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Nyheder2018august16

 

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Magnetic antiparticles offer new horizons for information technologies

Nanosized magnetic particles called skyrmions are considered highly promising candidates for new data storage and information technologies. Now, physicists have revealed new behavior involving the antiparticle equivalent of skyrmions in a ferromagnetic material. The researchers demonstrated their findings using advanced computer simulations that can accurately model magnetic properties of nanomete

1h

Parental life span predicts daughters living to 90 without chronic disease or disability

Researchers report that women whose mothers lived to at least age 90 were more likely to also live to 90, free of serious diseases and disabilities.

1h

Italienske ingeniører: Tusindvis af broer bør udskiftes

En stor del af den italienske infrastruktur er ligesom den kollapsede bro i Genova over 50 år gammel og bør rives ned og udskiftes med moderne broer, der er designet til nutidens trafikbelastning, siger direktøren for Italiens nationale forskningsråd.

5h

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Magnetic antiparticles offer new horizons for information technologies

Computer simulations reveal new behavior of antiskyrmions in gradually increased electric currents.

2min

Male tobacco smokers have brain-wide reduction of CB1 receptors

Chronic, frequent tobacco smokers have a decreased number of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, the 'pot receptor', when compared with non-smokers, reports a new study.

2min

Study of greater Yellowstone pronghorn finds highway crossing structures a conservation success

A recently published study has confirmed that efforts to protect migrating pronghorn by installing wildlife crossing structures over highways have succeeded, in terms of the increased success rate of pronghorn crossings over time.

2min

Protein droplets keep neurons at the ready and immune system in balance

Discoveries show how proteins that organize into liquid droplets inside cells make certain biological functions possible.

2min

World's oldest cheese found in Egyptian tomb

Aging usually improves the flavor of cheese, but that's not why some very old cheese discovered in an Egyptian tomb is drawing attention. Instead, it's thought to be the most ancient solid cheese ever found.

2min

Optimizing airport flight patterns take a toll on human health

Health costs associated with noise from changing flight patterns over populated urban landscapes far outweigh the benefits of reduced flight times, according to a new study. The researchers used flights from LaGuardia airport that have historically flown over Flushing Meadows and the U.S. Tennis Center in Queens – known as the TNNIS route — as a case study to explore the trade-offs between more e

14min

NASA catches formation of fifth Atlantic depression

The fifth tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Ocean season formed on Aug. 15, 2018, as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead.

14min

NASA satellite sees Tropical Depression Rumbia form

Tropical Depression Rumbia, the twenty-first tropical cyclone of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean season formed on Aug. 15, 2018, as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead.

14min

Light-emitting nanoparticles could provide a safer way to image living cells

A research team has demonstrated how light-emitting nanoparticles, developed at Berkeley Lab, can be used to see deep in living tissue. Researchers hope they can be made to attach to specific components of cells to serve in an advanced imaging system that can pinpoint even single cancer cells.

14min

NASA sees 14th Eastern Pacific Tropical Depression form

Tropical Depression 14E formed far from land and poses no threat to land areas. On Aug. 14, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over developing Tropical Depression 14E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

14min

Patient motivations behind cosmetic procedures

What motivates patients to seek minimally invasive cosmetic procedures? Most patients want the procedures to please themselves, not others, and, apart from aesthetic appearance to look younger and fresher, patient motivations ranged from physical health and psychological well-being to looking good at work and increasing self-confidence. Those were among the findings of a new observational study th

14min

When viruses infect phytoplankton, it can change the clouds

Microscopic plant-like organisms called phytoplankton support the diversity of life in the ocean. Scientists in Israel now report that one species, Emiliania huxleyi, and a virus closely associated with it, might be responsible for changes in cloud properties as well. When infected, E. huxleyi releases its chalky shell into the air, where it acts as an aerosol reflecting sunlight and even affectin

14min

Wood density of European trees decreasing continuously since 1870

Trees are growing more rapidly due to climate change. This may sound like good news—after all, this means that trees are storing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in their wood, and hence modulating a key ingredient in global warming. But is it that simple? A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) analyzed wood samples from the oldest existing experimental areas spanning a period

17min

Viruses may help phytoplankton make clouds — by tearing the algae apart

Sick phytoplankton shed their calcium carbonate plates more easily than their healthy counterparts, which could play a role in forming clouds.

19min

Wisconsin Reservation Offers A Climate Success Story And A Warning

Climate change is causing more severe flooding around the country, and a disproportionate number of Native American communities are on the front lines. (Image credit: Joe Proudman/UC Davis)

23min

When viruses infect phytoplankton, it can change the clouds

Microscopic plant-like organisms called phytoplankton are known to support the diversity of life in the ocean. Scientists in Israel now report that one species, Emiliania huxleyi, and a virus closely associated with it, might be responsible for changes in cloud properties as well. When infected, E. huxleyi releases its chalky shell into the air, where it acts as an aerosol reflecting sunlight and

29min

Explaining Jupiter’s wild appearance

New research spots a remarkable meeting of Jupiter’s jet streams and its magnetic field and proposes that it may contain the explanation for the planets’ striking cloud patterns. Read More

30min

Next 5 years predicted to be abnormally hot

This summer's worldwide heatwave makes 2018 a particularly hot year. As will be the next few years, according to a new study. Using a new method, the study shows that at the global level, 2018-2022 may be an even hotter period than expected based on current global warming.

31min

3-D inks that can be erased selectively

3-D printing by direct laser writing enables production of micro-meter-sized structures for many applications, from biomedicine to microelectronics to optical metamaterials. Researchers have now developed 3-D inks that can be erased selectively. This allows specific degradation and reassembly of highly precise structures on the micrometer and nanometer scales.

31min

Why I fight for the education of refugee girls (like me) | Mary Maker

After fleeing war-torn South Sudan as a child, Mary Maker found security and hope in the school at Kenya's Kakuma Refugee Camp. Now as a teacher of young refugees herself, she sees education as an essential tool for rebuilding lives — and empowering a generation of girls who are too often denied entrance into the classroom. "For the child of war, an education can turn their tears of loss into a p

33min

August Promotions are Open!

Our next major competition is coming around the bend, and you know what that means! We’re getting ready to promote our next class of Advanced Players. So make your request to upgrade to Scout, Scythe , Mod , Mentor and Mystic ! You can fill out the open promotion form here to be considered by HQ. Scout, Scythe, and Mentor Qualifications: Have at least earned 50,000 points and completed 500 cubes

35min

Glacier depth affects plankton blooms off Greenland

The unusual timing of highly productive summer plankton blooms off Greenland indicates a connection between increasing amounts of meltwater and nutrients in these coastal waters. In a new study published today in the international journal Nature Communications, an international group of researchers led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel shows that this connection exists, but is

35min

Molecular switch detects metals in the environment

An international team led by researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has designed a family of molecules capable of binding to metal ions present in the surrounding environment and providing an easily detectable light signal during binding. This new type of sensor forms a 3-D structure whose molecules are chiral, that is to say, structurally identical but not superimposable,

35min

Your PC might need an update to fight ‘Foreshadow’

A newly discovered processor vulnerability could potentially put secure information at risk in any Intel-based PC manufactured since 2008. It could affect users who rely on a digital lockbox feature known as Intel Software Guard Extensions, or SGX, as well as those who use common cloud-based services. “As long as users install the update, they’ll be fine.” Researchers identified the SGX security

35min

NASA sees Tropical Storm Bebinca still near Hainan Island

Tropical Storm Bebinca continues to rain on Hainan Island, China and has been doing so for days. On Aug. 15, when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead it captured a visible image of the storm.

36min

NASA satellite image Tropical Depression Hector elongating, weakening

Tropical Depression Hector is being torn apart in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. On Aug. 15, 2018, when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead it captured a visible image of the storm as the final bulletin on the system was issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

36min

NASA catches Tropical Depression Leepi nearing landfall

Tropical Depression Leepi was nearing landfall in southern South Korea on Aug. 15, when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead.

36min

The origin of off-taste in onions

Chopping onions is usually associated with watery and stinging eyes. But after the onions are diced and the tears are dried, the vegetable pieces can sometimes develop an unpleasant bitter taste. Now, one group reports in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that they have identified previously unknown compounds causing this off-taste.

36min

Magnetic antiparticles offer new horizons for information technologies

Nanosized magnetic particles called skyrmions are considered highly promising candidates for new data storage and information technologies. Now, physicists have revealed new behaviour involving the antiparticle equivalent of skyrmions in a ferromagnetic material. The researchers demonstrated their findings using advanced computer simulations that can accurately model magnetic properties of nanomet

36min

Our perceived birth status can affect our adult relationships

Birth status and knowledge about it play a role not only in parents' but also children's lives — affecting their attachment and mental representation into adulthood.

36min

Protein droplets keep neurons at the ready and immune system in balance

Discoveries by two HHMI investigators show how proteins that organize into liquid droplets inside cells make certain biological functions possible.

36min

World's oldest cheese found in Egyptian tomb

Aging usually improves the flavor of cheese, but that's not why some very old cheese discovered in an Egyptian tomb is drawing attention. Instead, it's thought to be the most ancient solid cheese ever found, according to a study published in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry.

36min

Study of greater Yellowstone pronghorn finds highway crossing structures a conservation success

A recently published study by scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Oregon State University has confirmed that efforts to protect migrating pronghorn by installing wildlife crossing structures over highways have succeeded, in terms of the increased success rate of pronghorn crossings over time.

36min

An Entirely New Type of Antidepressant Targets Postpartum Depression

The steroid drug is intended to help women who suffer from the hormone-driven condition — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

37min

Superkøling gør skibe billigst til transport af fisk

Rapport: Skibe kan erstatte 4.500 vogntog med fisk uden at bruge mere tid. Det vil give en samfundsgevinst på næsten en milliard kroner.

40min

Models Map City Residents’ Aversion to Pollution

Models Map City Residents’ Aversion to Pollution New theoretical models help urban planners understand how residents think about clean air. Visualizing-a-City.jpg Image credits: Gorodenkoff via Shutterstock Earth Wednesday, August 15, 2018 – 10:30 Jennifer Leman, Contributor (Inside Science) — Imagine the perfect city: It’s clean, the schools are excellent and crime is low. Constructing this fla

40min

Fishing quotas upended by nuclear DNA analysis

For decades, mitochondrial DNA analysis has been the dominant method used to make decisions about fishing quotas, culling, hunting quotas, or translocating animals from one population of a threatened species to another.

41min

Warmer ocean, warmer winter Eurasian climate

A vigorous and continuous rise in sea surface temperature (SST) and land surface temperature has been caused by increasing greenhouse gas concentrations during the last century. Several studies have suggested that the direct response of land temperature to radiative forcing is much smaller than the response to SST anomalies induced by radiative forcing. The importance of oceanic warming in climate

41min

Scientists discover organic acid in a protoplanetary disk

An international team of scientists from Russia, Germany, Italy, the U.S. and France has discovered a relatively high concentration of formic acid in a protoplanetary disk. This is the first organic molecule found in protoplanetary disks containing two oxygen atoms.

41min

Scientists discover compound which targets cancer cells that lack the protective p53 'guardian gene'

A new chemical compound with the potential to destroy hard-to-treat cancer cells has been developed and tested by scientists at the University of Huddersfield.

41min

Hole-based artificial atoms could be key to spin-based qubit

A UNSW study published this week resolves key challenges in creation of hole-based artificial atoms, with excellent potential for more-stable, faster, more scalable quantum computing.

41min

Effective material developed to prevent post-surgical adhesion

Researchers have investigated a novel Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) that provides a barrier to prevent adhesions in post-operative complications. This has the potential to avoid the need for a second surgery to remove the adhesions.

45min

Predicting landslide boundaries two weeks before they happen

Researchers have developed a software tool that uses applied mathematics and big data analytics to predict the boundary of where a landslide will occur, two weeks in advance.

45min

Magnetic antiparticles offer new horizons for information technologies

Computer simulations reveal new behavior of antiskyrmions in gradually increased electric currents.

50min

My counterpart determines my behavior

Whether individuals grow up in a working-class environment or in an academic household, they take on behaviors that are typical for their class — so goes the hypothesis. The Frankfurt social-psychologist Dr. Anna Lisa Aydin has found new evidence to support this hypothesis. Her study also shows, however, that people don't just rigidly exhibit class-specific behavior, but respond flexibly to count

50min

A molecular switch may serve as new target point for cancer and diabetes therapies

If certain signaling cascades are misregulated, diseases like cancer, obesity and diabetes may occur. A mechanism recently discovered by scientists at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin and at the University of Geneva has a crucial influence on such signaling cascades and may be an important key for the future development of therapies against these diseases

50min

Compound discovered that targets cancer cells lacking the protective p53 'guardian gene'

Developed and tested at the University of Huddersfield, the compound, containing ruthenium, is attracted to the vulnerable cancer cells, whilst leaving healthy cells untouched.

50min

Elephants Have a Secret Weapon Against Cancer

In 2012, on a whim, Vincent Lynch decided to search the genome of the African elephant to see if it had extra anti-cancer genes. Cancers happen when cells build up mutations in their DNA that allow them to grow and divide uncontrollably. Bigger animals, whose bodies comprise more cells, should therefore have a higher risk of cancer. This is true within species: On average, taller humans are more

52min

Forget the bling: High status-signaling deters new friendships

When it comes to making new friends, status symbols actually repel people from making friends with us, according to new research published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

53min

New research predicts landslide boundaries two weeks before they happen

University of Melbourne researchers have developed a software tool that uses applied mathematics and big data analytics to predict the boundary of where a landslide will occur, two weeks in advance.

53min

Lipid droplets do a lot more than store fat

Lipid droplets—long thought to be not much more than formless blobs of fat—actually play critical roles in the life cycles of certain proteins involved in gene expression, researchers say. A new study in eLife , which describes how lipid droplets regulate proteins, has implications for understanding what helps embryos survive and could lead us to reconsider how we look at lipid-related diseases l

57min

Can radar replace stethoscopes?

Along with a white coat, a stethoscope is the hallmark of doctors everywhere. Stethoscopes are used to diagnose the noises produced by the heart and lungs. Used in the conventional way, vibrations from the surface of the body are transmitted to a membrane in the chest-piece and then to the user's eardrum where they are perceived as sounds. Acoustic stethoscopes are comparatively inexpensive and ha

1h

Cultivating microtissues to replace animal testing

For the replacement of animal testing with alternatives in medical research, complex microtissues need to be cultivated. Researchers from Empa have developed a special polymer scaffold for three-dimensional cell cultures. Light beams act as signposts for the cells.

1h

1h

New Research about Eating, Sleeping, Eliminating and Snuggling

Recent research looks at basic bodily functions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Industry Trumps Peer-Reviewed Science at EPA

Critics outraged over changes to chemical-safety review guidelines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Cykelbranchen hilser fælles test af elcykler velkommen

Den tyske interesseorganisation Zweirad-Industrie-Verband har udviklet en standardiseret test af elcykler, som de håber bliver industristandard.

1h

Forget the bling: High status-signaling deters new friendships

When it comes to making new friends, status symbols actually repel people from making friends with us, according to new research published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

1h

Scientists found that wheat growing season lengths change significant due to crop management measure

An examination of changes in crop phenology is critical for guiding regional agricultural activities in attempts to adapt to climate change. A recent research discloses the spatiotemporal differentiation of changes in wheat phenology and attribution analysis in China.

1h

Male tobacco smokers have brain-wide reduction of CB1 receptors

Chronic, frequent tobacco smokers have a decreased number of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, the 'pot receptor', when compared with non-smokers, reports a study in Biological Psychiatry.

1h

A review of prevalent methods for automatic skin lesion diagnosis

The three prevalent skin cancers, according to the literature are melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

1h

The Catch Game: Do You Know Wild Bill?

Crewmen Nick, Tim, and Spencer face off, with "Wild" Bill at the helm. Who really knows Bill best? Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCat

1h

Why war evolved to be a man's game – and why that's only now changing

One pattern characterises every war that's ever been fought. Frontline fighting in warfare is primarily and often almost exclusively a male activity. From a numbers perspective, bigger armies obviously have greater chances of success in battles. Why then, are half of a community's potential warriors (the women) usually absent from the battlefield?

1h

Newly discovered cytoskeleton helps cancer cells survive

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a cytoskeleton which provides the structure for mitochondria, the cell's energy producers. The skeleton is necessary for the function of the mitochondria, but the researchers also found that cancer cells utilise the skeleton to maintain their cellular respiratory ability – and thereby to survive.

1h

Hard work could be detrimental to your well-being and your career

The old saying that "hard work pays off" may be a thing of the past following evidence from a new study that reveals working too hard not just predicts poor well-being, but also poor career-related outcomes.

1h

What do physicists mean when they talk about nothing?

Philosophers have debated the nature of "nothing" for thousands of years, but what has modern science got to say about it? In an interview with The Conversation, Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal and Emeritus Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Cambridge, explains that when physicists talk about nothing, they mean empty space (vacuum). This may sound straightforward, but exper

1h

Faster way to make mineral to remove carbon dioxide from atmosphere

Scientists have developed an accelerated way to produce magnesite, a mineral which can capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, at room temperature. Removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere would slow global warming. This work takes a different approach to existing processes, and may make it economically viable, but it is at an early stage and is not yet an industrial proc

1h

A molecular switch may serve as new target point for cancer and diabetes therapies

If certain signaling cascades are misregulated, diseases like cancer, obesity and diabetes may occur. A mechanism recently discovered by scientists at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin and at the University of Geneva has a crucial influence on such signaling cascades and may be an important key for the future development of therapies against these diseases

1h

How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

,Every day there are roughly 386,000 new mouths to feed, and in that same 24 hours, scientists estimate between one and 100 species will go extinct. That's it. Lost forever.

1h

When Academics Defend Colleagues Accused of Harassment

A famed professor. A student claiming they were sexually harassed. A months-long internal investigation. Many of the particulars of the case against Avital Ronell, a professor of German and Comparative Literature at New York University who an internal investigation found responsible for sexually harassing Nimrod Reitman, a former graduate student of hers, are familiar. Reitman accuses Ronell of k

1h

New research predicts landslide boundaries two weeks before they happen

University of Melbourne researchers have developed a software tool that uses applied mathematics and big data analytics to predict the boundary of where a landslide will occur, two weeks in advance.

1h

Taking a deep look: a near infrared fluorescent dye for long term bioimaging

A team of researchers at Nagoya University, RIKEN and Ehime University has succeeded in developing a photostable fluorescent labeling agent that allows long term bioimaging of living cells in the near infrared region. This new fluorescent probe has demonstrated its use for long term single molecule, multicolor and 3D deep imaging.

1h

Evidence suggests global warming might have a negative impact on some government workers

A team of researchers affiliated with MIT and Harvard University has found evidence suggesting that as the planet heats up, the performance of some government workers might be negatively impacted. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Nick Obradovich, Dustin Tingley and Iyad Rahwan describe their study of data related to police officer and food inspector perf

1h

Why there's been a boom in discovering new species despite a biodiversity crisis

Something of a boom in the discovery of new species is taking place right now. It is so significant that some say it is similar to the period of the 18th and 19th centuries when European naturalists ventured into newly discovered lands and brought back an astonishing number of exotic new plants and animals. But how can this be so when species worldwide are disappearing at unprecedented rates?

1h

Indonesia earthquake—how scrap tyres could stop buildings collapsing

At the time of writing, 436 people have died following an earthquake in the Indonesian island of Lombok. A further 2,500 people have been hospitalised with serious injuries and over 270,000 people have been displaced.

1h

Scientists are developing greener plastics – the bigger challenge is moving them from lab to market

Synthetic plastics have made many aspect of modern life cheaper, safer and more convenient. However, we have failed to figure out how to get rid of them after we use them.

1h

Inexpensive test can lead to higher college graduation rates

Students who pass one or more College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests in high school or college are more likely to earn a postsecondary degree, according to research published as a Georgia State University W.J. Usery Workplace Research Group working paper.

1h

Why we're watching the giant Australian cuttlefish

Australia is home to the world's only known site where cuttlefish gather to mate en masse.

1h

Maya rituals unearthed

Deep in the untamed lowlands, we search for artifacts buried under hundreds of years of sediment. We are excavating two ancient Maya sites nestled in the sacred landscape of Cara Blanca in central Belize. Both date to A.D. 800-900, when prolonged and severe droughts struck this region, disrupting the daily life of the Maya.

1h

How to cut queues at immigration – with maths

When going on holiday to a foreign country, there's one part of the journey that everybody dreads: border control. Everyone has to have their passport checked by an immigration official when entering a new country – and even when leaving some – so queues are almost inevitable.

1h

U.S. $23 trillion will be lost if temperatures rise four degrees by 2100

Imagine something similar to the Great Depression of 1929 hitting the world, but this time it never ends.

1h

Three reasons companies are being proactive about climate change

For business leaders, climate change is not uncertain or in the future, but part of their everyday decision making in the here and now, says Professor Daniel Vermeer.

1h

State-of-the-art solar panel recycling plant

The German engineering company Geltz Umwelt-Technologie has successfully developed an advanced recycling plant for obsolete or ageing solar panels.

1h

European aquaculture to benefit from a better quality of live feed

The aquaculture sector is growing, with fish farming being a key way to ensure Europe gets the quality food it needs without exploiting marine resources further. One key problem the industry faces is how to get the immature fish though their first few months – one EU project may be about to smooth the way.

1h

Smart consumption management system for energy-efficient industrial companies

Energy use in industrial buildings continues to skyrocket, contributing to the negative impact on global warming and Earth's natural resources. An EU initiative introduced a disruptive system that's able to reduce electricity consumption in the industrial sector.

1h

Revealing the retina: Graphene corneal contact lens provides robust, irritation-free topographic electroretinography

Our vision can be damaged or lost by damage to the retina—a sensory membrane lining the back of the eye that senses light, converting the image formed into electrochemical neuronal signals—resulting from two classes of medical conditions: a number of inherited degenerative conditions—including retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone dystrophy, and Usher Syndrome—as well as diabeti

1h

NUS study: RUNX proteins act as regulators in DNA repair

A study by researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore has revealed that RUNX proteins are regulators in efficient DNA repair via the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway.

1h

Password managers vulnerable to insider hacking

A new study shows that communication channels between different parts and pieces of computer software are prone to security breaches. Anyone with access to a shared computer — co-workers, family members, or guests — can attack or involuntarily subject it to security breaches.

1h

3-D inks that can be erased selectively

3-D printing by direct laser writing enables production of micro-meter-sized structures for many applications, from biomedicine to microelectronics to optical metamaterials. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed 3-D inks that can be erased selectively. This allows specific degradation and reassembly of highly precise structures on the micrometer and nanometer sc

1h

Effective material developed to prevent post-surgical adhesion

In a paper published in TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers have investigated a novel Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) that provides a barrier to prevent adhesions in post-operative complications. This has the potential to avoid the need for a second surgery to remove the adhesions.

1h

Chips, light and coding moves the front line in beating bacteria

The never-ending fight against bacteria has taken a turn in humanity's favor with the announcement of a tool that could give the upper hand in drug research.

1h

Maze runners and square dancers: Cytosolic diffusion of nanosized objects in mammalian cells

Cells are complex, multi-compartmentalized entities of matter enclosed with a variety of membrane-bound organelles ranging from the microscale (µm) down to the nanoscale (nm) in diameter. These structures intermingle in a crowded aqueous phase known as the cytoplasm, within which diffusion deviates from Brownian motion. Understanding the concept of "cell crowding" and the impact on intracellular m

1h

How ugly marital spats might open the door to disease

Married people who fight nastily are more likely to suffer from leaky guts — a problem that unleashes bacteria into the blood and can drive up disease-causing inflammation, new research suggests.

2h

Molecular switch detects metals in the environment

Researchers have designed a family of molecules capable of binding to metal ions present in its environment and providing an easily detectable light signal during binding. This new type of sensor forms a 3D structure whose molecules consist of a ring and two luminescent arms that emit a particular type of light in a process called circular polarized luminescence, and detect ions, such as sodium.

2h

Eating breakfast burns more carbs during exercise and accelerates metabolism for next meal

New research suggests that eating breakfast could 'prime' the body to burn carbohydrates during exercise and more rapidly metabolize foods after working out.

2h

Climate models predict the world will be 'anomalously warm' until 2022

The next four years are going to be anomalously warm – even on top of regular climate change. That's according to new research my colleague Sybren Drijfhout and I have just published.

2h

Six things to know about Florida red tide

Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency due to Florida red tide in seven counties, including Charlotte, Collier, Lee, Manatee, Monroe, Pinellas and Sarasota counties. Florida red tide blooms have struck the state's west coast, leaving discolored, smelly water and dead wildlife in its wake. The governor's actions mobilize available funding and resources to address the impacts of the harmf

2h

Neutron stars may hold an answer to neutron puzzle on Earth

According to University of Illinois physicist Douglas H. Beck, "Neutrons play some unusual roles in our world. Free neutrons decay in about 900 s but, bound in nuclei, they are stable and make up somewhat more than half the mass of the visible universe."

2h

Why sea level rise varies from place to place

The impact of global sea level rise varies regionally, thanks to these factors.

2h

As waters rise, coastal megacities like Mumbai face catastrophe

For coastal megacities like Mumbai, rising seas and weather chaos linked with climate change threaten economic and social disaster.

2h

Alternativet vil udbrede natur og kultur på recept

Alternativet har fremlagt en ny regeringsplan, der bl.a. indeholder et Sundheds- og Forebyggelsesministerium, hvor en opgave bliver at udbrede kultur og natur på recept.

2h

Fælder støjsignal håbet om superledning ved stuetemperatur?

Indiske forskere mener at have fundet vejen til superledning ved stuetemperatur. Amerikansk kollega kommer med en forundring, der vækker minder om fysikkens største svindelsag i dette århundrede.

2h

Unusual doughnut-shaped jet observed in the galaxy NGC 6109

Astronomers from the University of Bristol, U.K., have uncovered an unusual doughnut-shaped jet in the radio galaxy NGC 6109. It is the first time that such a jet morphology has been observed in a low-power radio galaxy. The finding is detailed in a paper published August 6 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

2h

Arctic seabird populations respond to climate change

Seabirds such as gulls can be key indicators of environmental change as their populations respond to shifts in their ocean habitat over time. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances investigates how several species have responded to changing environmental conditions in the Arctic over the last four decades. The authors find that a warming ocean is directly and indirectly affecting seabir

2h

A near-infrared fluorescent dye for long term bioimaging

A group of chemists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University, has developed a new near infrared (NIR) emitting photostable fluorescent dye PREX 710 (photo-resistant xanthene dye which can be excited at 710 nanometers) to have uses ranging from long term single molecule imaging to in vivo deep imaging, according to a study reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie

2h

Captain's Spotlight: Jake Anderson, Part 3 | Deadliest Catch

From a homeless addict to skipper in a matter of years, Jake Anderson has seen and done it all. From broken boats to broken spirits, he's faced it head-on, and emerged triumphant as a successful leader and family man. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://ww

2h

Password managers vulnerable to insider hacking

A new study shows that communication channels between different parts and pieces of computer software are prone to security breaches. Anyone with access to a shared computer – co-workers, family members, or guests – can attack or involuntarily subject it to security breaches.

2h

Mapping the universe in 3-D

In 1998, scientists discovered that the universe's expansion is accelerating. Physicists don't know how or why the universe is accelerating outward, but they gave the mysterious force behind this phenomenon a name: dark energy.

2h

Researchers suggest phonons may have mass and perhaps negative gravity

A trio of physicists with Columbia University is making waves with a new theory about phonons—they suggest they might have negative mass, and because of that, have negative gravity. Angelo Esposito, Rafael Krichevsky and Alberto Nicolis have written a paper to support their theory, including the math, and have uploaded it to the xrXiv preprint server.

2h

Arctic seabird populations respond to climate change

Seabirds such as gulls can be key indicators of environmental change as their populations respond to shifts in their ocean habitat over time. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances investigates how several species have responded to changing environmental conditions in the Arctic over the last four decades. The authors find that a warming ocean is directly and indirectly affecting seabir

2h

2h

We Need to Capture Carbon to Fight Climate Change

Grabbing CO2 as it exits smokestacks is key to fighting climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Chips, light and coding moves the front line in beating bacteria

A multidisciplinary study finds a way to examine biofilms with high efficiency.

2h

Discovery casts dark shadow on computer security

Two international teams of security researchers have uncovered Foreshadow, a new variant of the hardware vulnerability Meltdown announced earlier in the year, that can be exploited to bypass Intel Processors' secure regions to access memory and data.

2h

Mystery Russian satellite's behaviour raises alarm in US

Official says "there is no way to verify" what object is and whether or not it may pose a danger.

2h

Plasma Scientists Created Invisible, Whooping 'Whistlers' in a Lab

The strange radio bursts usually circle the Earth like electromagnetic ghosts, but scientists have now created and studied their shapes in a plasma chamber on Earth.

2h

Emergency hospital visits more common among most deprived bowel cancer patients

Bowel cancer patients living in the most deprived areas have up to 13 percent higher proportions of emergency hospital admissions before a diagnosis than patients living in the least deprived areas, according to a study funded by Cancer Research UK.

2h

Tablets and texts nudge parents to read to kids

Text messages that help parents set goals and offer follow-up reminders can double the time parents spend reading to their children, a new study shows. “Previous research has shown that reading to young children is associated with greater literacy and numeracy skill,” says Susan Mayer, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and one of the designers of the Parents

2h

Researchers unearth remarkable horse 'shoes'

Alex Meyer continues to be in awe of the treasure trove that is Vindolanda.

2h

Video: NASA's NICER does the space station twist

This time-lapse video, obtained June 8, 2018, shows the precise choreography of NASA's Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) as it studies pulsars and other X-ray sources from its perch aboard the International Space Station. NICER observes and tracks numerous sources each day, ranging from the star closest to the sun, Proxima Centauri, to X-ray sources in other galaxies. Movement in

2h

Equifax data breach—consumers heard about it but took little action

When the Equifax data breach impacting nearly 147 million people occurred just over a year ago most consumers took little to no action to protect themselves despite the risk of identity theft, University of Michigan researchers found.

2h

Carbon monoxide from California wildfires drifts east

California is being plagued by massive wildfires, and the effects on air quality from those fires can extend far beyond the state's borders. In addition to ash and smoke, fires release carbon monoxide into the atmosphere. Carbon monoxide is a pollutant that can persist in the atmosphere for about a month and can be transported great distances.

3h

Study shows competitive swimmer bodies consistent in morphology across race event lengths

A trio of researchers with Hunter College of the City University of New York has found that despite swimming in vastly different events, competitive swimmers tend to have the same body mass index (BMI). In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Christian Gagnon, Michael Steiper and Herman Pontzer describe their study of elite swimmer morphology and how it compared to elite ru

3h

The Candida Diet: Separating Fact from Fiction

You’ll find a confusing mix of true and false information about candida diet and nutrition online. Let’s sort fact from fiction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

22 klynger er nu registreret i almen praksis

De såkaldte kvalitetsklynger, der fremadrettet skal afløse akkrediteringen i almen praksis, er for alvor ved at få luft under vingerne. 22 klynger har registreret sig siden april.

3h

Praksislæge: Klyngerne har givet os medbestemmelsen tilbage

På Bornholm har 24 praksislæger dannet en kvalitetsklynge. De har været i gang med arbejdet siden foråret, og her glæder man sig over atter at have indflydelse på, hvordan kvaliteten i almen praksis skal styrkes

3h

Det integrerede energisystem er nøglen til at nå de energipolitiske målsætninger

Hvis Danmark skal være fri af fossile brændsler i 2050, kræver det, at energisystemet bliver fleksibelt og integrerer el, gas, fjernvarme og -køling, mener markedschef i Rambøll.

3h

Lakhta Center bliver Europas højeste skyskraber

Den russiske gas-gigant Gazproms nye hovedkvarter i Sankt Petersborg bliver snoet som en flamme – se billederne her.

3h

New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model the flow of air around the object by having a computer solve a complex set of equations—a procedure that usually takes hours, or even an entire day. Nobuyuki Umetani from Autodesk research (now at the University of Tokyo) and Bernd Bickel fr

3h

Parental life span predicts daughters living to 90 without chronic disease or disability

Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that women whose mothers lived to at least age 90 were more likely to also live to 90, free of serious diseases and disabilities.

3h

This one particle could solve five mega-mysteries of physics

Forget the Higgs: theorists have uncovered a missing link that explains dark matter, what happened in the big bang and more. Now they’re racing to find it

3h

Can an app replace your birth control? For most people, the answer is no.

Health Just make sure you know the facts. The Food and Drug Administration just approved the first software application for contraceptive use, called Natural Cycles, and it’s raising a lot of eyebrows.

3h

Elephants Revived a "Zombie" Gene that May Fend Off Cancer

DNA damage kick-starts what was once a defunct duplicated gene, which kills off injured cells.

3h

Your Tweets Can Help Map the Spread of Wildfire Smoke

Social media could help monitor air pollution that physical monitors miss.

3h

Back to School Sales on Laptops, Google Pixelbook, and other College Essentials

Ladies and gentlemen, step right up and get your student discounts!

3h

How 3-D Printing Exposes the Fallacy of Federal Gun Laws

Defense Distributed sparked a controversy that has little to do with 3-D printing and everything to do with the tiny hunk of metal that makes a gun a gun.

3h

Foot fossils suggest when primates went bipedal

Adaptations for bipedal walking in primates occurred as early as 4.4 million years ago, according to new research. The feet of primates function as grasping organs. But the adoption of bipedal locomotion—which reduces the ability to grasp—was a critical step in human evolution. The new study finds that in the process of adapting to bipedal walking, early hominin feet may have retained some graspi

3h

Image of the Day: Circularity

A marine flatworm swarms in a circular fashion off the coast of Guernsey.

3h

Remembering Bunji Tagawa

A look back at one of Scientific American’s most prolific illustrators and the racial injustice he endured — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

What Made Us Unique

How we became a different kind of animal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

India aims to send astronauts into space by 2022, Modi says

If successful, India would be fourth country to conduct manned space mission India will send an astronaut into space by 2022, the country’s prime minister has claimed during an annual independence day speech. Narendra Modi announced the target from the ramparts of the 370-year-old Red Fort in Delhi on Wednesday morning. “We have decided that by 2022, when India completes 75 years of independence,

3h

The Science Behind the Roundup Lawsuit

A jury has awarded a man $289 million for allegedly contracting cancer from exposure to Roundup, but the science is not on their side.

3h

DF vil af med Sundhedsplatformen

Dansk Folkepari vil skrotte det udskældte it-system i Region Hovedstaden og Sjælland og i stedet indføre et fælles system fra Systematic i hele landet.

3h

Floods close airport in Indian tourist hotspot of Kerala

Flights in and out of the Indian tourist hotspot of Kerala were cancelled for three days Wednesday as severe monsoon flooding ravaged the region.

3h

'Monster Hunter' on hold as China hits pause on new video games

China appears to have halted approvals of new online game licences, with reports Wednesday that a government shake-up was causing paralysis in the world's biggest gaming market.

3h

Danes to fence German border to stop boars with swine fever

Denmark will erect a 70-kilometer (43.4-mile) fence along the German border to stop wild boars from crossing, in the hope of preventing the spread of African swine fever, which can jeopardize the country's big pork industry.

3h

Kina censurerer 'forsiden på internettet'

Et kinesisk internet uden Facebook, Google, Instagram – og nu er Reddit også forsvundet.

3h

Study of ancient forefoot joints reveals bipedalism in hominins emerged early

The feet of primates function as grasping organs. But the adoption of bipedal locomotion – which reduces the ability to grasp – was a critical step in human evolution.

3h

Substances associated with bee ferocity reported

Brazilian researchers may have discovered why Africanized honeybees are so aggressive. The scientists detected higher levels of certain chemical substances in the brains of Africanized honeybees than in gentler strains of honeybees bred by beekeepers.

3h

Why war is a man's game

No sex differences in attitudes or abilities are needed to explain the near absence of women from the battlefield in ancient societies and throughout history, it could ultimately all be down to chance, say researchers at the University of St Andrews.

3h

LHC Physicists Embrace Brute-force Approach to Particle Hunt

The world’s most powerful particle collider has yet to turn up new physics—now some physicists are turning to a different strategy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

An Artist Discovered a Parasitic Worm in His Eye, Which He Said 'Guided' His Work

A striking painting called "The Host" is based on the artist's personal experience with a parasitic worm that he discovered in his eye.

4h

4h

Researchers assemble library of sugars

Sugar structures called GAGs are present in almost all tissues in the human body, and have important functions in various diseases. The understanding of these sugar structures is limited, because tools to study them have been lacking. Now, researchers from University of Copenhagen have assembled such a tool—a cellular library of sugars.

4h

Security gaps identified in internet protocol IPsec

In collaboration with colleagues from Opole University in Poland, researchers at Horst Görtz Institute for IT Security (HGI) at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that the internet protocol IPsec is vulnerable to attacks. The internet key exchange protocol IKEv1, which is part of the protocol family, has vulnerabilities that enable potential attackers to interfere with the communicati

4h

Four big targets in the cyber battle over the US ballot box

Here’s where hackers could strike the 2018 midterm elections

4h

How Sonos Is Building the Audio Internet

In an exclusive interview, Sonos' chief product officer Nick Millington charts the company’s history and hints at where it could go in the future—like outside your house.

4h

The Real Reason 'The Meg' Feasted at the Box Office

The shark flick went huge, while 'Slender Man' wasted away—because not all internet movies are made alike.

4h

A Guide to Finding Your Ideal Movie Ticket Subscription

MoviePass' latest offer isn't for everyone, but there are other options. Here's a guide to what's right for you.

4h

Bikinis and TED Talks: Can This All-Asian Competition Truly Disrupt Beauty Pageants?

Femaleness, Asian-ness, even beauty—the Miss Asian Global pageant aims to celebrate qualities that are often barriers in Silicon Valley. But can it transport its contestants from sexist trope to beyond the bamboo ceiling?

4h

Crazy Rich Asians Is a Breath of Fresh Air

The Young family of Crazy Rich Asians is, for lack of a better word, quite wealthy. They’re well-off. One might say they have oodles of money. There’s no ignoring the obvious here—the Youngs are absurdly rich, to the point where merely being close to them is exciting enough to serve as the premise of a major summer movie. Though Crazy Rich Asians is rightly being lauded for its groundbreaking nat

4h

A Cruel Epilogue to the Syrian Civil War

CHTAURA , Lebanon—Sitting on a bench in the shade of giant fir trees at a monastery in Lebanon’s Beqaa Valley, Yasmin, a 30-year-old Syrian refugee from the town of Daraya, recalled what her father told her back in the spring of 2011 when protests against the regime of Bashar al-Assad began. “Why should we use force when we have brains? Let’s resist peacefully,” he would tell Yasmin and her sibli

4h

Hackers are out to jeopardize your vote

Cyberattacks on the 2016 US election caused states to bolster the defenses of their voting systems. It hasn’t been enough, says the University of Michigan’s Alex Halderman.

4h

Why I Love International Diversity in the Lab

It makes me a better scientist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Plants Dominate the Planet's Biomass

About 80 percent of the Earth's biomass is plant life, with humans about equal to krill way down the heft chart. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

A Very Human Story: Why Our Species Is Special

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Footage suggests basking sharks use Scottish seas for courtship

Scientists collected footage showing basking sharks being "sociable" with each other off the coast of Mull.

4h

Intensivlæger har ingen tiltro til forbedringer i Sundhedsplatformen

Dansk Selskab for Anæstesiologi og Intensiv Medicin har drøftet udfordringerne med Sundhedsplatformen på de intensive afdelinger med Sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby. IT-systemet udgør en trussel mod patientsikkerheden, mener intensivlægerne, der ikke kan se nogen løsning på problemerne.

4h

Nordjysk Intel-lukning bekymrer ikke IDA

Med Intels nye planer om at lukke virksomhedens afdeling i Nordjylland står omkring 200 til at miste deres job. Formand for Ansattes Råd i IDA er dog ikke bekymret for de ansattes fremtidige jobmuligheder, hvis lukningen føres ud i livet.

4h

Can Talk Therapy Help People Who Are Unable to Experience Joy?

Researchers are developing new treatments for a depression symptom called anhedonia — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Derfor er sport et godt emne til visualiseringer

Skal du lære at lave visualiseringer, kan du lige så godt starte med data, der interesserer dig. Sådan lyder rådet fra data visualisation manager Neil Richards, som deler ud af sine erfaringer med visualiseringer af sportsresultater.

5h

Model T definerede privatbilismen: Nu fylder den 110 år

Fords Model T blev begyndelsen på bilrevolutionen, der stadig præger vores transportvaner og byplanlægning den dag i dag.

5h

America's hottest export? Sperm

An American and a Danish company dominate the global sperm market – and both claim their supply is biggest Ella Rasmussen’s doctors started to prod her about children when she turned 30. She was single, suffered from endometriosis, and contemplated a hysterectomy. After several years, the nudges took hold. Because she wasn’t a good candidate to freeze only her eggs, she was advised to undergo IVF

5h

Republican Candidates Can’t Keep Trump Out of Their Districts

When Donald Trump told Sean Hannity not long ago that he was tanned, rested, and ready for the midterm-campaign trail—“I’ll go six or seven days a week when we’re 60 days out, and I will be campaigning for all of these great people that do have a difficult race”—the response from virtually all those candidates was silence. And who can blame them? A president saddled with a 39 percent approval rat

5h

FBI advarer: Fare for globalt hacker-kup mod pengeautomater

Indberetninger om et muligt million-kup på pengeautomater får FBI til at advare banker.

5h

Weird circles in the sky may be signs of a universe before ours

A theory suggesting that the universe is constantly reborn could be proved right by ‘Hawking points’ – signs of evaporated black holes from a time before the big bang

6h

Nordic Medicare vokser igen i Region Sjælland

Nordic Medicare overtager omkring 1100 patienter, efter at en praksislæge i Slagelse går på pension uden at kunne sælge sit ydernummer.

6h

Molecular switch detects metals in the environment

A team led by researchers from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, has designed a family of molecules capable of binding to metal ions present in its environment and providing an easily detectable light signal during binding. This new type of sensor forms a 3D structure whose molecules consist of a ring and two luminescent arms that emit a particular type of light in a process called circular p

6h

Restoring blood flow may be best option to save your life and limb

Amputation for severe blockages in the lower limbs has a lower survival rate than other treatment options that restore blood flow. Treatment options to restore blood flow to the lower limbs are less expensive than amputation.

6h

Encourage your kids to talk back – and set them up for life | Stuart Heritage

No more ‘speak when you’re spoken to’. Science shows discussions boost kids’ brain power – even if they talk nonsense The Journal of Neuroscience has published a study revealing the benefit of allowing children to discuss things with adults. MRI images of 40 children between the ages of four and six showed greater development of white matter linking Wernicke’s area and Broca’s area – the parts of

6h

Sæbe preller i stigende grad af på sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier

Ved for lav dosering af desinfektionsmidler udvikler stafylokokker på et dansk hospital modstandsdygtighed over for kemiske stoffer. Det viser ny forskning.

7h

Alert level raised for tiny volcanic isle in southern Japan

Japan raised alert levels on a small southern volcanic island on Wednesday, urging its 105 residents to prepare for an evacuation amid growing risks of an eruption.

7h

Podcasts take growing role in shifting media landscape

As radio fades in the new world of digital media, podcasting has become hot.

7h

Are all those fossils worth the fuss? | Elsa Panciroli

Researchers are encouraged to embrace the media to communicate their science. But are the sexy headlines at the expense of telling stories of real significance? Recently, I got into a heated discussion with a colleague who felt I’d written about a fossil discovery that was not worthy of attention. They believed the author was only interested in self-promotion and the fossil was of no scientific i

7h

Kenyan farmers toast growing demand European demand for avocados

It may be loved and derided as the go-to millennial brunch, but avocado toast is proving a boon for Kenyan farmers as they cash in on the seemingly ever-growing enthusiasm.

7h

In Ivory Coast, global rubber glut erases profits

"We're not earning anything from it any more, we have nothing," says a rubber farmer in Ivory Coast, Africa's top producer, where revenues from natural rubber have been slashed by global oversupply.

7h

Modi says India will send manned flight into space by 2022

India will send a manned flight into space by 2022, Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced Wednesday as part of India's independence day celebrations.

7h

Why taking ayahuasca is like having a near-death experience

A psychedelic drug produces effects similar to near-death experiences. The finding suggests changes to brain activity may explain such paranormal phenomena

8h

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