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Nyheder2018august14

 

g Megalodon (2002) and Jurassic Shark (2012).

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Understanding climate change: Long Beach New York, post-Sandy

The past two weekends my summer routine of riding my bike on the Long Beach boardwalk to the gym has been interrupted by major rain storms. Instead, I drove to the gym and watched the water accumulate and drain from Long Beach's Park Avenue as I zoned-out on the elliptical machine. Whenever storms hit out there, like most of my neighbors, I think about "Superstorm Sandy" and the months (and for so

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Chemo spray may offer alternative to conventional chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is often used as a follow-up treatment after surgical removal of a cancerous tumor in order to destroy any remaining cancer cells, but intravenous chemo drugs have notorious side effects and are not always effective.

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Cancer drug delivery closes in on fabled ‘magic bullet’

Researchers have demonstrated that specialized nucleic acid-based nanostructures could target cancer cells while bypassing normal cells. “Most of the therapeutic drugs are not able to discriminate the cancer cells from healthy cells…” More than 100 years ago, German Nobel laureate Paul Ehrlich popularized the “magic bullet” concept—a method that clinicians might one day use to target invading mic

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Is social media making us less civil?

In the early 1990s, when the modern Internet was beginning to take shape, it was often referred to as the "information superhighway." Connectivity carried with it the promise of democratizing knowledge. Anyone with an Internet connection would have access to all the information ever known, we'd all be smarter and more civilized, and the world would be an infinitely better place.

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Deep learning stretches up to scientific supercomputers

Machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence, enjoys unprecedented success in commercial applications. However, the use of machine learning in high performance computing for science has been limited. Why? Advanced machine learning tools weren't designed for big data sets, like those used to study stars and planets. A team from Intel, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NER

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Transforming gas into fuels with better alloys

Technological advances in oil and gas well stimulation over the past decade now allow for the production of natural gas from shale gas trapped in rock formations underground. With the sudden increase in the availability of shale gas, scientists have regained interest in carbon–hydrogen (C–H) activation, the process of breaking C–H bonds from gases such as methane to form chains of hydrocarbons tha

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Fishing quotas upended by nuclear DNA analysis

Fishing quotas have been decided using an inadequate method for decades, according to a Scientific Reports study. The same method has also been used to decide about culling, hunting quotas, or translocating threatened species. Analysing the nuclear genome of sardines shows previously unrecognised genetic differences between populations, which are not identified by the go-to-method for Isolation-By

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Extending palm oil production in Africa threatens primate conservation

Future expansion of the palm oil industry could have a dramatic impact on African primates.

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'Alarming' diabetes epidemic in guatemala tied to aging, not obesity

The diabetes epidemic in Guatemala is worse than previously thought: more than 25 percent of its indigenous people, who make up 60 percent of the population, suffer from type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes, suggests a new study published in PLOS ONE from researchers at the Penn Center for Global Health

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Artificial placenta created in the laboratory

TU Wien (Vienna) has now produced an artificial placenta model that very closely resembles the natural organ. Using a specially developed femtosecond laser-based 3D printing process, it is possible to produce customized hydrogel membranes directly within microfluidic chips, which are then populated with placenta cells. This means it is now possible to provide clarity in some vital research issues,

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Kikuichi Cutlery went from Samurai swords to kitchen knives

Gadgets And we've got an exclusive deal with them for you. These knives aren't cheap, but the prices reflect the quality of the materials and the time spent creating them by hand. Right now, Kikiuchi is offering PopSci readers…

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DNA says ancient people bred macaws. But where?

Somewhere in the American Southwest or northern Mexico, there are probably the ruins of a scarlet macaw breeding operation dating to between 900 and 1200 CE, report archaeologists. The team sequenced the mitochondrial DNA of bird remains from the Chaco Canyon and Mimbres areas of New Mexico. Remains of a thriving prehistoric avian culture and breeding colony of scarlet macaws exist at the norther

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Using smartphones to detect strokes

Researchers of Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) have designed a mobile phone application that enables the early detection of cerebral ictus. By using the sensors available in smartphones, the program – which is in its testing stage – analyses the user's ability to smile, speech coherence and arm movements; if two of the three are impaired, it automatically sends out a warning message to the

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This leukemia comes with 600% higher risk of melanoma

People with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have a 600 percent higher risk of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, a new study reports. The higher melanoma risk isn’t news, but no one has reported a full analysis of detection rates and treatments among CLL patients, says Clive Zent, professor of hematology/oncology and medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Cancer and Wil

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Tesla board forms committee to consider going private

Tesla's board of directors said Tuesday it formed a special committee to consider chief executive Elon Musk's proposal to take the electric auto giant private.

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Unpublished Egyptian texts reveal new insights into ancient medicine

The University of Copenhagen in Denmark is home to a unique collection of Ancient Egyptian papyrus manuscripts.

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Aquifers for environmentally compatible cooling and heating

In this year's record summer, everybody wishes to have a cooled home or office. But air conditioning systems consume a lot of energy and are far from being environmentally compatible. Researchers of the GeoSpeicher.bw project coordinated by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are studying alternatives with a reduced energy consumption. These include storage and later retrieval of heat and cold

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Quest for source of black hole dark matter

Like a game of "hide and seek," Lawrence Livermore astrophysicists know that there are black holes hiding in the Milky Way, just not where.

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Severe declines of mountain hares on Scottish grouse moors

Mountain hare numbers on moorlands in the eastern Highlands have declined to less than one per cent of their initial levels, according to a newly published long-term scientific study.

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Bacteria-fighting polymers created with light

Hundreds of polymers — which could kill drug-resistant superbugs in novel ways — can be produced and tested using light, using a method developed at the University of Warwick

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Glacier depth affects plankton blooms off Greenland

The unusual timing of highly-productive summer plankton blooms off Greenland indicates a connection between increasing amounts of meltwater and nutrients in these coastal waters. In a new study published today in Nature Communications, an international group of researchers shows that this connection exists, but is much more complex than widely supposed. Whether increasing meltwater has a positive

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How hot is Schrödinger's coffee?

A new uncertainty relation, linking the precision with which temperature can be measured and quantum mechanics, has been discovered at the University of Exeter.

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Mixing energy drinks with alcohol could enhance the negative effects of binge drinking

A key ingredient of energy drinks could be exacerbating some of the negative effects of binge drinking according to a new study.

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Tiny helpers that clean cells

New results show which proteins assist the natural recycling process in the body.

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Men still upstage women on screen — but things are getting better

Only three out of every ten characters seen in the top 50 grossing movies of 2016 were played by women. According to Conor Neville and Phyllis Anastasio of Saint Joseph's University in the US, this in no way reflects real world demographics. In a study in Springer's journal Sex Roles, the researchers found that women, in particular, are nowadays more often cast as characters holding positions of p

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Being human: Big toe clung on longest to primate origins

Our big toe was one of the last parts of the foot to become human-like, as our early ancestors evolved to walk on two legs.

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Sundhedsminister forsvarer nærhedsfinansiering

Sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) lover at tage højde for læger og patienters bekymringer om nærhedsfinansiering. Den kommende sundhedsreform vil sikre, at kommunerne har kapacitet til at løfte opgaven, forsikrer ministeren

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Pinpointing mutations that cause bacterial antibiotic resistance

Researchers in Japan have developed a new way of testing bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and found three previously unknown resistance mutations in the process. The fact that they detected both known and unknown mutations suggests their approach will be useful for monitoring resistance to antibiotics.

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New zebrafish models will accelerate studies of the human skeleton and osteoporosis

Although much scientific research has been done into the development of the skeleton, the underlying mechanisms that drive the formation and maintenance of bones are still not very well understood, and research into the development of bone remains of enormous importance. To date, 20 percent of women at the age of 65 years develop osteoporosis, and 40 percent of elderly men suffering a hip fracture

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3-D inks that can be erased selectively

3-D printing allows for the efficient manufacture of complex geometries. A promising method is direct laser writing—a computer-controlled, focused laser beam acts as a pen and produces the desired structure in a photoresist. In this way, three-dimensional structures with details in the sub-micrometer range can be produced.

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Study links relationship of retail staff with their workplace to prevention of shoplifting

University of Otago research examining the role of psychological ownership in shoplifting prevention is to be extended into a New Zealand-wide survey of supermarket staff after notable results in a pilot trial.

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New Caledonia protects huge swathe of coral reefs

New Caledonia agreed Tuesday to tougher protections around a huge swathe of some of the world's last near-pristine coral reefs, in a move conservationists hailed as a major breakthrough.

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DeepMind’s AI can spot eye disease just as well as top doctors

DeepMind's system trains on eye scan data taken from thousands of NHS patients and determines which should be seen sooner

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Trump’s Attacks on Omarosa Are Getting Even More Vicious

Much about the Trump administration has been unpredictable, surprising, even shocking. The president’s falling-out with Omarosa Manigault-Newman is not one of those things. On Tuesday morning, the day Manigault-Newman’s new book was published, Donald Trump escalated his attacks on her, using the most vicious and dehumanizing language yet: When you give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give h

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Fitting a square peg in a round hole—the surprising structure of uranium bound in hematite

One promising approach to stabilize uranium contamination in soils is to envelop the radioactive uranium into iron-bearing minerals like hematite. But how well does uranium bind with hematite and for how long? Scientists have disagreed on the chemical structure of uranium bound in hematite, making long-term prediction difficult. By melding precise experimental characterization with molecular dynam

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New app, educational game gets its inspiration from phytoplankton

Marine phytoplankton are the inspiration for a new mobile application and educational game launched by University of Maine assistant professor of new media and intermedia Gene Felice.

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Heatwaves are more deadly for some cities than others – here's why

Residents of Melbourne and Adelaide may be more at risk from death during an extreme heatwave than their counterparts in Sydney and Brisbane.

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Study suggests palm oil cultivation in Africa could further endanger primates

An international team of researchers has found that there are few areas where palm oil cultivation could be undertaken in Africa that would not cause harm to native primates. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of data pertaining to the suitability of palm oil cultivation and primate vulnerability in Africa, and what they fou

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Blue light from phones causes the human eye to attack itself

We know that excessive blue light is a problem. Now we know why. Read More

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Is Dark Matter Real?

Astrophysicists have piled up observations that are difficult to explain with dark matter. It is time to consider that there may be more to gravity than Einstein taught us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Artificial intelligence equal to experts in detecting eye diseases

An artificial intelligence (AI) system, which can recommend the correct referral decision for more than 50 eye diseases, as accurately as experts has been developed by Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, DeepMind Health and UCL.

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Babies in prams can be exposed to more than twice as much pollution than adults

Babies in prams can be exposed to up to 60 percent more pollution than their parents, causing potential damage to their frontal lobe and impacting on their cognitive abilities and brain development.

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New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

When engineers or designers wanted to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed car or an airplane, the procedure usually took hours or even a day. Nobuyuki Umetani and Bernd Bickel have now significantly sped up this process, making streamlines and parameters available in real-time. Their method, which is the first to use machine learning to model flow around continuously editable 3D

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Warmer ocean, warmer winter Eurasian climate

Studies on the contribution of global oceanic warming to winter Eurasian climate change show that there are warmer winters in Europe and the northern part of East Asia.

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Flipping the switch on supramolecular electronics

Graphene Flagship Partners successfully combined photoswitchable molecular lattices with layered materials to create new high-performance devices that show macroscopic responses to light.

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Scientists propose a new lead for Alzheimer's research

A University of Adelaide-led team of scientists has suggested a potential link between iron in our cells and the rare gene mutations that cause Alzheimer's disease, which could provide new avenues for future research.

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Audience members influence value creation in the TV audience market

Recently an article was published in the International Journal of Digital Television, which examined the changing relationship between traditional TV providers and their audiences. Senior Research Fellow Ulrike Rohn (Tallinn University) and Docent Mats Nylund (Arcada University of Applied Sciences) say that the notion of sharing, which is most prominent in the current buzzword of the 'sharing econ

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Johns Hopkins experts create opioid prescribing guidelines for 20 common surgical procedures

A Johns Hopkins expert panel of health care providers and patients have announced what is, to their knowledge, the nation's first set of operation-specific opioid prescribing guidelines.

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Eight and nine-year-olds experience poor body image as hormone levels rise

Children as young as eight are vulnerable to poor body image as hormone levels rise with the onset of puberty, a new study has found. The study based on data from more than 1,100 eight- to nine-year-olds indicates a need for strategies in schools and at home to help children maintain a positive body image prior to the onset of puberty.

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Large collection of brain cancer data now easily, freely accessible to global researchers

A valuable cache of brain cancer biomedical data, one of only two such large collections in the country, has been made freely available worldwide by researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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This intervention reduces drinking in men with HIV

A simple intervention using a technique called “motivational interviewing” during routine HIV care can have strong and lasting effects in terms of alcohol consumption for men who have sex with men (MSM), according to a new study. Compared to treatment as usual, MSM exposed to the intervention and a few brief follow-up sessions reported fewer drinks per week, fewer days of heavy drinking, and less

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Forskellige klimaløsninger på linjerne: Bussernes temperatur måles manuelt

Movia står ikke selv for busdriften i København, den er udbudt til operatører, som selv står for klimaanlæg og for at holde temperaturen i busserne.

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Captain's Spotlight: Jake Anderson, Part 2 | Deadliest Catch

It's tough being the new guy on a fishing boat, but as a greenhorn, Jake was able to work his way through the ranks, to come out on top. The road is long and the sea is unforgiving, but Jake's newfound belief in himself allowed him to survive and thrive. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDisc

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Kurt Højlund bliver forskningsleder på Steno Diabetes Center Odense

Professor og overlæge Kurt Højlund er tiltrådt som forskningsleder på Steno Diabetes Center Odense, hvor han skal være med til at give diabetesforskningen et løft.

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En buddy skal hjælpe sundhedsprofessionelle i krise

Nyt tiltag skal gennem samtale med kolleger hjælpe sundhedsprofessionelle til at bearbejde traumatiske hændelser på arbejdspladsen.

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Can radar replace stethoscopes?

In conjunction with researchers at Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) in Cottbus and the Department of Palliative Medicine at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, electronic engineers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a procedure for reliably detecting and diagnosing heart sounds using radar. In future, mobile radar devices could replace conventional steth

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Trees and climate change: Faster growth, lighter wood

Trees are growing more rapidly due to climate change. This sounds like good news. After all, this means that trees are storing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in their wood and hence taking away the key ingredient in global warming. But is it that simple? A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) analyzed wood samples from the oldest existing experimental areas spanning a period

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Illinois' imperiled eastern massasauga rattlesnakes retain genetic diversity

A long-term study of eastern massasauga rattlesnakes in Illinois reveals that — despite their alarming decline in numbers — the few remaining populations have retained a surprising amount of genetic diversity.

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One antiplatelet drug after heart valve replacement

Treatment guidelines say patients who undergo minimally invasive aortic heart valve replacements should receive two antiplatelet drugs to reduce the risk of dangerous blood clots. A Loyola Medicine study has found that a single antiplatelet drug may work just as well, with lower risks of life-threatening bleeding and other complications.

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Ancient natural fission reactor offers clues on how to store modern nuclear waste

A team of researchers from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and Washington University has learned more about possible ways to store modern nuclear waste by studying an ancient natural fission reactor. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of cores taken from the natural Oklo nuclear reactor and what they found.

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Drone Swarms as You Know Them Are Just an Illusion—for Now

Networking isn't inherently evil. It's how teams of drones will one day be able to survey natural disasters, rescue survivors, and deliver your burritos.

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U.K. Police Are Investigating a Crash Near Parliament as Terrorism

A car plowed into the gates of the United Kingdom’s Parliament on Tuesday, injuring two people in what London’s Metropolitan Police are investigating as a possible act of terrorism . It’s at least the fourth vehicular attack to take place in London since March 2017, and the second outside the U.K.’s Houses of Parliament since then. “Given that this appears to be a deliberate act, the method, and

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Watch This Native Pollinator Build Her Bee-Jeweled Nest

Research shows that 400 female blue orchard bees are as effective at pollinating almonds as the more than 10,000 bees in a honeybee hive. But they reproduce slowly and are prone to wandering. (Image credit: Josh Cassidy/KQED)

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Tiny Worms Survive Forces 400,000 Times Stronger Than Gravity on Earth

New findings give some weight to the idea that life was blasted here from another planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Are Boys Better Than Girls at Math?

Colleen Ganley, assistant professor of developmental psychology, answers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ancient changes along the Hudson offer glimpse into how ice sheets grew

In a kind of geological mystery, scientists have known for decades that a massive ice sheet stretched to cover most of Canada and much of the northeastern U.S. 25,000 years ago. What's been trickier to pin down is how—and especially how quickly—it reached its ultimate size.

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Researcher accurately determines energy difference between two quantum states

A kiwi physicist has discovered the energy difference between two quantum states in the helium atom with unprecedented accuracy, a ground-breaking discovery that contributes to our understanding of the universe and space-time and rivals the work of the world's most expensive physics project, the Large Hadron Collider.

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Unraveling the stellar content of young clusters

About twenty-five percent of young stars in our galaxy form in clustered environments, and stars in a cluster are often close enough to each other to affect the way they accrete gas and grow. Astronomers trying to understand the details of star formation, for example the relative abundance of massive stars to low mass ones, must take such complicated clustering effects into account. Measuring the

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Study identifies distinct origin of ADHD in children with history of brain injury

According to a study in Biological Psychiatry, physical brain injury in children contributes to the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), distinct from genetic risk for the disorder.

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Renewables could drastically cut tailpipe emissions

Switching to renewable fuels could significantly lower exhaust emissions of toxic nitrogen oxides (NOx) as well as curbing global greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers at KAUST have combined computer analysis with laser-based NOx concentration measurements to understand NOx production pathways in different fuel types. The results may inspire new ways to mitigate NOx emissions, the researchers say.

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Converting carbon dioxide into methane or ethane selectively

A research team led by Professor Su-Il In from Department of Energy Science and Engineering has succeeded in developing photo catalysts that can convert carbon dioxide into usable energy such as methane or ethane.

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Flexible drug delivery microdevice to advance precision medicine

A KAIST research team has developed a flexible drug delivery device with controlled release for personalized medicine, a step toward theragnosis.

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Scientists-turned-students guide viewers through ‘The Most Unknown’

In The Most Unknown, a film on Netflix, a research round robin leads to fascinating discussions about scientific questions.

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Why do women get more migraines?

Differing levels of sex hormones, especially estrogens, may explain why many more women than men suffer from migraines. A study provides evidence that these hormones affect cell mechanisms that control responses to migraine triggers, offering a possible pathway to more effective, personalized treatments.

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California water managers vary in use of climate science

Lack of climate change adaptation among water utilities can put water supplies and the people dependent on them at risk, especially in marginalized communities, a new article suggests.

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Despite social development, gender attitudes chart different course globally

Sociologists charts three distinct transitions in gender attitudes associated with national characteristics. Gender equality has spread unevenly.

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Remifentanil during labor could halve the number of women needing an epidural

Half as many women in labor who were given a drug called remifentanil to help manage their pain needed a subsequent epidural, compared to the women given pethidine — the current standard of care, according to an open-label randomized controlled trial.

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Digital basketball players teach themselves to dribble

Researchers have developed a physics-based, real-time method for controlling animated characters that can learn basketball dribbling skills from experience. In this case, the system learns from motion capture of the movements that people dribbling basketballs performed. This trial-and-error learning process is time consuming, requiring millions of trials, but the results are arm movements that ar

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Men Who Advocate for Others in the Workplace Face Backlash

Study shows a cost for males who defy gender stereotypes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Multimodel ensemble prediction of summer droughts over the Yellow River Basin

The Yellow River basin is located in arid and semi-arid areas where drought is severe. However, soil moisture drought prediction at the seasonal time scale is very challenging, due to limited climate predictability over the mid-latitude region and uncertainties in land surface modeling over complex landscapes.

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Hybrid nanomaterials bristle with potential

By combining multiple nanomaterials into a single structure, scientists can create hybrid materials that incorporate the best properties of each component and outperform any single substance. A controlled method for making triple-layered hollow nanostructures has now been developed at KAUST. The hybrid structures consist of a conductive organic core sandwiched between layers of electrocatalyticall

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Solar fuels working well under pressure

Highly fuel-efficient new engine designs could significantly reduce the environmental impact of vehicles, especially if the engines run on renewable nonpetroleum-based fuels. Ensuring these unconventional fuels are compatible with next-generation engines was the aim of a new computational study on fuel ignition behavior at KAUST.

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Scientists develop an effective approach to optimizing medicinal molecules

The search for new medicinal molecules with predetermined properties is a complex, expensive and time-consuming process, especially in oncology. Modern science allows us to accelerate this search through the use of computer technology and the introduction of automated processes. In the development of biologically active molecules, there are two basic concepts—a medicinal molecule and a therapeutic

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Astronomers discover supermassive black hole in an ultracompact dwarf galaxy

A team of scientists from the Faculty of Physics and Sternberg State Astronomical Institute, MSU, leading an international collaboration with members from Europe, Chile, the U.S. and Australia discovered a supermassive black hole in the center of the Fornax galaxy. The results of the research were published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society journal.

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Q and A: Anthony Fauci Describes an Experimental Ebola Treatment

The monoclonal antibody, known as mAb114, is likely to be used in the current Ebola outbreak in DRC.

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New soft bioelectronic mesh tested on human wrist and pulsating pig's heart

A research team at the Center for Nanoparticle Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), has developed a wearable and implantable device that measures electrophysiological signals and applies electrical and thermal stimulations. It provides information on muscle and cardiac dysfunctions, and thus could be implemented for pain relief, rehabilitation, and prosthetic motor control. As t

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A new artificial quantum material for future high-efficiency computers

Scientists at Tsinghua University and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, have demonstrated the ability to control the states of matter, thus controlling internal resistance, within multilayered, magnetically doped semiconductors using the quantum anomalous Hall effect.

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Burundi plans plastic bag ban

Burundi's president, Pierre Nkurunziza, has issued a decree banning the use of plastic bags in the small central African country within the next 18 months.

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Chinese electric carmaker NIO eyes $1.8 bn IPO in US

Chinese electric carmaker NIO has filed for a $1.8 billion initial public offering in the United States as the burgeoning company seeks to compete with US rival Tesla.

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Most of your sodium isn't coming from your salt shaker

Health It's not de salt, it's DiGiorno (and other processed foods). More than 4 out of every 10 Americans are avoiding salt, but a lot of us are doing it wrong. We often think that to reduce our sodium intake, we should nix the shaker.

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Italiensk motorvejsbro kollapset over byområde

En sektion af en motorvejsbro ved Genova i Norditalien er kollapset ned over et byområde. Antallet af tilskadekomne er endnu ukendt.

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How to Track Your Heart Rate With Wearables

The best fitness training tool might already be on your wrist.

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Wildfire Smoke Is Smothering the US—Even Where You Don't Expect It

“Minnesota actually gets just about the most smoke days of any state in the US, you just don’t notice it.”

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Image of the Day: Velvet Worm

Researchers have recently identified a many-legged invertebrate from the Silurian period.

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The Origins of the 'OMG Particle'

Right now, as you read this very text, your DNA is getting sliced up by tiny, invisible bullets.

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The Church of Trump

Two weeks before the Iowa caucuses, in late January 2016, the Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump announced to an audience in Sioux City : “I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody, and I wouldn’t lose any voters, okay? It’s, like, incredible.” Trump, who has always been prone to fantastical overstatement , was derided at the time, but here and now—more than two a

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Is Gravity Quantum?

The ongoing search for the graviton—the proposed fundamental particle carrying gravitational force—is a crucial step in physicists’ long journey toward a theory of everything — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Svend Lings risikerer ekskludering fra Lægeforeningen

Lægeetisk Nævn skal vurdere, om Svend Lings skal smides ud af Lægeforeningen. Den nu pensionerede læge mener ikke selv, at han har handlet etisk forkert.

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Yes, Men Lose Weight Faster Than Women. Here's Why.

Women who have gone on a diet alongside men may have noticed a frustrating outcome: The pounds seem to fall off the men, while stubbornly sticking to women.

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Perseid Meteor Show Wows Skywatchers with Celestial Fireworks (Photos)

Brilliant displays of Perseid meteors lit up the heavens this past weekend as the annual Perseid meteor shower reached its peak.

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Why AI researchers shouldn’t turn their backs on the military

The author of a new book on autonomous weapons says scientists working on artificial intelligence need to do more to prevent the technology from being weaponized.

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Best Backpacks for College: Jansport, Chrome, Thule, Road Runner

You're a grown-up now. Time to get a new backpack.

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Inside the Lab Where Spiders Put on Face Paint and Fake Eyelashes (and Termites Wear Capes)

Researchers are using eyeliner and fake eyelashes to tease apart the complexities of the jumping spider mating ritual. Welcome to Extreme Makeover: Arachnid Edition.

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Forget Netflix: The Future of Television Is … More Television

With nimble startups like Netflix and NewTV, the death of television seems imminent. But the old-fashioned medium is powerful, lucrative, and just might be too big to fail.

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How social media took us from Tahrir Square to Donald Trump

To understand how digital technologies went from instruments for spreading democracy to weapons for attacking it, you have to look beyond the technologies themselves.

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East of Siberia: Goral on the Cliffs

They are highly secretive animals: stocky, goatlike creatures about the size of German shepherds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can Offshore Wind Turbines Succeed in the Great Lakes?

Ice jams and bird and bat deaths will determine the answer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Government ministers should ban Roundup – not sing its praises | Natalie Bennett

Thérèse Coffey’s ill-judged tweet shows we have still work to do to rid the planet of the glyphosate On a summer Sunday afternoon, Thérèse Coffey, parliamentary-under secretary of state at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), was, it would appear from her Twitter feed, about to do some gardening. Unremarkable, you might think. Parliament is in recess, and parliamentaria

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Controlling nickelate nano-switches with light

Dr. Giordano Mattoni, quantum researcher at TU Delft, and his collaborators have shown that the nano-electronic phase transition in a class of materials known as nickelates can be controlled by laser light. Their findings, which were published in Physical Review Materials, are an important step in the field of new materials for electronics.

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Koralrev overlevede dinosaurerne

Koralerne har klaret store klimamæssige forandringer gennem millioner af år. Men spørgsmålet er, om de kan klare de hastige menneskeskabte klimaforandringer. Forskerne håber, at ny viden kan redde koralerne.

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Historier frem for data: Det har været en øjenåbner for os

Storytelling handler om at turde give slip på de data, der ikke betyder noget, og læne sig godt op ad den agile arbejdsmetode, mener Coloplasts BI-chef.

20h

 

Spækhuggermor skubber afdød unge i 17 dage

– Vi har aldrig oplevet noget lignende, siger ekspert om spækhuggers rekordlange sørgetur.

20h

 

The Confirmation Wars Are Over

I have never lost a public debate more completely than I have lost the debate over judicial confirmations. For many years, across administrations of both parties, I clung to the increasingly minority view that each judicial nominee ought not be a skirmish in a larger war for the courts, that the Senate should tend to defer to the president in its exercise of the power to “advise and consent” on n

20h

 

Whose Untimely Death Would You Undo?

Alison Sweeney, actor and producer Abraham Lincoln’s assassination changed the trajectory of the United States. We’ll never know what could have been if he’d been able to finish his second term. Victor Levin, writer and director, Destination Wedding and 5 to 7 Anton Yelchin died tragically at 27, having made some 40 feature films. There was no finer actor. He was also a gifted writer and director

20h

 

The Lie of Little Women

Marc Burckhardt E arly in the recent BBC/PBS miniseries Little Women , the first significant adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s novel in 24 years, Laurie (played by Jonah Hauer-King) tells Jo (Maya Hawke)—the first March sister he falls in love with—how much he enjoys watching her family from his nearby window. “It always looks so idyllic, when I look down and see you through the parlor window in

20h

 

The Conversation

The Birth of a New American Aristocracy In June, Matthew Stewart wrote about the gilded future of the top 10 percent—and the end of opportunity for everyone else. I am moved to write simply because I find Mr. Stewart’s cover story one of the best-written, best-reasoned, and most important pieces of journalism I have read in many years. As a longtime citizen of the author’s hometown, I have someti

20h

 

To fend off Netflix, movie theaters try 3-screen immersion

Sit at the back of the movie theater, and it's possible to see the appeal of ScreenX, the latest attempt to drag film lovers off the sofa and away from Netflix.

20h

 

Managing energy demand spikes with seasonal forecasts of heatwaves and cold spells

The impact of heavy droughts, heatwaves and cold spells on energy demand and supplies would be lessened with seasonal climate forecasts that allow energy companies to better predict spikes in usage ahead of time, researchers say.

20h

 

Hospitalsbakterier udvikler resistens over for håndsprit

Dansk ingeniør advarede om det allerede for syv år siden. Nu risikerer tarmbakterie at sprede sig på hospitaler.

21h

 

Why do women get more migraines?

Differing levels of sex hormones, especially estrogens, may explain why many more women than men suffer from migraines. A study published today provides evidence that these hormones affect cell mechanisms that control responses to migraine triggers, offering a possible pathway to more effective, personalized treatments.

21h

 

Why allergies aren’t nuts at all

Faced with airline peanut bans, it’s easy to dismiss allergies as imaginary modern maladies. They’re not – and we need to understand why they’re on the up

21h

 

Google just made it much harder to build a serious quantum computer

To reach quantum supremacy, a quantum computer has to do a task no ordinary computer can. Google has made that harder with an algorithm that beefs up regular PCs

21h

 

Facebook to broadcast La Liga games for free in Indian subcontinent

Lionel Messi, Gareth Bale and a host of La Liga stars will be beamed for free to viewers in the Indian subcontinent as part of a landmark deal with Facebook to broadcast live matches, the Spanish top flight division said Tuesday.

22h

 

Derfor er sport et godt emne til visualiseringer

»Sport er af natur fuld af tal og data – tider, mål, resultater, datoer, rankings, statistikker, gennemsnit, rekorder, tabeller og lignende,« skriver Neil Richards.

22h

 

Apples datacentre får intet nødstrømsanlæg

Apples to jyske datacentre vil ikke blive udstyret med nødstrøm. Det er ganske uhørt for et datacenter, men resultat af, at forsyningen er stabil og robust nok til at overflødiggøre det.

22h

 

Pumper gør vandkraftværker til gigantiske batterier

Projekt til 3 milliarder dollars skal gøre den ikoniske Hoover-dæmning til energilager. I Skotland vil investorer via pumper gøre Loch Ness til et energilager med en kapacitet på 2,4 GWh.

22h

 

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor placerer man ikke flere vindmøller ved motorvejene?

En læser undrer sig over, at vi ikke har flere vindmøller ved de store veje, hvor vejstøjen kan overdøve dem. Det svarer Danmarks Vindmølleforening på.

22h

 

AP: Google sporer dine bevægelser, om du vil det eller ej

Selv når indstillingen 'Placeringshistorik' er deaktiveret, gemmer Google stadig lokationsdata fra søgninger, Maps og andre apps. Google giver klare beskrivelser af deres forskellige værktøjer, siger Google i en udtalelse.

22h

 

Despite social development, gender attitudes chart different course globally

In the half century since the birth of the women's movement in the West in the 1960s, support for gender equality has spread around the globe—but in uneven ways. A multinational study by University of California, Davis, sociologists charts three distinct transitions in gender attitudes associated with national characteristics.

22h

 

National team of researchers identify new genes that may contribute to Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have discovered new genes that will further current understanding of the genetic risk factors that predispose people to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

22h

 

California water managers vary in use of climate science

Historically, water managers throughout the thirsty state of California have relied on hydrology and water engineering—both technical necessities—as well as existing drought and flood patterns to plan for future water needs.

22h

 

Tech giants face hefty fines under Australia cyber laws

Tech companies could face fines of up to Aus$10 million (US$7.3 million) if they fail to hand over customer information or data to Australian police under tough cyber laws unveiled Tuesday.

22h

 

Tunisia anti-litter activist takes up 300-km, 30-beach challenge

Bin bags at the ready, "long-distance activist" Mohamed Oussama Houij moves methodically along a beach in Tunisia's Mediterranean town of Nabeul, scooping up all kinds of trash as he goes along.

22h

 

Vienna topples Melbourne in 'most liveable city' ranking

Austria's capital Vienna has beaten Melbourne to be ranked the "world's most liveable city" in a new annual survey released Monday, ending the southern Australian city's seven-year reign.

22h

 

Questions loom over Tesla deal after CEO reveals Saudi link

Tesla CEO Elon Musk's elaboration on his plan to engineer a buyout of the electric car maker could get the Silicon Valley maverick into legal trouble by revealing that the deal is far more uncertain than how he initially described it in his brash tweet last week.

23h

 

Forskere designer ’sukkerbibliotek’

Sukkerstrukturer kaldet GAGs er tilstede i næsten alt kroppens væv, og spiller vigtige roller…

23h

 

Glacier latest US park to be scorched by Western wildfires

A wildfire destroyed structures and forced evacuations Monday from the busiest area of Montana's Glacier National Park, as officials in California prepared to reopen Yosemite National Park following a two-week closure at the height of the summer season.

23h

 

NASA administrator supports Trump 'space force' proposal

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine expressed full support Monday for President Donald Trump's proposed military "Space Force" but added that it will have a role separate from NASA.

23h

 

SpaceX vows manned flight to space station is on track

Tech magnate Elon Musk's SpaceX vowed Monday to send its first astronauts into orbit on schedule next year—part of a drive to restore America's dominance of the space race.

23h

 

Master mimic insect is indistinguishable from a leaf on forest floor

Panama's Cocobolo Nature Reserve is a crucial pit stop for migratory species and holds a huge array of wildlife, including this master of disguise: a leaf-mimic katydid

23h

 

The ‘grieving’ orca mother? Projecting emotions on animals is a sad mistake | Jules Howard

When we interpret animal behaviour as humanlike, we risk simply seeing ourselves – which demeans us and them And so, the killer whale known as J35 is back to her old self. She is no longer carrying the dead body of a calf she held aloft in the water for more than two weeks . Her so-called tour of grief has ended, to the relief of a global audience who had become wrapped up in this heart-wrenching

23h

 

Naturopathy Textbook

The Textbook of Natural Medicine reveals what students of naturopathy are taught. It claims to be a scientific presentation, but it reveals just how unscientific naturopathy is. It mixes good science with bad science, pseudoscience, outright errors of fact, vitalism, philosophy, ancient history, superstition, gullibility, misrepresentations, metaphysics, religion, hearsay, opinion, and anecdotes.

23h

 

The public loves to hear from experts – if we present them in the right way | Tom Shakespeare

My Café Scientifique project brings academics and the public together in an informal setting. It has been a revelation Twenty years ago, Café Scientifique was born, borrowing from the French tradition of café philosophiques, where challenging ideas are discussed in the informal setting of a cafe or bar. That it’s still going is testament to just how much public interest academic work can have if

23h

 

Allan gik i Facebook-reklamefælde: Det lød tilforladeligt, så jeg sænkede paraderne

Det skulle vise sig, at scammerne havde flere tricks i ærmet. Blandt andet førsøger de gennem bølger af telefonangreb at tiltvinge sig adgang til Allans computer med ‘Anydesk’ – selvom han allerede har betalt dem mere end to tusind kroner.

1d

 

Hårdføre koraller kan vise vejen væk fra massedød i verdenshavene

Koralrev er truet af klimaforandringer, men modstandsdygtige alger kan være redning.

1d

 

California water managers vary in use of climate science

Lack of climate change adaptation among water utilities can put water supplies and the people dependent on them at risk, especially in marginalized communities, a new University of California, Davis, paper suggests.

1d

 

Despite social development, gender attitudes chart different course globally

A multinational study by University of California, Davis, sociologists charts three distinct transitions in gender attitudes associated with national characteristics. Gender equality has spread unevenly.

1d

 

Scarlet macaw DNA points to ancient breeding operation in Southwest

Somewhere in the American Southwest or northern Mexico, there are probably the ruins of a scarlet macaw breeding operation dating to between 900 and 1200 C.E., according to a team of archaeologists who sequenced the mitochondrial DNA of bird remains found in the Chaco Canyon and Mimbres areas of New Mexico.

1d

 

Mathematicians solve age-old spaghetti mystery

It's nearly impossible to break a dry spaghetti noodle into only two pieces. A new MIT study shows how and why it can be done.

1d

 

How Neolithic people adapted to climate change

Research has uncovered evidence that early farmers were adapting to climate change 8,200 years ago.

1d

 

Collaborate, but only intermittently, says new study

Technologies and organizations should be redesigned to intermittently isolate people from each other's work for best collective performance in solving complex problems.

1d

 

When it comes to regrowing tails, neural stem cells are the key

It's a longstanding mystery why salamanders can perfectly regenerate their tails whereas lizard tails grow back all wrong. By transplanting neural stem cells between species, researchers have discovered that the lizard's native stem cells are the primary factor hampering tail regeneration.

1d

 

What Is Mitosis?

Mitosis is a method of cell division in which a cell divides and produces identical copies of itself.

1d

 

Effektiv dræning kostede 80 ton fisk livet i Filsø

Fiskedøden i den naturgenoprettede sø er et udslag af en række uheldige omstændigheder, hvor opkoncentreret organisk materiale opbrugte ilten i vandet. Få dage senere var iltniveauet normalt.

1d

 

Wide variation across the nation in treatment for opioid abuse and dependence

Whether treatment for opioid abuse and dependence most commonly emphasized methadone administration, naltrexone injection, group psychotherapy or another procedure in 2017 depended on the state or region where the patient received care, according to a new white paper and state-by-state infographics from FAIR Health. Which procedures made up the largest share of total expenditures for opioid abuse

1d

 

What Omarosa Thinks of Pence, Melania, and the Trump Kids

In her new book, Unhinged , set to be released on Tuesday, Omarosa Manigault-Newman charts her 15 years in the “cult” of Trumpworld, from her Apprentice days to the West Wing. She uses the word— cult— often throughout her 330-page memoir, describing its leader as “mentally impaired,” his followers as “worshipful.” Manigault-Newman admits to being an unwitting member herself. The former reality-te

1d

 

Vote now for your favourite Space Force logo! | First Dog on the Moon

Is this a propaganda master stroke, a legitimate safeguard against Chinese hegemony beyond Earth’s atmosphere or complete babbling nonsense? Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…

1d

 

Palm oil: A new threat to Africa's monkeys and apes?

Large-scale expansion of palm oil in Africa will very likely risk the lives of primates, a study finds.

1d

 

Crickets Carve Tools to Amplify Their Chirps

The insects fashion and use "baffles"—sound controllers—made of leaves to produce sound more efficiently. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

E-cigarette vapor disables key immune cells in the lung and boosts inflammation

E-cigarette vapor boosts the production of inflammatory chemicals and disables key protective cells in the lung that keep the air spaces clear of potentially harmful particles, reveals a small experimental study.

1d

 

Why we tend to go big when we undermine our diets

New research clarifies why we tend to really go for it when violating a personal goal, such as saving money or sticking to a diet. When consumers contemplate violating a personal goal (i.e., cheating on a diet, overspending on a budget), they often seek to make the most of that violation by choosing the most extreme option, according to the research. “This implies that one will not ‘blow one’s di

1d

 

Rare cancer could be caught early using simple blood tests

A pioneering study into myeloma, a rare cancer, could lead to GPs using simple blood tests to improve early diagnosis.

1d

 

Experiment nails down new properties of water

Researchers have uncovered new molecular properties of water. Liquid water is an excellent transporter of its own autoionization products; that is, the charged species obtained when a water molecule (H 2 O) is split into protons (H+) and hydroxide ions (OH−). This remarkable property of water makes it a critical component in emerging electrochemical energy production and storage technologies such

1d

 

From windows to Mars: Scientists debut super-insulating gel

A new gel could increase energy efficiency in skyscrapers and help scientists to build habitats on Mars.

1d

 

A record number of Americans watched the 2017 solar eclipse — and sought science afterward

The 2017 total solar eclipse spurred a flurry of interest about solar eclipses, according to the final report of a survey led by the University of Michigan.

1d

 

Rethinking the stroke rule 'time is brain'

In 1993, neurologist Camilo Gomez, M.D., coined a phrase that for a quarter century has been a fundamental rule of stroke care: 'Time is brain!' The longer therapy is delayed, the less chance it will be successful. But the 'time is brain' rule is not as simple as it once seemed, Dr. Gomez now reports in a new study.

1d

 

The farmers using sewage to make saris

As groundwater supplies dwindle in rural India, farmers turn to wastewater to grow crops like mulberry, which is used to make silk.

1d

 

Going plastic-free with kids

Reducing your dependence on plastics can be daunting, especially if you've got a young family.

1d

 

Music lifts well-being for people in palliative care

Hospice and palliative care patients who listen to live music in their rooms as part of their treatment report feeling better both emotionally and physically, a new study reports. They also request fewer opioid-based medications, according to the study. Doctors working with seriously ill patients at Kent Hospital and Women and Infants Hospital in Rhode Island, gave them the option of having a flu

1d

 

How Asian-American firstborns see their family role

When compared to European Americans, Asian-American firstborns feel the additional burden of being cultural brokers and having to take care of their immigrant parents and young siblings at the same time, research suggests. The study explores how both groups—ages 18 to 25—viewed sibling relationships, their birth order, and family relations. Several positive themes of siblingship emerged from the

1d

 

Killing of black suspects is more than a ‘white police problem’

Police officers of all races—not just white ones—disproportionately kill African American suspects, according to a new study that points to a need for policing and legal reforms. “…white officers are no more likely to use lethal force against minorities than nonwhite officers.” Researchers looked at every use of deadly force by officers across the United States and discovered that the killing of

1d

 

Despite FDA Caution, Doctors Say Lasers May Help With Vaginal Pain And Dryness

The FDA recently warned against using lasers for so-called "vaginal rejuvenation" treatments to reshape or tighten the vagina. But one kind of laser treatment might have gotten a bad rap. (Image credit: Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images)

1d

 

Past space weather may boost prep for threats to Earth

Looking back at historic space weather may help us understand what’s coming next. Space weather can disrupt electronics, aviation and satellite systems, and communications. This depends on solar activity, but as this is different for each solar cycle, the overall likelihood of space weather events are difficult to forecast. “…there is an underlying pattern to [the likelihood of extreme space weat

1d

 

5 cognitive biases that explain America's biggest foreign policy mistakes

We think of ourselves as rational beings, but our cognitive biases often mean our decisions are based on instincts and emotions. Here are five times cognitive biases pushed Americans to advance foreign policies that stood against the country’s best interests. Read More

1d

 

Tomorrow's medicine may look like a tiny spider

Tiny Spider Robot, MD. Read More

1d

 

New labour pain drug may reduce need for epidurals – UK study

Calls for rethink on childbirth pain relief as research shows remifentanil works better than pethidine A new drug to relieve pain during labour works better than pethidine, which has been in widespread use since the 1950s even though it has long been known it does not help all women, say researchers. Pethidine is given as an injection, but a new study funded by the National Institute for Health R

1d

 

Tobacco content still common on UK prime time TV, despite regulations

Tobacco content remains common on UK prime time TV, cropping up in a third of all programmes, despite advertising and broadcasting regulations designed to protect children from this kind of exposure, reveals research published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

1d

 

E-cigarette vapor disables key immune cells in the lung and boosts inflammation

E-cigarette vapor boosts the production of inflammatory chemicals and disables key protective cells in the lung that keep the air spaces clear of potentially harmful particles, reveals a small experimental study, published online in the journal Thorax.

1d

 

The Lancet: Remifentanil during labour could halve the number of women needing an epidural

Half as many women in labor who were given a drug called remifentanil to help manage their pain needed a subsequent epidural, compared to the women given pethidine — the current standard of care, according to an open-label randomised controlled trial of 400 women from 14 maternity units in the UK published in The Lancet.

1d

 

We may finally know why marijuana helps people with chronic gut problems

Health And it could have implications for other inflammation, too. Some IBD patients have turned to marijuana for treatment—but their stories about how it has helped them have remained just that, stories, until now.

1d

 

Creation and selective functionalization of virus-like polymer particles

Researchers have collaborated with others to develop a simple way to create and functionalize virus-like polymer particles that have various nanostructures.

1d

 

New technology can detect hundreds of proteins in a single sample

New technology shows potential to streamline the analysis of proteins, offering a quick, high volume and cost-effective tool to hospitals and research labs alike.

1d

 

Medical testing: Drop the C-word to reduce anxiety and overtreatment

Medical researchers are calling for the word 'cancer' to be dropped from some doctor-patient conversations in a bid to reduce patient anxiety and harm from over treatment. The appeal follows mounting evidence that patients who are told they have 'cancer' for low risk conditions more often choose surgery than those whose condition is described with terms such as 'lesions' or 'abnormal cells'.

1d

 

The behavior of water: Scientists find new properties of H2O

A team of scientists has uncovered new molecular properties of water — a discovery of a phenomenon that had previously gone unnoticed.

1d

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: One Strzok and He’s Out

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines Peter Strzok, the FBI agent removed from the Russia investigation over anti-Trump text messages, was fired , his lawyer said. Bobby Goodlatte, the son of House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, said he’s “embarrassed” by his father's “political grandstanding” during Strzok's hearing earlier this year. Former White House

1d

 

The Atlantic Daily: ‘Literally Unreal’

What We’re Following Charlottesville Anniversary: The white-supremacist “Unite the Right” rally planned for August 12 in Washington, D.C., drew roughly two dozen marchers, who were were far outnumbered by counterprotesters. Elaine Godfrey and Madeleine Carlisle reported from the event. Donald Trump commemorated the violence that followed last year’s rally with a tweet that decried “all types of r

1d

 

Cannabis link to relieving intestinal inflammation explained

Reports from cannabis users that the drug reduces the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may finally be explained by new research showing that endocannabinoids help control and prevent intestinal inflammation in mice.

1d

 

First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments

Giant cancer cells are much larger and stiffer than other cancer cells and move further, study shows.

1d

 

 

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