nanoscopic architectures. They underpin the essential functions of a variety of life forms, from bacteria to berries, wasps to whales.

1d

 

Young salmon may leap to 'oust the louse'

A study by aquatic ecologists reveals that young salmon may jump out of water to remove sea lice.

1d

 

Sea stars critical to kelp forest resilience

A study by a resource and environmental management researcher reveals that sunflower sea stars play a critical role in the resilience of B.C.'s kelp forests, which are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Similar to land-based forests, kelp forests provide essential habitat for species and also help remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

1d

 

How birds learn

Songbirds can acquire new abilities both through observation and through trial and error. However, skills acquired with the latter method are more easily adapted to new situations, as scientists have been able to demonstrate. The researchers also see parallels to how children learn.

1d

 

Cycling is the urban transport mode associated with the greatest health benefits

A study carried out in seven European cities highlights the role of active transport in good mental health and self-perceived health.

1d

 

Converting carbon dioxide into methane or ethane selectively

Researchers have developed high-efficiency photocatalysts that convert carbon dioxide into methane or ethane with graphene-covered reduced titanium dioxide. The finding is expected to be utilized in the carbon dioxide reduction and recycling industries.

1d

 

How people adapt to post stroke visual impairments

A new study examines the factors that influence how a person adapts to visual field loss following stroke.

1d

 

VOX pops cereal challenge

A popular technique for studying genes from different organisms plus a new carrier to transfer them to plants has yielded a powerful tool for understanding crops better.

1d

 

The medicine of the future against infection and inflammation?

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, have in collaboration with colleagues in Copenhagen and Singapore, mapped how the body's own peptides act to reduce infection and inflammation by deactivating the toxic substances formed in the process. The study is published in Nature Communications and the researchers believe their discovery could lead to new drugs against infection and inflammation, for

1d

 

VOX pops cereal challenge

A plant virus with a simple genome promises to help crop scientists understand traits and diseases in wheat and maize more quickly and easily than existing techniques and, as its full potential is tapped, to work across a range of different plant species.

1d

 

The Master of Negation

Over the past few days, the news for Republican congressional candidates has been almost unremittingly bleak. Troy Balderson, a state senator running in a central Ohio district that had long been considered rock solid for the GOP, is only narrowly ahead of the Democrat Danny O’Connor, a relative newcomer who has yet to concede defeat. In Washington State’s jungle primary, which winnows candidates

1d

 

The Strange, Unique Intimacy of the Roommate Relationship

Alex Schelldorf shares a sunny Chicago apartment with a man who creates messes but who doesn’t, Schelldorf says, clean them up. His roommate also leaves doors open long enough for Schelldorf’s Shiba Inu to escape and has a habit of making what Schelldorf considers to be insensitive offhand comments to guests. But Schelldorf won’t have to deal with these annoyances much longer. This roommate, who

1d

 

There's a reason Siri, Alexa and AI are imagined as female – sexism

Virtual assistants are increasingly popular and present in our everyday lives: literally with Alexa, Cortana, Holly, and Siri, and fictionally in films Samantha (Her), Joi (Blade Runner 2049) and Marvel's AIs, FRIDAY (Avengers: Infinity War), and Karen (Spider-Man: Homecoming). These names demonstrate the assumption that virtual assistants, from SatNav to Siri, will be voiced by a woman. This rein

1d

 

Historic space weather could clarify what's next

Historic space weather may help us understand what's coming next, according to new research by the University of Warwick.

1d

 

Researcher discusses the launch of the Parker Solar Probe

On Saturday, NASA launched a bold mission to fly directly into the sun's atmosphere, with a spacecraft named the Parker Solar Probe, after solar astrophysicist Eugene Parker. The incredibly resilient vessel, vaguely shaped like a lightbulb the size of a small car, was launched early in the morning from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Its trajectory will aim straight for the sun, where

1d

 

Rock layers show our sun has been in same cycle for 700 million years

Our star gets more and less active in a repeating cycle that lasts 11 years, and ancient rocks suggest it behaved the same way over 700 million years ago

1d

 

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is on its way to the sun, via Venus

After a false start on Saturday, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe blasted off on Sunday to begin a mission to enter the sun’s scorching atmosphere

1d

 

Extreme tales from a record-breaking dive in the Antarctic

Jon Copley dived deep for Blue Planet II. He reveals the risks of falling rocks, leaks and fires inside the sub, and highlights the extraordinary "death star"

1d

 

‘Catch-up rule’ could shorten lengthy baseball games

A new rule could shorten major league baseball games, make them more competitive, and, perhaps, boost fan interest at the same time, according to researchers. If MLB’s intent is to truly speed up contests and increase the league’s competitiveness, a radical change is in order. Recent rule changes, such as a limited number of mound visits, have done little to shorten baseball games—contests curren

1d

 

Lighter sedation won't drop risk of postop delirium

Researchers say a study designed to see if reducing the amount of anesthesia reduces the risk of postoperative delirium in older patients surprisingly found that lighter sedation failed to do so in severely ill people undergoing hip fracture repair.

1d

 

How birds learn

Songbirds can acquire new abilities both through observation and through trial and error. However, skills acquired with the latter method are more easily adapted to new situations, as scientists at ETH and the University of Zurich have been able to demonstrate. The researchers also see parallels to how children learn.

1d

 

Researchers uncover a major new vulnerability of childhood leukemia

A team of researchers from IOCB Prague, KU Leuven, and Baylor College of Medicine has recently uncovered a major new vulnerability of mixed lineage leukemia. Their findings, published in a recent issue of the journal PNAS, reports that a protein called LEDGF/p75 is regulated by phosphorylation, a molecular modification that changes the electrical charge of the LEDGF/p75 protein.

1d

 

Thirty percent increase in risk of fracture after gastric bypass

A study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research shows that the risk of fractures increases by about 30 percent after a gastric bypass operation. It was also discovered that falls increase after these operations.

1d

 

Study examines how people adapt to post stroke visual impairments

A new University of Liverpool study, published in Brain and Behaviour, examines the factors that influence how a person adapts to visual field loss following stroke.

1d

 

Converting carbon dioxide into methane or ethane selectively

Korean researchers developed high-efficiency photocatalysts that convert carbon dioxide into methane or ethane with graphene-covered reduced titanium dioxide. The finding is expected to be utilized in the carbon dioxide reduction and recycling industries.

1d

 

Renewables could drastically cut tailpipe emissions

Ethanol and related gasoline replacement fuels produce fewer smog-causing chemicals.

1d

 

Solar fuels working well under pressure

Computer analysis aids the formulation of methanol-based renewable fuels that can operate under compression ignition conditions.

1d

 

Video: 5G er på vej – se virkningen af lav latency

Mens overgangen fra 3G til 4G LTE mest handlede om hastighed, vil 5G bringe lav latency og dermed uanede muligheder med sig: fra VR til selvkørende biler til Internet of Skills.

1d

 

UK wildfires—prevention is more than a fire service issue

The huge moorland fires at Saddleworth and Winter Hill in northwest England have shown just how serious a problem wildfires can be in the UK. Now the fires are out, it is time to look at how such catastrophes can be prevented in the future and why this critical environmental issue needs to be on the political agenda.

1d

 

Putting the ethics into planetary protection

In the coming decades, as we gear up for a more in-depth search for life on Mars, as well as visits to potentially habitable ocean moons in the outer Solar System, should scientists start addressing the ethical concerns of accidentally contaminating these worlds with Earthly microbes, as well as the scientific implications? That's the question posed by a trio of scientists who are arguing for a sh

1d

 

Are they watching you? The tiny brains of bees and wasps can recognise faces

Recognising faces is essential for how we interact in complex societies, and is often thought to be an ability that requires the sophistication of the large human brain.

1d

 

How homeless women have little choice but to use sex for survival

Women comprise 42% of Australia's homeless population. Not only do many women become homeless due to family violence, homelessness can expose them to further gendered violence. Research shows homeless women experience violence – or feel vulnerable to it – in crisis accommodation, such as private rooming houses and motels, to which housing services often refer them due to the scarcity of more suita

1d

 

Complex networks identify genes for biofuel crops

To improve biofuel production, scientists must understand the fundamental interactions that lead to the expression of key traits in plants and microbes. To understand these interactions, scientists are using different layers of information (about the relationships between genes, and between genes and phenotypes) combined with new computational approaches to integrate vast amounts of data in a mode

1d

 

Cybersecurity is failing us – and will continue to do so unless we act

Our current model of internet security is too vulnerable to the mistakes of individual programmers. Better alternatives exist – and should be deployed

1d

 

Buzz: A beautiful book shows why modern bees are hippy wasps at heart

A beautifully illustrated new book details the evolutionary path that created modern bees from their ancient wasp ancestors – and why the apians’ future is uncertain

1d

 

Tools reveal Easter Island may not have had a societal collapse

Tools used to make Easter Island’s famous statues have yielded a clue that suggests the Rapa Nui inhabitants that made them all got along with each other

1d

 

Læger er bekymrede for opgradering af Sundhedsplatformen

Lægeforeninger i Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland ønsker svar på, hvordan den kommende opgradering af Sundhedsplatformen skal foregå. De er bl.a. bekymrede for, om lægerne får tid til at afprøve nye funktioner.

1d

 

16 smartphone apps for (nearly) any emergency

DIY Apply first aid, face natural disasters, and more. In an emergency, your phone can save the day. These 16 apps will help you find your way, apply first aid, escape a dangerous situation, and face natural disasters.

1d

 

Fake news isn't just bad news—it's bad for the bottom line, too

Note to Mark Zuckerberg: Beware of misinformation

1d

 

Smart urban solutions for more resilient cities

Europe is one of the most urbanised regions in the world, with 73 % of its population living in cities and towns. With the expected rise in global urbanisation in the coming decades, European cities will be facing many challenges associated with sustainable urban development.

1d

 

US mid-term elections: Truth-seeking scientists run for office

"Scientists are not natural politicians… but they solve problems," says one of the record number running in the US mid-term elections.

1d

 

Cycling is the urban transport mode associated with the greatest health benefits

A study carried out in seven European cities highlights the role of active transport in good mental health and self-perceived health.

1d

 

Benzodiazepines are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease

The use of benzodiazepines and related drugs (Z drugs) is associated with a modestly increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland.

1d

 

NUS develop AI platform to identify personalized drug combinations for myeloma patients

A multidisciplinary team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has developed an artificial intelligence technology platform that could potentially change the way drug combinations are being designed, hence enabling doctors to determine the most effective drug combination for a patient quickly.

1d

 

Flexible drug delivery microdevice to advance precision medicine

A KAIST research team has developed a flexible drug delivery device with controlled release for personalized medicine, blazing the path toward theragnosis. They fabricated a device on a rigid substrate and transferred a 50 μm-thick active drug delivery layer to the flexible substrate via inorganic laser lift off. The fabricated device shows mechanical flexibility while maintaining the capability o

1d

 

Breast cancers enlist the help of normal cells to help them spread and survive

Australian researchers have uncovered a secret communication hotline between breast cancers and the normal cells surrounding them. Importantly, the messages sent back and forth between the normal and tumor cells encourage the cancer to survive and to become more aggressive.

1d

 

Sports stats show why lefties are rare

Left-handed people are relatively rare because of the balance between cooperation and competition in human evolution, according to a new study of sports data. Representing only 10 percent of the general human population, left-handers have been viewed with suspicion and persecuted across history. The word “sinister” even derives from “left or left-hand.” Researchers at Northwestern University now

1d

 

Genetic tools uncover cause of childhood seizure disorder missed by other methods

Researchers have developed high-tech tools to uncover the genetic cause of the most difficult to diagnose cases.

1d

 

Debat om medicinsk cannabis trækker fronterne op mellem læger og sundhedsministeren

Læger anklager sundhedsministeren for at svække tilliden til videnskaben i debatten om medicinsk cannabis.

1d

 

SDU ansætter ny professor i almen medicin

Den diagnostiske proces bliver et hovedfokus for praktiserende læge Dorte Ejg Jarbøl, der er tiltrådt som professor i almen medicin på Syddansk Universitet.

1d

 

Hybrid nanomaterials bristle with potential

Triple-layered nanoarray electrode promises to boost battery performance and enhance other electrochemical processes.

1d

 

Sea stars critical to kelp forest resilience

A study by Simon Fraser University resource and environmental management researcher Jenn Burt reveals that sunflower sea stars play a critical role in the resilience of B.C.'s kelp forests, which are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Similar to land-based forests, kelp forests provide essential habitat for species and also help remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

1d

 

‘The Music Is All About Surviving’: Inside the Sonic World of Sharp Objects

In HBO’s Sharp Objects , the troubled journalist Camille Preaker returns to her small Missouri hometown to investigate a string of murders—as well as the mystery of her own family’s past. She does so, in large part, as the ominous rock of Led Zeppelin surges from her headphones and car speakers. At the mansion of her mother, Adora, and stepfather, Alan Crellin, more demure sounds play: contempora

1d

 

Prototype could offer fresh water where wells run salty

A solar-powered distillation unit could desalinate water in arid coastal areas where wells are so depleted that seawater leaches into the freshwater supply. The prototype can distill 150 liters (40 gallons) of water per day and can scale up to 3,000 liters (793 gallons). That’s equal to five truckloads of fresh water and a much more eco-friendly solution to the problem of insufficient access to f

1d

 

Heavy D Throws the Best Birthday Parties | Diesel Brothers

There's nothing cooler than having a dad like Heavy D who throws some of the best Monster Jam themed birthday parties ever. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://

1d

 

Hydrogen sulfide detected in the protoplanetary disk of GG Tauri A

An international team of researchers has detected hydrogen sulfide emission from the dense protoplanetary disk around the star GG Tauri A. It is the first detection of this chemical compound in a protoplanetary disk. The finding is reported in a paper published August 2 on the arXiv pre-print server.

1d

 

Grip strength of children gives clues about their future health

Adolescents with a strong hand grip — an indicator of overall muscle strength — have better odds of being healthy over time, according to a two-year study of 368 elementary school children. The findings give insights to identify youngsters at future risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

1d

 

Strange brains offer a glimpse into the mind

A close look at unusual brains offers a way to understand how the human mind is constructed, two new books argue.

1d

 

Young salmon may leap to 'oust the louse'

A study by Simon Fraser University aquatic ecologists Emma Atkinson and John Reynolds reveals that young salmon may jump out of water to remove sea lice.

1d

 

Star Wars News: Disney Would Like Its Movies Back Now, Please

The Mouse House reportedly wants all of them for its streaming service.

1d

 

Watch a Harlem Globetrotter Sink a Shot from a Plane

Really, this is a classic projectile motion physics problem.

1d

 

GE Smart Countertop Microwave Review: Future Food

GE loaded this microwave with Alexa capabilities and scan-to-cook technology. But those high-tech features make microwaving more complicated than ever.

1d

 

Størstedelen af fejl i robotkirurgi skyldes fejl i robotterne

Amerikanske analyser viser, at det sjældent galt, når en kirurg bruger robotter til operationer, og kun i meget få tilfælde fører det til skader på mennesker. Efter ti års brug af robotter ved operationer kan lægerne på Herlev Hospital bekræfte tendensen.

1d

 

Chimpanzee foods are more mechanically demanding than previously thought

Chimpanzees are generally known as the ripe fruit specialist among the great apes, but also incorporate other food items such as leaves and seedpods into their diets. Savannah chimpanzees are thought to rely on these non-fruit resources more than their forest counterparts. The mechanical properties of plant foods can vary substantially, but to date, there were no comparative data available for chi

1d

 

How Termites Shape the Natural World

Interactions between termites and vegetation explain mysterious patterns throughout the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Teachers Help One Another Bring Evolution Back to the Classroom

Research shows that 60 percent of American teachers avoid or skimp on teaching evolution. A growing movement is trying to change that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Record-Breaking Signal May Help Solve the Mystery of Fast Radio Bursts

The CHIME telescope could soon deliver thousands of additional detections of the mysterious cosmic outbursts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

High-speed cameras show MOMO-2 launch failure in unprecedented detail

Japanese startup Interstellar Technologies Inc. (IST) has revealed high-definition videos of the unsuccessful June 30 launch of its MOMO-2 rocket. The new footage, captured by industrial high-speed cameras, shows the failure in unprecedented detail.

1d

 

Self-assembled nanostructures with atomically precise structure and tailored electronic properties

Bio organisms are the most-complex machines we know, and are capable of achieving demanding functions with great efficiency.

1d

 

Superconductivity above 10 K in a novel quasi-one-dimensional compound

In the past century, superconductivity has been observed in thousands of substances with multifarious chemical compositions and crystal structures; however, researchers have still not found an explicit method for discovering new superconductors. For the unconventional high-Tc superconductors of cuprates and iron pnictides/chalcogenides, the occurrence of superconductivity is highly related to the

1d

 

New water simulation captures small details even in large scenes

When designers select a method for simulating water and waves, they have to choose either fast computation or realistic effects; state-of-the-art methods are only able to optimize one or the other. Now, a method developed by researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and NVIDIA bridges this gap. Their simulation method can reproduce complex interactions with the e

1d

 

A land model with groundwater lateral flow, water use, and soil freeze-thaw front dynamics

Human water regulation, groundwater lateral flow and the movement of soil frost and thaw fronts affect water and thermal processes, as well as energy and water exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere. Reasonable representation of these processes in land surface models is very important to improving the understanding of terrestrial eco-hydrological processes and land-atmosphere interactio

1d

 

Biomimetic micro/nanoscale fiber reinforced composites

Over hundreds of millions of years of evolution, nature has produced a myriad of biological materials that serve either as skeletons or as defensive or offensive weapons. Although these natural structural materials are derived from relatively sterile natural components, such as fragile minerals and ductile biopolymers, they often exhibit extraordinary mechanical properties due to their highly orde

1d

 

Research Brief: No defense for some plants in the eat-or-be-eaten world of grasslands

University of Minnesota researchers are showing the important role such plant-eating consumers play in an ecosystem's ability carry out key jobs like storing carbon — and, in turn, the role plants play in supporting these organisms and the others that depend on them.

1d

 

Using tellurium nanoparticles to achieve plasmonic-like and all-dielectric properties when exposed to sunlight

A team of researchers at Sun Yat-sen University in China has created a material with dual solar properties by adding tellurium nanoparticles to water—it showed both plasmonic-like and all-dielectric properties when exposed to sunlight. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their material and its possible uses.

1d

 

Flat-pack homes and profit-sharing retrofits are making sustainable housing affordable

Wealth-generating, flat-pack solar houses and a profit-sharing scheme that incentivises retrofitting are bringing sustainable living to people who would otherwise not be able to afford it.

1d

 

Rising temperatures are causing soil to dump more carbon dioxide into the air

Nexus Media News The Earth, essentially, is panting. Earth is panting as soil struggles to keep up with climate change.

1d

 

Lighter sedation won't drop risk of postop delirium

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say a study designed to see if reducing the amount of anesthesia reduces the risk of postoperative delirium in older patients surprisingly found that lighter sedation failed to do so in severely ill people undergoing hip fracture repair.

1d

 

Grip strength of children gives clues about their future health

Adolescents with a strong hand grip — an indicator of overall muscle strength — have better odds of being healthy over time, according to a two-year study of 368 elementary school children. The findings give insights to identify youngsters at future risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

1d

 

The Next Populist Revolution Will Be Latino

Immerse yourself in the pro-immigration literature of Democratic Party thinkers, and you will notice a curious pattern of argument: High levels of immigration have awakened the racism and bigotry that have fueled the rise of right-wing populism, but it is nevertheless best to press forward with the policies that have ostensibly produced this fearsome reaction. Why? Because slowing the pace of imm

1d

 

Jakarta, the fastest-sinking city in the world

With frequent floods, sinking markets and engulfed homes, by 2050 parts of Jakarta will be underwater.

1d

 

Where do rare spiders live? Ask citizen scientists

Online data from citizen scientists may be key to mapping the distribution of rare species in the wild, a new study reports. Species distribution maps are essential to understanding an organism’s ecology, forecast how climate change and other activities will affect it, and plan management strategies. But detailed knowledge of most species’ ranges is lacking, since the number of professional field

1d

 

Team develops a family of bioinspired artificial woods from traditional resins

Nature has provided the inspiration for the design and fabrication of high-performance biomimetic engineering materials. Wood, which has been used for thousands of years, has received considerable attention due to the low density and high strength. A unique anisotropic cellular structure endows wood with outstanding mechanical performance. In recent decades, researchers have developed monolithic m

1d

 

Another step forward on universal quantum computer

Researchers have demonstrated holonomic quantum gates under zero-magnetic field at room temperature, which could enable the realization of fast and fault-tolerant universal quantum computers.

1d

 

Image of the Day: Slimy Business

A new study reports finding corn species in Mexico that can trap nitrogen.

1d

 

Breaking down the Wiedemann-Franz law

A study exploring the coupling between heat and particle currents in a gas of strongly interacting atoms highlights the fundamental role of quantum correlations in transport phenomena, breaks the Wiedemann-Franz law, and should open up an experimental route to testing novel ideas for thermoelectric devices.

1d

 

Five things to know about Bayer and Monsanto

A cancer victim's surprise court victory over US pesticide maker Monsanto could open the floodgates to a slew of similar lawsuits, potentially leaving the firm's new German owner with a major case of buyer's remorse.

1d

 

Photos Show Horrifying Scenes from California Wildfires

Firefighters fight to contain the several wildfires burning across California, including the state's largest fire on record, the Mendocino Complex Fire. Here's a look at some of the most dramatic scenes from the fires.

1d

 

 

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image