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Nyheder2018august17

 

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Why a Free Press Matters

America’s Founding Fathers, after breaking free from monarchical subjugation, were determined to construct a government of checks and balances on absolute concentrated power. So they created a federal system that differentiated between state and national control, as well as three branches of government with distinct powers and responsibilities that had to answer to one another. But, not satisfied

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Ny cykeltransmission har kun halvt så stor friktion som kæden

En dansk virksomhed har opfundet et nyt transmissionssystem til cykler, der i stedet for kæde og tandhjul bruger kuglelejer til at overføre kraft. Det giver 49 procent mindre friktion end de bedste kædesystemer på markedet.

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Study links mothers' pesticide levels with autism in children

A new study from The American Journal of Psychiatry finds that elevated pesticide levels in pregnant women are associated with an increased risk of autism among their children. The study examined levels of DDE (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene), a breakdown product of the pesticide DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). The odds of autism among children were significantly increased in mother

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LATEST

Luftforurening rammer børn hårdere end voksne

Tænk over, hvor du stiller barnevognen, siger professor. Børn udsættes nemlig for op til 60 procent mere luftforurening end voksne, viser forskning.

13min

Internet of Things technology can boost classroom learning and bridge gender divide

The use of Internet of Things devices in the classroom can have major educational benefits and appeal to both genders if designed and used in the right way, according to new research.

16min

Brain response study upends thinking about why practice speeds up motor reaction times

Researchers report that a computerized study of 36 healthy adult volunteers asked to repeat the same movement over and over became significantly faster when asked to repeat that movement on demand — a result that occurred not because they anticipated the movement, but because of an as yet unknown mechanism that prepared their brains to replicate the same action.

16min

Using mushrooms as a prebiotic may help improve glucose regulation

Eating white button mushrooms can create subtle shifts in the microbial community in the gut, which could improve the regulation of glucose in the liver, according to a team of researchers. They also suggest that better understanding this connection between mushrooms and gut microbes in mice could one day pave the way for new diabetes treatments and prevention strategies for people.

16min

Trilobites: Trapped in 99-Million-Year-Old Amber, a Beetle With Pilfered Pollen

The discovery is among the strongest evidence in the fossil record that the insects pollinated prehistoric cycads, a plant that preceded flowering plants.

16min

Reorganization of USDA Research Offices Concerns Scientists

The plan would move two scientific branches out of Washington, DC, by 2019.

18min

Phantom Smells Affect More Noses Than You Think

That whiff of rotten egg could just be your nose playing tricks on you.

48min

Working memory might be more flexible than previously thought

Breaking with the long-held idea that working memory has fixed limits, a new study suggests that these limits adapt themselves to the task that one is performing.

52min

A unique combination of catalysts opens doors to making useful compounds

Researchers have developed a new method that aids in the process of making valuable compounds by using a unique combination of catalysts.

52min

New manufacturing technique could improve common problem in printing technology

A new manufacturing technique developed by researchers from Binghamton University, State University at New York may be able to avoid the "coffee ring" effect that plagues inkjet printers.

52min

Female mosquitoes get choosy quickly to offset invasions

Certain female mosquitoes quickly evolve more selective mating behavior when faced with existential threats from other invasive mosquito species, with concurrent changes to certain genetic regions, according to new research from North Carolina State University. The findings shed light on the genetics behind insect mating behavior and could have implications for controlling mosquito pests that plag

52min

The male fish who eat their eggs because they want better babies

When male barred-chin blenny fish are unimpressed by their latest batch of offspring, they often eat them so they can start a new family as soon as possible

58min

In 1968, scientists tried taming hurricanes

For over 20 years, the U.S. government tried to subdue hurricanes through cloud seeding, with mixed results.

59min

New manufacturing technique could improve common problem in printing technology

A new manufacturing technique developed by researchers from Binghamton University, State University at New York may be able to avoid the 'coffee ring' effect that plagues inkjet printers.

59min

ShareBackup could keep data in the fast lane

Rice University engineers develop ShareBackup, a hardware and software solution to help data centers recover from failures without slowing applications.

59min

Most wear-resistant metal alloy in the world engineered at Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia's materials science team has engineered a platinum-gold alloy believed to be the most wear-resistant metal in the world. It's 100 times more durable than high-strength steel, making it the first alloy, or combination of metals, in the same class as diamond and sapphire, nature's most wear-resistant materials.

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‘Functional Fingerprint’ May Identify Brains Over a Lifetime

Michaela Cordova , a research associate and lab manager at Oregon Health and Science University, begins by “de-metaling”: removing rings, watches, gadgets and other sources of metal, double-checking her pockets for overlooked objects that could, in her words, “fly in.” Then she enters the scanning room, raises and lowers the bed, and waves a head coil in the general direction of the viewing windo

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This Scientist Chases Wildfires to Better Predict Fire Behavior

To know what a wildfire might do next, researchers need to know how an inferno interacts with the atmosphere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Before and After Aretha

To be a popular artist is, generally, to bend yourself into whatever form the public demands of you. As audiences, we have tortured such gorgeous majesties out of our artists, coaxing them into unrecognizable shapes to satisfy our ever-shifting appetites and prejudices. Those contortions are more elaborate for people of color, practically byzantine for women, and downright murderous for black wom

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Study: The eyes may have it, an early sign of Parkinson's disease

The eyes may be a window to the brain for people with early Parkinson's disease. People with the disease gradually lose brain cells that produce dopamine, a substance that helps control movement. Now a new study has found that the thinning of the retina, the lining of nerve cells in the back of the eye, is linked to the loss of such brain cells.

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Patients with healthcare-associated infections suffer social, emotional pain

The consequences of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) reach well beyond patients' physical health, souring social relationships, and leading some healthcare providers (HCP) to distance themselves from affected patients, according to a qualitative, systematic review published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Con

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New aid to help identify and manage patients with diabetes at increased risk of fracture

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) Bone & Diabetes Working Group has published 'Diagnosis and management of bone fragility in diabetes: an emerging challenge' an expert review that summarizes key research, highlights clinical issues, and provides a helpful 'decision-tree' style algorithm for the identification and management of diabetic patients at increased fracture risk.

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A unique combination of catalysts opens doors to making useful compounds

All organisms rely on chemical reactions in order to make various natural products. Chemical reactions can be caused by a number of catalysts, such as enzymatic or chemical catalysts. Researchers have developed a new method that aids in the process of making valuable compounds by using a new catalytic method that combines enzymatic catalysts with photocatalysts.

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Female mosquitoes get choosy quickly to offset invasions

Certain female mosquitoes quickly evolve more selective mating behavior when faced with existential threats from other invasive mosquito species, with concurrent changes to certain genetic regions, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

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Autism and DDT: What One Million Pregnancies Can–and Can't–Reveal

Analysis finds that prenatal exposure to the pesticide is associated with a higher risk of severe autism with intellectual impairment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Opinion: Consumer DNA Testing Is Crossing into Unethical Territories

Data don’t support many direct-to-consumer products, from telomere assessments to bespoke diets based on genetic sequences.

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Coming out at work is not a one-off event

For many LGBTIQ+ workers coming out is a never-ending process. A recent study in the UK shows coming out at work is still a problem. Our research, to be launched in Sydney on August 27, supports this finding and further unpacks the reasons for these continuing difficulties.

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Prashant Rao Named Global Editor of The Atlantic

As The Atlantic continues to expand internationally, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today the hire of Prashant Rao as The Atlantic’s new global editor, based in London. Rao joins The Atlantic from The New York Times, where for the past three years he has written and edited stories about business, economics, and finance in Europe. In a memo to staff announcing Rao’s hire, Goldberg and

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Photos: The Queen of Soul's Amazing Career

The legendary soul singer, pianist, and performer Aretha Franklin died on Thursday, surrounded by family and friends, at the age of 76. The Queen of Soul will be remembered for countless songs and performances throughout her life, and is eloquently memorialized here by our own Spencer Kornhaber. Below, a collection of images of Franklin’s amazing career, spanning the past five decades.

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Trump vil gøre asbest 'great again'

Med nye regler er det lykkedes USA's præsident Donald Trump at åbne for brugen af asbest i USA. Leverandøren er russiske Uralasbest, der nu sætter Trumps portræt på sine produkter.

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How gene hunting changed the culture of science

A new report finds that 15 years after the end of the Human Genome Project, which mapped the human genetic blueprint, the project is still making news because it forever changed the way scientists work. Among the findings, the literature published by teams of scientists fared better than those published by single authors.

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What are rare earth elements? Four questions answered

Most Americans use rare earth elements every day – without knowing it, or knowing anything about what they do. That could change, as these unusual materials are becoming a focal point in the escalating trade war between the U.S. and China.

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A mega-journal is launching for African science and will transform it

A new journal for Africa's scientific researchers is about to makes its debut. It could be a game changer for the continent, says Curtis Abraham

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Oil palm: few areas in Africa reconcile high yields and primate protection

An international research team, including scientists from CIRAD and the European Commission Joint Research Centre, has assessed the potential impact on primates of the expansion of oil palm cultivation in Africa. The authors of the study combined information on land suitability for oil palm cultivation with primate distribution, diversity and vulnerability. They concluded that it will be very diff

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Blood test may identify gestational diabetes risk in first trimester, NIH study indicates

A blood test conducted as early as the 10th week of pregnancy may help identify women at risk for gestational diabetes, a pregnancy-related condition that poses potentially serious health risks for mothers and infants, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.

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Expecting to learn: Language acquisition in toddlers improved by predictable situations

Two year-old children were taught novel words in predictable and unpredictable situations. Children learned words significantly better in predictable situations.

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Newly identified role for inhibition in cerebellar plasticity and behavior

Researchers at MPFI have discovered part of the answer to this longstanding question: How do our brains turn the motor errors we make into meaningful and reliable learning? Uncovering a surprising new role for inhibition in the cerebellum, regulating how and when motor learning is acquired in the cerebellum, Dr. Christie's team has broadened the current understanding of neural computation and prov

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Cells agree: What doesn't kill you makes you stronger

Brief exposures to stressors can be beneficial by prompting cells to trigger sustained production of antioxidants, molecules that help get rid of toxic cellular buildup related to normal metabolism — findings with potential relevance for age-related diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease.

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YouTube is source of misinformation on plastic surgery, Rutgers study finds

In the first study to evaluate YouTube videos on facial plastic surgery procedures, Rutgers University researchers found that most are misleading marketing campaigns posted by non-qualified medical professionals.

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Ancient beetle discovery gives clue to gymnosperm pollination

Scientists from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology reported a new mid-Cretaceous (99-million-year-old) boganiid beetle with specialized pollen feeding adaptations. This discovery suggests an ancient origin for beetle pollination of cycads long before the rise of flowering plants.

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Quality of YouTube videos for facial plastics information

YouTube videos are a popular resource for facial plastics information. However, a new research letter that evaluated the quality of some of those videos suggests they can present biased information, offer an unbalanced assessment of risks and benefits, and be unclear about the qualifications of the practitioners featured.

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How common among US adults is the perception of a phantom odor?

The perception of phantom odors is a condition in which individuals think they smell odors that don't actually exist. Anecdotal reports suggest it can be a debilitating condition, with the odors often described as foul, rotten or chemical. A new observational study estimates 6.5 percent of US adults 40 and older perceive phantom smells. The study included about 7,400 adults who participated in the

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That stinks! 1 American in 15 smells odors that aren't there

A new study finds that one in 15 Americans (or 6.5 percent) over the age of 40 experiences phantom odors. The study, published in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, is the first in the US to use nationally representative data to examine the prevalence of and risk factors for phantom odor perception. The study could inform future research aiming to unlock the mysteries of phantom odors.

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'Traffic wardens' of cells can be counterproductive

A research team from the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência and the Centre for Biomedical Research/University of Algarve, found that a mechanism of cell division control can be associated with an increase of errors in chromosomes distribution. This process can influence the development of diseases, such as cancer, infertility and some congenital disorders. The study will be published on Aug. 16 in th

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How people use, and lose, preexisting biases to make decisions

From love and politics to health and finances, humans can sometimes make decisions that appear irrational, or dictated by an existing bias or belief. But a new study from Columbia University neuroscientists uncovers a surprisingly rational feature of the human brain: a previously held bias can be set aside so that the brain can apply logical, mathematical reasoning to the decision at hand.

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Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion

Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Aug. 16 have found an unexpected difference between men and women. On average, their studies show, men pick up on visual motion significantly faster than women do.

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99-million-year-old beetle trapped in amber served as pollinator to evergreen cycads

Flowering plants are well known for their special relationship to the insects and other animals that serve as their pollinators. But, before the rise of angiosperms, another group of unusual evergreen gymnosperms, known as cycads, may have been the first insect-pollinated plants. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Aug. 16 have uncovered the earliest definitive fossil evid

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There isn't one kind of 'good sperm' – it depends on other qualities in the male

In a study published in Behavioral Ecology researchers from Uppsala University show that the same type of sperm is not always the best for all male birds. Depending on how attractive or dominant you are you might be more successful with longer or shorter sperm.

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Trees are migrating west to escape climate change

Nexus Media News Go west, young sapling. Climate change is creating tough living conditions for certain species of trees. So they're moving westward to cope.

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RUNX proteins act as regulators in DNA repair

A study has revealed that RUNX proteins are regulators in efficient DNA repair via the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway.

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Restoring blood flow may be best option to save your life and limb

Amputation for severe blockages in the lower limbs has a lower survival rate than other treatment options that restore blood flow. Treatment options to restore blood flow to the lower limbs are less expensive than amputation.

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When mixing granular matter, order among disorder

Researchers find mixed and non-mixed regions among tumbled granular particles, providing a new understanding of how sand, concrete, and paint mix.

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Brain networks responsible for naming objects

Scientists have identified the brain networks that allow you to think of an object name and then verbalize that thought. The study represents a significant advance in the understanding of how the brain connects meaning to words and will help the planning of brain surgeries.

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Donald Trump's Space Force plans analysed by a sci-fi expert

The US leadership has plans to introduce a "US Space Force" by 2020. Already announced by president Donald Trump in June, US vice president Mike Pence outlined further details of the plan at a press conference on August 9. The Space Force, he said, would consist of an elite corps of soldiers trained to fight in space, and a space command that would design military strategies for warfare beyond the

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Trilobites: Paternity Tests at the Penguin House

New research challenges assumptions that some penguins mate for life, and suggests DNA testing is needed to avoid inbred captive populations.

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Key factor may be missing from models that predict disease outbreaks from climate change

New research from Indiana University suggests that computer models used to predict the spread of epidemics from climate change—such as crop blights or disease outbreaks—may not take into account an important factor in predicting their severity.

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Logging site slash removal may be boon for wild bees in managed forests

New research suggests the removal of timber harvest residue during harvesting may be a boon for wild bees, an important step toward better understanding the planet's top group of pollinators.

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No, You Shouldn't Get Plastic Surgery Advice from YouTube

An old adage with a modern spin says that you shouldn't believe everything you read on the internet. That especially goes for plastic surgery videos on YouTube.

2h

Scientists create antilaser for ultracold atoms condensate

An international team of scientists developed the world's first antilaser for nonlinear Bose-Einstein condensate of ultracold atoms. For the first time, scientists demonstrated that it is possible to absorb the selected signal completely, even though the nonlinear system makes it difficult to predict the waves behaviour. The results can be used to manipulate superfluid flows, create atomic lasers,

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Volcano eruptions at different latitudes impact sea surface temperature differently

Scientists investigate the different impacts of northern, tropical and southern volcanic eruptions on the tropical Pacific Sea Surface Temperature(SST). The results are useful for the mitigation and adaptation of climate change after volcanic eruptions and the associated socioeconomic impacts, and can also provide insight for understanding future SST changes induced by large volcanic eruptions.

2h

Brain response study upends thinking about why practice speeds up motor reaction times

Researchers in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that a computerized study of 36 healthy adult volunteers asked to repeat the same movement over and over became significantly faster when asked to repeat that movement on demand–a result that occurred not because they anticipated the movement, but because of an as yet unknown mechanism that prep

2h

Using mushrooms as a prebiotic may help improve glucose regulation

Eating white button mushrooms can create subtle shifts in the microbial community in the gut, which could improve the regulation of glucose in the liver, according to a team of researchers. They also suggest that better understanding this connection between mushrooms and gut microbes in mice could one day pave the way for new diabetes treatments and prevention strategies for people.

2h

Prenatal exposure to violence leads to increased toddler aggression toward mothers

Babies whose mothers experience interpersonal violence during pregnancy are more likely to exhibit aggression and defiance toward their mothers in toddlerhood, according to new research by Laura Miller-Graff and Jennifer Burke Lefever.

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Scientists Want to Fly an Armored Warplane into Hailstorms

Hail causes most thunderstorm-related damage and could become more common with warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Bird communities dwindle on New Mexico's Pajarito Plateau

Researchers have found declines in the number and diversity of bird populations at nine sites surveyed in northern New Mexico, where eight species vanished over time while others had considerably dropped.

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Most Americans accept genetic engineering of animals that benefits human health: study

Americans' views of possible uses of genetic engineering in animals vary depending on the mechanism and intended purpose of the technology, particularly the extent to which it would bring health benefits to humans, according to a new study released today by Pew Research Center.

2h

99-million-year-old beetle trapped in amber served as pollinator to evergreen cycads

Flowering plants are well known for their special relationship to the insects and other animals that serve as their pollinators. But, before the rise of angiosperms, another group of unusual evergreen gymnosperms, known as cycads, may have been the first insect-pollinated plants. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 16 have uncovered the earliest definitive fossil ev

2h

AI for code encourages collaborative, open scientific discovery

We have seen significant recent progress in pattern analysis and machine intelligence applied to images, audio and video signals, and natural language text, but not as much applied to another artifact produced by people: computer program source code. In a paper to be presented at the FEED Workshop at KDD 2018, we showcase a system that makes progress towards the semantic analysis of code. By doing

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'Traffic wardens' of cells can be counterproductive

A research team led by Raquel Oliveira (IGC) and Rui Gonçalo Martinho (CBMR/ UAlg), found that a mechanism of cell division control can be associated with an increase of errors in chromosome distribution. This process can influence the development of diseases such as cancer, infertility and some congenital disorders. The study will be published on the 16th of August in Current Biology.

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Scientists show that cells adapt to brief stressors by boosting antioxidants and energy production longer term

We've all heard the expression: "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger." Now, research led by a Salk Institute scientist suggests why, at a cellular level, this might be true. The team reports that brief exposures to stressors can be beneficial by prompting the cell to trigger sustained production of antioxidants, molecules that help get rid of toxic cellular buildup related to normal metabolis

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Fossilized Beetle Is Earliest Evidence of Insect Pollinator

A 99-million-year-old beetle preserved in amber alongside grains of pollen likely pollinated prehistoric plants.

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What a scrapyard in Ghana can teach us about innovation | DK Osseo-Asare

In Agbogbloshie, a community in Accra, Ghana, people descend on a scrapyard to mine electronic waste for recyclable materials. Without formal training, these urban miners often teach themselves the workings of electronics by taking them apart and putting them together again. Designer DK Osseo-Asare wondered: What would happen if we connected these self-taught techies with students and young profes

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Super-resolution microscope reveals secrets of deadly Nipah virus

The deadly Nipah virus and others like it assemble themselves in a much more haphazard manner than previously thought, new UBC research has found. The discovery could allow scientists to develop more effective vaccines and rule out many approaches to fighting these viruses.

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What lonely snails can tell us about the effects of stress on memory

In numerous different animals, cognitive ability, including learning and memory, is often negatively affected by stress. But not all individuals of a particular species are equally good at cognitive tasks to begin with, and they respond to the effects of stress in different ways.

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Study tracks inner workings of the brain with new biosensor

An international team of scientists have taken an important step towards gaining a better understanding of the brain's inner workings, including the molecular processes that could play a role in neurological disorders.

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Oort clouds around other stars should be visible in the cosmic microwave background

For decades, scientists have theorized that beyond the edge of the solar system, at a distance of up to 50,000 AU (0.79 ly) from the sun, there lies a massive cloud of icy planetesimals known as the Oort Cloud. Named in honor of Dutch astronomer Jan Oort, this cloud is believed to be where long-term comets originate from. However, to date, no direct evidence has been provided to confirm the Oort C

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Elephants’ anti-cancer trick is discovered

Geneticists figure out how elephants keep from getting cancer in line with Peto’s paradox. They revive a dead gene, and this “zombie” gene kills cancerous cells. Read More

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These maps show how much range America’s wild animals have lost

There’s nothing natural about our environment, and these maps offer a glimpse of what’s been lost – or rather, destroyed – by previous generations. Read More

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Is there a cure for pessimism?

Researchers at MIT believe they might have located the neural regions responsible for pessimism. Read More

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Scientists Crack Spaghetti Snapping Mystery

Scientists Crack Spaghetti Snapping Mystery Researchers found that adding a full twist made it possible to break spaghetti in half. Spaghetti.jpg Image credits: ugurv via Shutterstock Physics Thursday, August 16, 2018 – 10:30 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — It is nearly impossible to snap a dry spaghetti noodle neatly in two — a challenge that has confounded pasta-loving researc

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Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), physicist Professor Thomas Schimmel and his team have developed a single-atom transistor, the smallest transistor in existence. This quantum electronics component switches electrical current by controlled repositioning of a single atom, now also in the solid state in a gel electrolyte. The single-atom transistor works at room temperature and consumes ver

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Research suggests bigger banks are worse for customers

Yet again this week, the Hayne Royal Commission has brought disturbing news of misconduct toward customers of our largest financial institutions. This time super accounts have been plundered for the benefit of shareholders.

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Why X-rays could become a lot more personal

X-rays could be about to change. Since its discovery at the end of the 19th century, the radiation has provided a window into the inner workings of the body, and later gave us the power to "see" inside everything from buildings to suitcases. But the technology has remained in principle the same: the rays are fired through whatever object is being inspected onto a fixed, rigid and usually small det

2h

Image: Australian antenna ready to hear Aeolus' first words

Measuring 4.5 metres across, this relatively small antenna in Australia, dubbed NNO-2, will be the first to hear from the soon-to-be-launched Aeolus satellite, the first ever to measure winds on Earth from Space.

2h

Arctic seabird populations respond to climate change

Seabirds such as gulls can be key indicators of environmental change as their populations respond to shifts in their ocean habitat over time. A new study investigates how several species have responded to changing environmental conditions in the Arctic over the last four decades. The authors find that a warming ocean is directly and indirectly affecting seabird populations in Alaska.

2h

Computer security: Processor vulnerability can be exploited to access memory

Two international teams of security researchers have uncovered Foreshadow, a new variant of the hardware vulnerability Meltdown announced earlier in the year, that can be exploited to bypass Intel processors' secure regions to access memory and data.

2h

Protecting trees from imported pests

New research unravels the dynamics of tree production, economics and variability in demand to show how to reduce the risks of importing such damaging forest pests and diseases as oak processionary moth and ash dieback.

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Common Wifi can detect weapons, bombs and chemicals in bags

Ordinary WiFi can easily detect weapons, bombs and explosive chemicals in bags at museums, stadiums, theme parks, schools and other public venues, according to a new study. The researchers' suspicious object detection system is easy to set up, reduces security screening costs and avoids invading privacy such as when screeners open and inspect bags, backpacks and luggage. Traditional screening typi

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Chips, light and coding moves the front line in beating bacteria

A multidisciplinary study finds a way to examine biofilms with high efficiency.

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First reliable estimates of highly radioactive cesium-rich microparticles released by Fukushima disaster

Scientists have for the first time been able to estimate the amount of radioactive cesium-rich microparticles released by the disaster at the Fukushima power plant in 2011. This work hsd significant health and environmental implications.

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Lipid droplets play crucial roles beyond fat storage

Lipid droplets were long thought of merely as formless blobs of fat. But a new study describes how lipid droplets regulate certain proteins involved in gene expression. The research has implications for understanding what helps embryos survive and how we look at lipid-related diseases like obesity.

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The Women Who Gave Trump the White House Could Tip the Midterms to Democrats

When Donald Trump this week publicly disparaged his former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman as a “dog,” he crystallized again the belligerent style and volatile behavior that has exposed Republican candidates in November to the risk of a crushing backlash among women. The most important unanswered question for the midterm election may be how far that backlash extends among the women whose prepondera

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Bio-based plastics can reduce waste, but only if we invest in both making and getting rid of them

With news that companies like Starbucks, Hyatt and Marriott have agreed to ban plastic straws, it's a fitting time to consider the role of plastic in our daily lives. Plastics are an often overlooked modern wonder – cheap and multipurpose substances that can be fashioned into myriad products.

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Amazon River pirating water from neighboring Rio Orinoco

The Amazon River is slowly stealing a 40,000-square-kilometer (25,000-square-mile) drainage basin from the upper Orinoco River, according to new research suggesting this may not be the first time the world's largest river has expanded its territory by poaching from a neighbor. The rare conjunction could help researchers understand how river systems evolve and how the Amazon Basin grew to dominate

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Regular old WiFi spots dangerous objects in bags

It’s possible to use ordinary WiFi to detect weapons, bombs, and explosive chemicals in bags at places like stadiums, theme parks, schools, and other public venues, research shows. The researchers’ suspicious object detection system is easy to set up, reduces security screening costs, and avoids invading privacy such as when screeners open and inspect bags, backpacks, and luggage. Traditional scr

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China & UK scientists find coarse resolution models underestimate future Mei-yu rainfall

China and UK scientists investigated the effect of model resolution on the mei-yu rainfall projection using the Hadley Centre's latest climate model, HadGEM3-GC2. The investigation highlights the need of high resolution models in future climate change projections.

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There's no place like home: study finds home care effective for patients with blood clots

Study finds that patients with low-risk blood clots may be better off receiving treatment at home versus being admitted to the hospital.

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Retinoic acid may improve immune response against melanoma

University of Colorado Cancer Center clinical trial results describe a promising strategy to remove one of melanoma's most powerful defenses: By adding retinoic acid to standard-of-care treatment, researchers were able to turn off myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that turn off the immune system, leading to more immune system activity directed at melanoma.

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Working memory might be more flexible than previously thought

Breaking with the long-held idea that working memory has fixed limits, a new study by researchers at Uppsala University and New York University suggests that these limits adapt themselves to the task that one is performing. The results are presented in the scientific journal eLife.

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Exercise shown to improve symptoms of patients with chronic kidney disease

Leicester's Hospitals and University of Leicester lead research into CKD.

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Cardiovascular disease related to type 2 diabetes can be reduced significantly

Properly composed treatment and refraining from cigarette consumption can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease resulting from type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine. In some cases, the increased risks could theoretically be eliminated.

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Children put on by robots

Can robots induce the same social influence and peer pressure as hu-mans do? A new study shows that children adopt a false claim when this is expressed by a group of robots.

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Scientists discover new method of diagnosing cancer with malaria protein

In a spectacular new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a method of diagnosing a broad range of cancers at their early stages by utilising a particular malaria protein, which sticks to cancer cells in blood samples. The researchers hope that this method can be used in cancer screenings in the near future.

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Rubbish-collecting crows a star attraction at French theme park

Visitors to a theme park in western France this week have a new attraction to enjoy: six crows that have been specially trained to pick up cigarette ends and rubbish.

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Kroger begins testing driverless grocery deliveriesNuro Kroger Arizona

Kroger will begin testing grocery deliveries using driverless cars outside of Phoenix.

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Bayer presses on with Monsanto integration as stock suffers

German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer said Thursday it would finally begin integrating US seeds and pesticides maker Monsanto into its business, after meeting competition authorities' final conditions for the merger.

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Opinion: Time to re-think the climate change challenge

The climate change challenge has fallen into a familiar pattern – more research papers on climate change, another COP (Conference of the Parties) meeting, more pledges by the world's governments to do something, continuing rises in greenhouse gas emissions, worsening extreme weather events, and so on and so on.

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Remembering the Incomparable Aretha Franklin

A song gets changed by who sings it both because of how they sing and who they are. As Aretha Franklin proved again and again, in that transformation lies an art form as important as any. The legendary singer, who died Thursday at 76, leaves behind the definitive testament to the capabilities of the human voice: its wide-ranging potential as sound, of course, but also as communication, as identit

2h

Video-on-demand and the myth of 'endless choice'

If you like independent, art-house films or other specialised movies, you may have heard of the Romanian comedy-drama Sieranevada, which was released in 2016. The film was formally premiered as part of the main competition programme of the prestigious Cannes Film Festival and was subsequently shown at other international film festivals, including Toronto, New York and London.

2h

What Paris shows us about the history of photography

Imagine a photo of Paris you've seen before, whether it's the Eiffel Tower or an urchin carrying a baguette. Have you ever considered the story behind that picture—why it was taken, and why it's in circulation today?

2h

Physicists suggest reversible adjustment of nanoparticles emission colour

Researchers have found a method of reversibly adjusting the radiation color of nanosized light sources. Previously, radiation color could be specified only during nanoparticle synthesis, but now it can be changed after synthesis. Stability and electromagnetic resonances of the particles are retained during this adjustment. This makes them promising for optical chips, LEDs and optoelectronic device

2h

Pioneering study predicts true impact of roadkill on wildlife

A new tool that predicts which animal species are most at risk of dying on roads, and in which areas, could aid efforts to preserve global biodiversity.

2h

Internet of Things technology can boost classroom learning and bridge gender divide

The use of Internet of Things devices in the classroom can have major educational benefits and appeal to both genders if designed and used in the right way.

2h

How sheds can help men stave off loneliness after retirement – according to our new research

When people hear the word shed, they may think about a rickety wooden building at the bottom of a garden crawling with spiders, filled with old paint tins, a lawnmower and out-of-date weedkiller. It has also been associated with the term "man cave" – a space where a man spends time on his own, tinkering with junk or avoiding his partner. But our new research found there was more to the humble shed

2h

Blood test for cancer uses sticky malaria protein

Researchers have come up with a new method of diagnosing cancer in its early stages in humans by way of a malaria protein—VAR2CSA—that sticks to cancer cells. All the scientists need to determine whether or not a person has cancer is a blood sample. Each year, cancer kills approximately nine million people worldwide, and early diagnosis is crucial to efficient treatment and survival. “…if there i

2h

Internet of Things technology can boost classroom learning and bridge gender divide

The use of Internet of Things devices in the classroom can have major educational benefits and appeal to both genders if designed and used in the right way, according to new research carried out by the University of Kent.

2h

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), physicist Professor Thomas Schimmel and his team have developed a single-atom transistor, the smallest transistor worldwide. This quantum electronics component switches electrical current by controlled repositioning of a single atom, now also in the solid state in a gel electrolyte. The single-atom transistor works at room temperature and consumes very l

2h

Resistance training and exercise-motivation go hand-in-hand

A recent study conducted in the University of Jyväskylä suggests that resistance training improves exercise motivation and contributes to making exercise planning among older adults. Exercise motivation and exercise self-efficacy are key factors in continuing resistance training.

2h

There is not one kind of 'good sperm' — it depends on other qualities in the male

In a study published in Behavioral Ecology researchers from Uppsala University show that the same type of sperm is not always the best for all male birds. Depending on how attractive or dominant you are you might be more successful with longer or shorter sperm.

2h

Most Americans accept genetic engineering of animals that benefits human health

Americans' views of possible uses of genetic engineering in animals vary depending on the mechanism and intended purpose of the technology, particularly the extent to which it would bring health benefits to humans.

2h

Individuals shot by police exhibit distinct patterns of recent prior hospitalizations and arrests

A new study finds that more than 50 percent of people with assault-related or legal intervention firearm injuries due to law enforcement actions and over 25 percent of individuals with self-inflicted or unintentional firearm injuries were arrested, hospitalized, or both in the two years prior to being shot.

2h

Corals on old North Sea oil rigs could help natural reefs recover

Not only are deep-sea coral ecosystems thriving on oil and gas rigs in the North Sea, their larvae may be helping repopulate damaged natural reefs

2h

It Was the Gatekeepers Who Failed

The consistently thought-provoking Damon Linker posits in his latest column that Western culture’s dominant view of technology rests on a lie: “the notion that the world would be a better place without gatekeepers.” Conventional wisdom holds that “if only the most powerful information-dissemination technologies ever devised were left open to all—unregulated, uncontrolled, ungoverned by authoritie

2h

Are Cities Making Animals Smarter?

T he goldfish were the first to vanish. Every so often, a few would go missing overnight from the office’s tiny outdoor pond. But goldfish were cheap, so no one in the building—an environmental nonprofit in the bustling, sweaty center of Colombo, Sri Lanka—bothered investigating. Then the dragon koi began to disappear. Lustrous and ethereal, each of these whiskered Japanese carp cost around 10,00

2h

Interactive software tool makes complex mold design simple

Most of the plastic objects we see are created using injection molding, but designing such molds is a difficult task, usually requiring experts. Now, computer scientists have created an interactive design tool that allows non-experts to create molds for an object of their choice. The software will be presented at this year's prestigious SIGGRAPH conference, as one of IST Austria's five successful

3h

Smart fluorescent dyes

Controlling the excited electronic states in luminescent systems remains a challenge in the development of fluorescent and phosphorescent dyes. Now, scientists in Japan have developed a unique organic fluorophore that changes its emission color without loss of efficiency when externally stimulated. The study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie explains this behavior by a simple phase transf

3h

Stress during pregnancy increases risk of mood disorders for female offspring

High maternal levels of the stress hormone cortisol during pregnancy increase anxious and depressive-like behaviors in female offspring at the age of 2, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry. The effect of elevated maternal cortisol on the negative offspring behavior appeared to result from patterns of stronger communication between brain regions important for sensory and emotion processing

3h

Discovery of a structurally 'inside-out' planetary nebula

The Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC) in Spain, the Laboratory for Space Research (LSR) of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), and an International team comprising scientists from Argentina, Mexico and Germany have discovered the unusual evolution of the central star of a planetary nebula in our Milky Way. This extraordinary discovery sheds light on the future evolution, and more imp

3h

Scientists create anti-laser for a condensate of ultracold atoms

An international team of scientists developed the world's first anti-laser for a nonlinear Bose-Einstein condensate of ultracold atoms. For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that it is possible to absorb the selected signal completely, even though the nonlinear system makes it difficult to predict the wave behaviour. The results can be used to manipulate superfluid flows, create atomic

3h

Image: Aurora observed from orbit

Ever wondered what auroras look like from space? Astronaut Alexander Gerst, also known as @Astro_Alex, gives us his bird's-eye view from aboard the International Space Station, tweeting that the experience is "[m]ind-blowing, every single time."

3h

Breaking down the barriers of human-computer communication

Many of us regularly ask our smartphones for directions or to play music without giving much thought to the technology that makes it all possible – we just want a quick, accurate response to our voice commands.

3h

Study shows courts tending to side with people impersonating, parodying via social media

Thirty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a satirical ad in Hustler magazine was not libelous against the Rev. Jerry Falwell and did not intentionally cause him emotional distress because no reasonable person would believe Falwell lost his virginity to his mother in an outhouse while drunk. The media landscape has changed a great deal since then, and court rulings have recently tended to

3h

Cathode material made from organic molecules enhances the green credentials of rechargeable batteries

Incorporating organic materials into lithium ion batteries could lower their cost and make them more environmentally friendly, A*STAR researchers have found. The team has developed an organic-based battery cathode that has significantly improved electrochemical performance compared to previous organic cathode materials. Crucially, the new material is also robust, remaining stable over thousands of

3h

Engineers create most wear-resistant metal alloy in the world

If you're ever unlucky enough to have a car with metal tires, you might consider a set made from a new alloy engineered at Sandia National Laboratories. You could skid—not drive, skid—around the Earth's equator 500 times before wearing out the tread.

3h

Suspects confess to crimes they didn't commit – here's why

Office clerk Stefan Kiszko spent 17 years in prison for the murder of schoolgirl Lesley Molseed in Rochdale in northwest England in 1975. Though he had confessed his guilt to the police at the time, evidence later proved he was innocent.

3h

Flexible color displays with microfluidics

A new study published on Microsystems and Nanoengineering by Kazuhiro Kobayashi and Hiroaki Onoe details the development of a flexible and reflective multicolor display system that does not require continued energy supply for color retention. The idea aims to find futuristic applications with sustainable color displays and replace existing electronic display signs currently used for multicolor mes

3h

10 tips for making LinkedIn useful, even if you already have a job

DIY Make the social network less soul-crushing. Many of us think of LinkedIn as the lamest social network. But that's because we're not using it to its full potential. Here are 10 tips to make LinkedIn work for…

3h

Discovery of a key protein involved in the development of autism

The protein CPEB4, which coordinates the expression of hundreds of genes required for neuronal activity, is altered in the brains of individuals with autism.

3h

Dominant men make decisions faster

Men who exhibit high social dominance make faster decisions than low-dominance men even outside a social context, finds a large behavioral study from EPFL.

3h

How do plants rest photosynthetic activity at night?

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have identified two proteins that allow plants to respond to changes in surrounding light conditions and thereby make photosynthesis more efficient.

3h

Getting warmer—understanding threats to ocean health

The global ocean covers 70 percent of our planet, makes Earth habitable, and contributes to economies, food supplies, and our health. Yet the ocean is increasingly threatened by the growing amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

3h

How virtual reality is giving the world's roller coasters a new twist

Roller coasters have been a popular attraction at theme and amusement parks around the world for more than a century. Whether it's at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida, in the US or the now-defunct Ratanga Junction in Cape Town, South Africa, these behemoths have a way of drawing the crowds.

3h

Global climate models for public health? Useful, but not in the way we think

A new paper in PLOS Medicine argues that climate change projections are often misused in health impact studies: they are best suited for shaping public health policies, not for triggering operational actions on the ground.

3h

Study on race and genetics finds Americans have nuanced understanding of race

Despite believing that race relations are getting worse, a majority of Americans agree that someone's racial identity is not hard-wired into their DNA, according to a new survey by Northwestern University's Center for the Study of Diversity and Democracy (CSDD), in collaboration with DNA testing company 23andMe.

3h

Forskere fastslår: Depression er en hjernelidelse

Nyt studie kortlægger 44 områder i arvemassen, der øger risikoen for depression. De nye fund betyder, at depression nu kan betegnes som en hjernelidelse, slår professor og medforfatter af studiet Thomas Werge fast.

3h

Flere patienter med bugspytkirtelkræft venter stadig for lang tid på operation

Nye tal fra Sundhedsstyrelsen viser, at fortsat flere patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen vælger at vente i længere tid på en operation på deres primære sygehus, i stedet for at tage imod et tilbud fra et andet sygehus.

3h

A simplified way to predict the function of microbial communities

In areas that flood frequently, microbial communities must adapt to repeated wet-dry cycles. Metabolic strategies help them survive, but these strategies can also influence nutrient cycling and atmospheric emissions from soils and sediments. An international team of scientists examined soils from rice paddies to understand how microbial communities function during floods. Their work suggests analy

3h

Gravitational wave detectors to search for dark matter

Gravitational wave detectors might be able to detect much more than gravitational waves. According to a new study, they could also potentially detect dark matter, if dark matter is composed of a particular kind of particle called a "dark photon." In the future, LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) scientists plan to implement a search for dark photons, which will include cert

3h

Kold vinter efter tørt efterår vil give tårnhøje elpriser

Depoterne ved de norske vandkraftværker er langt under gennemsnit. Kommer der ikke regn de næste tre måneder og en kold vinter, ryger elpriserne i vejret.

3h

Researchers discover key mechanism of DNA replication

Researchers from Osaka University in Japan have uncovered a key control mechanism of DNA replication with potential implications for better understanding how cells maintain genetic information to prevent diseases or cancer.

3h

India's excess fluoride in groundwater

Fluoride occurs naturally in groundwater. In small amounts, this is usually not a problem, but in India the concentration in many places exceeds the threshold at which is starts to present a health hazard. According to estimates by Eawag researchers, based on new computer models, more than a hundred million people are affected.

3h

Former 'Mars czar' reviews latest news on the red planet

Since June, we've heard major news about two indicators of possible life on Mars and become absorbed with the fate of the rover Opportunity, shrouded in one of the planet's global dust storms. We've also looked back on rover Curiosity's mission and forward to how humans may someday step foot on Mars. This flurry of activity has generated increased attention for Mars, and questions about where the

3h

Aboriginal traditions describe the complex motions of planets, the 'wandering stars' of the sky

(Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised that this story may contain images and voices of people who have died.)

3h

Walmart tried to make sustainability affordable—here's what happened

What a difference the birth of a granddaughter can make.

3h

Sprawling galaxy cluster found hiding in plain sight

MIT scientists have uncovered a sprawling new galaxy cluster hiding in plain sight. The cluster, which sits a mere 2.4 billion light years from Earth, is made up of hundreds of individual galaxies and surrounds an extremely active supermassive black hole, or quasar.

3h

Highly effective natural plant-based food preservative discovered

Scientists have discovered a plant-based food preservative that is more effective than artificial preservatives.

3h

Key mechanism of DNA replication discovered

Researchers have uncovered a key control mechanism of DNA replication with potential implications for better understanding how cells maintain genetic information to prevent diseases or cancer.

3h

Educational tracking creates artificial inequalities among students

New research shows the structure of educational tracking can lead evaluators to favor high over low socioeconomic status students in tracking decisions.

3h

Image: DLR's Rollin' Justin robot

This Friday 17 August, ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst will be directing this humanoid robot Rollin' Justin – based in the DLR German Aerospace Center establishment in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany – from aboard the International Space Station, flying at 28 800 km/h and 400 km above Earth.

3h

Similarities between the two gap phases of the cell cycle indicate a default biochemical program in living cells

The two 'gap' phases of the cell cycle were long thought to be under different regulatory control circuits, but a new study from A*STAR overturns this idea.

3h

Reconstructing skin on a chip

Microfluidics could fulfill a growing need for alternatives to animal testing for the development of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. A multidisciplinary team, led by Zhiping Wang from the A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, and Paul Bigliardi from the A*STAR Institute of Medical Biology, have produced a scalable credit-card sized device that simultaneously facilitates skin cell

3h

Model predicts polymer food packaging's propensity for absorbing aroma molecules from their contents

Your favorite foods and beverages could soon taste even better, thanks to new calculations developed at A*STAR. One significant source of flavor loss for food and beverage is from aroma molecules that are absorbed into the polymeric packaging materials used to store the products. Researchers have now developed a method to quickly predict aroma molecule absorption by packaging polymers.

3h

This Ancient Mummy Is Older Than the Pharaohs

Mummification in ancient Egypt began 1,500 years earlier than once thought.

3h

Scientists turn to the quantum realm to improve energy transportation

Scientists based at the National Institute of Informatics in Tokyo, Japan, have designed a more efficient quantum transport system using a creative, yet counterintuitive solution.

3h

Super-resolution microscope reveals secrets of deadly Nipah virus

The deadly Nipah virus and others like it assemble themselves in a much more haphazard manner than previously thought, new UBC research has found. The discovery could allow scientists to develop more effective vaccines and rule out many approaches to fighting these viruses.

3h

These tags turn everyday objects into smart, connected devices

Engineers have developed printable metal tags that could be attached to plain objects, like water bottles, walls or doors, and turn them into 'smart' Internet of Things devices. The tags can also be fashioned into paper-thin control panels that can be used to remotely operate WiFi-connected speakers, smart lights and other smart home appliances. The metal tags are made from patterns of copper foil

3h

NTU scientists discover natural plant-based food preservative

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have discovered a plant-based food preservative that is more effective than artificial preservatives.

3h

Researchers reveal miscarriage cause, key cellular targets of potential drugs

UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered a gene mutation underlying hydrops fetalis — a fatal condition to fetuses due to fluid buildup in the space between organs. The proteins at the center of this finding have already been implicated in a number of diseases, opening avenues of potential drug discovery related to migraines, diabetes, osteoporosis, and other conditions.

3h

It's okay when you're not okay: A re-evaluation of resilience in adults

Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology closely examined a series of research studies on resilience in adults that report most people are unaffected by adversity. Psychologists Frank Infurna and Suniya Luthar discovered problems with how many of the studies were designed and how the data were analyzed. In a Clinical Psychology Review, the researchers explain the proble

3h

Logging site slash removal may be boon for wild bees in managed forests

New research suggests the removal of timber harvest residue during harvesting may be a boon for wild bees, an important step toward better understanding the planet's top group of pollinators.

3h

Efficient glycopeptide separation achieved by interfacially polymerized polymer particles

Researchers from the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (TIPC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed an emulsion interfacial polymerization approach to synthesize polymer particles with hydrophilic-hydrophobic heterostructured surfaces and two-dimensional Janus film actuators.

3h

Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics, study finds

It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries.

3h

Tiny ASTERIA satellite achieves a first for CubeSats

A miniature satellite called ASTERIA (Arcsecond Space Telescope Enabling Research in Astrophysics) has measured the transit of a previously-discovered super-Earth exoplanet, 55 Cancri e. This finding shows that miniature satellites, like ASTERIA, are capable of making of sensitive detections of exoplanets via the transit method.

3h

Tasmanian devils under new threat from cancer, research finds

A new study has shown that the Tasmanian devil is under severe threat from a newly emerged contagious cancer, Devil Facial Tumour 2 (DFT2), which could jeopardise its future in the wild.

3h

How the world came to be in the computer

For the world to be managed and organised using computers, it has to follow the digital logic of machines. Historian David Gugerli tells the story of this thrilling process of adaptation with marvellously entertaining flair.

3h

How to Become a Bush Pilot

Bush pilots need to land in conditions most other pilots consider impossible. If that wasn't enough, bush pilots must be ready to survive in the wilderness alone for days while waiting for help and fighting off wild animals. Stream Full Episodes of Hard to Kill: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/hard-to-kill/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://w

3h

Bugs Will Actually Make Your Next Phone Better

In everything from cameras to batteries, researchers are pursuing biomimicry—basically, copping nature’s secrets.

3h

'Dead Cells' Succeeds Where Its Competitors Fail

For a roguelike, *Dead Cells* is highly addicting. Thank sleek design and appreciation for the past for that.

3h

Researchers discover key mechanism of DNA replication

Researchers from Osaka University in Japan have uncovered a key control mechanism of DNA replication with potential implications for better understanding how cells maintain genetic information to prevent diseases or cancer.

4h

Microbial activity in the mouth may differentiate children with autism spectrum disorder

Research suggests that shifts in bacterial populations within a child's mouth could provide objective biomarkers for identifying autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings catalyze development of a novel, saliva-based panel to aid clinicians in earlier diagnosis of ASD. Five ratios of oral microbes distinguished ASD from typically developing children (79.5 percent accuracy), three distinguished

4h

Bird communities dwindle on New Mexico's Pajarito Plateau

Researchers have found declines in the number and diversity of bird populations at nine sites surveyed in northern New Mexico, where eight species vanished over time while others had considerably dropped.

4h

A way to get green revolution crops to be productive without needing so much nitrogen

A team of researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences in China and the University of Oxford in the U.K. has found a way to grow green revolution crops using less nitrogen with no reduction in yield. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their research efforts and the results they found when planting newly develope

4h

A Necessary Evil

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Red Light Cameras May Not Make Streets Safer

Fear of fines may fuel more sudden stops and rear-end accidents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Replacing your boss with a cruel robot could make you concentrate more

A mean robot watching over you increases your focus on the most important parts of a task more than a friendly robot or even no robot at all

4h

4h

First biomarker evidence of DDT-autism link

A study of more than 1 million pregnancies in Finland reports that elevated levels of a metabolite of the banned insecticide DDT in the blood of pregnant women are linked to increased risk for autism in the offspring. The study is the first to connect an insecticide with risk for autism using maternal biomarkers of exposure.

4h

Social position determines pregnant women's exposure to air pollution

A new study analyzes the urban exposome of 30,000 women in nine European cities.

4h

Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke may increase risk of adult lung disease death

A new study suggests that long-term exposure to secondhand smoke during childhood increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) death in adulthood.

4h

Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases

Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease.

4h

App that will extend your smartphone battery life

New research has found a novel method to extend the battery life of smartphones for up to an hour each day.

4h

Key factor may be missing from models that predict disease outbreaks from climate change

A study led by Indiana University suggests that computer models used to predict the spread of epidemics from climate change — such as crop blights or disease outbreaks — may not take into account an important factor in predicting their severity.

4h

Track, target, trigger: USU scientists explore controlled carbon monoxide release

Utah State University scientists have developed flavonoid-based, organic carbon monoxide-releasing molecules that exhibit CO release only when triggered by visible light. Using fluorescence microscopy, the researchers demonstrate targeted CO delivery by the photoCORMs to human lung cancer cells, as well as the ability of the molecules to produce anti-inflammatory effects.

4h

Study: immune cell dysfunction linked to photosensitivity

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have discovered that a type of immune cell known as Langerhans appears to play an important role in photosensitivity, an immune system reaction to sunlight that can trigger severe skin rashes.

4h

New drug target may curb cocaine relapse

A class of proteins with the potential to treat psychiatric and other diseases may also be effective in reducing relapse, or drug-seeking behaviors, a new preclinical study suggests. The paper in Biological Psychiatry reveals important new information about the molecular changes that occur in the brain when someone takes cocaine—and how to target these molecules to reduce drug-seeking behaviors d

4h

Rusland børster støvet af Sovjets enorme ekranoplan

Den russiske nordflåde skal have nye ekranoplan med krydsermissiler.

4h

US EPA's Chemical Assessment Guide Creates Contention

Scientists and advocacy groups criticize new guidelines that could exclude some academic studies during toxicity reviews.

4h

Ny blodprøve kan afsløre om du har kræft

Danske forskere har udviklet en unik metode til at opdage usædvanligt mange kræftformer.

4h

Measles cases aren't spiking, despite talk of an outbreak

Health 2018 has been a pretty normal year for the measles, actually. Multiple news outlets are reporting this week that there’s currently a measles outbreak of 107 people in 21 states. There’s just one problem: that’s not from one big…

4h

For women undergoing IVF, is fresh or frozen embryo transfer best?

IVF experts disagree about whether transferring a fresh or frozen embryo to a patient's womb offers the best opportunity for healthy babies. According to a study of almost 83,000 IVF patients published August 16 in the journal Fertility and Sterility, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. The best technique may vary, depending on how many eggs the patient produces.

4h

More than 2 billion people lack safe drinking water. That number will only grow.

By 2050, half the world’s population may no longer have safe water to drink or grow food. What then?

4h

Russian Satellite Is Behaving Oddly. But Is It a Space Weapon?

A Russian satellite that launched to Earth orbit last October has been behaving oddly, raising the possibility that the craft could be some sort of space weapon, a U.S. diplomat warned.

4h

There’s No Innocent Way to Ask Your Son or Daughter About Grandkids

This summer, my family has been spending a month at the beach. It’s been like a daydream come to life: bright days and languid evenings spent with family, including a sparkly 3-year-old and her serene new baby sister. My granddaughters. I started picturing—and pining for—this kind of family gathering, the three-generation kind that includes grandchildren, as my 60s loomed and my two daughters ent

4h

Tern Link A7 Review: Affordable and Foldable

If you’re on the fence about folding bikes, try this one.

4h

The Ever-Evolving Art of the Coming-Out Video

On YouTube, the personal moment has transformed from bare-bones confessional to something unabashedly public.

4h

Huge Cache of Magma Hidden Beneath California Supervolcano

Scientists detected 240 cubic miles of magma, enough for an enormous mega-explosion the likes of the supereruption that occurred 760,000 years ago.

5h

Image of the Day: Revved Up

Progesterone helps in the transportation of eggs within the mouse reproductive system.

5h

Meet the ‘climate kids’ suing the US government over global warming

They claim inaction on climate change has blighted their future – just one of many challenges now hitting the courts. And they might just succeed

5h

Why the US is worried a Russian satellite might be a space weapon

A Russian satellite has been getting closer to Earth without a clear reason and US officials are concerned that it could be a space weapon

5h

A drug’s weird side effect lets people control their dreams

Researchers have developed the most effective technique for lucid dreaming yet, and it may allow people to fulfil fantasies and overcome nightmares and phobias

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Overvågning, censur og droner: Etik får medarbejdere til at undgå tech-giganter

Nogle kandidater afviser jobtilbud fra Google, Amazon og andre større tech-firmaer, fordi de nægter at arbejde for selskaber, der bruger teknologi til at knægte menneskerettigheder eller sikre kunder overtaget i krig.

5h

Prize-Winning Images of the Brain

Check out this year’s winners of The Art of Neuroscience competition — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

How focusing on emotions helps diffuse political tension

Workshops focusing on intergroup emotions are showing how deeply-rooted beliefs can be changed to support conflict resolution.

5h

Noise in the biorhythm: biological clocks respond differently to light fluctuations

Anyone who has experienced jet lag knows the power of the biological clock. Almost all organisms, from humans to the smallest of bacteria, have a built-in system that tells them whether it is time to rest or to be active. Most biological clocks 'tick' autonomously, but some bacteria depend on light to synchronize their clock every day. Using mathematical calculations, researchers from AMOLF and th

5h

Controlling hole spin for future quantum spin-based devices, topological materials

The 'spins' of electrons (and holes) in semiconductors have potential applications in spintronics, spin-based quantum computing, and topological systems.

5h

The Alt-Right Doesn’t Need to Be Visible to Succeed

It’s tempting to mock last weekend’s Unite the Right rally as an abject failure. But doing so misunderstands how the group itself has been defining success for decades.

5h

Meet Santiago Siri, the Man With a Radical Plan for Blockchain Voting

A new movement says that crypto-voting can purify democracy—and eventually eliminate the need for governments altogether.

5h

Cryo-electron microscopy sheds new light on batteries

The interface of the solid anode and the liquid electrolyte plays a crucial role in the performance of a lithium-metal battery, but characterizing the processes that happen at that intersection has been a challenge.

5h

Chasing the Myth of Michael Jackson

In 1985, when the King of Pop was at the height of his fame and the beginning of his infamy, James Baldwin wrote that the “Michael Jackson cacophony is fascinating in that it is not about Jackson at all.” Tabloids, fans, and critics alike wondered of the entertainer: Is he asexual? How many surgeries has he had? Does he want to be white? Who is the real Michael Jackson? Is there a real Michael Ja

5h

Autism Risk May Increase If Child's Mother Has High DDT Exposure

Pregnant woman who have high levels of a byproduct from the banned insecticide DDT in their bodies may be more likely to have a child with autism, a new study finds.

6h

The “neuropolitics” consultants who hack voters’ brains

These experts say they can divine political preferences you can’t express from signals you don’t know you’re producing.

6h

Life after Drowning

Public health advocates have been coming up with ways to save people for centuries, and they continue to do so — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Forskere opdager ny metode til at diagnosticere kræft med malariaprotein

I et opsigtsvækkende, nyt studie har forskere fra Københavns Universitet fundet en metode…

6h

Meadow spittlebugs declining rapidly along the California coastline

Meadow spittlebugs, once very abundant on plants along the California coastline, are declining rapidly or vanishing from their previous habitats, according to ecologists Richard Karban and Mikaela Huntzinger of the University of California, Davis, co-authors of newly published research in the journal Ecology.

6h

The Government's Revealing Case Against Paul Manafort

ALEXANDRIA , Va.—The trial of President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort has been anything but sexy. A document-heavy, jargon-laden slog, the tax-and-bank-fraud case has disappointed many who expected bombshell testimony and allusions to a grand Trump-Russia conspiracy—but left the courthouse gossiping about $15,000 ostrich jackets and the extramarital affairs of Manafort’s e

6h

Are Blockchains the Answer for Secure Elections? Probably Not

As midterm political campaigns shift into full gear, start-ups are pushing for blockchain-based voting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Modulating photo- and electroluminescence in a stimuli-responsive molecular dye

Controlling the excited electronic states in luminescent systems remains a challenge in the development of fluorescent and phosphorescent dyes. Now, scientists in Japan have developed a unique organic fluorophore that changes its emission color without loss of efficiency when externally stimulated. The study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie explains this behavior by a simple phase transf

6h

The effect of social class on interpersonal relationships

Are people with more money and education dominating and less warm? A social-psychological study at Goethe University scrutinizes stereotypes.

6h

Effective material developed to prevent post-surgical adhesion

In a paper published in Technology, a group of researchers has investigated a novel polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) that provides a barrier to prevent adhesions in post-operative complications. This could prevent the need for a second surgery to remove the adhesions.

6h

Robotoperationer er bedre for lægernes skuldre, nakke og ben

Nyt studie fra Rigshospitalet viser, at læger, der bruger robotter til kirurgi, får markant mindre arbejdsbelastninger end ved traditionelle kikkertoperationer.

6h

Investor sagsøger amerikansk teleselskab efter SIM-svindel

AT&T sagsøges for 223,8 millioner dollars, efter kriminelle ifølge anklage fik adgang til konto gennem SIM-svindel.

6h

Track, target, trigger: Scientists explore controlled CO release

About four years ago, Utah State University chemist Lisa Berreau posed a question to USU colleague and toxicologist Abby Benninghoff.

6h

Imposter 'Fortnite' Android Apps Are Already Spreading Malware

New analysis from mobile security firm Lookout shows that malware authors are taking full advantage of 'Fortnite' ditching the Google Play Store.

6h

Saving Lives With Tech Amid Syria’s Endless Civil War

A band of activist-entrepreneurs is building a sensor network to warn when and where air strikes will hit—a constant threat under Bashar al-Assad's regime.

6h

Steve Bannon May Be Too Late to the Populist Party

It’s no secret Steve Bannon has his sights set on Europe. The former White House chief strategist announced last month that he would be moving to Brussels to start a new movement—a think tank called The Movement—to support Europe’s right-wing populist parties ahead of the European Parliament’s elections next spring. His goal, Bannon told the Daily Beast at the time, is to create a “supergroup” of

6h

Should US mothers be paid to donate placentas?

Pregnant women are incubating something that could prove hugely valuable to modern medicine and the global economy – and 99% of the time it’s being thrown away Birth is messy. It’s often not until you’re pregnant that you learn about the third stage of labor – the bit after the baby appears, when the mother pushes out the placenta that has provided life support for the previous nine months. In de

7h

Spørg Scientariet: Dræbte dankortterminalen min NFC-chip?

En læser har oplevet, at dankortet ’døde’ efter en episode med en fejlende kontaktløs betaling. Nets har et bud på, hvad der i virkeligheden skete.

7h

Reklamegigant undersøger datamuligheder: Vi kan blive en hub for bydata

AFA JCDecaux afsøger nye måder at indsamle og bruge data på. Et omfattende netværk af reklamestandere giver et unikt udgangspunkt, mener chef for internt startup.

7h

Sygehuse har svært at rekruttere ledende overlæger

Sundhedsvæsenet har seriøse udfordringer med at rekruttere ledende overlæger. »Overlæger er generelt den gruppe, der føler den laveste grad af ledelsesidentitet og i højere grad føler en faglig identitet,« lyder det fra headhunter.

7h

Færre og færre virksomheder producerer flere og flere køretøjer

På vegne af konkurrerende firmaer står én fabrikant i dag for hovedparten af al elektronik. Snart anvender Apple, Uber og Google de gamle bilproducenter til ligeledes at stå for produktionen for fremtidens biler, spår forskere.

7h

One of world's top urban forests threatened by tiny beetle

One of the world's largest urban forests is under threat from a tiny beetle.

7h

Endangered Green, Loggerhead turtles make comeback in Cyprus

For these ancient reptiles, a stretch of beach on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus has been their home for thousands of years.

7h

Italy collapse points to difficulties with aging bridges

The bridge that collapsed in the Italian port city of Genoa was considered a feat of engineering innovation when it was built five decades ago, but it came to require constant maintenance over the years. Its design is now being investigated as a possible contributor to its stunning collapse.

7h

Researchers Figure Out How To Break Spaghetti Into Only 2 Pieces

It's almost impossible to break a piece of dry spaghetti into exactly two pieces. Mathematicians at MIT have figured out how to do it. And all it takes is a twist.

7h

Scientists Race To Improve 'Living Drugs' To Fight Cancer

To outwit cancer, researchers are working on better ways to teach patients' immune system to root out and kill malignant cells. A promising approach involves cells that attack cancer two ways at once. (Image credit: Pearl Mak/NPR)

7h

China Is Going to Outrageous Lengths to Surveil Its Own Citizens

China has reportedly begun deploying flocks of drones disguised as birds to surveil its citizens. The drones have wings that flap so realistically they’re difficult to distinguish from actual birds. In fact, animals on the ground often can’t make the distinction, and even real birds in the sky sometimes fly alongside the drones. The robotic birds can mimic 90 percent of the movements of their bio

7h

The World Economic Forum warns that AI may destabilize the financial system

Increased use of machine learning and cloud services could make the financial world more vulnerable.

8h

Indokina blev flyttet flere hundrede kilometer ved geologisk sammenstød

Dansk-vietnamesisk forskergruppe bekræfter kontroversiel teori om dramatiske konsekvenser for 40 mio. år siden under Indiens sammenstød med Asien.

8h

Australia telecom giant Telstra flags tough times as profit slides

Australia's dominant telecommunications company Telstra Thursday warned of "enormous challenges" ahead as it posted an 8.9 percent slump in annual profit.

9h

#47 Udsendt del 2

I Stetoskopets andet program om at være udsendt som læge i verdens brændpunkter, møder vi fødselslæge Josephine Obel, der netop er vendt hjem fra Yemen.

9h

Lenovo posts first-quarter profit as recovery continues

Chinese technology giant Lenovo Thursday recorded a sharp rise in first quarter net profit as the company's turnaround gathered pace.

9h

Educational tracking creates artificial inequalities among students

In a series of studies, social psychologists show that educational tracking—grouping students based on their achievement levels—encourages evaluators to artificially create social class inequalities. Three studies reveal that evaluators consider a lower track more suitable for a low socioeconomic status (SES) pupil and a higher track more suitable for a high-SES pupil, even when school achievement

9h

Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases

Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.

9h

Vital US reservoir OK for now, but shortages are looming

A vital reservoir on the Colorado River will be able to meet the demands of Mexico and the U.S. Southwest for the next 13 months, but a looming shortage could trigger cutbacks as soon as the end of 2019, officials said Wednesday.

9h

What you should know about Florida's awful algae problem

Environment 5 questions answered. One of the longest-lasting red tide outbreaks in the state’s history is affecting more than 100 miles of beaches. Meanwhile, discharges of polluted fresh water from Lake…

10h

Lost Worlds wrapping up: cephalopods, mammophants and boob-shaped rocks

With the Science Blog Network closing, Mark Carnall reflects on his contributions to the Guardian’s Lost Worlds Revisited At the end of August, the Guardian Science Blog Network closes down. Taking a leaf from fellow Guardian science bloggers Jon Butterworth and Dean Burnett , consider this blog a wrap up of my short time writing with the Lost Worlds Revisited team. You know, like one of those fi

11h

Intelligens: Lemuren regner ud, at tusindben i numsen hjælper mod orm

Det er ikke ualmindeligt, at dyr finder medicin i naturen, men lemuren tager fænomenet til et nyt niveau.

11h

An opt-out organ donor system might actually lead to fewer transplants

England’s plans to make everyone an organ donor by default could make families less likely to give consent, perhaps leading to a fall in transplant operations

11h

Exposure to insecticide DDT linked to having a child with autism

Although DDT has been banned for decades in many countries, exposure to its breakdown products may be influencing whether mothers have autistic babies

11h

Capitalism can crack climate change. But only if it takes risks | Larry Elliott

Anglo-Saxon capitalism’s drive to maximise profits in the short term won’t save the planet. Perhaps the Chinese model can? This summer’s heatwave has provided a glimpse of the future, and it is not a pretty one. On current trends, the years to come will see rising temperatures , droughts , a fight to feed a growing population, and a race against time to reduce dependency on fossil fuels. The stru

12h

Report: Health Care Sharing Ministries pose risks to consumers and insurance markets

Health care sharing ministries are exempt from virtually all regulation, do not guarantee payment, and offer extremely limited coverage. Because their features closely resemble traditional insurance products, they can confuse consumers into thinking they are buying conventional health insurance.

12h

Forsinket opdatering af Sundhedsplatformen koster over 3 millioner kroner om måneden

Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland udskød for nylig en stor opdatering af Sundhedsplatformen med tre måneder. Det koster millioner i ekstern bistand.

12h

Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases

Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.

12h

Social position determines pregnant women's exposure to air pollution

A new study analyzes the urban exposome of 30,000 women in nine European cities.

12h

Opt-out organ donation register unlikely to increase number of donations

An opt-out organ donation register is unlikely to increase the number of donations, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

12h

Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke may increase risk of adult lung disease death

A new study suggests that long-term exposure to secondhand smoke during childhood increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) death in adulthood.

12h

Educational tracking creates artificial inequalities among students

New research shows the structure of educational tracking can lead evaluators to favor high over low socioeconomic status students in tracking decisions.

12h

First biomarker evidence of DDT-autism link

A study of more than 1 million pregnancies in Finland reports that elevated levels of a metabolite of the banned insecticide DDT in the blood of pregnant women are linked to increased risk for autism in the offspring. The study is the first to connect an insecticide with risk for autism using maternal biomarkers of exposure.

12h

Individuals shot by police exhibit distinct patterns of recent prior hospitalizations and arrests

A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that more than 50 percent of people with assault-related or legal intervention (LI) firearm injuries due to law enforcement actions and over 25 percent of individuals with self-inflicted or unintentional firearm injuries were arrested, hospitalized, or both in the two years prior to being shot. The study's findings contribute i

12h

Frequent fires make droughts harder for young trees, even in wet eastern forests

Forests in the eastern United States may have had it easy compared to their western counterparts, with the intense, prolonged droughts and wildfires that have become typical out west in recent years. But as the climate changes over time, eastern forests are also likely to experience longer droughts. And although wildfires are comparatively rare, prescriptive fires are increasingly used in the east

12h

How 5G connectivity and new technology could pave the way for self-driving cars

C-V2X enables vehicles to communicate, which should reduce accidents and aid autonomous driving.

13h

Widespread declines in life expectancy across high income countries coincide with rising young adult and midlife mortality in the United States

The ongoing opioid epidemic in the United States is a key contributor to the most recent declines in life expectancy, suggests a new study.

13h

Poor sleep triggers viral loneliness and social rejection

In a study of sleep-deprived versus well-rested individuals, researchers found that the brains of those lacking sufficient sleep exhibited heightened activity in areas that deal with perceived human threats and a shutdown of areas that encourage social interaction. People shown videos of sleep-deprived individuals felt more alienated, suggesting that antisocial feelings are contagious. This is the

13h

The secret behind cell revival revealed

Scientists identify essential genes for quiescent cells to switch back to dividing mode using fission yeast that may lead to new cancer therapies.

13h

Scientists discover chemical which can kill glioblastoma cells

Aggressive brain tumor cells taken from patients self-destructed after being exposed to a chemical in laboratory tests, researchers have shown.

13h

Varmeplaget supersygehus er bygget efter fortidige vejrdata: »Vi bliver udfordret, hvis der er somre med ekstremt vejr«

Det var udelukkende temperatur-data fra tidligere år, der blev benyttet, da man projekterede Det Nye Universitetshospital i Aarhus, siger projektdirektør. Det strider mod prognoser for fremtidens vejr og har allerede vist sig at være utilstrækkeligt.

13h

Prehistoric mummy reveals ancient Egyptian embalming 'recipe' was around for millennia

The ancient Egyptians developed sophisticated embalming treatments far earlier and across a wider geographical area than had been previously known, forensic tests on a well-known prehistoric mummy have revealed.

13h

Sydney rock oysters getting smaller as oceans become more acidic

NSW oysters are shrinking and fewer in number, and academics fear the cause is climate change The famous Sydney rock oyster is shrinking as oceans become more acidic, new research has found. In news that will rock seafood lovers, a study released overnight by academics in the UK found oysters in New South Wales have become smaller and fewer in number because of coastal acidification. Continue rea

13h

Elon Musk's Boring Company Is Planning a Tunnel to Dodger Stadium

The proposed 3.6-mile route would take fans from the metro to the parking lot, saving them from hellish Los Angeles traffic.

14h

Filmmaker Tony Kaye Casts Robot As Lead Actor In Next Feature

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

16h

The great unbundling: Will organized religion go the same way as cable TV?

What could religion learn from cable television? A surprising amount, seeing as the younger generations are turning away from both in huge numbers. Read More

16h

Some suicidal men find support on Reddit

New research illuminates how some men and boys who are contemplating suicide are finding emotional support in an unexpected place: Reddit. Responses to those posts often contained gendered language of their own, like, “Hey, bro, I’ve been through that before,” or, “What’s bothering you, man?” Sometimes referred to as the “front page of the internet,” Reddit is a social news aggregation and discus

17h

Prehistoric mummy reveals ancient Egyptian embalming 'recipe' was around for millennia

The ancient Egyptians developed sophisticated embalming treatments far earlier and across a wider geographical area than had been previously known, forensic tests on a well-known prehistoric mummy have revealed.

17h

Mapping the future direction for quantum research

The way research in quantum technology will be taken forward has been laid out in a revised roadmap for the field.Published today in the New Journal of Physics, leading European quantum researchers summarise the field's current status, and examine its challenges and goals.

17h

Study of material surrounding distant stars shows Earth's ingredients 'pretty normal'

The Earth's building blocks seem to be built from 'pretty normal' ingredients, according to researchers working with the world's most powerful telescopes. Scientists have measured the compositions of 18 different planetary systems from up to 456 light years away and compared them to ours, and found that many elements are present in similar proportions to those found on Earth. This will have implic

17h

How our brains predict where speedy objects will go

New research may explain why some people—like sports stars—anticipate and react to fast-moving objects much quicker than others. When Serena Williams returns a lightning-quick tennis serve—most of us marvel at her skill and speed. Considering what the human brain overcomes to make it happen, these kinds of feats are nothing short of miraculous. via GIPHY When we watch a moving object, such as a f

17h

Prehistoric mummy reveals ancient Egyptian embalming 'recipe' was around for millennia

It is the first time that extensive tests have been carried out on an intact prehistoric mummy, consolidating the researchers' previous findings that embalming was taking place 1,500 years earlier than previously accepted.

17h

Mapping the future direction for quantum research

The way research in quantum technology will be taken forward has been laid out in a revised roadmap for the field.

17h

Young people’s news choice may sway political activism

How young people select their news may make a difference in the way they participate in politics, new research suggests. For a new study, Sam Scovill, a doctoral student in sociology at the University of Arizona, examined three primary ways young people, ages 15-25, select what news they consume: They rely on conventional sources, such as newspapers and broadcast outlets in either the traditional

18h

The U.S. Must Engage With Russia

On my recent trip to Russia, I spent an hour with Mikhail Gorbachev. I told him that in the West we are grateful that he and President Ronald Reagan defied Cold War orthodoxy to significantly reduce our countries’ nuclear arms. And I asked him whether there was a moment in his life when he’d realized that he might shape history. He paused a moment and then recounted how as a young man, he had wat

18h

The Freedom of the Press Is Yours

The press, says the 45th president of the United States, is “very dangerous & sick.” It causes “great division & distrust.” It is the “enemy of the people.” Every president—starting with George Washington, who griped about his treatment at the hands of “infamous scribblers”—has felt maligned or misunderstood by the media. The rhetoric now emanating from the White House—remarkable in its ferocity,

18h

Kids who need help with social skills may learn best together

Children who need assistance improving their social skills might benefit more when grouped with peers who have similar social skill levels, rather than with peers who have a similar disability or disorder, according to new research. “We know that how you group children together in an intervention situation matters immensely,” says Janine Stichter, professor of special education at the College of

18h

Enzyme discovery may lead to new diabetes and obesity drugs

Discoveries about a special enzyme could pave the way for new drugs to treat diabetes and obesity, research shows. The study also finds, however, that certain existing cancer drugs meant to inhibit the enzyme don’t work as well as previously thought. Almost all medical treatments are based on drugs that inhibit the activity of proteins in the body leaving them unable to contribute to the developm

18h

Widespread declines in life expectancy across high income countries coincide with rising young adult and midlife mortality in the United States

The ongoing opioid epidemic in the United States is a key contributor to the most recent declines in life expectancy, suggests a study published by The BMJ today.

18h

The Atlantic Daily: Value in the Movement

What We’re Following Freedom of the Press: Donald Trump’s attacks on the media don’t only affect professional journalists, write The Atlantic ’s editors; rather, they’re attacks on the individual rights of all Americans. That’s because “the press is neither the enemy of the people nor its ally, but rather its possession.” Read the editorial. Long-Term War: Ongoing clashes between the Taliban and

18h

New fracking wells are using hundreds of times more water than their predecessors

Science The change between 2011 and 2018 is stark. Over the last few years, fracking operations have gotten more efficient at removing oil and natural gas from the ground—this according to a new study published today in…

18h

Study: Women peak at 18 on dating apps. Men peak at 50.

A new study used massive amounts of data from an online dating service to explore what makes someone desirable, and how people go about attracting partners online. Read More

18h

Robots have power to significantly influence children's opinions

Young children are significantly more likely than adults to have their opinions and decisions influenced by robots, according to new research.

18h

The exhilarating history of roller coaster photography

Technology Capturing thrill seekers through the ages. Photographing people on roller coasters has existed almost as long as the rides themselves.

18h

Photos: Cropmarks Reveal Traces of Lost Civilizations in England

Fields laden with cropmarks serve as a map for archeological finds.

19h

Heat Wave Reveals Cropmarks of Lost Civilizations in England

Dry conditions have revealed unknown archaeological sites hidden beneath England's fields.

19h

How Daquan Went From Homegrown Instagram Account to Modern Media Conglomerate

With more than 11 million followers, Daquan is on par with Instagram meme stalwarts like The Fat Jew and Fuck Jerry . The account’s posts have spread far and fast , and have attracted famous followers including Justin Bieber, Drake, the Weeknd, Kendall Jenner, and Kevin Hart. Its homespun memes— mostly Twitter screenshots about sports, pop culture, childhood nostalgia, family life, and other #rel

19h

The Ocean’s Cosmic Lessons

On the southernmost shore of Oaxaca lies the Punta Cometa peninsula, a rocky cape that juts out into the Pacific Ocean in the shape of a cowboy boot. It is a destination popular with tourists, who flock to the region for its spectacular views of the sunset. But to locals, Punta Cometa is known as Cerro Sagrado, or Sacred Hill. Here, people live and die by the rhythms of the sea—keenly attuned to

19h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Warning: Low Clearance

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said President Trump revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan, a critic of the president. Sanders added that the security clearances of other former officials are also being evaluated. Jurors heard closing arguments in the fraud trial of former Trump campaign

19h

In Photos: Response Teams Try To Save Starving Killer Whale

Teams in Washington and Canada are working together to save Scarlet, a starving 3-year-old killer whale.

19h

At Least Two Dozen People Overdosed in a Connecticut Park Today

Several dozen people overdosed within just hours of each other at a park in Connecticut today (Aug. 15), according to news reports.

19h

By Creating Habitats For Monarch Butterflies In Cities, Scientists Hope To Save Them

As summer draws to a close, conservationists are getting ready for the annual Monarch butterfly migration. One scientist thinks the best way to help the migration is to create more Monarch habitats in big cities.

19h

New pesticide may harm bees as much as those to be replaced

A new class of pesticides positioned to replace neonicotinoids may be just as harmful to crop-pollinating bees, researchers cautioned Wednesday.

19h

Old species learn new tricks…very slowly

No species lasts forever, and, just as the saying goes, it seems like old species may get stuck in their ways and can't adapt to environmental change as fast as younger species do.

19h

Particles pull last drops of oil from well water

Engineers develop magnetic nanoparticles that separate the last droplets of oil from produced water at wells.

19h

How many American cities protect the rights of employed breastfeeding mothers?

Research found that among the 151 largest cities in the United States, only Philadelphia and New York City have local legislation that protects a nursing mother who returns to work outside the home and who wants to continue breastfeeding.

19h

New HIV therapy reduces virus, boosts immunity in drug-resistant patients

A new HIV drug reduced viral replication and increased immune cells in individuals with advanced, drug-resistant HIV infection. Used in combination with existing HIV medications, the drug is a promising strategy for patients who have run out of effective treatment options, the researchers said.

19h

Researchers use green gold to rapidly detect and identify harmful bacteria

Researchers have developed a method to screen and identify harmful or antibiotic-resistant bacteria within one hour using a portable luminometer.

19h

Immune cells in the brain have surprising influence on sexual behavior

Immune cells usually ignored by neuroscientists appear to play an important role in determining whether an animal's sexual behavior will be more typical of a male or female.

19h

Healthy fat cells uncouple obesity from diabetes

Researchers have identified possible ways to uncouple obesity from co-morbidities such as heart disease and insulin resistance.

19h

Byproducts of 'junk DNA' implicated in cancer spread

Biologists have revealed that enhancer RNAs play a significant role in cancer dissemination. The researchers found that eRNAs have a direct role in the activation of genes that are important for tumor development. This role is facilitated by the ability of eRNAs to directly interact with BRD4, a protein known as a cancer disseminator. BRD4 has been recognized as a promising cancer target.

19h

SMURF1 provides targeted approach to preventing cocaine addiction relapse

A class of proteins that has generated significant interest for its potential to treat diseases, has for the first time, been shown to be effective in reducing relapse, or drug-seeking behaviors, in a preclinical study.

19h

Quantum material is promising 'ion conductor' for research, new technologies

Researchers have shown how to shuttle lithium ions back and forth into the crystal structure of a quantum material, representing a new avenue for research and potential applications in batteries, "smart windows" and brain-inspired computers containing artificial synapses.

19h

Tesla shares fall on reports of SEC subpoena

Shares of Tesla tumbled Wednesday following reports US securities regulators have subpoenaed the electric car maker's Chief Executive Elon Musk over his statements about taking the company private.

19h

Should all babies have their genomes sequenced?

New Hastings Center special report outlines ethics and policy recommendations on genome-wide sequencing of newborns.

19h

New HIV therapy reduces virus, boosts immunity in drug-resistant patients

In a study, a new HIV drug reduced viral replication and increased immune cells in individuals with advanced, drug-resistant HIV infection. Used in combination with existing HIV medications, the drug is a promising strategy for patients who have run out of effective treatment options, the researchers said.

19h

PARP inhibitor improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancers

In a randomized, Phase III trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the PARP inhibitor talazoparib extended progression-free survival (PFS) and improved quality-of-life measures over available chemotherapies for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes.

19h

Study of material surrounding distant stars shows Earth's ingredients 'pretty normal'

The Earth's building blocks seem to be built from 'pretty normal' ingredients, according to researchers working with the world's most powerful telescopes. Scientists have measured the compositions of 18 different planetary systems from up to 456 light years away and compared them to ours, and found that many elements are present in similar proportions to those found on Earth. This will have implic

19h

Weight gain after smoking cessation linked to increased short-term diabetes risk

People who gain weight after they quit smoking may face a temporary increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the risk directly proportional to the weight gain.

19h

Best Buy to buy a provider of health devices for the aging

Consumer electronics retailer Best Buy is pushing more into the health field, acquiring a company that provides emergency response devices for the aging.

19h

Baby elephant joins herd at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The newest elephant at San Diego Zoo Safari Park has joined the rest of the herd.

19h

Study of material surrounding distant stars shows Earth's ingredients 'pretty normal'

The Earth's building blocks seem to be built from 'pretty normal' ingredients, according to researchers working with the world's most powerful telescopes. Scientists have measured the compositions of 18 different planetary systems from up to 456 light years away and compared them to ours, and found that many elements are present in similar proportions to those found on Earth.

19h

Nanoparticle-based solution pulls last drops of oil from well water

Oil and water tend to separate, but they mix well enough to form stable oil-in-water emulsions in produced water from oil reservoirs to become a problem. Rice University scientists have developed a nanoparticle-based solution that reliably removes more than 99 percent of the emulsified oil that remains after other processing is done.

19h

How many American cities protect the rights of employed breastfeeding mothers?

Research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia found that, among the 151 largest cities in the United States, only Philadelphia and New York City have local legislation that protects a nursing mother who returns to work outside the home and who wants to continue breastfeeding.

20h

20h

New Pesticide Affects Bumblebee Reproduction

Sulfoxaflor, an alternative insect-killer to older chemicals that decimate pollinators, turns out to kneecap colonies.

20h

Particles pull last drops of oil from well water

Rice University engineers develop magnetic nanoparticles that separate the last droplets of oil from produced water at wells.

20h

Aging in human cells successfully reversed in the lab

Scientists reversed the ageing of human cells, which could provide the basis for future anti-degeneration drugs. Read More

20h

Scientists have created a carbon-trapping mineral in a lab

It’s still only in the lab at this stage, and then there’s the problem of where, exactly, to store the carbon-impregnated magnesite. Read More

20h

3 ways to ensure the internet's future is creative, collaborative, and fair

The European Commission is about to pass some laws regulating the future of the Internet. Here's how to make sure these laws are fair and just. Read More

20h

The Book of Why: How a 'causal revolution' is shaking up science

A much-needed "causal revolution" has arrived in Judea Pearl's 'The Book of Why'. But despite vast improvements over "trad stats", there's cause for concern over logic-losing numbers. Read More

20h

The Strange Infinities of e-Commerce

When the tube from Walmart.com arrived at my door, I rushed inside, popped off the lid, and unfurled my inspirational poster . On it, a quote from the science-fiction author and journalist Annalee Newitz hovered in a curly font over a photograph of a pier reaching into a tropical ocean. “When I was a policy analyst at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, I became obsessed with end user license agr

20h

Sea life in 'peril' as ocean temperatures hit all-time high in San Diego

Between 1982 and 2016, the number of ‘marine heatwaves’ doubled, and likely will become more common and intense as the planet warms, study finds Even the oceans are breaking temperature records in this summer of heatwaves. Off the California coast near San Diego, scientists in early August recorded all-time high seawater temperatures since daily measurements began in 1916. “Just like we have heat

20h

Aluminum Casting a Neuron

When you spend your days and nights looking at the beautifully intricate branches of neurons, sometimes it’s nice to take a break from the laptop. Hiking? Yoga? Surfing? Not for me! More brains, different format. Daniela and I have been working toward a fine art bronze cast neuron. It’s a fascinating process but it’s slow, so to get a little excitement flowing with the liquid-metal dendritic arbo

20h

Was a Muppet Just Spotted on Mars?

Muppet Labs did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

20h

Iron and titanium in the atmosphere of an exoplanet

Exoplanets can orbit close to their host star. When the host star is much hotter than our sun, then the exoplanet becomes as hot as a star. The hottest 'ultra-hot' planet was discovered last year. A team has now discovered the presence of iron and titanium vapors in the atmosphere of this planet. This detection was made possible by the surface temperature of this planet, which reaches more than 4,

21h

This giant exoplanet's atmosphere teems with glowing hot atoms of titanium and iron

Space And you thought this summer was hot For the first time, astronomers have detected iron and titanium vapors in a planet's sky—the metals glowing hot like the filaments in a light bulb in the searing…

21h

Nicki Minaj Guards a Shrinking Kingdom

Donald Trump’s rhetoric may be coarsening most everything in America, but might the already rowdy realm of commercial rap at least be safe? Don’t bet on it. Midway through Nicki Minaj’s “LLC,” one line washed me with a nausea of familiarity: “All these low-IQ hoes baffle me.” Low-IQ as a modifier: Isn’t that Trump’s thing? The president makes a habit of invoking IQ as an insult, drawing on an apt

21h

A Visit to Tuvalu, Surrounded by the Rising Pacific

Fiona Goodall, a photographer working with Getty Images, recently visited the tiny South Pacific island nation of Tuvalu, a country battling rising sea levels with limited resources. Goodall reports that high tides regularly bring flooding that “inundates taro plantations, floods either side of the airport runway, and affects people’s homes.” While a study released in February showed that Tuvalu’

21h

Why Facebook Enlisted This Research Lab to Track Its Trolls

What can the 14-person Digital Forensics Research Lab discover about fake news on Facebook that the billion-dollar company doesn't already know?

21h

'Crazy Rich Asians' Changes Nothing About Rom-Coms, and Everything About Movies

Jon H. Chu’s posh extravaganza is a movie of communal heart and necessary firsts.

21h

The Fate of Black Colleges Post-Omarosa

The Trump administration’s relationship with historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) started with a lot of flash and a little substance. Dozens of black educators in the Oval Office for a photo opportunity with the president. An executive order on black colleges that didn’t live up to expectations. And a host of unforced errors . Black college leaders and their advocates, though, rem

21h

Talking to the Taliban While Still Fighting the Taliban

The latest headlines from Afghanistan are much like the old headlines from Afghanistan. This week, U.S.-backed Afghan troops forced the Taliban out of Ghazni city, only after dozens of people had already been killed by the militant group. Afghan forces could do little as Taliban fighters seized Camp Chinaya, a military outpost in the north, killing 17 soldiers. And on Wednesday, the militants kil

21h

Scientists Are Trying Desperately to Save a Starving Orca. Will Their Efforts Pay Off?

Will this starving young killer whale respond to researchers' attempts to save her?

21h

Uber narrows 2Q loss as company polishes tarnished image

Uber is still struggling to make money while the ride-hailing service's CEO deals with the headaches left behind by his predecessor.

21h

No contraceptive is perfect, but can you trust apps to stop pregnancy?

Birth control app Natural Cycles has come under fire for unwanted pregnancies, but this just reveals how little we understand contraception

21h

A Popular Military Website Is Attacked From the Right

S ince its launch four years ago , the website Task & Purpose has built an ardent following among veterans, military personnel, and defense intellectuals with smart, unvarnished coverage of military issues and veterans’ affairs. This week, the site analyzed President Donald Trump’s proposed Space Force, described security careers for veterans, and led with a follow-up to one of its own scoops on

22h

Canada to phase out pesticides linked to bee and water bug deaths

Canada announced plans Wednesday to phase out two pesticides widely applied to canola, corn and soybean crops in this country and linked to bee and now also aquatic insect deaths.

22h

Canada's westernmost province declares wildfires emergency

British Columbia declared a province-wide state of emergency Wednesday as Canada's military joined firefighters in trying to douse 556 wildfires burning across the craggy region.

22h

'Devastating' dolphin loss in Florida red tide disaster

A state of emergency has been declared in Florida as the worst red tide in a decade blackens the ocean water, killing dolphins, sea turtles and fish at a relentless pace.

22h

Spacewalkers install bird trackers, send satellites flying (Update)

Spacewalking cosmonauts set up an antenna for tracking birds on Earth and sent a series of tiny satellites flying from the International Space Station on Wednesday.

22h

Frequent fires make droughts harder for young trees, even in wet eastern forests

Forests in the eastern United States may have had it easy compared to their western counterparts, with the intense, prolonged droughts and wildfires that have become typical out west in recent years. But as the climate changes over time, eastern forests are also likely to experience longer droughts. And although wildfires are comparatively rare, prescriptive fires are increasingly used in the east

22h

Old species learn new tricks… very slowly

A quick look at the fossil record shows that no species lasts forever. On average, most species exist for around a million years, although some species persist for much longer. A new study published in Scientific Reports from paleontologists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama shows that young species can take advantage of new opportunities more easily than older species: a hi

22h

The weirdest things we learned this week: bone flutes, zebra carriages, and laughing gas parties

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

22h

Survey reveals how U.S. government scientists feel Trump administration affecting their work

The Union of Concerned Scientists recently surveyed more than 63,000 scientists from 16 federal agencies, revealing a range of attitudes toward the current administration. Read More

22h

Students' social skills flourish best in groups with similar skill levels

Research shows that the behavior of the people you most spend time with can affect your own behavior, for better or worse. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that children who need assistance improving their social skills might benefit more when grouped with peers who have similar social skill levels, rather than with peers who have a similar disability or disorder.

22h

Funny bone: Survey finds 99 percent of science students appreciate instructor humor

There's nothing like a good laugh to lighten a mood, especially when the atmosphere is serious—like it can be in a science classroom.

22h

Climate change multiplies harmful marine heatwaves (Update)

The number of days marked by potentially destructive ocean heatwaves has doubled in 35 years, and will multiply another five-fold at current rates of climate change, scientists warned Wednesday.

22h

Old species learn new tricks…very slowly

No species lasts forever, and, just as the saying goes, it seems like old species may get stuck in their ways and can't adapt to environmental change as fast as younger species do.

22h

Frequent fires make droughts harder for young trees, even in wet eastern forests

Forests in the eastern United States may have had it easy compared to their western counterparts, with the intense, prolonged droughts and wildfires that have become typical out west in recent years. But as the climate changes over time, eastern forests are also likely to experience longer droughts. And although wildfires are comparatively rare, prescriptive fires are increasingly used in the east

22h

Water use for fracking has risen by up to 770 percent since 2011

The amount of water used per well for fracking surged by up to 770 percent between 2011 and 2016 in all major US shale gas- and oil-producing regions, a new study finds. The volume of flowback and produced water that new wells generated during their first year of operation also increased by up to 1,440 percent. If this rapid intensification continues, fracking's water footprint could grow by up to

22h

Robots will never replace teachers but can boost children's education

Robots can play an important role in the education of young people but will never fully replace teachers, a new study suggests.

22h

Hunk of Destroyed WWII Ship Discovered off the Coast of Alaska

The stern of the USS Abner Read was completely torn off in 1943. Now scientists have found it.

22h

Funny bone: ASU survey finds 99 percent of science students appreciate instructor humor

In a first-of-its-kind study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers from Arizona State University found that students appreciate when instructors tell jokes in science class, but that female and male students differ in what topics they find funny or offensive.

22h

This matrix delivers healing stem cells to injured elderly muscles

Muscles of the elderly and of patients with Duchene muscular dystrophy have trouble regenerating. A new nanohydrogel with muscle stem cells has boosted muscle growth in mouse models while protecting the stem cells from immune reactions that usually weaken or destroy them.

22h

Logging permit fraud threatens timber species in Brazilian Amazon

Timber harvested illegally under fraudulent permits is undercutting conservation efforts in the Brazilian Amazon, new research by an international collaboration shows.

22h

First-of-its-kind Parkinson's biomarker guidelines invigorates drive for treatments

A slate of guidelines to shape the future of Parkinson's biomarker research have been published in Science Translational Medicine.

22h

How gene hunting changed the culture of science

A University of Houston researcher reports that 15 years after the end of the Human Genome Project, which mapped the human genetic blueprint, the project is still making news because it forever changed the way scientists work. Among the findings, the literature published by teams of scientists fared better than those published by single authors.

22h

Climate change sea level rises could increase risk for more devastating tsunamis worldwide

The threat of rising sea levels to coastal cities and communities throughout the world is well known, but new findings show the likely increase of flooding farther inland from tsunamis following earthquakes.

22h

The secret behind cell revival revealed

OIST scientists identify essential genes for quiescent cells to switch back to dividing mode using fission yeast that may lead to new cancer therapies.

22h

A steady increase in the water footprint at US fracking sites

Water use for hydraulic fracturing (commonly referred to as 'fracking') in the US has been increasing at individual facilities in recent years, even as unconventional oil and gas production has more broadly declined, a new study reports. The findings emphasize the importance of water management at fracking operations, particularly if the prices of oil and natural

22h

Fluorescent probe sheds light on tuberculosis bacteria

Scientists have created a fluorescent probe that can tag and illuminate single specimens of the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), one of the world's most problematic infectious diseases.

22h

Scientists discover chemical which can kill glioblastoma cells

Aggressive brain tumour cells taken from patients self-destructed after being exposed to a chemical in laboratory tests, researchers have shown.

22h

Robots have power to significantly influence children's opinions

Young children are significantly more likely than adults to have their opinions and decisions influenced by robots, according to new research.

22h

New research reveals corals could be trained to survive environmental stress

Scientists have discovered the first molecular evidence that when exposed to environmental stress corals and anemones can optimize their gene expression enabling them to acclimatize to extreme conditions such as those experienced during climate change.

22h

Robots will never replace teachers but can boost children's education

Robots can play an important role in the education of young people but will never fully replace teachers, a new study suggests.

22h

Water use for fracking has risen by up to 770 percent since 2011

The amount of water used per well for fracking surged by up to 770 percent between 2011 and 2016 in all major US shale gas- and oil-producing regions, a Duke University study finds. The volume of flowback and produced water that new wells generated during their first year of operation also increased by up to 1,440 percent. If this rapid intensification continues, fracking's water footprint could g

22h

How forests improve kids' diets

A first-of-its-kind global study shows that children in 27 developing countries have better nutrition — when they live near forests. The results turn on its head the assumption that improving nutrition in poorer countries requires clearing forests for more farmland — and, instead, suggest that forest conservation could be an important tool to improve the nutrition of children.

22h

Dating the ancient Minoan eruption of Thera using tree rings

New analyses that use tree rings could settle the long-standing debate about when the volcano Thera erupted by resolving discrepancies between archeological and radiocarbon methods of dating the eruption, according to new University of Arizona-led research.

22h

Anticancer drug offers potential alternative to transplant for patients with liver failure

Patients suffering sudden liver failure could in the future benefit from a new treatment that could reduce the need for transplants, research published today shows.

22h

Cancer drugs may help the liver recover from common painkiller overdoses

Experimental anticancer drugs may help the liver recover after acetaminophen poisoning.

22h

It Really is All About the Bass

submitted by /u/Matrovski22 [link] [comments]

22h

Students' social skills flourish best in groups with similar skill levels

Researchers have found that children who need assistance improving their social skills might benefit more when grouped with peers who have similar social skill levels, rather than with peers who have a similar disability or disorder.

22h

A molecular switch may serve as new target point for cancer and diabetes therapies

If certain signaling cascades are misregulated, diseases like cancer, obesity and diabetes may occur. A mechanism recently discovered has a crucial influence on such signaling cascades and may be an important key for the future development of therapies against these diseases.

22h

Our perceived birth status can affect our adult relationships

Birth status and knowledge about it play a role not only in parents' but also children's lives — affecting their attachment and mental representation into adulthood.

22h

It's possible to reverse damage caused by aging cells

What's the secret to aging well? Researchers have answered it — on a cellular level.

22h

Climate change sea level rises could increase risk for more devastating tsunamis worldwide

As sea levels rise due to climate change, so do the global hazards and potential devastating damages from tsunamis, according to a new study by a partnership that included Virginia Tech.

22h

The secret behind cell revival revealed

Scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), have identified 85 genes essential for fission yeast cells at rest, under nutritionally limited environmental conditions, to maintain their ability to return to the dividing mode. The study sheds light on the genetic network required for resting cells like cancer stem cells to reactivate, and has potential

22h

How gene hunting changed the culture of science

Years after the end of the Human Genome Project (HGP), which mapped the human genetic blueprint, its contributions to science and scientific culture are still unfolding. Ioannis Pavlidis, Eckhard Pfeiffer Professor of Computational Physiology at the University of Houston, UH doctoral student Dinesh Majeti and Alexander Petersen, professor of management at the University of California Merced, repor

22h

Water use for fracking has risen by up to 770 percent since 2011

The amount of water used per well for hydraulic fracturing surged by up to 770 percent between 2011 and 2016 in all major U.S. shale gas and oil production regions, a new Duke University study finds.

22h

Logging permit fraud threatens timber species in Brazilian Amazon

Timber harvested illegally under fraudulent permits is undercutting conservation efforts in the Brazilian Amazon, new research by an international collaboration shows.

22h

New research reveals corals could be trained to survive environmental stress

Scientists have discovered the first molecular evidence that corals and anemones can optimize their gene expression when exposed to environmental stress, enabling them to acclimatize to extreme conditions such as those experienced during climate change.

22h

Dating the ancient Minoan eruption of Thera using tree rings

New analyses that use tree rings could settle the long-standing debate about when the volcano Thera erupted by resolving discrepancies between archeological and radiocarbon methods of dating the eruption, according to new University of Arizona-led research.

22h

Study shows forest conservation is a powerful tool to improve nutrition in developing nations

A first-of-its-kind global study shows that children in 27 developing countries have better nutrition—when they live near forests.

22h

How Rude Humanoid Robots Can Mess With Your Head

A pair of clever studies show how the development of advanced social robots is far outpacing our understanding of how they’re going to make us feel.

22h

Diving robots find Antarctic seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide in winter

The open water nearest the sea ice surrounding Antarctica releases significantly more carbon dioxide in winter than previously believed, a new study has found. Researchers conducting the study used data gathered over several winters by an array of robotic floats diving and drifting in the Southern Ocean around the southernmost continent.

23h

Mechanism that affects multiplication of dengue virus lineage is discovered

A study aiming at the development of a dengue vaccine shows that the prevalence of a virus lineage upon the other does not rely on the highest replication rate: it is rather based on the virus' ability in triggering weaker activation of the patient's immune response.

23h

New clues into how 'trash bag of the cell' traps and seals off waste

The mechanics behind how an important process within the cell traps material before recycling it has puzzled scientists for years. But Penn State researchers have gained new insight into how this process seals off waste, much like a trash bag.

23h

Evening preference, lack of sleep associated with higher BMI in people with prediabetes

People with prediabetes who go to bed later, eat meals later and are more active and alert later in the day — those who have an 'evening preference' — have higher body mass indices compared with people with prediabetes who do things earlier in the day, or exhibit morning preference.

23h

Zika Likes it Warmer than Dengue: Study

Climate change may open up new habitats suitable for the virus's spread.

23h

2018 Revealed Just How Ill-Prepared We Are For Climate Change

Somini Sengupta, international climate reporter for The New York Times, discusses the dire consequences of rising temperatures, such as drought, famine, disease, war and increased migration.

23h

The Samsung Galaxy Note 9 is a great gaming phone that won't make you better at Fortnite

Gadgets Playing the most popular game in the world on Samsung's new Flagship phone. Gaming phones are increasing in popularity so get your thumbs ready.

23h

Children may be especially vulnerable to peer pressure from robots

Elementary school children often endorsed unanimous but inaccurate judgments made by small groups of robots.

23h

Florida Declares Emergency As Red Tide Blooms

Toxic red tide in Florida led the governor to declare a state of emergency.

23h

New pesticides 'may have risks for bees'

Attempts to find a new generation of pesticides to replace neonicotinoids have been dealt a potential blow.

23h

What Does It Mean to ‘Sound’ Black?

On HBO’s Insecure , the Issa Rae–helmed comedy about black women navigating life and love in Los Angeles, the show’s main characters tease each other lovingly and unceasingly. The two friends, Issa Dee (Rae) and Molly Carter (Yvonne Orji), trade barbs in a cheeky, exaggerated tone. It’s a welcome dynamic, a reminder that the show is first and foremost dedicated to the story of the women’s friends

23h

Congenital blindness reversed in mice

Researchers have reversed congenital blindness in mice by changing supportive cells in the retina called Müller glia into rod photoreceptors. The findings advance efforts toward regenerative therapies for blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa.

23h

When viruses infect phytoplankton, it can change the clouds

Microscopic plant-like organisms called phytoplankton support the diversity of life in the ocean. Scientists now report that one species, Emiliania huxleyi, and a virus closely associated with it, might be responsible for changes in cloud properties as well. When infected, E. huxleyi releases its chalky shell into the air, where it acts as an aerosol reflecting sunlight and even affecting cloud cr

23h

Light-emitting nanoparticles could provide a safer way to image living cells

A research team has demonstrated how light-emitting nanoparticles can be used to see deep in living tissue. Researchers hope they can be made to attach to specific components of cells to serve in an advanced imaging system that can pinpoint even single cancer cells.

23h

Star Trek saga casts new Spock actor Ethan Peck

How will Ethan Peck compare to Leonard Nimoy and other actors who've played the pointy-eared science officer?

23h

How the humble cabbage can stop cancers

Researchers reveal how chemicals in some vegetables can prevent bowel cancer.

23h

23h

Structure of ion channel reveals how insects smell their way around the world

Researchers describe, for the first time, the structure of a smell-receptor protein common among insects. Its inner architecture illuminates how insects evolved to detect an amazing diversity of odors.

23h

NIH-funded researchers reverse congenital blindness in mice

Researchers funded by the National Eye Institute have reversed congenital blindness in mice by changing supportive cells in the retina called Müller glia into rod photoreceptors. The findings advance efforts toward regenerative therapies for blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa.

23h

Iron and titanium in the atmosphere of an exoplanet

Exoplanets can orbit close to their host star. When the host star is much hotter than our sun, then the exoplanet becomes as hot as a star. The hottest 'ultra-hot' planet was discovered last year. Today, a team led by UNIGE discovered the presence of iron and titanium vapors in the atmosphere of this planet. This detection was made possible by the surface temperature of this planet, which reaches

23h

Mount Sinai researchers discover how to restore vision using retinal stem cells

Researchers at Mount Sinai have successfully restored vision in mice through activating retinal stem cells, something that has never been done before.

23h

Tongue microbiome research underscores importance of dental health

Elderly individuals with fewer teeth, poor dental hygiene, and more cavities constantly ingest more dysbiotic microbiota, which could be harmful to their respiratory health, according to new research published in the journal mSphere. The findings come from a large, population-based study that identified variations in the tongue microbiota among community-dwelling elderly adults in Japan.

23h

Stern of World War II US destroyer discovered off remote Alaskan island

In the midst of World War II on August 18, 1943, the USS Abner Read struck what was presumed to be a Japanese mine in the Bering Sea. The catastrophic blast took the lives of 71 American sailors. For their families, the final resting place of loved ones lost remained unknown. Until now. On July 16, 2018, a team of researchers using robotics technology discovered the sunken stern of the World War I

23h

Hottest of 'ultra-hot' planets is so hot its air contains vaporised metal

The temperature on Kelt-9b is 4,000C and its atmosphere contains iron and titanium vapours, say astronomers New observations of the hottest known planet have revealed temperatures similar to those typically seen at the surface of a star, as well as an atmosphere of vaporised iron and titanium. The findings add to the diverse and, in some cases, extreme conditions seen on planets far beyond our ow

23h

Coinbase Acquires Distributed Systems to Double Down on Digital Identity

Cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase is banking on decentralized identity to help it find long-term relevance.

23h

Structure of ion channel reveals how insects smell their way around the world

The mosquito, sworn enemy of exposed ankles and elbows, locates each bloody meal using a finely tuned sense of smell. Yet, not all insects can sniff out vulnerable flesh. Butterflies, for example, feed not on necks but on nectar, and accordingly excel at smelling flowers. Each insect olfactory system is, in fact, tailored to a species' particular habitat and needs. And a new study from a group of

23h

Iron and titanium in the atmosphere of an exoplanet

Exoplanets, planets in other solar systems, can orbit very close to their host stars. When the host star is much hotter than the sun, the exoplanet becomes as hot as a star. The hottest "ultra-hot" planet was discovered last year by American astronomers. Today, an international team led by researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), who collaborated with theoreticians from the University of

23h

Students' social skills flourish best in groups with similar skill levels

Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that children who need assistance improving their social skills might benefit more when grouped with peers who have similar social skill levels, rather than with peers who have a similar disability or disorder.

1d

Reprogrammed Muller Glia Restore Vision in Mice

A double gene-transfer therapy transformed the non-neuronal cells into rod photoreceptors in the retinas of animal models of congenital blindness.

1d

Will Washington State Voters Make History on Climate Change?

Updated on August 15 at 4:30 p.m. ET This November, voters in Washington State may do what no group of people—in or outside the United States—has done before. They will vote on whether to adopt a carbon fee , an aggressive policy to combat climate change that charges polluters for the right to emit carbon dioxide and other potent greenhouse gases. Their decision will reverberate far beyond the Ol

1d

Battery breakthrough: Doubling performance with lithium metal that doesn't catch fire

A rechargeable battery technology developed at the University of Michigan could double the output of today's lithium ion cells — drastically extending electric vehicle ranges and time between cell phone charges — without taking up any added space.

1d

Evolutionary Math and Just-So Stories

The story of Darwin’s finches — the species of birds that Charles Darwin discovered with marked differences in many surface traits, each adapted to specific islands in the Galápagos — is well known. Based on their fundamental anatomical similarities, Darwin determined that the birds were all related and probably descended from a single ancestral species. That evolution can be vastly accelerated o

1d

NASA satellite sees Tropical Depression Rumbia form

Tropical Depression Rumbia, the twenty-first tropical cyclone of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean season formed on Aug. 15, as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead.

1d

Nu ser vi konsekvenserne af spareplanen i 2013

Der er behov for en langsigtet planlægning, der kan garantere de praktiserende læger og deres patienter en langsigtet stabil udvikling, så lægerne kan foretage de nødvendige investeringer og yngre læger før satse på almen praksis.

1d

The End of the David Clarke Era

Remember David Clarke? He became a national celebrity for his support of Donald Trump during the 2016 election, speaking at the Republican National Convention and delivering often inflammatory remarks on the campaign trail. But as Clarke’s large array of badges and oversize hat were intended to remind, he was first and foremost a lawman—the sheriff of Milwaukee County, in office since 2002. In th

1d

Neonatal pig hearts can heal from heart attack

Researchers have discovered that the hearts of newborn piglets have one remarkable ability. They can almost completely heal themselves after experimental heart attacks. This regenerative capacity is short-lived — disappearing by day three after birth, and this is the first time the ability regrow heart muscle has been shown in large mammals, the researchers report in the journal Circulation. This

1d

Long-term efficacy of AAV5-based gene therapy to treat day blind sheep with achromatopsia

A study of a large animal model of achromatopsia caused by a mutation in the CNGA3 gene that was treated with a single injection of CNGA3 gene therapy delivered using an AAV5 vector revealed findings reported long-term follow-up findings that show promise for the efficacy and safety of this therapeutic approach.

1d

Stern of World War II US destroyer discovered off remote Alaskan island

In the midst of World War II on Aug. 18, 1943, the USS Abner Read struck what was presumed to be a Japanese mine in the Bering Sea. The catastrophic blast took the lives of 71 American sailors. For their families, the final resting place of loved ones lost remained unknown.Until now. On July 16, 2018, a team of researchers using robotics technology discovered the sunken stern of the World War II d

1d

NASA sees Tropical Storm Bebinca still near Hainan Island

Tropical Storm Bebinca continues to rain on Hainan Island, China and has been doing so for days. On Aug. 15, when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead it captured a visible image of the storm.

1d

Some clouds are formed when a virus makes algae shed their shells

When algae in the ocean get a virus, they shed their exoskeleton and those chalky bits can get flung into the air and trigger the formation of clouds

1d

Stern of World War II US destroyer discovered off remote Alaskan island (Update)

For almost 75 years, the stern of the destroyer USS Abner Read lay somewhere below the dark surface of the Bering Sea off the Aleutian island of Kiska, where it sank after being torn off by an explosion while conducting an anti-submarine patrol. Seventy-one U.S. Navy Sailors were lost in the aftermath of the blast, during a brutal and largely overlooked early campaign of World War II.

1d

Hyperspectral imager leaves a legacy of contributions to coastal research

Images of Earth from space are not only beautiful and inspirational, they also provide valuable information for science and commerce that cannot be obtained any other way.

1d

NASA sees 14th Eastern Pacific Tropical Depression form

Tropical Depression 14E formed far from land and poses no threat to land areas. On Aug. 14, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over developing Tropical Depression 14E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

1d

Firefighting mars the earth. California crews are fixing it

Jack Hattendorf steers his road grader back and forth across a dirt path cutting through blackened earth.

1d

Scientists get new tool to track new pathogen killing frogs

An undergraduate researcher has developed a method to screen frogs for an infectious disease that has been linked to mass die-offs of frogs around the world. Thanks to her method, scientists will be able to track the disease and try to figure out why it is triggering the deaths.

1d

NASA catches Tropical Depression Leepi nearing landfall

Tropical Depression Leepi was nearing landfall in southern South Korea on Aug. 15, when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead.

1d

NASA satellite image Tropical Depression Hector elongating, weakening

Tropical Depression Hector is being torn apart in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. On Aug. 15, when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead it captured a visible image of the storm as the final bulletin on the system was issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

1d

A trained eye

UCSB researchers show that category learning can be influenced by where an object is in our field of vision.

1d

Study of greater Yellowstone pronghorn finds highway crossing structures a conservation success

A recently published study by scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Oregon State University has confirmed that efforts to protect migrating pronghorn by installing wildlife crossing structures over highways have succeeded, in terms of the increased success rate of pronghorn crossings over time.

1d

Some Sunscreen Harms Reefs–Warming Could Mean More of It

Worry over environmental damage is being pitted against public health concerns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

World's oldest cheese found in Egyptian tomb

Aging usually improves the flavor of cheese, but that's not why some very old cheese discovered in an Egyptian tomb is drawing attention. Instead, it's thought to be the most ancient solid cheese ever found, according to a study published in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry.

1d

Light-emitting nanoparticles could provide a safer way to image living cells

A research team has demonstrated how light-emitting nanoparticles, developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), can be used to see deep in living tissue.

1d

Doctors may be able to enlist a mysterious enzyme to stop internal bleeding

An enzyme can boost platelet production may work as a future therapeutic.

1d

Ethiopian 7-year trial finds that childhood eye infection increases after antibiotic program ends

Continuous mass distribution of azithromycin in northern Ethiopia, where the childhood eye infection trachoma is a major cause of blindness, is effective in preventing recurrence of trachoma but does not eliminate the infection entirely.

1d

1d

The origin of off-taste in onions

Chopping onions is usually associated with watery and stinging eyes. But after the onions are diced and the tears are dried, the vegetable pieces can sometimes develop an unpleasant bitter taste. Now, one group reports in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that they have identified previously unknown compounds causing this off-taste.

1d

NASA catches formation of fifth Atlantic depression

The fifth tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Ocean season formed on Aug. 15, as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew overhead.

1d

UMN Medical School research shows it's possible to reverse damage caused by aging cells

What's the secret to aging well? University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have answered it — on a cellular level.

1d

Better statistical methods to understand gene interactions leading to cancer development

Research led by Hui-Yi Lin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biostatistics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, has developed another novel statistical method for evaluating gene-to-gene interactions associated with cancer and other complex diseases.

1d

Mizzou program significantly reduces delay in autism diagnosis

A new study on the effectiveness of ECHO Autism shows that the program significantly reduces diagnostic wait times for young children at highest risk for autism and saved families an average of 172.7 miles in travel for diagnosis.

1d

Play-Doh helps plant research

You know that smell of fresh cut grass? It's a cry for help plants use when under attack.

1d

Doctors will grow human tissue on the International Space Station

Liver tissue and muscle fibre are going to be grown on the ISS, to see if we can one day grow human organs in space

1d

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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