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Nyheder2018august15

 

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Forskere har opdaget elefant-gen, der forhindrer kræft

Elefanter er usandsynligt gode til at undgå kræft. Nu har forskere løst mysteriet om hvorfor.

2h

 

Milliard-besparelse til kraftværker, der fyrer med træ

Danmark importerer mere biomasse pr. indbygger end noget andet EU-land. Men energiformen er fri for afgift i det nye energiforlig. Det kunne ellers have betalt fem energiforlig.

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How ugly marital spats might open the door to disease

Married people who fight nastily are more likely to suffer from leaky guts — a problem that unleashes bacteria into the blood and can drive up disease-causing inflammation, new research suggests.

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Hjernerystelser og hovedskader giver større risiko for selvmord

Folk med hovedskader har større risiko for at begå selvmord, viser dansk forskning.

now

 

Model way to protect trees

Oak processionary moth and ash dieback are among the most notorious tree pests and diseases intro-duced into the UK. And many exotic pests and diseases are suspected of having been introduced, or are known to have been introduced, through the import of commercial tree planting material.

2h

 

Ny Version2-blog: 3D-printeren som pædagogisk løftestang

Ny blogger på Version2 er leder på en skole, der deler lokaler med en ingeniørvirksomhed. Skolen anvender it til at give børnene motiverende og kvalificeret undervisning.

2h

 

Efter krads kritik fra Rigsrevisionen: Sådan vil Region H forbedre Sundhedsplatformen

Region Hovedstaden vil bruge mere end 31 millioner kroner på at forbedre Sundhedsplatformen efter skarp kritik fra Rigsrevisionen. Pengene skal blandt andet gå til ekspertviden fra udlandet og frikøb af klinisk personale. Og vikarer.

2h

 

Common Wifi can detect weapons, bombs and chemicals in bags

Ordinary WiFi can easily detect weapons, bombs and explosive chemicals in bags at museums, stadiums, theme parks, schools and other public venues, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led study. The researchers' suspicious object detection system is easy to set up, reduces security screening costs and avoids invading privacy such as when screeners open and inspect bags, backpacks and lu

2h

 

App that will extend your smartphone battery life

New research out of the University of Waterloo has found a novel method to extend the battery life of smartphones for up to an hour each day.

2h

 

Eating breakfast burns more carbs during exercise and accelerates metabolism for next meal

New research published in the American Journal of Physiology suggests that eating breakfast could 'prime' the body to burn carbohydrates during exercise and more rapidly metabolise foods after working out.

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Model way to protect trees

New research unravels the dynamics of tree production, economics and variability in demand to show how to reduce the risks of importing such damaging forest pests and diseases as oak processionary moth and ash dieback.

2h

 

LabQuiz: The Filtration Game

What IS that glob of bacterial contamination floating in your culture, anyway? Sounds like you need a filtration fix!

2h

 

Hot weather reveals hidden history to archaeologists

The UK heatwave has been good for aerial archaeologists spotting hidden treasures in the dry fields.

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Facts About Indium

Properties, sources and uses of the element indium.

2h

 

Potent psychedelic DMT mimics near-death experience in the brain

A powerful psychedelic compound found in ayahuasca can model near-death experiences in the brain, a study has found.

3h

 

Sterile fish could help wild salmon dodge the ‘gene pollution’ effect

Farmed Atlantic salmon make the local wild salmon population weaker. Making them sterile could work – but there’s a catch

4h

 

Shivering in the cold? Exercise may protect against muscle fatigue

New research published in The Journal of Physiology highlights how exercise could help people exposed to extreme temperatures protect themselves from the cold. This could be useful for people who live and work in very cold conditions.

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Elon Musk's Tesla Tweets Could Spark a Fight With the SEC

A fight the CEO would have trouble winning, according to experts.

6h

 

Math cuts trial and error in building biological circuits

Synthetic biologists have the tools to build complex, computer-like DNA circuits that sense or trigger activities in cells. And thanks to new research, they now have a way to test those circuits in advance. Researchers developed models to predict the output of custom-built genetic circuits that, for example, scientists can prompt to start or stop the production of proteins. “In the same way that

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Knowing you were an ‘accident’ can affect your relationships

People who believe they resulted from unwanted or unplanned pregnancies tend to have more insecure relationship styles as adults, research shows. “You could have learned about your birth status from your parents or sibling, you could have heard it from someone else, or maybe you did the math and figured out your older sister was born just 10 months before you,” says Omri Gillath, professor of psy

7h

 

Overall stroke death rates decline in Europe but level off or increase in some countries

New research, published in the European Heart Journal, has shown deaths from conditions that affect the blood supply to the brain, such as stroke, are declining overall in Europe but that in some countries the decline is leveling off or death rates are even increasing. Cerebrovascular disease includes strokes, mini-strokes, and narrowing, blockage or rupturing of the blood vessels supplying blood

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New method makes spinning collagen microfibres quicker, cheaper, and easier

Scientists in Norfolk, VA (USA) have developed a new method of making collagen microfibres, which could have applications in research, medical devices and clinical treatments ranging from ligament damage to skin burns.

7h

 

Secondhand smoke increases risk of children developing arthritis later in life

A new study in the journal Rheumatology indicates that being exposed to secondhand smoke in childhood could increase the risk of someone developing arthritis as an adult.

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Giant cancer cells break all the rules

New research reveals key physical properties of “giant” cancer cells. Polyploidal cancer cells—cells that have more than two copies of each chromosome—are much larger than most other cancer cells, resistant to chemotherapy and radiation treatments, and associated with disease relapse. Like the allegorical tortoise, giant cancer cells move slower than other cancer cells, but go further. The resear

7h

 

Sharpies makes cutting ‘gummy’ metal way easier

Permanent markers, glue sticks, and packing tape may make soft and ductile, or so-called “gummy” metals easier to cut, according to new research. What makes inks and adhesives effective isn’t their chemical content, but their stickiness to the surface of any gummy metal such as nickel, aluminum, stainless steels, or copper, researchers found. “[Gummy metals] could be something we use every day, s

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'Millennia of human activity': heatwave reveals lost UK archaeological sites

Ancient farms, burial mounds and neolithic monuments among fascinating finds in Britain and Ireland Rediscovered archaeological sites – in pictures The scorching weeks of the summer of 2018 left crops shrivelled and gardens scorched. It has also revealed the lines of scores of archaeological sites across the UK landscape, tracing millennia of human activity, from neolithic cursus monuments laid o

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UK archaeology sites made visible in heatwave – pictures

Scorching summer reveals hidden sites, including neolithic monuments Heatwave reveals lost UK archaeological sites Continue reading…

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Check out these new flying dinosaur bones

Animals The bird-boned dino showed up somewhere unexpected. Back in the day, dinosaurs roamed the earth, but pterosaurs were masters of the sky.

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New method makes spinning collagen microfibres quicker, cheaper, and easier

Scientists in Norfolk, VA have developed a new method of making collagen microfibres, which could have applications in research, medical devices and clinical treatments ranging from ligament damage to skin burns.

7h

 

Model pinpoints a huge shift in the Earth’s mantle

A shift in the Earth’s mantle to start incorporating and retaining volatile compounds from the atmosphere before spewing them out again through volcanic eruptions could not have begun much before 2.5 billion years ago, according to new research. “…there’s an interplay between what the deep Earth was doing and how the surface environment changed over billion-year timescales.” “Life on Earth cares

7h

 

Stress in utero harms cognitive skills of poor children

Exposure to an acute stress in utero can have long-term consequences extending into childhood—but only among children in poor households, according to a new study. The study, which took place in Chile, did not find the same effect among children in upper- or middle-class families. “These children performed worse on a diverse set of skills critical for educational success, including arithmetic rea

7h

 

Why salamanders can regrow perfect tails, but lizards can’t

New research explains why tail regeneration is perfect in salamanders and imperfect in lizards—and may help clarify why mice can’t regenerate their tails at all. Stem cells in the spinal cord are the ultimate limiting factor, scientists report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . “The traditional animal model for regeneration is the salamander,” says senior author Thomas P. Lo

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Brain scan checklist set to boost care for stroke survivors

People who suffer a stroke caused by bleeding in the brain could be helped by four simple checks of their brain scans, research led by the University of Edinburgh suggests. The checks could help spot people at risk of further bleeding so they can be monitored more closely. Experts say this could help improve outcomes for the millions of people around the world who experience a brain bleed each yea

7h

 

Why Saudi Arabia Would Want to Invest in Elon Musk and Tesla

Spending on electric cars is a great way to diversify an economy built on the back of Big Oil.

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Ironing-free future? Scientists cotton on to benefits of man-made fibres

Australian researchers examine whether plants can be grown with characteristics of man-made materials The dream of a cotton shirt that does not need ironing could one day materialise into a reality, with CSIRO scientists on the case. Related: How to run a race: emotions may be more crucial than training says study Continue reading…

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The Atlantic Daily: Omitted Mention

What We’re Following Trump and the Tape: White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said she “can’t guarantee” that Donald Trump has never used the N word, after a tell-all book by the former Trump aide Omarosa Manigault-Newman alleged he had been recorded using the slur. While the Trump presidency has been marked by public fascination with purported secret recordings, Adam Serwer argues

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Chemicals found in vegetables prevent colon cancer in mice

Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a new study shows.

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Vaping Damages Immune Cells, Researchers Find

A small, in vitro study concludes that e-cigarette vapor harms macrophages taken from human lung tissue.

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What you can do to prevent Google—and others—from tracking your phone

Technology Location, location, location. Even if a setting called “Location History” is switched off in your Google account, that company may still have a record of where you’ve been.

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An Interminable U.S.-Canada Border Conflict

“When we think of modern-day international border disputes, we imagine places like Kashmir, Jerusalem, Crimea, or the U.S.-Mexico border,” filmmaker Brian Gersten told The Atlantic . “So when I heard about Machias Seal Island, it was just so unexpected.” Gersten is referring to the last remaining border conflict between the U.S. and Canada. Nicknamed “the grey zone,” the 20-acre island sits in th

8h

 

Zombie gene protects against cancer — in elephants

LIF6, a dead gene that came back to life, prevents cancer by killing cells with DNA damage.

8h

 

Transistor technology may improve speed, battery life for computers, mobile phones and other electronics

Purdue University researchers have developed transistor technology that shows potential for improving computers and mobile phones.

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Water matters to metal nanoparticles

When you purchase anything from makeup to paint to sunscreen, chances are it contains engineered nanoparticles. These nanoscale materials have properties that are revolutionizing products—from medicine to agriculture to electronics. But eventually, those nanoparticles will reach natural environments. To use them safely and to their fullest potential, we need to know how they behave in real environ

9h

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Amorphous Tapes

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump escalated his attacks against former White House staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman, calling her a “dog” on Twitter. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters she “can’t guarantee” that Trump has never used a racial slur after Manigault Newman claimed Trump is on tape using the N-word. Defense law

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7 Ways to Group Video Chat While You Wait for That FaceTime Update

Bring up to 50 people into the conversation with these group video chat apps from Facebook, Snapchat, Google, and more.

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Deadly collapse in Italy turns spotlight onto aging bridges around the world

Science Nearly 10 percent of U.S. bridges are considered structurally deficient. Since the 1960s the Morandi bridge in Genoa, Italy arced high over railway tracks, nearby buildings and the Polcevera river.

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New species of orchid discovered in Peruvian jungle

Botanists have discovered a new species of orchid in Peru's central Amazonian rainforest, the country's national parks service announced Tuesday.

9h

 

Tinder founders sue parent alleging cheating on stock options

Tinder founders and early employees filed a lawsuit Tuesday accusing parent firm InterActiveCorp of cheating them out of billions of dollars by manipulating the value of stock options for the popular dating app.

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Florida's Gulf Coast Battles Deadly And Smelly Red Tide

A toxic algae bloom is killing fish, turtles and dolphins and discouraging tourists from visiting Florida's Gulf Coast. It's not the first such event, but it is especially intense. (Image credit: Greg Allen/NPR)

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The White House's Striking Equivocation on a Trump N-Word Tape

The request didn’t seem all that difficult: Could President Donald Trump’s spokeswoman say that he didn’t use the N word on tape? Yet time after time during Tuesday’s briefing, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders parried the question, refusing to give a simple “yes” or “no.” Rather than answer the question herself, she repeatedly directed reporters to the president’s tweet from Mon

9h

 

Scientists find way to make mineral which can remove CO2 from atmosphere

Scientists have found a rapid way of producing magnesite, a mineral which stores carbon dioxide. If this can be developed to an industrial scale, it opens the door to removing CO2 from the atmosphere for long-term storage, thus countering the global warming effect of atmospheric CO2. This work is presented at the Goldschmidt conference in Boston.

9h

 

First reliable estimates of highly radioactive cesium-rich microparticles released by Fukushima disaster

Scientists have for the first time been able to estimate the amount of radioactive cesium-rich microparticles released by the disaster at the Fukushima power plant in 2011. This work, which will have significant health and environmental implications, is presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Boston.

9h

 

When mixing granular matter, order among disorder

Mixing liquids is easy, or at least scientifically understood: a drop of food coloring will eventually mix into a cup of water through diffusion, and a dollop of cream can be mixed into coffee with a spoon through what is called turbulent mixing.

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Sound waves reveal diamond cache deep in Earth’s interior

MIT researchers find that 1–2 percent of Earth’s oldest mantle rocks are made from diamond. Read More

9h

 

FBI warns of massive ATM ‘cash-out’ heist that could soon steal millions

The FBI has warned banks that a group of criminals might be planning a large-scale ‘ATM cash-out’ after receiving a tip from an unknown source. Read More

9h

 

Researchers use green gold to rapidly detect and identify harmful bacteria

Researchers from the University of Minnesota (UMN) have developed a method to screen and identify harmful or antibiotic-resistant bacteria within one hour using a portable luminometer. Traditional diagnostic methods often require complex equipment and lab work that can take days. The new method uses chemiluminescence, or the emission of light during a chemical reaction. It was developed with the f

9h

 

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Bebinca east of Hainan Island

China's Hainan Island can't seem to get away from slow moving Tropical Storm Bebinca. The storm continues to linger near the island on Aug. 14 as seen when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm in Aug. 14. In fact, Hainan Island is expected to get another visit from the storm.

9h

 

Lipid droplets play crucial roles beyond fat storage

Lipid droplets: they were long thought of merely as the formless blobs of fat out of which spare tires and muffin tops were made. But these days, they're "a really hot area of research," says Michael Welte, professor and chair of biology at the University of Rochester.

9h

 

When mixing granular matter, order among disorder

Researchers find mixed and non-mixed regions among tumbled granular particles, providing a new understanding of how sand, concrete, and paint mix.

10h

 

Brigham Young University Geologists Discover Oldest Known Pterosaur Fossil

A pterosaur is not a dinosaur, but the oldest known powered flying vertebrates. Brigham Young University students and teachers have published the result of their findings of the oldest known fossil.

10h

 

News Clip Linked Coal to Climate Change — 106 Years Ago Today

More than a century ago, scientists already knew that burning coal would cause global warming.

10h

 

Plantwatch: unspoilt, rare, dunes earmarked for new golf course

Planning go-ahead for Coul Links development, Sutherland, ‘threatens unique habitat and last stronghold for wild plants’ One of the last unspoilt coastal dunes in Scotland is under threat from plans for a championship golf course , which the developers say will be environmentally friendly. Coul Links, near Embo, Sutherland, north-east Scotland, is considered very special – a complete, undisturbed

10h

 

Snake fungal disease alters skin microbiome in eastern Massasaugas

In the first study of its kind, researchers characterized the skin microbiome of a population of free-ranging snakes to begin to understand how the animals' environmental microbial community may promote disease resistance as well as how it may be disrupted by infection.

10h

 

Magnetic gene in fish may someday help those with epilepsy, Parkinson's

An aquarium fish that senses the Earth's magnetic field as it swims could help unlock how the human brain works and how diseases such as Parkinson's and other neurological disorders function.

10h

 

NASA gets an infrared view of Tropical Storm Hector

Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed the storm had two areas of strong convection.

10h

 

Research brief: UMN researchers use green gold to rapidly detect and identify harmful bacteria

Researchers from the University of Minnesota (UMN) have developed a method to screen and identify harmful or antibiotic-resistant bacteria within one hour using a portable luminometer.

10h

 

Scientists find way to make mineral which can remove CO2 from atmosphere

Scientists have developed an accelerated way to produce magnesite at room temperature, a mineral which can capture the greenhouse gas CO2 from the atmosphere. Removing CO2 from the atmosphere will slow global warming. This work takes a different approach to existing processes, and may make it economically viable, but it is at an early stage, and is not yet an industrial process.

10h

 

First reliable estimates of highly radioactive cesium-rich microparticles released by Fukushima disaster

Scientists have for the first time been able to estimate the amount of radioactive cesium-rich microparticles released by the disaster at the Fukushima power plant in 2011. This work, which will have significant health and environmental implications, is presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Boston.

10h

 

How to Discuss the Far Right Without Empowering It

BERLIN—What happens when you do a primetime interview with a far-right leader—but don’t ask them anything about refugees? German television viewers found out Sunday night when the broadcaster ZDF ran a major interview with Alexander Gauland, co-leader of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, which capitalized on anti-refugee sentiment to earn its first-ever seats in the German parlia

10h

 

Donald Trump and the Currency of Tapes

At this point, it’s clear that one of the defining features of the 45th presidency is tapes. Whether mythical or real, recordings hover, cumulus-like, on the periphery of Donald Trump’s administration. There’s the Access Hollywood tape . The purported pee tape . The Michael Cohen tapes . The Mark Burnett tapes . The “Lordy, I hope there are tapes” tapes . The alleged—and quickly disproven— Trump

10h

 

New study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers"—very low frequency packets of radio waves that race along magnetic field lines. This first-of-its-kind study, appearing in the Physics of Plasmas, provides new insights into the nature of whistlers and space plasmas—regions of energized particles trapped by Earth's magne

10h

 

Scientists get new tool to track new pathogen killing frogs

An undergraduate researcher has developed a method to screen frogs for an infectious disease that has been linked to mass die-offs of frogs around the world. Thanks to her method, scientists will be able to track the disease and try to figure out why it is triggering the deaths.

10h

 

Suomi NPP satellite find Tropical Storm Leepi nearing southern Japan

Tropical Storm Leepi continued its northwestern track through the northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm. Leepi was moving toward Kyushu, southern Japan.

10h

 

Bananas: your cousin, maybe?

Science You have a lot more in common with an orangutan, but scientists can still track how closely you’re related to fruit flies and cucumbers. You have a lot more in common with an orangutan, but scientists can still track how closely you’re related to fruit flies and cucumbers.

10h

 

The little risks you can take to increase your luck | Tina Seelig

Luck is rarely a lightning strike, isolated and dramatic — it's much more like the wind, blowing constantly. Catching more of it is easy but not obvious. In this insightful talk, Stanford engineering school professor Tina Seelig shares three unexpected ways to increase your luck — and your ability to see and seize opportunities.

10h

 

Scientists pinpoint brain networks responsible for naming objects

Scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified the brain networks that allow you to think of an object name and then verbalize that thought. The study appeared in the July issue of BRAIN. It represents a significant advance in the understanding of how the brain connects meaning to words and will help the planning of brain surgeries.

10h

 

Societies recommend policies to retain, increase ranks of ID physician scientists

Improved compensation, expanded mentorship and training opportunities, and concrete measures to improve workforce diversity are all needed to address attrition from the ranks of physician scientists specializing in infectious diseases, and to ensure that the next generation of that work force is sufficient to bring quests for new life-saving treatments and cures to fruition, according to recommend

10h

 

Lipid droplets play crucial roles beyond fat storage

Lipid droplets were long thought of merely as formless blobs of fat. But a study by Michael Welte of the University of Rochester, and his colleagues, describes how lipid droplets regulate certain proteins involved in gene expression. The research has implications for understanding what helps embryos survive and how we look at lipid-related diseases like obesity.

10h

 

This Woman Lost Her Contact Lens. Doctors Found It in Her Eyelid 28 Years Later.

Nearly three decades ago, a 14-year-old in the United Kingdom got hit in the eye during a game of badminton and lost her contact lens. Here's where it turned up.

10h

 

More Bridges Will Collapse

There’s an old chestnut about infrastructure that goes, Infrastructure is everything you don’t notice—until it fails . It’s a definition that works for any kind of infrastructure, too: big or small, visible or invisible, bridges and garage doors, electric grids and Wi-Fi routers. Infrastructure is everything you take for granted. And you only notice that you take it for granted when it breaks. La

10h

 

The Elusive ‘Better Deal’ With China

These days in U.S.-China trade relations, confrontation is the governing principle. In an effort to challenge China’s growing global economic clout, Donald Trump’s administration has, to date, levied around $37 billion in tariffs on Chinese products and threatened to expand these measures to cover all $504 billion in U.S. imports from China. While the measures may help reduce the trade deficit be

10h

 

Snake fungal disease alters skin microbiome in eastern Massasaugas

In the first study of its kind, researchers characterized the skin microbiome of a population of free-ranging snakes to begin to understand how the animals' environmental microbial community may promote disease resistance as well as how it may be disrupted by infection.

11h

 

Magnetic gene in fish may someday help those with epilepsy, Parkinson's

An aquarium fish that senses the Earth's magnetic field as it swims could help unlock how the human brain works and how diseases such as Parkinson's and other neurological disorders function. Scientists have discovered a navigational gene in glass catfish called the electromagnetic-perceptive gene, or EPG, that responds to certain magnetic waves. They've already developed a way to use it to contro

11h

 

Inching closer to a soft spot in isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis

Researchers comparing clonal strains of the mycobacteria that cause TB, before and after they developed resistance to a first-line drug, found that a single genetic change may not always have identical effects on bacterial fitness.

11h

 

Cancer-fighting drugs also help plants fight disease

Cancer-fighting drugs used on humans can help plants fight disease as well. That discovery, by plant pathologists, could help scientists develop new pathways for plants to battle infection.

11h

 

Effectively expressing empathy to improve ICU care

Physicians express empathy frequently to families in the pediatric intensive care unit, but more than one-third of empathetic statements are buried by medical jargon that reduces their effectiveness.

11h

 

Scientists propose a new lead for Alzheimer's research

Scientists have suggested a potential link between iron in our cells and the rare gene mutations that cause Alzheimer's disease, which could provide new avenues for future research.

11h

 

Can radar replace stethoscopes?

Electronic engineers have developed a procedure for reliably detecting and diagnosing heart sounds using radar. In future, mobile radar devices could replace conventional stethoscopes and permanent touch-free monitoring of patients' vital functions could be possible using stationary radar devices.

11h

 

A Fireball and a Wall of Sound: What NASA's Epic Solar Probe Launch Felt Like

The launch of NASA's $1.5 billion Parker Solar Probe atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket was spectacular. Here's what it was like to see it in person.

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11h

 

Early opaque universe linked to galaxy scarcity

A team of astronomers has made a surprising discovery: 12.5 billion years ago, the most opaque place in the universe contained relatively little matter.

11h

 

Deaths from resident-to-resident incidents in dementia offers insights to inform policy

Analyzing the incidents between residents in dementia in long-term care homes may hold the key to reducing future fatalities among this vulnerable population, according to a new research.

11h

 

Ecology of investors in financial markets

Researchers studied the similarity of investment decisions in the financial market and how the investment strategies used by the investors influence the volatility of the markets by using an exceptionally large set of empirical data. The results help in understanding the operation of financial markets and shed light on the connection of earlier theories to the actual stock market.

11h

 

Weight loss: Surprising scale of health benefits for biggest losers

When it comes to shedding pounds, it pays to think big, according to new research.

11h

 

Eight and nine-year-olds experience poor body image as hormone levels rise

Children as young as eight are vulnerable to poor body image as hormone levels rise with the onset of puberty, a new study has found. The study based on data from more than 1,100 eight- to nine-year-olds indicates a need for strategies in schools and at home to help children maintain a positive body image prior to the onset of puberty.

11h

 

Trees and climate change: Faster growth, lighter wood

Trees are growing more rapidly due to climate change. This sounds like good news. After all, this means that trees are storing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in their wood and hence taking away the key ingredient in global warming. But is it that simple? A team analyzed wood samples from the oldest existing experimental areas spanning a period of 150 years — and reached a surprising conc

11h

 

Long-sought carbon structure joins graphene, fullerene family

Scientists have been playing with pure carbon compounds for centuries, starting with diamond and graphite and now with fullerenes, nanotubes and graphene. One type of 3D geometry has been missing, however: a negatively curved carbon-cage surface called schwarzite. Chemists have now shown that serendipitously produced materials called zeolite-templated carbons are in fact the long-sought schwarzite

11h

 

Study suggests drastic decline in mountain hares

Conservation groups have called for an end to the "indiscriminate and ruthless" mountain hare culls.

11h

 

Snake fungal disease alters skin microbiome in eastern Massasaugas

In the first study of its kind, researchers characterized the skin microbiome of a population of free-ranging snakes to begin to understand how the animals' environmental microbial community may promote disease resistance as well as how it may be disrupted by infection.

11h

 

Healthy fat cells uncouple obesity from diabetes

Researchers have identified possible ways to uncouple obesity from co-morbidities such as heart disease and insulin resistance.

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Diving robots find Antarctic winter seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide

A new study uses data gathered by floating drones in the Southern Ocean over past winters to learn how much carbon dioxide is transferred by the surrounding seas. Results show that in winter the open water nearest the sea ice surrounding Antarctica releases significantly more carbon dioxide than previously believed.

11h

 

Workplace bias differs for single versus married parents

Single moms aren't penalized at work in the same way married mothers are, new University of Arizona research suggests. At the same time, single dads don't benefit in the workplace the way that married fathers do.

11h

 

Inhibition of tumor-microenvironment interaction and tumor invasion by small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of DDR2 extracellular domain [Medical Sciences]

The action of the collagen binding receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in both tumor and tumor stromal cells has been established as critical for breast cancer metastasis. Small molecule inhibitors that target the extracellular domain of RTKs are rare, as they have classically been regarded as…

11h

 

Estrogen receptor-1 is a key regulator of HIV-1 latency that imparts gender-specific restrictions on the latent reservoir [Microbiology]

Unbiased shRNA library screens revealed that the estrogen receptor-1 (ESR-1) is a key factor regulating HIV-1 latency. In both Jurkat T cells and a Th17 primary cell model for HIV-1 latency, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs, i.e., fulvestrant, raloxifene, and tamoxifen) are weak proviral activators and sensitize cells to latency-reversing…

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Roles for ClpXP in regulating the circadian clock in Synechococcus elongatus [Microbiology]

In cyanobacteria, the KaiABC posttranslational oscillator drives circadian rhythms of gene expression and controls the timing of cell division. The Kai-based oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro, demonstrating that the clock can run without protein synthesis and degradation; however, protein degradation is known to be important for clock function in…

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Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus Clone 13 infection causes either persistence or acute death dependent on IFN-1, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and host genetics [Microbiology]

Understanding of T cell exhaustion and successful therapy to restore T cell function was first described using Clone (Cl) 13 variant selected from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) Armstrong (ARM) 53b parental strain. T cell exhaustion plays a pivotal role in both persistent infections and cancers of mice and humans….

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Ycf48 involved in the biogenesis of the oxygen-evolving photosystem II complex is a seven-bladed beta-propeller protein [Plant Biology]

Robust photosynthesis in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria requires the participation of accessory proteins to facilitate the assembly and maintenance of the photosynthetic apparatus located within the thylakoid membranes. The highly conserved Ycf48 protein acts early in the biogenesis of the oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) complex by binding to newly synthesized precursor…

11h

 

Plant pathogen effector utilizes host susceptibility factor NRL1 to degrade the immune regulator SWAP70 [Plant Biology]

Plant pathogens deliver effectors into plant cells to suppress immunity. Whereas many effectors inactivate positive immune regulators, other effectors associate with negative regulators of immunity: so-called susceptibility (S) factors. Little is known about how pathogens exploit S factors to suppress immunity. Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector Pi02860 interacts with host protein…

11h

 

Evolution and diversification of the plant gibberellin receptor GID1 [Plant Biology]

The plant gibberellin (GA) receptor GID1 shows sequence similarity to carboxylesterase (CXE). Here, we report the molecular evolution of GID1 from establishment to functionally diverse forms in eudicots. By introducing 18 mutagenized rice GID1s into a rice gid1 null mutant, we identified the amino acids crucial for GID1 activity in…

11h

 

Unexpected synergistic HIV neutralization by a triple microbicide produced in rice endosperm [Plant Biology]

The transmission of HIV can be prevented by the application of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and lectins. Traditional recombinant protein manufacturing platforms lack sufficient capacity and are too expensive for developing countries, which suffer the greatest disease burden. Plants offer an inexpensive and scalable alternative manufacturing platform that can produce multiple…

11h

 

Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition [Sustainability Science]

The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive….

11h

 

Histone methyltransferase Smyd1 regulates mitochondrial energetics in the heart [Systems Biology]

Smyd1, a muscle-specific histone methyltransferase, has established roles in skeletal and cardiac muscle development, but its role in the adult heart remains poorly understood. Our prior work demonstrated that cardiac-specific deletion of Smyd1 in adult mice (Smyd1-KO) leads to hypertrophy and heart failure. Here we show that down-regulation of mitochondrial…

11h

 

Correction for Kang and Lubensky, Chiral twist drives raft formation and organization in membranes composed of rod-like particles [Correction]

PHYSICS, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Chiral twist drives raft formation and organization in membranes composed of rod-like particles,” by Louis Kang and Tom C. Lubensky, which was first published December 20, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1613732114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:E19–E27). The authors note that a sign error for the…

11h

 

Correction for Burdyga et al., Phosphatases control PKA-dependent functional microdomains at the outer mitochondrial membrane [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Phosphatases control PKA-dependent functional microdomains at the outer mitochondrial membrane,” by Alex Burdyga, Nicoletta C. Surdo, Stefania Monterisi, Giulietta Di Benedetto, Francesca Grisan, Elisa Penna, Luca Pellegrini, Mario Bortolozzi, Pawel Swietach, Tullio Pozzan, and Konstantinos Lefkimmiatis, which was first published June 25, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1806318115

11h

 

Correction for Nojiri et al., Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells [Correction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells,” by Takashi Nojiri, Hiroshi Hosoda, Takeshi Tokudome, Koichi Miura, Shin Ishikane, Kentaro Otani, Ichiro Kishimoto, Yasushi Shintani, Masayoshi Inoue, Toru Kimura, Noriyoshi Sawabata, Masato Minami, Tomoyuki Nakagiri, Soichiro Funaki, Yukiyasu Takeuchi, Hajime Maeda, Hiroyasu

11h

 

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Drivers of cotton pest severity in China Cotton in Hebei Province, China. China is one of the world’s largest pesticide consumers, with cotton being the most heavily treated agricultural crop. To assess the influence of landscape complexity, pest control technology, and weather on long-term cotton pest severity and management, Wei…

11h

 

Molecular machinery underlying the autophagic regulation by MDA-9/Syntenin leading to anoikis resistance of tumor cells [Biological Sciences]

I read with great interest the excellent work of Talukdar et al. (1), in which the authors demonstrate that melanoma differentiation associated gene-9 (MDA-9)/Syntenin (syndecan binding protein; SDCBP) regulates protective autophagy in glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) through two cascades: First, the complex composed of MDA-9/Syntenin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)…

11h

 

Reply to Yoshida: Delineating critical roles of MDA-9 in protective autophagy-mediated anoikis resistance in human glioma stem cells [Biological Sciences]

We appreciate the interest, positive feedback, and useful insights of Yoshida (1) relative to our study by Talukdar et al. (2). We acknowledge the constructive analysis of our work and the valuable comments related to our unique observations on the role of melanoma differentiation associated gene-9 (MDA-9)/Syntenin, a gene initially…

11h

 

Reply to Liu et al.: Decidualization defect in severe preeclampsia [Biological Sciences]

Addressing our first line of evidence of a decidualization defect in severe preeclampsia (sPE) (1), Liu et al. (2) describe an in vitro decidualization model by using an endometrial cell line from hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts of a woman with nonmalignant myomas (ATCC: CRL-4003) with cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate for 5 d….

11h

 

Disrupting a negative feedback loop drives endocrine therapy-resistant breast cancer [Medical Sciences]

According to the American Cancer Society, 266,120 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,920 will die in 2018 (1). Approximately 70% of all these breast cancers express estrogen receptor α (ERα) and are initially treated with endocrine therapies that target this nuclear hormone receptor…

11h

 

New pests for old as GMOs bring on substitute pests [Agricultural Sciences]

In agroecological systems, one thing leads to another, often in unexpected ways. In the 1950s a single pesticide application per season was sufficient to control the jassid bug Empoasca lybica, the only major cotton pest in the Gezira of Sudan at the time (1). However, the spraying killed the natural…

11h

 

Conservation biological control: Improving the science base [Sustainability Science]

Based on the notion that monocultures and highly simplified farmscapes are associated with pest outbreaks (1), there has been an increased focus on “conservation biological control” [also called “ecological engineering” (2)] within the last decades to minimize economic losses to pests (3, 4), and at the same time avoid the…

11h

 

Antifreeze protein hydration waters: Unstructured unless bound to ice [Applied Physical Sciences]

How do fish, insects, and other organisms survive in frigid polar environments? They do so with the help of remarkable molecules known as antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which suppress freezing and associated cell death despite being present at concentrations of less than 1 wt % (1). In contrast, automotive antifreeze needs…

11h

 

Backbone-free duplex-stacked monomer nucleic acids exhibiting Watson-Crick selectivity [Applied Physical Sciences]

We demonstrate that nucleic acid (NA) mononucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs and rNTPs), at sufficiently high concentration and low temperature in aqueous solution, can exhibit a phase transition in which chromonic columnar liquid crystal ordering spontaneously appears. Remarkably, this polymer-free state exhibits, in a self-assembly of NA monomers, the key structural elements…

11h

 

A mean field view of the landscape of two-layer neural networks [Statistics]

Multilayer neural networks are among the most powerful models in machine learning, yet the fundamental reasons for this success defy mathematical understanding. Learning a neural network requires optimizing a nonconvex high-dimensional objective (risk function), a problem that is usually attacked using stochastic gradient descent (SGD). Does SGD converge to a…

11h

 

Early metal use and crematory practices in the American Southeast [Anthropology]

Long-distance exchange of copper objects during the Archaic Period (ca. 8000–3000 cal B.P.) is a bellwether of emergent social complexity in the Eastern Woodlands. Originating from the Great Lakes, the Canadian Maritimes, and the Appalachian Mountains, Archaic-age copper is found in significant amounts as far south as Tennessee and in…

11h

 

Distinguishing neural correlates of context-dependent advantageous- and disadvantageous-inequity aversion [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Humans can integrate social contextual information into decision-making processes to adjust their responses toward inequity. This context dependency emerges when individuals receive more (i.e., advantageous inequity) or less (i.e., disadvantageous inequity) than others. However, it is not clear whether context-dependent processing of advantageous and disadvantageous inequity involves differential

11h

 

A framework to diagnose factors influencing proenvironmental behaviors in water-sensitive urban design [Sustainability Science]

The ongoing challenge of maintaining and improving the quality of water that leaves urban stormwater systems is often addressed using technical rather than social solutions. The need for investment in often expensive water infrastructure can be reduced through better investing in promoting human behaviors that protect water quality as part…

11h

 

Multidecadal, county-level analysis of the effects of land use, Bt cotton, and weather on cotton pests in China [Agricultural Sciences]

Long-term changes in land use, climate, and agricultural technologies may affect pest severity and management. The influences of these major drivers can only be identified by analyzing long-term data. This study examines panel data on land use, adoption of genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insect-resistant cotton, weather, pest severity, and…

11h

 

Cellular clearance of circulating transthyretin decreases cell-nonautonomous proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans [Biochemistry]

Cell-autonomous and cell-nonautonomous mechanisms of neurodegeneration appear to occur in the proteinopathies, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. However, how neuronal toxicity is generated from misfolding-prone proteins secreted by nonneuronal tissues and whether modulating protein aggregate levels at distal locales affects the degeneration of postmitotic neurons remains unknown. We

11h

 

Directly light-regulated binding of RGS-LOV photoreceptors to anionic membrane phospholipids [Biochemistry]

We report natural light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) photoreceptors with a blue light-switched, high-affinity (KD ∼ 10−7 M), and direct electrostatic interaction with anionic phospholipids. Membrane localization of one such photoreceptor, BcLOV4 from Botrytis cinerea, is directly coupled to its flavin photocycle, and is mediated by a polybasic amphipathic helix in the linker…

11h

 

Central role of autophagic UVRAG in melanogenesis and the suntan response [Cell Biology]

UV-induced cell pigmentation represents an important mechanism against skin cancers. Sun-exposed skin secretes α-MSH, which induces the lineage-specific transcriptional factor MITF and activates melanogenesis in melanocytes. Here, we show that the autophagic tumor suppressor UVRAG plays an integral role in melanogenesis by interaction with the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex…

11h

 

Juvenile hormone-regulated alternative splicing of the taiman gene primes the ecdysteroid response in adult mosquitoes [Developmental Biology]

Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates many aspects of insect development and reproduction. In some processes, JH plays a critical role in defining the action of the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, JH prepares newly emerged female adults to become competent to synthesize vitellogenin in response to 20E after…

11h

 

Functions of the COPII gene paralogs SEC23A and SEC23B are interchangeable in vivo [Genetics]

Approximately one-third of the mammalian proteome is transported from the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi via COPII-coated vesicles. SEC23, a core component of coat protein-complex II (COPII), is encoded by two paralogous genes in vertebrates (Sec23a and Sec23b). In humans, SEC23B deficiency results in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type-II (CDAII), while SEC23A deficiency results…

11h

 

Heterosubtypic influenza protection elicited by double-layered polypeptide nanoparticles in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]

Influenza is a persistent threat to public health. Here we report that double-layered peptide nanoparticles induced robust specific immunity and protected mice against heterosubtypic influenza A virus challenges. We fabricated the nanoparticles by desolvating a composite peptide of tandem copies of nucleoprotein epitopes into nanoparticles as cores and cross-linking another…

11h

 

Nitro-fatty acids are formed in response to virus infection and are potent inhibitors of STING palmitoylation and signaling [Immunology and Inflammation]

The adaptor molecule stimulator of IFN genes (STING) is central to production of type I IFNs in response to infection with DNA viruses and to presence of host DNA in the cytosol. Excessive release of type I IFNs through STING-dependent mechanisms has emerged as a central driver of several interferonopathies,…

11h

 

Inhibition of GCN2 sensitizes ASNS-low cancer cells to asparaginase by disrupting the amino acid response [Medical Sciences]

General control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) plays a major role in the cellular response to amino acid limitation. Although maintenance of amino acid homeostasis is critical for tumor growth, the contribution of GCN2 to cancer cell survival and proliferation is poorly understood. In this study, we generated GCN2 inhibitors and demonstrated…

11h

 

Trajectories of the Earth System in the Anthropocene [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

We explore the risk that self-reinforcing feedbacks could push the Earth System toward a planetary threshold that, if crossed, could prevent stabilization of the climate at intermediate temperature rises and cause continued warming on a “Hothouse Earth” pathway even as human emissions are reduced. Crossing the threshold would lead to…

11h

 

Double-stranded RNA binding protein, Staufen, is required for the initiation of RNAi in coleopteran insects [Agricultural Sciences]

RNA interference (RNAi) is being used to develop methods to control pests and disease vectors. RNAi is robust and systemic in coleopteran insects but is quite variable in other insects. The determinants of efficient RNAi in coleopterans, as well as its potential mechanisms of resistance, are not known. RNAi screen…

11h

 

Cognitive resource allocation determines the organization of personal networks [Applied Mathematics]

The typical human personal social network contains about 150 relationships including kin, friends, and acquaintances, organized into a set of hierarchically inclusive layers of increasing size but decreasing emotional intensity. Data from a number of different sources reveal that these inclusive layers exhibit a constant scaling ratio of ∼3. While…

11h

 

Preordering of water is not needed for ice recognition by hyperactive antifreeze proteins [Applied Physical Sciences]

Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit ice growth in organisms living in cold environments. Hyperactive insect AFPs are particularly effective, binding ice through “anchored clathrate” motifs. It has been hypothesized that the binding of hyperactive AFPs to ice is facilitated by preordering of water at the ice-binding site (IBS) of the protein…

11h

 

Rheotaxis-based separation of sperm with progressive motility using a microfluidic corral system [Applied Physical Sciences]

The separation of motile sperm from semen samples is sought after for medical infertility treatments. In this work, we demonstrate a high-throughput microfluidic device that can passively isolate motile sperm within corrals inside a fluid channel, separating them from the rest of the diluted sample. Using finite element method simulations…

11h

 

Identification of a biologically active fragment of ALK and LTK-Ligand 2 (augmentor-{alpha}) [Biochemistry]

Elucidating the physiological roles and modes of action of the recently discovered ligands (designated ALKAL1,2 or AUG-α,β) of the receptor tyrosine kinases Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) and Leukocyte Tyrosine Kinase (LTK) has been limited by difficulties in producing sufficient amounts of the two ligands and their poor stability. Here we…

11h

 

Bottom-up single-molecule strategy for understanding subunit function of tetrameric {beta}-galactosidase [Biochemistry]

In this paper, we report an example of the engineered expression of tetrameric β-galactosidase (β-gal) containing varying numbers of active monomers. Specifically, by combining wild-type and single-nucleotide polymorphism plasmids at varying ratios, tetrameric β-gal was expressed in vitro with one to four active monomers. The kinetics of individual enzyme molecules…

11h

 

Quantitative measurements of protein-surface interaction thermodynamics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Whereas proteins generally remain stable upon interaction with biological surfaces, they frequently unfold on and adhere to artificial surfaces. Understanding the physicochemical origins of this discrepancy would facilitate development of protein-based sensors and other technologies that require surfaces that do not compromise protein structure and function. To date, however, only…

11h

 

Mutations in the Drosophila tricellular junction protein M6 synergize with RasV12 to induce apical cell delamination and invasion [Cell Biology]

Complications from metastasis are responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. Despite the outsized medical impact of metastasis, remarkably little is known about one of the key early steps of metastasis: departure of a tumor cell from its originating tissue. It is well documented that cellular delamination in the basal…

11h

 

Promoter-mediated diversification of transcriptional bursting dynamics following gene duplication [Cell Biology]

During the evolution of gene families, functional diversification of proteins often follows gene duplication. However, many gene families expand while preserving protein sequence. Why do cells maintain multiple copies of the same gene? Here we have addressed this question for an actin family with 17 genes encoding an identical protein….

11h

 

p53-inducible DPYSL4 associates with mitochondrial supercomplexes and regulates energy metabolism in adipocytes and cancer cells [Cell Biology]

The tumor suppressor p53 regulates multiple cellular functions, including energy metabolism. Metabolic deregulation is implicated in the pathogenesis of some cancers and in metabolic disorders and may result from the inactivation of p53 functions. Using RNA sequencing and ChIP sequencing of cancer cells and preadipocytes, we demonstrate that p53 modulates…

11h

 

Active sites for tandem reactions of CO2 reduction and ethane dehydrogenation [Chemistry]

Ethylene (C2H4) is one of the most important raw materials for chemical industry. The tandem reactions of CO2-assisted dehydrogenation of ethane (C2H6) to ethylene creates an opportunity to effectively use the underutilized ethane from shale gas while mitigating anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Here we identify the most likely active sites over…

11h

 

Experimental measurement of the diamond nucleation landscape reveals classical and nonclassical features [Chemistry]

Nucleation is a core scientific concept that describes the formation of new phases and materials. While classical nucleation theory is applied across wide-ranging fields, nucleation energy landscapes have never been directly measured at the atomic level, and experiments suggest that nucleation rates often greatly exceed the predictions of classical nucleation…

11h

 

Energy transfer-enhanced photocatalytic reduction of protons within quantum dot light-harvesting-catalyst assemblies [Chemistry]

Excitonic energy transfer (EnT) is the mechanism by which natural photosynthetic systems funnel energy from hundreds of antenna pigments to a single reaction center, which allows multielectron redox reactions to proceed with high efficiencies in low-flux natural light. This paper describes the use of electrostatically assembled CdSe quantum dot (QD)…

11h

 

Temporal dynamics of pair-rule stripes in living Drosophila embryos [Developmental Biology]

Traditional studies of gene regulation in the Drosophila embryo centered primarily on the analysis of fixed tissues. These methods provided considerable insight into the spatial control of gene activity, such as the borders of eve stripe 2, but yielded only limited information about temporal dynamics. The advent of quantitative live-imaging…

11h

 

Osterix functions downstream of anti-Mullerian hormone signaling to regulate Mullerian duct regression [Developmental Biology]

In mammals, the developing reproductive tract primordium of male and female fetuses consists of the Wolffian duct and the Müllerian duct (MD), two epithelial tube pairs surrounded by mesenchyme. During male development, mesenchyme–epithelia interactions mediate MD regression to prevent its development into a uterus, oviduct, and upper vagina. It is…

11h

 

FGFR1-mediated protocadherin-15 loading mediates cargo specificity during intraflagellar transport in inner ear hair-cell kinocilia [Developmental Biology]

The mechanosensory hair cells of the inner ear are required for hearing and balance and have a distinctive apical structure, the hair bundle, that converts mechanical stimuli into electrical signals. This structure comprises a single cilium, the kinocilium, lying adjacent to an ensemble of actin-based projections known as stereocilia. Hair…

11h

 

In vivo replacement of damaged bladder urothelium by Wolffian duct epithelial cells [Developmental Biology]

The bladder’s remarkable regenerative capacity had been thought to derive exclusively from its own progenitors. While examining consequences of DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) inactivation in mouse embryonic bladder epithelium, we made the surprising discovery that Wolffian duct epithelial cells can support bladder regeneration. Conditional Dnmt1 inactivation in mouse urethral and…

11h

 

Tearing of Indian mantle lithosphere from high-resolution seismic images and its implications for lithosphere coupling in southern Tibet [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

What happened to the Indian mantle lithosphere (IML) during the Indian–Eurasian collision and what role it has played on the plateau growth are fundamental questions that remain unanswered. Here, we show clear images of the IML from high-resolution P and S tomography, which suggest that the subducted IML is torn…

11h

 

Synergistic O3 + OH oxidation pathway to extremely low-volatility dimers revealed in {beta}-pinene secondary organic aerosol [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Dimeric compounds contribute significantly to the formation and growth of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from monoterpene oxidation. However, the mechanisms of dimer production, in particular the relevance of gas- vs. particle-phase chemistry, remain unclear. Here, through a combination of mass spectrometric, chromatographic, and synthetic techniques, we identify a…

11h

 

Prevalence of tornado-scale vortices in the tropical cyclone eyewall [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Analyses of datasets from manned research flights that penetrated hurricane eyes and tropical cyclone (TC) damage surveys strongly suggest the existence of tornado-scale vortices in the turbulent boundary layer of the TC eyewall. However, their small horizontal scale, their fast movement, and the associated severe turbulence make the tornado-scale vortex…

11h

 

Climate mediates the biodiversity-ecosystem stability relationship globally [Ecology]

The insurance hypothesis, stating that biodiversity can increase ecosystem stability, has received wide research and political attention. Recent experiments suggest that climate change can impact how plant diversity influences ecosystem stability, but most evidence of the biodiversity–stability relationship obtained to date comes from local studies performed under a limited set…

11h

 

Core Concept: How does climate change influence extreme weather? Impact attribution research seeks answers [Environmental Sciences]

Hurricane Harvey devastated the Houston area when it stalled over southeastern Texas in August 2017. In the weeks that followed, Hurricane Irma traveled up the mainland of Florida, and Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico. The year 2017 would become the most expensive hurricane season on record. Hurricanes Irma, Jose, and…

11h

 

Invariances in the architecture of pride across small-scale societies [Evolution]

Becoming valuable to fellow group members so that one would attract assistance in times of need is a major adaptive problem. To solve it, the individual needs a predictive map of the degree to which others value different acts so that, in choosing how to act, the payoff arising from…

11h

 

Comparative genomic investigation of high-elevation adaptation in ectothermic snakes [Evolution]

Several previous genomic studies have focused on adaptation to high elevations, but these investigations have been largely limited to endotherms. Snakes of the genus Thermophis are endemic to the Tibetan plateau and therefore present an opportunity to study high-elevation adaptations in ectotherms. Here, we report the de novo assembly of…

11h

 

Warsaw breakage syndrome DDX11 helicase acts jointly with RAD17 in the repair of bulky lesions and replication through abasic sites [Genetics]

Warsaw breakage syndrome, a developmental disorder caused by mutations in the DDX11/ChlR1 helicase, shows cellular features of genome instability similar to Fanconi anemia (FA). Here we report that DDX11-deficient avian DT40 cells exhibit interstrand crosslink (ICL)-induced chromatid breakage, with DDX11 functioning as backup for the FA pathway in regard to…

11h

 

Heme ameliorates dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis through providing intestinal macrophages with noninflammatory profiles [Immunology and Inflammation]

The local environment is crucial for shaping the identities of tissue-resident macrophages (Mϕs). When hemorrhage occurs in damaged tissues, hemoglobin induces differentiation of anti-inflammatory Mϕs with reparative function. Mucosal bleeding is one of the pathological features of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the heme-mediated mechanism modulating activation of intestinal innate immune..

11h

 

Structural basis for the inhibition of poxvirus assembly by the antibiotic rifampicin [Microbiology]

Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that cause disease in animals and humans. They differ from classical enveloped viruses, because their membrane is acquired from cytoplasmic membrane precursors assembled onto a viral protein scaffold formed by the D13 protein rather than budding through cellular compartments. It was found three decades ago…

11h

 

Acid-sensing ion channels emerged over 600 Mya and are conserved throughout the deuterostomes [Neuroscience]

Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated ion channels broadly expressed in the vertebrate nervous system, converting decreased extracellular pH into excitatory sodium current. ASICs were previously thought to be a vertebrate-specific branch of the DEG/ENaC family, a broadly conserved but functionally diverse family of channels. Here, we provide phylogenetic and…

11h

 

Syringeal EMGs and synthetic stimuli reveal a switch-like activation of the songbird’s vocal motor program [Neuroscience]

The coordination of complex vocal behaviors like human speech and oscine birdsong requires fine interactions between sensory and motor programs, the details of which are not completely understood. Here, we show that in sleeping male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), the activity of the song system selectively evoked by playbacks of…

11h

 

Inner Workings: Safer opioids may be on the horizon, but mitigating addiction is a long shot [Pharmacology]

Opioids are well-known to be lethally addictive, spurring a nationwide crisis. Less well-known are the drugs’ other complications: dangerous breathing difficulties, nausea, gastrointestinal distress, and paradoxically, a hypersensitization that worsens feelings of pain. Inevitably, frequent users grow tolerant of the drugs’ pain-relieving effects, leading them to use increasingly higher doses…

11h

 

Dirac semimetal in {beta}-CuI without surface Fermi arcs [Physics]

Anomalous surface states with Fermi arcs are commonly considered to be a fingerprint of Dirac semimetals (DSMs). In contrast to Weyl semimetals, however, Fermi arcs of DSMs are not topologically protected. Using first-principles calculations, we predict that β-cuprous iodide (β-CuI) is a peculiar DSM whose surface states form closed Fermi…

11h

 

MOTHER-OF-FT-AND-TFL1 represses seed germination under far-red light by modulating phytohormone responses in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]

Seed germination in many plant species is triggered by sunlight, which is rich in the red (R) wavelength and repressed by under-the-canopy light rich in far red (FR). R:FR ratios are sensed by phytochromes to regulate levels of gibberellins (GAs) and abscisic acid (ABA), which induce and inhibit germination respectively….

11h

 

Circadian control of ORE1 by PRR9 positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The circadian clock coordinates the daily cyclic rhythm of numerous biological processes by regulating a large portion of the transcriptome. In animals, the circadian clock is involved in aging and senescence, and circadian disruption by mutations in clock genes frequently accelerates aging. Conversely, aging alters circadian rhythmicity, which causes age-associated…

11h

 

A dynamic model of transmission and elimination of peste des petits ruminants in Ethiopia [Population Biology]

Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a devastating viral disease of sheep and goats, has been targeted by the global community for eradication within the next 15 years. Although an efficacious attenuated live vaccine is available, the lack of knowledge about the transmission potential of PPR virus (PPRV) may compromise eradication…

11h

 

The dynamics of norm change in the cultural evolution of language [Social Sciences]

What happens when a new social convention replaces an old one? While the possible forces favoring norm change—such as institutions or committed activists—have been identified for a long time, little is known about how a population adopts a new convention, due to the difficulties of finding representative data. Here, we…

11h

 

Future population and human capital in heterogeneous India [Social Sciences]

Within the next decade India is expected to surpass China as the world’s most populous country due to still higher fertility and a younger population. Around 2025 each country will be home to around 1.5 billion people. India is demographically very heterogeneous with some rural illiterate populations still having more…

11h

 

Russiske kæleræve giver svaret: Derfor er din hund så kærlig

I snart 60 år har forskere avlet på kæleræve i Sibirien. Nu er rævenes DNA blevet analyseret, og deres gener kan gøre os klogere på både hunde og menneskers adfærd.

11h

 

Controversial law requires Florida public schools to display ‘In God We Trust’

Starting this fall, public schools in Florida will be required to display the words “In God We Trust” in a noticeable place within each building used by a district. Read More

11h

 

America Doesn’t Need Another Tape to Know Who Trump Is

Updated at 4:25 p.m. In 1993, The New York Times published an article headlined “Rap’s Embrace of ‘Nigger’ Fires Bitter Debate.” It’s not a word likely to find its way into headlines today. Sometime in the past 25 years, using that word became the only proof of racism that much of the country is willing to accept. The dividing line is hard to find, but one pivotal moment came during the O. J. Sim

11h

 

Doctors may be able to enlist a mysterious enzyme to stop internal bleeding

An enzyme can boost platelet production may work as a future therapeutic.

11h

 

Origins and spread of Eurasian fruits traced to the ancient Silk Road

Studies of ancient plant remains from a medieval archaeological site in the Pamir Mountains of Uzbekistan have shown that fruits, such as apples, peaches, apricots, and melons, were cultivated in the foothills of Inner Asia. The archaeobotanical study is among the first systematic analyses of medieval agricultural crops in the heart of the ancient Silk Road.

11h

 

Light-engineered bacterial shapes could hold key to future labs-on-a-chip

Scientists have used light patterns to control the swimming speed of bacteria and direct them to form different shapes.

11h

 

Immune cells in the brain have surprising influence on sexual behavior

Immune cells usually ignored by neuroscientists appear to play an important role in determining whether an animal's sexual behavior will be more typical of a male or female.

12h

 

Meteorites May Have Created Some of Earth's Oldest Rocks

A barrage of impacts more than four billion years ago is linked to ancient stones found in Canada — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

 

The Flawed Human Mind – The Fallacy of Contemporary Spirituality

submitted by /u/samm9891 [link] [comments]

12h

 

Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

Scientists have presented research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as 'whistlers' — very low frequency packets of radio waves that race along magnetic field lines. The study provides new insights into the nature of whistlers and space plasmas and could one day aid in the development of practical plasma technologies with magnetic fields, including spacecraft thrusters that use charged particl

12h

 

Natural refrigerant replacements could reduce energy costs and conserve the environment

The 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1997 Kyoto Protocol called for countries around the world to phase out substances that deplete the ozone layer, but many HVAC systems still use synthetic refrigerants that violate those international agreements and inflict environmental damage. Recently, researchers investigated how natural refrigerants could be used in geothermal heat pumps to reduce energy cons

12h

 

A resurrected gene may protect elephants from cancer

Researchers have found another gene that may play a role in explaining elephants’ cancer resistance.

12h

 

12h

 

Scientists get new tool to track new pathogen killing frogs

An undergraduate researcher has developed a method to screen frogs for an infectious disease that has been linked to mass die-offs of frogs around the world. Thanks to her method, scientists will be able to track the disease and try to figure out why it is triggering the deaths.

12h

 

SMURF1 provides targeted approach to preventing cocaine addiction relapse

A class of proteins that has generated significant interest for its potential to treat diseases, has for the first time, been shown to be effective in reducing relapse, or drug-seeking behaviors, in a preclinical study.

12h

 

Early opaque universe linked to galaxy scarcity

A team of astronomers led by George Becker at the University of California, Riverside, has made a surprising discovery: 12.5 billion years ago, the most opaque place in the universe contained relatively little matter.

12h

 

Byproducts of 'junk DNA' implicated in cancer spread

UC San Diego biologists and their colleagues have revealed that enhancer RNAs play a significant role in cancer dissemination. The researchers found that eRNAs have a direct role in the activation of genes that are important for tumor development. This role is facilitated by the ability of eRNAs to directly interact with BRD4, a protein known as a cancer disseminator. BRD4 has been recognized as a

12h

 

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite find Tropical Storm Leepi nearing southern Japan

Tropical Storm Leepi continued its northwestern track through the northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm. Leepi was moving toward Kyushu, southern Japan.

12h

 

Origins and spread of Eurasian fruits traced to the ancient Silk Road

Studies of ancient plant remains from a medieval archaeological site in the Pamir Mountains of Uzbekistan have shown that fruits, such as apples, peaches, apricots, and melons, were cultivated in the foothills of Inner Asia. The archaeobotanical study, conducted by Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, is among the first systematic analyses of medieval agric

12h

 

Ethiopian 7-year trial finds that childhood eye infection increases after antibiotic program ends

Continuous mass distribution of azithromycin in northern Ethiopia, where the childhood eye infection trachoma is a major cause of blindness, is effective in preventing recurrence of trachoma but does not eliminate the infection entirely, according to a new study in PLOS Medicine by Jeremy Keenan and colleagues from the University of California in San Francisco, USA and the Carter Center in Addis A

12h

 

In Photos: Elusive Mountain Lions Come Out of Hiding

There is no animal across the Americas that has been given more names than the hemisphere's dominant hunting cat often known as the mountain lion. Here's a look at the evasive predator.

12h

 

'Contagious' Loneliness Could Follow Poor Sleep

Sleep deprivation could contribute to loneliness, and the feeling is "contagious," researchers say.

12h

 

Medicaid expansion states see rise in coverage for low income adults with substance use disorders

The percentage of low-income Americans with substance use disorders who were uninsured declined more sharply in states that chose to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act versus states that did not, according to a new study. The percentage of low-income residents with substance use disorders without coverage decreased from 34 percent in 2013 to 20 percent in 2015 within states that had imp

12h

 

New approach to treating chronic itch

Two receptors in the spinal cord and the right experimental drug: Researchers have discovered a new approach that suppresses itch. In a series of experiments in mice and dogs they successfully alleviated different forms of acute as well as chronic itch. For the latter, current treatment options are very limited.

12h

 

How MERS Coronavirus evolves to infect different species

New research shows how MERS-CoV can adapt to infect cells of a new species, which suggests that other coronaviruses might be able to do the same.

12h

 

Effects of climate warming seen in tallgrass prairie ecosystem

Ecologists have completed a new study on the effects of climate warming on soil microbes in a long-term climate change experiment at a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. The new study shows that climate warming will affect microbial communities in the future, and future community states will be more predictable under warmed climate. Eventually, microbial communities will produce different functions and

12h

 

Models give synthetic biologists a head start

Researchers have developed mathematical models to predict the performance of multi-input synthetic biological circuits that can be used to engineer bacteria and other organisms to regulate cellular systems or perform functions they wouldn't in nature. Applications include biological sensing, chemical production and therapeutics such as probiotics to alter gut bacteria.

12h

 

Potential guidance for gastric cancer treatment

Researchers have discovered that gastric cancer tissue samples bearing mutation of a specific gene, MUC16, too are associated with higher tumor mutation loads. Also known as tumor mutation burdens, measurement of high genetic mutation rates among cancerous versus healthy tissue has increasingly been shown to correlate with effective response rates to immunotherapy. The knowledge could bode positiv

12h

 

Security gaps identified in Internet protocol 'IPsec'

Researchers have demonstrated that the Internet protocol 'IPsec' is vulnerable to attacks. The Internet Key Exchange protocol 'IKEv1', which is part of the protocol family, has vulnerabilities that enable potential attackers to interfere with the communication process and intercept specific information.

12h

 

Drug repurposing study sheds light on heart disease risk

A team led by researchers has developed a computational technique to reveal the unknown side effects — both good and bad — of hundreds of drugs. That knowledge could help pharmacologists discover new indications for drugs already on the market and repurpose them for other disorders. Using their unique method, the researchers discovered that two drugs commonly prescribed for non-coronary disorder

12h

 

Origins and spread of Eurasian fruits traced to the ancient Silk Road

Studies of ancient preserved plant remains from a medieval archaeological site in the Pamir Mountains of Uzbekistan have shown that fruits such as apples, peaches, apricots and melons were cultivated in the foothills of Inner Asia. The archaeobotanical study, conducted by Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, is among the first systematic analyses of medieva

12h

 

Review: Looking to the Stars, ‘Cielo’ Can’t Quite Form a Constellation

Alison McAlpine’s experimental feature tries to film an essentially unfilmable subject: the night sky above the Atacama Desert in Chile.

12h

 

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Bebinca east of Hainan Island

China's Hainan Island can't seem to get away from slow moving Tropical Storm Bebinca. The storm continues to linger near the island on Aug. 14 as seen when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm in Aug. 14. In fact, Hainan Island is expected to get another visit from the storm.

12h

 

NASA gets an infrared view of Tropical Storm Hector

Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed the storm had two areas of strong convection.

12h

 

Everything You Need to Know About the 'Avengers: Infinity War' Heroes

WIRED asked the Russo brothers themselves to offer up character profiles.

12h

 

Sticking brain cells together with glue could boost and protect memory

Can a chemical that reinforces the connections in our brains prevent the destruction of memories in ageing and Alzheimer’s? It seems to work in mice

12h

 

We have finally figured out how to snap spaghetti into two pieces

Snap a piece of dry spaghetti and you will always end up with three or more pieces – but now mathematicians have figured out how to get a single clean break

12h

 

Why forecasting how hot it will be in 2022 is mostly a gimmick

It will never be possible to forecast weather years ahead, but we can predict the average global temperature four years from now. Trouble is, that’s not that useful

12h

 

US police testing AI that learns to spot crimes in CCTV footage

Police in Orlando have been testing a system that automatically scans CCTV looking for potentially illicit activity – with some success

12h

 

There is no evidence that the weedkiller glyphosate causes cancer

Agrichemical firm Monsanto has been ordered to pay $289 million to a man who says its products caused his cancer – but scientific evidence for links to cancer is lacking

12h

 

Air traffic controller training makes emergencies seem ordinary

Aviation Preparation, organization, and team work help navigate a crisis. When a Horizon Air plane was stolen from SeaTac International Airport, it fell on an air traffic controller to guide the man in the cockpit through a very unusual…

12h

 

DARPA Wants to Zap Your Brain to Boost Your Memory

But the real question is: can you sleep with all those wires on your head?

13h

 

Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as 'whistlers' — very low frequency packets of radio waves that race along magnetic field lines. Appearing in the Physics of Plasmas, the study provides new insights into the nature of whistlers and space plasmas and could one day aid in the development of practical plasma technologies wi

13h

 

Substances associated with bee ferocity are discovered

Chemical compounds identified by Brazilian researchers may explain why less aggressive bees become ferocious. Study is published in Journal of Proteome Research.

13h

 

Magnetic gene in fish may someday help those with epilepsy, Parkinson's

An aquarium fish that senses the Earth's magnetic field as it swims could help unlock how the human brain works and how diseases such as Parkinson's and other neurological disorders function. Michigan State University scientists are the first to discover a navigational gene in glass catfish called the electromagnetic-perceptive gene, or EPG, that responds to certain magnetic waves. They've already

13h

 

Modern security technology in Intel processors not watertight

Technology giant Intel has been including an innovative security method in its processors for a number of years. This method works as a vault for your personal data. However, KU Leuven researchers (Belgium) have shown that the system can, in fact, be hacked using the Foreshadow attack. What's more, information processed in cloud systems also seems vulnerable to this kind of attack. Intel will be r

13h

 

What a Grieving Orca Tells Us

The first half of the killer whale’s scientific name— Orcinus orca —comes from the Latin for “of the realms of the dead.” For one population of orcas living in the waters of the Pacific Northwest, that etymology has taken on a newly dark resonance. Last month, a 20-year-old female orca named Tahlequah (J35) gave birth to a male calf that died after half an hour. While many orca mothers have been

13h

 

‘Buddy, can you spare $70,000?’ Great Recession cost us all that much over a lifetime.

A publication from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco says that the Great Recession that happened 10 years ago will cost us all $70K over a lifetime because of lost GDP. Read More

13h

 

I await a second Magnum opus | Brief letters

Morris Traveller in the Alps | What’s the point of Sats? | DNA ancestry tests | A dog called Trevor | Lolly sticks In the early 60s, I drove a Morris Traveller ( Letters , passim) laden with three friends and a month’s worth of camping gear to Yugoslavia. We stalled on a 1:2.5 gradient up the Julian Alps from Villach in Austria to the border. We set about unloading all my passengers and possibly t

13h

 

'Foreshadow' Flaw Undermines the Intel CPU Secure Enclave

In the spirit of Meltdown and Spectre, a new vulnerability called Foreshadow could expose Intel's secure enclave to attack.

13h

 

Workplace bias differs for single versus married parents, research finds

Previous research has shown that mothers and fathers experience different biases at work, with mothers being penalized and fathers benefiting from their parenthood status.

13h

 

Clinical trial suggests new direction for heavy-smoking head and neck cancer patients

Phase I results of olaparib with cetuximab and radiation led to 72 percent 2-year survival in 16 patients on trial, compared with an expected 2-year survival rate of about 55 percent for standard-of-care treatment.

14h

 

Workplace bias differs for single versus married parents, UA research finds

Single moms aren't penalized at work in the same way married mothers are, new University of Arizona research suggests. At the same time, single dads don't benefit in the workplace the way that married fathers do.

14h

 

Deaths from resident-to-resident incidents in dementia offers insights to inform policy

Analyzing the incidents between residents in dementia in long-term care homes may hold the key to reducing future fatalities among this vulnerable population, according to a new research from the University of Minnesota School of Nursing.

14h

 

Diving robots find Antarctic winter seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide

A new study led by the University of Washington uses data gathered by floating drones in the Southern Ocean over past winters to learn how much carbon dioxide is transferred by the surrounding seas. Results show that in winter the open water nearest the sea ice surrounding Antarctica releases significantly more carbon dioxide than previously believed.

14h

 

LA to become first in US to install subway body scanners

The Los Angeles subway system will become the first in the U.S. to install body scanners that screen passengers for weapons and explosives, officials said Tuesday.

14h

 

In a massive region of space, astronomers find far fewer galaxies than they expected

University of California astronomers, including three from UCLA, have resolved a mystery about the early universe and its first galaxies.

14h

 

Diving robots find Antarctic winter seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide

More than 100 oceanic floats are now diving and drifting in the Southern Ocean around Antarctica during the peak of winter. These instruments are gathering data from a place and season that remains very poorly studied, despite its important role in regulating the global climate.

14h

 

Light-engineered bacterial shapes could hold key to future labs-on-a-chip

Scientists have used light patterns to control the swimming speed of bacteria and direct them to form different shapes, according to a new study in the journal eLife.

14h

 

Cancer-fighting drugs also help plants fight disease

Cancer-fighting drugs used on humans can help plants fight disease as well. That discovery, by two Washington State University plant pathologists, could help scientists develop new pathways for plants to battle infection, as revealed in a paper in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science.

14h

 

Apathy towards poachers widespread in world's marine protected areas

A new study has found that nearly half of fishers from seven countries had witnessed someone poaching in marine protected areas in the past year and most of them did nothing about it.

14h

 

Space-based tracker to give scientists a beyond-bird's-eye-view of wildlife

The International Cooperation for Animal Research Using Space, or ICARUS, will be flying closer to the sun than ever when a pair of Russian cosmonauts installs the antennae for its state-of-the-art animal tracking system on the exterior of the International Space Station on Aug. 15. The installation will be one small step for the cosmonauts and one giant leap for Yale biodiversity research.

14h

 

Models give synthetic biologists a head start

Synthetic biologists have the tools to build complex, computer-like DNA circuits that sense or trigger activities in cells, and thanks to scientists at Rice University and the University of Houston they now they have a way to test those circuits in advance.

14h

 

Cancer-fighting drugs also help plants fight disease

Cancer-fighting drugs used on humans can help plants fight disease as well. That discovery, by two Washington State University plant pathologists, could help scientists develop new pathways for plants to battle infection, as revealed in a paper in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science.

14h

 

Light-engineered bacterial shapes could hold key to future labs-on-a-chip

Scientists have used light patterns to control the swimming speed of bacteria and direct them to form different shapes.

14h

 

Family Separation Isn’t New

For the past few months, images of distressed migrant children have populated American newsfeeds and television screens. Many of the children are the victims of “family separation,” their parents deported from the U.S. without them ; while detained without their parents, some of them have been forbidden from being hugged . The Trump administration has defended family separation, then backtracked

14h

 

Study shows effects of climate warming in tallgrass prairie ecosystem

A University of Oklahoma professor, Jizhong Zhou, and his team have completed a new study on the effects of climate warming on soil microbes in a long-term climate change experiment at a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. The new study shows that climate warming will affect microbial communities in the future, and future community states will be more predictable under warmed climate. Eventually, microbi

14h

 

Warming Is Worsening Wildfires, but Not Everywhere or Every Time

Human development patterns can be a larger influence on blazes in some places — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

 

Rare Chinese tree's flowers attract visitors to Roath Park

The Chinese tree has flowered for the first time since it was planted in Cardiff more than 100 years ago.

14h

 

14h

 

Inching closer to a soft spot in isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis

Researchers comparing clonal strains of the mycobacteria that cause TB, before and after they developed resistance to a first-line drug, found that a single genetic change may not always have identical effects on bacterial fitness.

14h

 

In a massive region of space, astronomers find far fewer galaxies than they expected

A team of University of California astronomers has made a discovery that resolves a mystery and sheds new light on the early universe and its first galaxies.

14h

 

Studying Climate Change in One of the Grandest Classrooms in the World

If I could, I’d bring politicians who doubt the reality of human-caused global change to spend a few days on the Juneau Icefield — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

 

Surfer's Monster, 80-Foot Wave Came from a Hidden, Underwater Canyon

There's a massive underwater landform creating extreme surfing conditions in Portugal.

14h

 

Security gaps identified in Internet protocol 'IPsec'

In collaboration with colleagues from Opole University in Poland, researchers at Horst Görtz Institute for IT Security (HGI) at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that the Internet protocol 'IPsec' is vulnerable to attacks. The Internet Key Exchange protocol 'IKEv1', which is part of the protocol family, has vulnerabilities that enable potential attackers to interfere with the communi

14h

 

Natural refrigerant replacements could reduce energy costs and conserve the environment

The 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1997 Kyoto Protocol called for countries around the world to phase out substances that deplete the ozone layer, but many HVAC systems still use synthetic refrigerants that violate those international agreements and inflict environmental damage. Recently, Iranian researchers investigated how natural refrigerants could be used in geothermal heat pumps to reduce ene

14h

 

In neutron stars, protons may do the heavy lifting

A new study led by Tel Aviv University and MIT suggests that some properties of neutron stars may be influenced not only by their multitude of densely packed neutrons, but also by a substantially smaller fraction of protons. The finding may lead to a new understanding of how neutron stars behave.

14h

 

Study: What patients really think about opioid vs non-opioid medications for chronic pain

A new study investigates pre-existing perceptions about pain medications by individuals with chronic pain and how these perceptions relate to patients' experiences with these medications. The study found that, despite strongly held beliefs about opioid and non-opioid medications, patients were often surprised by their own results from these drugs.

14h

 

Google sporer din lokation – selvom du har sagt nej

Søgegiganten Google gemmer mulighed for at fravælge sporing af din lokation langt væk.

15h

 

Next few years 'may be exceptionally warm'

The next few years could be "anomalously warm", according to a new study.

15h

 

Using common social media tactics to subvert US elections

The latest efforts to disrupt the U.S. midterm elections through Facebook manipulation seem to be following a persuasion playbook refined by legitimate companies and organizations—but with a twist.

15h

 

Google tracks your location even if you switch off location tracking

Google records your movements even when you explicitly tell it not to, an investigation by the Associated Press has found

15h

 

New Scientist Live: the sophisticated home life of Neanderthals

We once thought Neanderthals were less advanced than humans, but Matt Pope will argue at New Scientist Live that Neanderthal families lived rich domestic lives

15h

 

Flipping the switch on supramolecular electronics

Engineers have successfully combined photoswitchable molecular lattices with layered materials to create new high-performance devices that show macroscopic responses to light.

15h

 

Tiny helpers that clean cells

New results show which proteins assist the natural recycling process in the body.

15h

 

How hot is Schrödinger's coffee?

A new uncertainty relation, linking the precision with which temperature can be measured and quantum mechanics, has been discovered.

15h

 

Glacier depth affects plankton blooms off Greenland

The unusual timing of highly-productive summer plankton blooms off Greenland indicates a connection between increasing amounts of meltwater and nutrients in these coastal waters. Researchers now show that this connection exists, but is much more complex than widely supposed. Whether increasing meltwater has a positive or negative effect on summertime phytoplankton depends on the depth at which a g

15h

 

Severe declines of mountain hares on Scottish grouse moors

Mountain hare numbers on moorlands in the eastern Highlands have declined to less than one per cent of their initial levels, according to a long-term scientific study.

15h

 

Artificial placenta created in the laboratory

Scientists have now produced an artificial placenta model that very closely resembles the natural organ. Using a specially developed femtosecond laser-based 3D printing process, it is possible to produce customized hydrogel membranes directly within microfluidic chips, which are then populated with placenta cells. This means it is now possible to provide clarity in some vital research issues, such

15h

 

Mixing energy drinks with alcohol could enhance the negative effects of binge drinking

A key ingredient of energy drinks could be exacerbating some of the negative effects of binge drinking according to a new study.

15h

 

Bacteria-fighting polymers created with light

Hundreds of polymers — which could kill drug-resistant superbugs in novel ways — can be produced and tested using light, using a new method.

15h

 

Fishing quotas upended by nuclear DNA analysis

Fishing quotas have been decided using an inadequate method for decades, according to a new study. The same method has also been used to decide about culling, hunting quotas, or translocating threatened species. Analyzing the nuclear genome of sardines shows previously unrecognized genetic differences between populations, which are not identified by the go-to-method for Isolation-By-Distance, mito

15h

 

Wage gap between hospital executives and doctors is widening, study finds

Over the past decade, salaries for hospital CEOs have risen much faster than for surgeons, physicians, and nurses, reports a new study.

15h

 

Stress hormone is key factor in failure of immune system to prevent leukemia

The human stress hormone cortisol has been identified as a key factor when the immune system fails to prevent leukemia taking hold.

15h

 

Black holes are actually giant fuzzballs of string, claims new research

A new paper strengthens the theory that black holes are like balls of space yarn and debunks the idea of "firewalls". Read More

15h

 

Just 10 minutes of meditation turbocharges your brain

A new study finds that even minutes of meditation or mindfulness increases your cognitive capabilities. Read More

15h

 

Research identifies potential guidance for gastric cancer treatment

Researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital (TMUCIH) have discovered that gastric cancer tissue samples bearing mutation of a specific gene, MUC16, too are associated with higher tumor mutation loads. Also known as tumor mutation burdens, measurement of high genetic mutation rates among cancerous versus healthy tissue has increas

15h

 

Models give synthetic biologists a head start

Rice University researchers have developed mathematical models to predict the performance of multi-input synthetic biological circuits that can be used to engineer bacteria and other organisms to regulate cellular systems or perform functions they wouldn't in nature. Applications include biological sensing, chemical production and therapeutics such as probiotics to alter gut bacteria.

15h

 

OU study shows effects of climate warming in tallgrass prairie ecosystem

A University of Oklahoma professor, Jizhong Zhou, and his team have completed a new study on the effects of climate warming on soil microbes in a long-term climate change experiment at a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. The new study shows that climate warming will affect microbial communities in the future, and future community states will be more predictable under warmed climate. Eventually, microbi

15h

 

NIH study shows how MERS Coronavirus evolves to infect different species

New research published in Cell Reports from scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows how MERS-CoV can adapt to infect cells of a new species, which suggests that other coronaviruses might be able to do the same.

15h

 

Apathy towards poachers widespread in world's marine protected areas

A new study has found that nearly half of fishers from seven countries had witnessed someone poaching in marine protected areas in the past year and most of them did nothing about it.

15h

 

2018-2022 expected to be abnormally hot years

This summer's worldwide heatwave makes 2018 a particularly hot year. As will be the next few years, according to a study led by Florian Sévellec, researcher at CNRS and at the University of Southampton, and published in the Aug. 14, 2018, edition of Nature Communications. Using a new method, the study shows that at the global level, 2018-2022 may be an even hotter period than expected based on cur

15h

 

Medically underserved women in the Southeast rarely receive BRCA tests

Medically underserved women in the Southeast diagnosed with breast cancer or ovarian cancer missed out on genetic testing that could have helped them and their relatives make important decisions about their health, according to new research from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.

15h

 

Poor sleep triggers viral loneliness and social rejection

In a study of sleep-deprived versus well-rested individuals, UC Berkeley researchers found that the brains of those lacking sufficient sleep exhibited heightened activity in areas that deal with perceived human threats and a shutdown of areas that encourage social interaction. People shown videos of sleep-deprived individuals felt more alienated, suggesting that antisocial feelings are contagious.

15h

 

Traumatic brain injury may be associated with increased risk of suicide

An increased risk of suicide was associated with those residents of Denmark who sought medical attention for traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared with the general population without TBI in a study that used data from Danish national registers. A history of TBI has been associated with higher rates of self-harm, suicide and death than the general population.

15h

 

Chemicals found in vegetables prevent colon cancer in mice

Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a new study from the Francis Crick Institute shows.

15h

 

Can combining low doses of 3 high blood pressure medications into one pill improve blood pressure control?

Poorly controlled high blood pressure is a leading global public health problem requiring new treatment strategies. In most instances, inadequate blood pressure treatment can be mainly attributed to use of one medication, which has modest effectiveness.

15h

 

Innovative triple pill significantly lowers blood pressure, study finds

A new low dose three in one pill to treat hypertension could transform the way high blood pressure is treated around the world.

15h

 

Researchers artificially generate immune cells integral to creating cancer vaccines

For the first time, Mount Sinai researchers have identified a way to make large numbers of immune cells that can help prevent cancer reoccurrence, according to a study published in August in Cell Reports.

15h

 

Zombie gene protects against cancer — in elephants

LIF6, a dead gene that came back to life, prevents cancer by killing cells with DNA damage.

15h

 

Elephants resist cancer by waking a zombie gene

Elephants have evolved a way to make LIF6 (a non-functioning, or dead, gene in mammals) come back to life, and it's what makes the largest living land mammals nearly immune to cancer. In response to DNA damage, such as that caused by ultraviolet rays, the elephant version of the tumor-suppressing protein p53 prompts 'zombie' LIF6 to efficiently kill cells poised to become cancerous. The research p

15h

 

The science behind rooting for the home team

Children often observe society dividing its members — by ethnicity, religion, gender, or even favorite sports team. But a review by a Yale psychologist published Aug. 14 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences concludes that favoritism toward members of one's own social groups may not be a learned behavior but an instinct triggered by belonging to that group. Although this favoritism can mani

15h

 

NASA team demonstrates 'science on a shoestring' with greenhouse gas-measuring instrument

A novel instrument that has already proven its mettle on field campaigns will attempt to measure atmospheric greenhouse gases from an occultation-viewing, low-Earth-orbiting CubeSat mission called Mini-Carb early next year—marking the first time this type of instrument has flown in space.

15h

 

Wellcome photography prize launched with focus on health

Competition aims to encourage a ‘more diverse view of what research and health means’ A new international photography prize for pictures that tell stories about health, medicine and science has been launched by the charitable foundation Wellcome . It said the competition aimed to do for health what the Natural History Museum’s wildlife photographer of the year award had done for nature or the Pri

15h

 

Statistisk analyse: De næste fem år bliver ekstraordinært varme

Naturlige og tilfældige variationer vil de næste fem år give en ekstraordinær stigning i den globale opvarmning.

15h

 

Matter: The ‘Zombie Gene’ That May Protect Elephants From Cancer

With such enormous bodies, elephants should be particularly prone to tumors. But an ancient gene in their DNA, somehow resurrected, seems to shield the animals.

15h

 

Solar Eclipse of 2017 Boosted Science Interest

The Michigan Scientific Literacy Survey of 2017 found that last year's total solar eclipse got Americans more interested in celestial science. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

 

How Insulin Helped Create Ant Societies

Ants, wasps, bees and other social insects live in highly organized “eusocial” colonies where throngs of females forgo reproduction — usually viewed as the cornerstone of evolutionary fitness — to serve the needs of a few egg-laying queens and their offspring. How they got that way has been hard to explain despite more than 150 years of biologists’ efforts. Many researchers have thought the answe

15h

 

Don’t Miss Out

Don’t want to be on Twitter or Facebook 24/7? You won’t miss any of our news, briefing papers, Cerebrum essays, or helpful handouts if you subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter . In the past few months, for example, we’ve posted Lesson Plans for K-5 (with more to come soon) Fact Sheets for middle school and high school Podcast interviews with scientists on remembering what we learn , stemming bra

15h

 

'Alarming' diabetes epidemic in Guatemala tied to aging, not obesity

The diabetes epidemic in Guatemala is worse than previously thought: more than 25 percent of its indigenous people, who make up 60 percent of the population, suffer from type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes, suggests a new study.

15h

 

One antiplatelet drug after heart valve replacement

Treatment guidelines say patients who undergo minimally invasive aortic heart valve replacements should receive two antiplatelet drugs to reduce the risk of dangerous blood clots. A new study has found that a single antiplatelet drug may work just as well, with lower risks of life-threatening bleeding and other complications.

15h

 

Illinois' imperiled eastern massasauga rattlesnakes retain genetic diversity

A long-term study of eastern massasauga rattlesnakes in Illinois reveals that — despite their alarming decline in numbers — the few remaining populations have retained a surprising amount of genetic diversity.

15h

 

Large collection of brain cancer data now easily, freely accessible to global researchers

A valuable cache of brain cancer biomedical data, one of only two such large collections in the country, has been made freely available worldwide.

15h

 

Study identifies distinct origin of ADHD in children with history of brain injury

Physical brain injury in children contributes to the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), distinct from genetic risk for the disorder.

15h

 

Cetuximab+RT found to be inferior to standard treatment in HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer

An interim analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial of patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer found that treatment with radiation therapy and cetuximab is associated with worse overall and progression-free survival compared to the current standard treatment with radiation and cisplatin. The trial was designed to see if cetuximab with radiation would be less

15h

 

Babies in strollers can be exposed to more than twice as much pollution than adults

Babies in strollers or prams can be exposed to up to 60 percent more pollution than their parents, causing potential damage to their frontal lobe and impacting on their cognitive abilities and brain development.

15h

 

Bacteria-fighting polymers created with light

Hundreds of polymers that could kill drug-resistant superbugs in novel ways can be produced and tested with light, using a method developed at the University of Warwick. The new methodology may identify antimicrobials for a range of applications from personal care to coatings.

15h

 

How teachers can help kids find their political voices | Sydney Chaffee

Social justice belongs in our schools, says educator Sydney Chaffee. In a bold talk, she shows how teaching students to engage in activism helps them build important academic and life skills — and asks us to rethink how we can use education to help kids find their voices. "Teaching will always be a political act," Chaffee says. "We can't be afraid of our students' power. Their power will help the

15h

 

Can food have negative calories?

Health Eating celery with your burger is not going to help you lose weight. Diets are everywhere, but could eating “negative calorie” foods, such as celery and grapefruit, help to boost weight loss?

15h

 

Cuban 'acoustic attack' report on US diplomats flawed, say neurologists

Tests stating staff suffered brain damage were ‘misinterpreted’ and ruled out other explanations such as mass psychogenic illness Claims that US diplomats suffered mysterious brain injuries after being targeted with a secret weapon in Cuba have been challenged by neurologists and other brain specialists. A medical report commissioned by the US government, published in March, found that staff at t

15h

 

Extreme temperatures 'especially likely for next four years'

Cyclical natural phenomena that affect planet’s climate will amplify effect of manmade global warming, scientists warn The world is likely to see more extreme temperatures in the coming four years as natural warming reinforces manmade climate change, according to a new global forecasting system. Following a summer of heatwaves and forest fires in the northern hemisphere, the study in the journal

15h

 

Health Care Is Broken. Oscar Health Thinks Tech Can Fix It

Mario Schlosser, the CEO of Oscar Health, wants technology to cure what ails the health care industry. And now Alphabet, Google's parent company, is betting $375 million on this digital panacea.

15h

 

Men still upstage women on screen—but things are getting better

Only three out of every ten characters seen in the top 50 grossing movies of 2016 were played by women. According to Conor Neville and Phyllis Anastasio of Saint Joseph's University in the US, this in no way reflects real world demographics. In a study in Springer's journal Sex Roles, the researchers analyzed how gender and age are presented in popular films. They found that although women and old

15h

 

Audience members influence value creation in the TV audience market

Recently an article was published in the International Journal of Digital Television, which examined the changing relationship between traditional TV providers and their audiences. Senior Research Fellow Ulrike Rohn (Tallinn University) and Docent Mats Nylund (Arcada University of Applied Sciences) say that the notion of sharing, which is most prominent in the current buzzword of the 'sharing econ

15h

 

Elephants resist cancer by waking a zombie gene

An estimated 17 percent of humans worldwide die from cancer, but less than five percent of captive elephants—who also live for about 70 years, and have about 100 times as many potentially cancerous cells as humans—die from the disease.

15h

 

Severe declines of mountain hares on Scottish grouse moors

New study in the Journal of Applied Ecology shows mammals at less than one per cent of original levels.

15h

 

2018-2022 expected to be abnormally hot years

This summer's worldwide heatwave makes 2018 a particularly hot year. And the next few years will be similar, according to a study led by Florian Sévellec, a CNRS researcher at the Laboratory for Ocean Physics and Remote Sensing (LOPS) (CNRS/IFREMER/IRD/University of Brest) and at the University of Southampton, and published in the 14 August 2018 edition of Nature Communications. Using a new method

15h

 

New approach to treating chronic itch

Two receptors in the spinal cord and the right experimental drug: Researchers at the University of Zurich have discovered a new approach that suppresses itch. In a series of experiments in mice and dogs they successfully alleviated different forms of acute as well as chronic itch. For the latter, current treatment options are very limited.

15h

 

Researchers assemble 'library of sugars'

Sugar structures called GAGs are present in almost all tissues in the human body, and have important functions in various diseases. The understanding of these sugar structures is limited, because tools to study them have been lacking. Now, researchers from University of Copenhagen have assembled such a tool – a cellular library of sugars.

15h

 

Dragon vs. Phoenix: The Rematch!

Sometimes a VS rolls around that’s just so intriguing, so wondrous, you can’t help but visit it again. Back in 2015 , we hosted a duel between the magical dragon and phoenix of Chinese legend. The phoenix won last time, but what about this time? The competition starts at 11 AM EDT on 8/16 and goes for 24 hours! Let’s review the matchup: Dragon (龙) Embodies the principle yang , also rules over wat

15h

 

The Apotheosis of Dinesh D’Souza

In “ Dinesh D’Souza and the Decline of American Conservatism ,” my colleague David Frum notes a mainstay of his subject’s work: portraying racism in the United States as if it is overwhelmingly a sin of the Democratic Party, even as D’Souza, a partisan Republican, stokes the racial prejudices of his readers by playing on pernicious group stereotypes. D’Souza’s basic formula for distortion is easy

15h

 

Corymbia genome expands terpene synthesis knowledge

Genome annotations of two C. citriodora subspecies broaden understanding of the terpene synthase gene family across eucalypt lineages.

15h

 

Ten reasons teachers can struggle to use technology in the classroom

Somewhere in a school near you, a teacher is struggling to handle a query from a student whose laptop has a flat battery or another who's watching a funny cat video on a phone. Perhaps the wireless internet connection is dropping in and out, or the electronic whiteboard is playing up.

15h

 

Liquid battery could lead to flexible energy storage

A new type of energy storage system could revolutionise energy storage and drop the charging time of electric cars from hours to seconds.

15h

 

Why universal basic income costs far less than you think

Want to get rid of poverty, lessen inequality and provide financial stability in a world of precarious work? Well, why not simply give everyone enough money to ensure basic sustenance?

15h

 

The best photos from the 2018 Perseids meteor shower

Space Capturing a meteor shower takes serious photographic skill, but the results are worth the effort. Capturing a meteor shower takes serious photographic skill, but the results are clearly worth the effort.

15h

 

Animals and plants jointly coexist

The tropical rainforest, with its permanently wet climate, brims over with an abundance of plant species. Flowers of all sizes with shallow to deep tubes offer a wide variety of food sources to pollinators. Sunbirds, for example, developed long, down-curved beaks enabling them to reach the nectar at the bottom of long tubes. But who is the leading actor in this interplay of plants and animals?

15h

 

New results show which proteins assist the natural recycling process in the body

Cells collect, decompose and recycle surplus or damaged cell material. This process, known as autophagy, is important, because cellular waste can be harmful to the entire organism if it accumulates in the cells. Like the treatment of household waste, autophagy requires certain mechanisms and elements. A team led by Prof. Dr. Claudine Kraft from the Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology a

15h

 

Flipping the switch on supramolecular electronics

Graphene and related materials hold great potential for technological applications such as electronics, sensors, and energy storage devices, among others. Thanks to their high surface sensitivity, these materials are an ideal platform to study the interplay between molecular assemblies at the nanoscale and macroscopic electrical phenomena.

15h

 

Optical pressure detector could improve robot skin, wearable devices and touch screens

A new type of pressure sensor based on light could allow the creation of sensitive artificial skins to give robots a better sense of touch, wearable blood-pressure monitors for humans and optically transparent touch screens and devices.

15h

 

Filsøs fiskedød: Minister skal forholde sig til dræn

Enhedslisten ønsker svar på, om den fiskedød, der har ramt naturgenoprettet sø i Vestjylland, kunne forekomme andre steder, og om man kan ændre drænsystemet for at undgå det. Landboforeningen er positiv over for at se på drænsystemet.

15h

 

For now, Illinois' imperiled eastern massasauga rattlesnakes retain their genetic diversity

Habitat loss, habitat fragmentation and the loss of genetic diversity are the three main factors driving the extinction of many wild species, and the few eastern massasauga rattlesnakes remaining in Illinois have certainly suffered two of the three. A long-term study of these snakes reveals, however, that—despite their alarming decline in numbers—they have retained a surprising amount of genetic d

16h

 

Babies in prams can be exposed to more than twice as much pollution than adults

Babies in prams can be exposed to up to 60 percent more pollution than their parents, causing potential damage to their frontal lobe and impacting on their cognitive abilities and brain development.

16h

 

Medicaid expansion states see rise in coverage for low income adults with substance use disorders

The percentage of low-income Americans with substance use disorders who were uninsured declined more sharply in states that chose to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act versus states that did not, according to a new study. The percentage of low-income residents with substance use disorders without coverage decreased from 34 percent in 2013 to 20 percent in 2015 within states that had imp

16h

 

Drug repurposing study sheds light on heart disease risk

A team led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital has developed a computational technique to reveal the unknown side effects — both good and bad — of hundreds of drugs. That knowledge could help pharmacologists discover new indications for drugs already on the market and repurpose them for other disorders. Using their unique method, the researchers discovered that two drugs commonly pres

16h

 

Research shows surprising scale of health benefits for biggest losers

When it comes to shedding pounds, it pays to think big, according to new research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

16h

 

Effectively expressing empathy to improve ICU care

Study: Physicians express empathy frequently to families in the pediatric intensive care unit, but more than one-third of empathetic statements are buried by medical jargon that reduces their effectiveness.

16h

 

A new computer program generates eerily realistic fake videos

It’s getting harder to tell fact from fiction — even on camera.

16h

 

The Perseid meteor shower – in pictures

The Perseid meteor shower has been spotted across Europe, the US and Canada. Darker skies have created a spectacular show. The annual occurrence can be seen until the 24 August, but peaked on 11-13 August Continue reading…

16h

 

How hot is Schrodinger's coffee?

A new uncertainty relation, linking the precision with which temperature can be measured and quantum mechanics, has been discovered at the University of Exeter.

16h

 

'Natural disasters' and people on the margins – the hidden story

With earthquakes devastating Indonesia, and fires raging in the United States, there has been plenty of discussion of so-called "natural disasters" in recent weeks.

16h

 

How technology turns consumers into spies

Digital tools increasingly compel us to spend time and energy monitoring other people, from our own children or ailing parents to the workers preparing our pizza, a new study says.

16h

 

Wildfires are inevitable – increasing home losses, fatalities and costs are not

Wildfire has been an integral part of California ecosystems for centuries. Now, however, nearly a third of homes in California are in wildland urban interface areas where houses intermingling with wildlands and fire is a natural phenomenon. Just as Californians must live with earthquake risk, they must live with wildfires.

16h

 

Understanding the enzyme that enables bacteria to breathe arsenic

Arsenic-contaminated drinking water is a major health hazard, with chronic exposure causing illnesses and cancers. The World Health Organization estimates that in Bangladesh, for example, over 5 million people were exposed to arsenic-contaminated drinking water in 2009. Often, arsenic is released into water by microbes that breathe, or respire, arsenic-containing compounds. Caltech researchers hav

16h

 

Scientists examine how plants protect themselves by emitting scent cues for birds

When plants are in distress or being fed on by insects, they have been known to send out sensory volatile cues that alert organisms in the area—such as birds—that they are in need of help. While research has shown that this occurs in ecosystems such as forests, until now, this phenomenon has never been demonstrated in an agricultural setting.

16h

 

New study shows furfural derivatives a way to make renewable fuel production financially appealing

Sales of furfural derivatives could make renewable fuel production considerably more financially attractive, according to a new University of Maine study.

16h

 

New study sheds light on the ecology of investors in financial markets

Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, and the University of Palermo, Italy, studied the similarity of investment decisions in the financial market and how the investment strategies used by the investors influence the volatility of the markets by using an exceptionally large set of empirical data. The results help in understanding the operation of financial markets and shed light on th

16h

 

Scientists discovered organic acid in a protoplanetary disk

International team of scientists from Russia (including a research associate of the Kourovka Astronomical Observatory of Ural Federal University Sergei Parfenov), Germany, Italy, USA and France discovered relatively high concentration of formic acid in the protoplanetary disk. This is the first organic molecule found in protoplanetary disks, containing two oxygen atoms.

16h

 

Stress hormone is key factor in failure of immune system to prevent leukemia

The human stress hormone cortisol has been identified by scientists at the University of Kent as a key factor when the immune system fails to prevent leukemia taking hold.

16h

 

Wage gap between hospital executives and doctors is widening, study finds

Over the past decade, salaries for hospital CEOs have risen much faster than for surgeons, physicians, and nurses, reports a study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

16h

 

Cetuximab+RT found to be inferior to standard treatment in HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer

An interim analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial of patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer found that treatment with radiation therapy and cetuximab is associated with worse overall and progression-free survival compared to the current standard treatment with radiation and cisplatin. The trial was designed to see if cetuximab with radiation would be less

16h

 

16h

 

The Writer Who Makes Perfect Sense of Classical Music

Alfred Brendel, one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century, is also a great writer. You can often detect a good-natured smirk behind his words, but right there with it is a genuinely humane seriousness. His writing, always engaging, strikes a balance between solemn reflection and undeniable wit. A perfect example of this balance can be found in his 1985 essay “A Mozart Player Gives Himself

16h

 

The Catch Game: How Much Do You Know About Captain Keith?

Can you guess what makes Captain Keith cry? Crew-mates Roger, Monte, Gary, and Tyler go head-to-head in a hilarious and revealing challenge. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on

16h

 

The Meg! When the (giant prehistoric) shark bites, the science bites back

The Meg is the blockbuster shark monster movie we didn't realise we needed in our lives. With a cast led by Jason Statham, this is a big-budget version of several megalodon movies that have popped out over the years – includin

 

App for Preventing Pregnancy Gets FDA Marketing Approval. Is It Reliable?

A smartphone app for preventing pregnancy has just become the first of its kind to receive marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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