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Study confirms truth behind 'Darwin's moth'

Scientists have revisited — and confirmed — one of the most famous textbook examples of evolution in action.

12h

US interior secretary's school friend blocking climate research, scientists say

Trump administration forces some scientific funding to be reviewed by adviser who was high-school football teammate of Ryan Zinke Prominent US climate scientists have told the Guardian that the Trump administration is holding up research funding as their projects undergo an unprecedented political review by the high-school football teammate of the US interior secretary. The US interior department

5h

Pesticidfund i drikkevandsboringer breder sig som ringe i vandet

Omfattende fund af pesticidresten DMS landet over viser, at det er nødvendigt at få screenet drikkevandsområder for alle problematiske stoffer og sikret vigtige drikkevandslagre, mener vandbranchen.

18h

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Let this AI bot turn your words into vaguely-recognizable pictures

Technology It gets weird. AI draws crazy art when asked to interpret words and phrases.

2min

AI could make dodgy lip sync dubbing a thing of the past

Researchers have developed a system using artificial intelligence that can edit the facial expressions of actors to accurately match dubbed voices, saving time and reducing costs for the film industry.

11min

16 going on 66: Will you be the same person 50 years from now?

From 16 to 66 your personality will change and over time you will generally become more emotionally stable. But don't compare yourself to others; those who are the most emotionally stable when young are probably going to continue being the most stable as they age.

11min

Three factors could explain physician burnout in the US

In just three years, physician burnout increased from 45.5 percent to 54.4 percent, according to a new article. They offer three factors that they say contribute to this burnout.

11min

As body mass index increases, blood pressure may as well

Body mass index is positively associated with blood pressure, according to the ongoing study of 1.7 million Chinese men and women.

25min

Scientists discover why silver clusters emit light

Clusters of silver atoms captured in zeolites, a porous material with small channels and voids, have remarkable light emitting properties. They can be used for more efficient lighting applications as a substitute for LED and TL lamps. Until recently, scientists did not know exactly how and why these small particles emit light. An interdisciplinary team of physicists and chemists has now demonstrat

25min

How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant

Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), the economically most important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition. With these insights, researchers provide a new explanation f

25min

Alexa, Cortana finally get the conversation going

Amazon's Alexa and Microsoft's Cortana are coming soon to a smart device near you – together, with new integrated features that allow the digital assistants to talk to each other.

30min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Parade’s End

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Jurors in Paul Manafort’s fraud trial ended a second day of deliberations without reaching a verdict. The judge said he has received threats and denied media requests to release the names of jurors in fear for their safety. Trump refused to say whether he plans to pardon Manafort if he’s convicted, but said that his former campaign ch

36min

Scientists create new technology and solve a key puzzle for cellular memory

With a new groundbreaking technique, researchers have managed to identify a protein that is responsible for cellular memory being transmitted when cells divide. The finding is crucial for understanding development from one cell to a whole body.

39min

Cells agree: What doesn't kill you makes you stronger

Brief exposures to stressors can be beneficial by prompting cells to trigger sustained production of antioxidants, molecules that help get rid of toxic cellular buildup related to normal metabolism — findings with potential relevance for age-related diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease.

39min

A Field Covered in Dead, Headless Reindeer and Poop Is Teaching Us About the Circle of Life

Scavengers are helping transform a grim landscape in Norway

43min

Experiences at first sexual encounter impact risk of HIV and violence for women in Kenya

Adolescent girls and young women in Mombasa, Kenya are more likely to experience higher risks of HIV and gender-based violence when they are involved with sex work venues or have sexual experiences at a young age, suggests a study co-led by St. Michael's Hospital and the University of Manitoba in Canada.

49min

Water-worlds are common: Exoplanets may contain vast amounts of water

Scientists have shown that water is likely to be a major component of those exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) which are between two to four times the size of Earth. It will have implications for the search of life in our Galaxy. The work is presented at the Goldschmidt conference in Boston.

49min

Helium 150 Years After Its Discovery

Helium 150 Years After Its Discovery One hundred fifty years ago, scientists observed in light from the sun the first evidence of the inert gas. helium_top.jpg Image credits: chriskeller via pixabay Rights information: CC0 Creative Commons Technology Friday, August 17, 2018 – 15:45 Inside Science Staff (Inside Science) — Today, we honor helium, that most noble of gasses, which was discovered 150

56min

What If a Female CEO Acted Like Elon Musk?

On Thursday night, The New York Times published an interview with Elon Musk that offers a view into the billionaire entrepreneur’s life in the last year. Musk choked up “multiple times,” the Times reported in the story, and “alternated between laughter and tears.” He explained that he was overworked at Tesla, his electric-car company—which has spent the last several months scrambling to meet ambi

58min

Water-worlds are common: Exoplanets may contain vast amounts of water

Scientists have shown that water is likely to be a major component of those exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) which are between two to four times the size of Earth. It will have implications for the search of life in our Galaxy. The work is presented at the Goldschmidt Conference in Boston.

1h

HIV and a tale of a few cities

In a pair of new modeling studies, researchers examined how policy reform in terms of drug decriminalization (in Mexico) and access to drug treatment (in Russia) might affect two regions hard hit by the HIV pandemic: Tijuana, Mexico and the Russian cities of Omsk and Ekaterinburg.

1h

Automated detection of focal epileptic seizures in a sentinel area of the human brain

In a first-in-humans pilot study, researchers have identified a sentinel area of the brain that may give an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations from focal epilepsy appear. They have also validated an algorithm that can automatically detect that early warning. These two findings offer the possibility of squelching a focal epilepsy seizure — before the patient feels any symptoms —

1h

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature

Up to now, electronic computer components have been run on electricity, generating unwanted heat. If spin current were employed instead, computers and similar devices could be operated in a much more energy-efficient manner. Researchers have now discovered an effect that could make such a transition to spin current a reality.

1h

Novel nanoparticle-based approach detects and treats oral plaque without drugs

When the good and bad bacteria in our mouth become imbalanced, the bad bacteria form a biofilm (aka plaque), which can cause cavities, and if left untreated over time, can lead to cardiovascular and other inflammatory diseases like diabetes and bacterial pneumonia. A team of researchers has recently devised a practical nanotechnology-based method for detecting and treating the harmful bacteria tha

1h

More efficient security for cloud-based machine learning

A novel encryption method secures data used in online neural networks, without dramatically slowing their runtimes. This approach holds promise for using cloud-based neural networks for medical-image analysis and other applications that use sensitive data.

1h

Chemists find a surprisingly simple reaction to make a family of bioactive molecules

Many natural products and drugs feature a so-called dicarbonyl motif — in certain cases however their preparation poses a challange to organic chemists. In their most recent work, chemists present a new route for these molecules. They use oxidized sulfur compounds even though sulfur is not included in the final product.

1h

New approach to fight tuberculosis, a leading cause of death worldwide

A group of researchers used a systematic approach to get an entirely new look at the way tuberculosis infects people. Their study uncovered interactions between tuberculosis and human proteins that could provide new approaches to combat infection.

1h

Internt oprør blandt medarbejderne: Google pønser på comeback i Kina

Søgegigantens nye ledelse har et mere afslappet forhold til censur og kontrol.

1h

Stunning NASA Image Lets You Watch the Sun Explode in Real Time

The surface of the sun is a roiling tangle of magnetism, heat and light, stunning new images reveal.

1h

Making aquafeed more sustainable: Scientists develop feeds using a marine microalga co-product

Dartmouth scientists have created a more sustainable feed for aquaculture by using a marine microalga co-product as a feed ingredient. The study is the first of its kind to evaluate replacing fishmeal with a co-product in feed designed specifically for Nile tilapia. The results are published in the open access journal, PLOS ONE.

1h

A valley so low: Electrons congregate in ways that could be useful to 'valleytronics'

A team led by researchers at Princeton University have made a finding that could help usher in new area of technology called 'valleytronics.' The study found that electrons in bismuth crystals prefer to collect in one valley rather than being distributed equally across valleys, setting up a type of electricity known as ferroelectricity.

1h

Perinatal hypoxia associated with long-term cerebellar learning deficits and Purkinje cell misfiring

The type of hypoxia that occurs with preterm birth is associated with locomotor miscoordination and long-term cerebellar learning deficits but can be partially alleviated with an off-the-shelf medicine, according to a study using a preclinical model.

1h

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional 'protein knockdown' in vertebrates

Researchers have developed a novel synthetic antibody that paves the way for an improved functional analysis of proteins.

1h

Astronomers observe cosmic steam jets and molecules galore

A team of scientists using the highest-frequency capabilities of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has uncovered jets of warm water vapor streaming away from a newly forming star. The researchers also detected the 'fingerprints' of an astonishing assortment of molecules near this stellar nursery.

1h

Ants, acorns and climate change

The relatively swift adaptability of tiny, acorn-dwelling ants to warmer environments could help scientists predict how other species might evolve in the crucible of global climate change, according to biologists.

1h

Like shark attacks and the lottery, unconscious bias influences cancer screening

Study shows that doctors with personal experience of cancer are more likely to act against established guidelines to recommend that low-risk women receive ovarian cancer screening.

1h

Exploring the relationship between fever and cancer incidence

In a new paper, researchers propose a mechanistic hypothesis that focuses on the potential impact infectious fever has on a particular subset of T cells, known as gamma/delta T cells.

1h

New way to grow blood vessels developed

Formation of new blood vessels, a process also known as angiogenesis, is one of the major clinical challenges in wound healing and tissue implants. To address this issue, researchers have developed a clay-based platform to deliver therapeutic proteins to the body to assist with the formation of blood vessels.

1h

Taking a closer look at unevenly charged biomolecules

Clinicians most often monitor antibodies because these small proteins attach to antigens, or foreign substances, we face every day. Most biomolecules, however, have complicated charge characteristics, and the sensor response from conventional carbon nanotube systems can be erratic. A team recently revealed how these systems work and proposed changes to dramatically improve biomolecule detection.

1h

Novel research optimizes both elasticity and rigidity in the same material without the usual tradeoffs

In the world of materials, rigidity and elasticity are usually on opposite ends of the continuum. Typically, the more elastic a material, the less able it is to bear loads and resist forces. The more rigid it is, the more prone it is to rupture at lower strains when the load or force exceeds its capacity. A goal for many materials scientists is to create a material that brings together the best of

1h

Autoimmunity plays role in development of COPD

Autoimmunity plays a role in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study that analyzed human genome information.

1h

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1h

How worried should we be that glyphosate was found in our Cheerios?

Health It depends on which scientific organization—or advocacy group—you ask. An environmental advocacy group found traces of controversial herbicides on popular breakfast cereals like Cheerios, Lucky Charms, and Quaker Oats, according to their…

1h

‘Zombie’ gene returns to life and kills cancer in elephants

Researchers have discovered a gene that can protect elephants from cancer. An estimated 17 percent of humans worldwide die from cancer, but less than five percent of captive elephants—who live for about 70 years, and have about 100 times as many potentially cancerous cells as humans—die from the disease. “This dead gene came back to life. When it gets turned on by damaged DNA, it kills that cell,

1h

Taking Away John Brennan's Clearance Threatens National Security

When Trump strips a former CIA director's security clearance, the impact is more than just symbolic.

1h

More protein after weight loss may reduce fatty liver disease

Increasing the amount of protein in the diet may reduce the liver's fat content and lower the risk of diabetes in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

1h

Obesity, infertility and oxidative stress in mouse egg cells

Proteomic analysis of oocytes from obese mice showed changes in a protein that promotes antioxidant production and may alter meiotic spindles.

1h

YouTube is source of misinformation on plastic surgery

In the first study to evaluate YouTube videos on facial plastic surgery procedures, researchers found that most are misleading marketing campaigns posted by non-qualified medical professionals.

1h

Aretha Louise Franklin’s storied career at a glance, and Twitter's response

Accomplishments? Yes, Aretha Franklin had them. Read More

1h

The New York University School of Medicine just gave its students a life-saving gift

Citing increasing student debt and the desire to see more family and pediatric physicians, the school might have started a trend. Read More

1h

Take a Trip to the Eyewire Brain Zoo!

This summer we’ve teamed up with Zoo New England and MassArt to produce a special series of illustrations that highlight the amazingness of animal brains. You’re invited on a special expedition through the Eyewire Brain Zoo! Along the way we will take a look at a few impressive animals and consider what aspects of their brains make them unique. Keep an Eye out for Tamarins. They keep getting loos

1h

Students more likely to eat school breakfast when given extra time, new study finds

Using food weighting stations, the researchers collected information on the number of students who ate a school breakfast, how much they ate, and their exact nutritional intake.

1h

Eyewire Release Report 8/17/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. We’ve pushed a bunch of updates to @KrzysztofKruk’s scripts. You can read the details here ! Newcomers to Eyewire now receive a special welcome notification when they arrive, as well as a new notification after they complete the main tutorial. Notifications n

1h

NYU Medical School is Now Free, Almost

All students’ tuition will be funded through its endowment.

1h

9 Reasons We Have an Undying Interest in the Undead

Zombie fans rejoice! There are some legitimate scientific reasons why you like zombies.

2h

Judge told to consider protections for Montana grayling fish

An appeals court on Friday told a judge to take another look at whether a Montana fish should be protected, saying that U.S. wildlife officials did not consider all environmental factors when it decided against designating the Arctic grayling as a threatened or endangered species.

2h

NASA analyzes Typhoon Soulik's water vapor

NASA's Terra satellite looked at water vapor and cloud top temperatures when it passed over the recently strengthened Typhoon Soulik in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

2h

Chemists develop contaminant detection technique for heparin

In 2008, a contaminant eluded the quality safeguards in the pharmaceutical industry and infiltrated a large portion of the supply of the popular blood thinner heparin, sickening hundreds and killing about 100 in the U.S.

2h

URI scientist: Long-legged lizards better adapted for hurricane survival

Jason Kolbe has been thinking about hurricanes and lizards for many years. The University of Rhode Island professor of biological sciences has measured the length of lizard legs and the size of their toe pads to assess how those factors influence the animal's ability to cling to vegetation during strong storms. He even used a powerful leaf blower to test his hypotheses in a laboratory.

2h

Intensifying Hurricane Lane examined by GPM satellite

Heavy rainfall and towering cloud heights were the findings when Hurricane Lane was scanned by the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite on Aug. 17. Lane strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

2h

NASA's GPM analyzes Atlantic Tropical Storm Ernesto's rainfall

NASA found light to moderate rainfall occurring in Tropical Storm Ernesto as it continued on an eastern trek toward Ireland and the United Kingdom. Ireland has already issued a warning for Ernesto.

2h

This Silicon Valley car tech firm is bringing secret weapon to the streets of Sacramento

A Silicon Valley tech company recently posted a video front and center on its website that may startle some Sacramentans.

2h

Photos of the Week: Sun Biter, Solar Probe, Belgian Bovines

Flowers carpet Brussels, an alt-right rally is met with overwhelming opposition in Washington, D.C., City2Surf takes off in Sydney, the Women’s Softball World Championship is underway in Japan, a farewell is bid to Aretha Franklin, the Obon prayer is made in Japan, abandoned share bikes find homes in Germany, record-setting hot dogs are lined up in Mexico, a cardboard Viking church collapses in L

2h

HIV drug reduces virus, boosts immunity in hard-to-treat patients

A new HIV drug reduces viral replication and increases immune cells in people with advanced, drug-resistant HIV infection, according to a new study. In combination with existing medications, the drug holds promise for patients who have run out of effective treatment options, researchers say. For some people with HIV, existing drug therapies fail to suppress the virus, leading to drug resistance a

2h

Ciircuit-switching tech to help data centers recover from failures

Engineers develop ShareBackup, a hardware and software solution to help data centers recover from failures without slowing applications.

2h

URI chemistry professor develops contaminant detection technique for heparin

In 2008, a contaminant eluded the quality safeguards in the pharmaceutical industry and infiltrated a large portion of the supply of the popular blood thinner heparin, sickening hundreds and killing about 100 in the US.

2h

UVA multidisciplinary engineering team designs technology for smart materials

With inspiration from squid ring teeth, a multidisciplinary team led by UVA engineers has invented a novel way to manufacture smart materials, including fabrics, that can regulate their own thermal properties.

2h

Researchers find pathways that uncover insight into development of lung cancer

Lung cancer results from effects of smoking along with multiple genetic components. A new study conducted at Dartmouth identifies two main pathways for the role of chromosome 15q25.1–a leader in increasing susceptibility to lung cancer–in modifying disease risk. One pathway is implicated in nicotine dependence. The other plays a part in biological processes such as nutrient transfer and immune s

2h

K2's deadly mystery: Nobody knows what’s actually in synthetic marijuana

Health The constantly shifting chemical formula makes illness from these drugs hard to treat. Over the past few years, there’ve been multiple reports of clustered hospitalizations from synthetic marijuana. If the cannabinoid receptors were a dial, the plant would…

2h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Will Elon Musk Really Take Tesla Private?Elon Musk Tesla NYT

Elon Musk’s public and sometimes-controversial tweets have triggered a cascade of events in recent weeks. We discuss on the Gadget Lab podcast.

2h

Automated detection of focal epileptic seizures in a sentinel area of the human brain

In a first-in-humans pilot study, researchers have identified a sentinel area of the brain that may give an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations from focal epilepsy appear. They have also validated an algorithm that can automatically detect that early warning. These two findings offer the possibility of squelching a focal epilepsy seizure — before the patient feels any symptoms —

2h

NASA's GPM analyzes Atlantic Tropical Storm Ernesto's rainfall

NASA found light to moderate rainfall occurring in Tropical Storm Ernesto as it continued on an eastern trek toward Ireland and the United Kingdom. Ireland has already issued a warning for Ernesto.

2h

When flying to Mars is your day job

Living on Mars time, landing nightmares and sometimes spreadsheets… a day in the life of a Nasa engineer.

3h

Texas A&M team develops new way to grow blood vessels

Formation of new blood vessels, a process also known as angiogenesis, is one of the major clinical challenges in wound healing and tissue implants. To address this issue, researchers from Texas A&M University have developed a clay-based platform to deliver therapeutic proteins to the body to assist with the formation of blood vessels.

3h

Q&A: Companions for City Trees

If you’re going to add plants around a street tree, make sure they’re not too thirsty and have shallow roots.

3h

How Amazon could change your evening at the movies

Going to the movies now consists of buying a ticket and sitting through some trailers. What if the entire evening was brought to you by Amazon?

3h

NASA analyzes Typhoon Soulik's water vapor

NASA's Terra satellite looked at water vapor and cloud top temperatures when it passed over the recently strengthened Typhoon Soulik in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

3h

Exploring the relationship between fever and cancer incidence

In 'Toward Antitumor Immunity and Febrile Infections: Gamma/Delta (γδ) T Cells Hypothesis' published in The Quarterly Review of Biology, Wieslaw Kozak, Tomasz Jedrzejewski, Malgorzata Pawlikowska, Jakub Piotrowski, and Sylwia Wrotek propose a mechanistic hypothesis that focuses on the potential impact infectious fever has on a particular subset of T cells, known as gamma/delta (gd) T cells.

3h

HIV and a tale of a few cities

In a pair of new modeling studies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with international colleagues, examined how policy reform in terms of drug decriminalization (in Mexico) and access to drug treatment (in Russia) might affect two regions hard hit by the HIV pandemic: Tijuana, Mexico and the Russian cities of Omsk and Ekaterinburg.

3h

Acid coastal seas off US putting common fish species at risk

Scientists have shown that coastal waters and river estuaries can exhibit unique vulnerabilities to acidification than offshore waters. This acidification, detected in waters off the United States West Coast and the Gulf of Mexico, can lead to disorientation and cognitive problems in some marine fish species, such as salmon, sharks, and cod. This work is presented at the Goldschmidt Conference in

3h

CityU develops the world's first-ever 4D printing for ceramics

A ground-breaking advancement in materials research by successfully developing the world's first-ever 4D printing for ceramics, which are mechanically robust and can have complex shapes. This could turn a new page in the structural application of ceramics.

3h

Acid coastal seas off US putting common fish species at risk

Scientists have shown that coastal waters and river estuaries can exhibit unique vulnerabilities to acidification than offshore waters. This acidification, detected in waters off the United States West Coast and the Gulf of Mexico, can lead to disorientation and cognitive problems in some marine fish species, such as salmon, sharks, and cod. This work is presented at the Goldschmidt Conference in

3h

Scientists deploy damage assessment tool in Laos relief efforts

The July 23 failure of the Xepian-Xe Nam Noy hydropower dam unleashed more than 130 billion gallons of water on rural villages in southern Laos, in Southeast Asia, devastating thousands of houses and businesses and displacing more than 6,000 people. As authorities scrambled to gather information in the wake of the disaster, scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, a

3h

NASA finds Tropical Storm Bebinca moving over Laos, Thailand

NASA's Aqua satellite found strong storms circling the center of Tropical Storm Bebinca as it moved over northern Laos and into Thailand on Aug. 17.

3h

Is it true that ‘rain follows the plow’?

In the 19th century, the “rain follows the plow” myth was a justification for settling the Great Plains. The cultivation of semi-arid to arid land was said to increase rainfall by moistening the soil and humidifying the atmosphere. Subsequent research debunked this myth, though large discrepancies still existed between model representations and actual observations. The research finds that morning

3h

NASA finds Tropical Storm Bebinca moving over Laos, Thailand

NASA's Aqua satellite found strong storms circling the center of Tropical Storm Bebinca as it moved over northern Laos and into Thailand on Aug. 17.

3h

Trump’s Risky War of Choice Against the Generals

This week, beset by bad news about Omarosa Manigault-Newman, President Donald Trump decided to launch a war of choice. The White House announced Wednesday that he had revoked security clearance for John Brennan, who was the CIA director under Barack Obama and has since become a leading Trump critic. Trump also threatened to take clearance away from a slew of other critics. But wars, once started,

3h

One American’s Failed Quest to Protect Civilians in Yemen

Last week, Saudi jets bombed a bus packed with schoolchildren in northern Yemen. The attack, which occurred during a field trip to mark the end of summer classes, killed at least 40 students aged 6 to 11 , and left dozens more wounded, as footage from the scene later showed. After more than three years of war against the Houthi rebels and thousands of casualties, the attack was one of the conflic

3h

Humans have a hard time 'killing' robots, especially when they beg for their lives

Technology Could you pull the plug? When robots ask humans not to be turned off, humans experience a stressful ethical quandary.

3h

What it’s like to photograph Earth from space

Space Chris Hadfield on how to make great photos from the International Space Station. “The world is a very generous photography subject and you have the best tripod in existence.”…

4h

Latest Attraction at French Theme Park: Crows That Pick Up Trash

No, that crow casually holding a cigarette butt in its beak isn’t a smoker. It’s meant to “make people feel a little bit guilty” for littering.

4h

Microfossils, possibly world's oldest, had biological characteristics

Scientists have confirmed that the 3.4-billion-year-old Strelley Pool microfossils had chemical characteristics similar to modern bacteria. This all but confirms their biological origin and ranks them amongs the world's oldest microfossils.

4h

Yuval Noah Harari: why the reluctant guru is upsetting scientists

What could possibly go wrong when a world famous public intellectual grapples with our bewilderingly strange times? Find out in 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

4h

New Scientist Live: can we defend Earth from asteroids?

Ian Carnelli leads a team at the European Space Agency dedicated to asteroid defence – come learn about his mission this September at New Scientist Live

4h

This AI will draw whatever you want – but it’s utterly terrible

Just type in a few words, and this AI will try to draw them. It’s good at textures and colours, but the details can get a bit mixed up

4h

Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

submitted by /u/Jnendy [link] [comments]

4h

Robots as tools and partners in rehabilitation

Why trust should play a crucial part in the development of intelligent machines for medical therapies.

4h

Harnessing energy from algae: Enzyme could help accelerate biofuel production

Researchers have homed in on an enzyme belonging to the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) family as a promising target for increasing biofuel production from the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

4h

Low bandwidth? Use more colors at once

As researchers engineer solutions for eventually replacing electronics with photonics, one team team has simplified the manufacturing process that allows utilizing multiple colors at the same time on an electronic chip instead of a single color at a time.

4h

Astronomers identify some of the oldest galaxies in the universe

Astronomers have found evidence that the faintest satellite galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way galaxy are among the very first galaxies that formed in our universe.

4h

NYU Medical School Students Will Get Free Tuition

The move could have benefits far beyond one medical school — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Low Pay Has Teachers Flocking to the Sharing Economy

Airbnb, the popular platform that lets people rent out their homes and apartments, released the results of a volunteer survey this week containing the striking statistic that nearly one in 10 of its hosts in the United States is an educator. In some states the trend appears to be even more pronounced—more than a quarter of all Airbnb hosts in Utah and Wisconsin, for example, work as teachers or i

4h

Tre sygdomme hvor graviditet virker som medicin

Fra sklerose til kræft. Nogle gange kan graviditet mindske eller forhindre sygdomme.

4h

How Much of an Herbicide Is Safe in Your Cereal?

On Wednesday, the prominent consumer-advocacy group Environmental Working Group, or EWG, released a report that found glyphosate, a common herbicide, in breakfast foods. The report, which focuses on cereals, granola bars, and oatmeal, determined that out of the 45 products tested, only two were free from traces of the herbicide. Twelve samples contained amounts of glyphosate that were lower than

5h

Scientists deploy damage assessment tool in Laos relief efforts

The July 23 failure of the Xepian-Xe Nam Noy hydropower dam unleashed more than 130 billion gallons of water on rural villages in southern Laos, in Southeast Asia, devastating thousands of houses and businesses and displacing more than 6,000 people. As authorities scrambled to gather information in the wake of the disaster, scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., activa

5h

Stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital are less likely to be readmitted

Stroke patients appear to receive better care at teaching hospitals with less of a chance of landing back in a hospital during the early stages of recovery, according to new research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

5h

First science with ALMA's highest-frequency capabilities

The ALMA telescope in Chile has transformed how we see the universe, showing us otherwise invisible parts of the cosmos. This array of incredibly precise antennas studies a comparatively high-frequency sliver of radio light: waves that range from a few tenths of a millimeter to several millimeters in length. Recently, scientists pushed ALMA to its limits, harnessing the array's highest-frequency (

5h

CRISPR powers the hunt for new, better antidepressants

New research takes a different approach to find new types of antidepressants using CRISPR technology. An estimated 13 percent of Americans take antidepressant drugs for depression, anxiety, chronic pain, or sleep problems. For the 14 million Americans who have clinical depression, roughly one third don’t find relief with antidepressants. “The most commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs—such as

5h

Sketchbook | Graphic Review: A Graphic Tribute to a Classic Work of Paleontological Literature

The children’s book author and illustrator David Nytra draws a review of William E. Scheele’s “Prehistoric Animals.”

5h

How salamanders can regrow nearly complete tails but lizards can’t

Differences in stem cells in the spinal cord explain the amphibians’ ability.

5h

Trump asks SEC to consider changing filing rules from quarterly to biannually

After speaking with the world's "top business leaders", President Donald Trump has asked the SEC to study the potential impacts of removing rules that require companies to file reports with the agency every three months. Read More

5h

Like shark attack and the lottery, unconscious bias influences cancer screening

Study shows that doctors with personal experience of cancer are more likely to act against established guidelines to recommend that low-risk women receive ovarian cancer screening.

5h

Five rad and random things I found this week

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 54. It's bananas. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

5h

Synthetic Bacteria Help Treat Phenylketonuria in Mice

The genetically engineered probiotic, already in clinical trials, may ease patients' strict dietary regimes.

5h

Drug Approval Could Boost Research on Marijuana Treatment for Autism

Epidiolex, a cannabis-derived medicine for epilepsy, will prompt federal regulatory changes that could crack open access to study the plant.

5h

Synthetic Cannabinoid K2 Overdoses Are Rampant. Here's Why.

NIDA pharmacologist Michael Baumann explains how "unscrupulous vendors" hijacked compounds used in neuroscience and turned them into dangerous drugs.

5h

Particulate pollution's impact varies greatly depending on where it originated

Aerosols are tiny particles that are spewed into the atmosphere by human activities, including burning coal and wood. They have negative effects on air quality — damaging human health and agricultural productivity. New research demonstrates that the impact these fine particles have on the climate varies greatly depending on where they were released.

5h

Who are you? Royal Institution Christmas lectures will unpick human evolution

Exclusive : former Time Team presenter and anthropologist Alice Roberts says we ‘overegg the uniqueness of humans compared with other animals’ Who are we? It’s a fundamental question that has nagged at thinkers as diverse as Descartes, Aristotle and Simone de Beauvoir, and the conundrum is set to take centre stage this Christmas at Britain’s most prestigious public science lectures. Alice Roberts

5h

Biologists study swift evolutionary changes in acorn-dwelling insects

The relatively swift adaptability of tiny, acorn-dwelling ants to warmer environments could help scientists predict how other species might evolve in the crucible of global climate change.

5h

Radio Atlantic: When Does Hollywood’s Diversity Become Real Representation?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play With movies like Crazy Rich Asians, BlacKkKlansman , and Sorry To Bother You out in theaters, Hollywood is trying to mute the complaint that it lacks racial and ethnic diversity, to avoid another #OscarsSoWhite. But depicting people of color onscreen was always the easy part. Next comes a harder question: how authentic

5h

Beta Test: Live Player Overview

It’s finally time to beta test the most requested feature by players: live player overview. This feature brings the overview to life by showing the anonymous location of active Eyewirers, differentiating between Play, Reap, and Complete. Since this beta test will only work when there are several people simultaneously online, we’re offering two beta sessions on Monday, Aug 20. First session: 11-11

5h

First science with ALMA's highest-frequency capabilities

A team of scientists using the highest-frequency capabilities of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array(ALMA) has uncovered jets of warm water vapor streaming away from a newly forming star. The researchers also detected the 'fingerprints' of an astonishing assortment of molecules near this stellar nursery.

5h

Unexpected future boost of methane possible from Arctic permafrost

New NASA-funded research has discovered that Arctic permafrost's expected gradual thawing and the associated release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere may actually be sped up by instances of a relatively little known process called abrupt thawing. Abrupt thawing takes place under a certain type of Arctic lake, known as a thermokarst lake that forms as permafrost thaws.

5h

Egyptian Papyrus Reveals Rare Details of Ancient Medical Practices

New translations of ancient medical texts detail Egyptians' scientific and medical knowledge.

5h

Amazon's Fire TV Edition is a cord-cutter's dream—when it works

Amazon's Fire TV Edition, a $299 smart TV made by Toshiba, sounds like a cord-cutter's dream. Which it is. If you have an antenna. Cable and satellite subscribers will have to endure some hurdles.

5h

A Bot Panic Hits Amazon Mechanical Turk

Concerned social scientists turned their analytical skills onto one of their most widely used research tools this week: Amazon's Mechanical Turk.

6h

Three factors could explain physician burnout

In just three years, physician burnout increased from 45.5 percent to 54.4 percent, according to a paper authored by doctors at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine. They offer three factors that they say contribute to this burnout.

6h

Tree rings date eruption of ancient Thera volcano

New analyses that use tree rings could shed light on discrepancies between archeological and radiocarbon methods of dating the ancient volcanic eruption of Thera. “It’s about tying together a timeline of ancient Egypt, Greece, Turkey, and the rest of the Mediterranean at this critical point in the ancient world—that’s what dating Thera can do,” says lead author Charlotte Pearson, an assistant pro

6h

Amerikanernes superjager F-22 træner med europæiske F-35

Det meget roste amerikanske kampfly F-22 Raptor er på midlertidig udplacering i Europa.

6h

NYU’s Free Medical-School Tuition Could Funnel More Doctors to Primary Care

Medical school costs a lot of money that a lot of people don’t have. That often means students do a bit of cost-benefit analysis: Is it worth it to take on hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt now for the possibility of making hundreds of thousands of dollars a year later? New York University’s School of Medicine is trying remove that calculation as a factor in students’ career decision makin

6h

Why some people with brain markers of Alzheimer's have no dementia

A new study has uncovered why some people that have brain markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) never develop the classic dementia that others do. The results showed that resilient individuals had a unique synaptic protein signature that set them apart from both demented AD patients and normal subjects with no AD pathology.

6h

Statins associated with improvement of rare lung disease

Researchers have found that cholesterol-lowering statins may improve the conditions of people with a rare lung disease called autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The research also suggested that two new tests could help diagnose the condition.

6h

Study confirms truth behind 'Darwin's moth'

Scientists have revisited — and confirmed — one of the most famous textbook examples of evolution in action.

6h

Quantum material is promising 'ion conductor' for research, new technologies

Researchers have shown how to shuttle lithium ions back and forth into the crystal structure of a quantum material, representing a new avenue for research and potential applications in batteries, 'smart windows' and brain-inspired computers containing artificial synapses.

6h

Ants, acorns and climate change

The relatively swift adaptability of tiny, acorn-dwelling ants to warmer environments could help scientists predict how other species might evolve in the crucible of global climate change, according to Case Western Reserve biologists.

6h

Historically black schools pay more to issue bonds, researchers find

After examining the underwriting fees — the fees that underwriters charge a school to bring a bond offering to investors — Paul Gao and his co-authors found that HBCU issuance costs were about 20 percent higher than for non-HBCUs.

6h

Prescriptions for opioid use disorder treatment, opioid pain relievers after ACA Medicaid expansion

Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was associated with an overall increase in people filling prescriptions for buprenorphine with naloxone, which is a treatment for opioid use disorder, as well as an increase in people filling prescriptions for opioid pain relievers (OPRs) paid for by Medicaid in a data analysis from five states.

6h

Better access to quality cancer care may reduce rural and urban disparities

When enrolled in a cancer clinical trial, the differences in survival rates between rural and urban patients are significantly reduced, SWOG study results show.

6h

As body mass index increases, blood pressure may as well

Body mass index is positively associated with blood pressure, according to the ongoing study of 1.7 million Chinese men and women being conducted by researchers at the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) and in China. These findings appear in the Aug. 17 issue of JAMA Network Open.

6h

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional 'protein knockdown' in vertebrates

The research groups led by Dr. Jörg Mansfeld of the Biotechnology Center of the TU Dresden (BIOTEC) and Dr. Caren Norden of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) have developed a novel synthetic antibody that paves the way for an improved functional analysis of proteins. They combined auxin-inducible "protein knockdown" with a synthetic antibody to not only obs

6h

Team Phoenix wins again!

Woohoo! It seems Team Phoenix is tough to beat. Congratulations to the rematch champions! And who knows, another rematch could be in the future… keep your eyes peeled! Artwork by Daniela Gamba

6h

How the sunflower transformed from a garden novelty to a mighty beast

Environment Demand for the plant's oil fueled the rise in popularity. Over the last 60 years, changes to our diets and industrial needs mean the area of global oil crop production has more than doubled. Four oil crops consume most of this…

6h

Color effects from transparent 3-D printed nanostructures

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and certain color effects are impossible to achieve. The natural world, however, also exhibits structural coloration, where the microstructure of an object causes various colors to appear. Peacock feathers, for instance, are pigmented brown, but—becau

6h

Lockheed Martin gives first look into where astronauts may live on missions to deep space

A massive cylindrical habitat may one day house up to four astronauts as they make the trek to deep space.

6h

Texas plants spewed 8 million pounds of air pollutants as Hurricane Harvey hit

Floodwater caused most of the damage when Hurricane Harvey slammed into the Texas coast a year ago. But that region's air quality was also harmed when the Category 4 hurricane swept through the U.S. oil refining and chemical heartland.

6h

Moderate carbohydrate intake may be best for health, study suggests

A new study has found that diets both low and high in carbohydrates were linked with an increase in mortality, while moderate consumers of carbohydrates had the lowest risk of mortality. The study also found that low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fats from plant sources were associated with lower risk of mortality compared to those that replace carbohydrates with proteins

6h

For children with complex medical situations, a new roadmap for improving health

A team of UCLA researchers has developed a set of health outcome measures for children with medical complexity, using a software program that aggregates the latest research and expertise about how to treat their conditions. The team's work, published in the September issue of the journal Pediatrics, proposes a standard to shape the ideal model of care for such children.

6h

More efficient security for cloud-based machine learning

A novel encryption method devised by MIT researchers secures data used in online neural networks, without dramatically slowing their runtimes. This approach holds promise for using cloud-based neural networks for medical-image analysis and other applications that use sensitive data.

6h

Lack of funding leaves world's roads in disrepair

In an age of austerity and budget cutbacks, the deadly bridge collapse in Genoa, Italy, has put the spotlight clearly on the lack of public funding for road networks across the globe, from France and Germany, to the United States and beyond.

6h

How urban spaces can preserve history and build community | Walter Hood

Can public spaces both reclaim the past and embrace the future? Landscape architect Walter Hood has explored this question over the course of an iconic career, with projects ranging from Lafayette Square Park in San Francisco to the upcoming International African American Museum in Charleston, South Carolina. In this inspiring talk packed with images of his work, Hood shares the five simple concep

6h

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature

The transition from light bulbs to LEDs has drastically cut the amount of electricity we use for lighting. Most of the electricity consumed by incandescent bulbs was, after all, dissipated as heat. We may now be on the verge of a comparable breakthrough in electronic computer components. Up to now, these have been run on electricity, generating unwanted heat. If spin current were employed instead,

6h

Robots as tools and partners in rehabilitation

In future decades, the need for effective strategies for medical rehabilitation will increase significantly, because patients' rate of survival after diseases with severe functional deficits, such as a stroke, will increase. Socially assistive robots (SARs) are already being used in rehabilitation for this reason. In the journal Science Robotics, a research team led by neuroscientist Dr. Philipp K

6h

T-Mobile gets rid of robot system for customer service callsOnePlus T-Mobile US

T-Mobile is getting rid of that robotic voice on its customer service lines, the company announced Wednesday.

6h

16 going on 66: Will you be the same person 50 years from now?

From 16 to 66 your personality will change and over time you will generally become more emotionally stable. But don't compare yourself to others; those who are the most emotionally stable when young are probably going to continue being the most stable as they age. A University of Houston psychologist reports the findings in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

7h

Is Walmart's tech investment in San Diego a sign of bigger things to come?

A technology company moving from a dated 9,000 square-foot office to a modern 30,000 square-foot space usually doesn't portend a major shift in San Diego's corporate dynamics. But when that company is the nation's largest retailer and its motivation is rooted in out-recruiting its biggest rival, both of which previously ignored the region, then a sea change seems in the works.

7h

Why mosquitoes bite some people more than others

Surprisingly few of the more than 3,000 mosquito species actually specialise in biting humans. Instead, most are opportunistic feeders – feeding when they are able and from lots of different sources. But Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae are well known for their preference for human blood and their role as vectors which transmit disease in humans. Ae. aegypti has been linked to zika and dengue,

7h

Scientists examine the relative impact of proximity to seed sources

A new research study published in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management tackles an important, unresolved question in the biology of invasive plants. Which is most important to the establishment of new invasive communities—proximity to seed sources, canopy disturbance, or soil disturbance?

7h

Novel nanoparticle-based approach detects and treats oral plaque without drugs

When the good and bad bacteria in our mouth become imbalanced, the bad bacteria form a biofilm (aka plaque), which can cause cavities, and if left untreated over time, can lead to cardiovascular and other inflammatory diseases like diabetes and bacterial pneumonia.

7h

Forskere: Patienter har brug for strengere indeklimakrav på sygehuse

Bygningsreglementet stiller ikke særlige krav til indeklimaet på hospitaler eller andre bygninger, hvor brugerne har særlige behov. Men ifølge forskere i indeklima bør der skelnes mere mellem forskellige typer af byggeri.

7h

The U.S. Is Developing a New Way to Weaken Iran

Sixty-five years ago this week, a CIA-backed coup toppled Mohammad Mosaddegh, Iran’s democratically elected prime minister. The goal of the coup was to strengthen the hand of the West’s ally Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. On Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the creation of a new Iran Action Group to coordinate U.S. policy toward the Islamic Republic in the wake of the U.S. wit

7h

A bee economist explains honey bees' vital role in growing tasty almonds

It's sometimes reported that one in every three bites of food depends on bees. As is often the case when an easy to grasp notion spreads, there's a dose of truth and a dollop of exaggeration.

7h

Scientists find titanium dioxide from sunscreen is polluting beaches

Scientists have found that sunscreen from bathers releases significant quantities of polluting TiO2 (titanium dioxide) into the sea. This has the potential to harm marine life. This work, which comes from research on beaches in the South of France, was presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Boston (see below).

7h

Microfluidic chip for analysis of single cells

A few little cells that are different from the rest can have a big effect. For example, individual cancer cells may be resistant to a specific chemotherapy—causing a relapse in a patient who would otherwise be cured. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a microfluidics-based chip for the manipulation and subsequent nucleic-acid analysis of individual cells. The techniqu

7h

A long, hot summer always raises the pulses of archaeologists | Becky Wragg Sykes

Spectral pleasure gardens and the ancient routes of hunter-gatherers are only some of the forgotten gems coming to light We buckle in, the engine roars to life, and we begin creeping across the airfield; wings wobble alarmingly with acceleration, then that stomach-dropping lurch pulls us away from the ground. Rising skywards, nervousness distils to anticipation for the priceless views of the great

7h

Du bliver fysisk og psykisk stærkere af at være gravid

Et barn i maven fungerer lidt ligesom doping, og fødslen gør kvinder bedre til at udholde smerter.

7h

Researchers use bacteria to cure fungal infections

Researchers in the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology's Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Engineering have cured fungal infections using a soil-dwelling bacteria. The findings of the research led by Assistant Professor Boaz Mizrahi and conducted by his student Maayan Lupton and Dr. Ayelet Orbach were published recently in Advanced Functional Materials.

7h

Scientists discover natural plant-based food preservative

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have discovered a plant-based food preservative that is more effective than artificial preservatives. The organic preservative comprises naturally occurring flavonoids, a diverse group of phytonutrients found in almost all fruits and vegetables. The flavonoids created by NTU scientists have strong antimicrobial and antioxidant

7h

New telescope chases the mysteries of radio flashes and dark energy

South Africa is becoming one of the world's most important radio astronomy hubs, thanks in large part to its role as co-host of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Now a new telescope is being unveiled that will be built at the SKA South Africa site in the Karoo. The Hydrogen Intensity and Real-time Analysis eXperiment (HIRAX) project is an international collaboration being led by scientists from th

7h

Pigs form a visual concept of human faces

Contrary to previous studies, pigs appear to have better visual discrimination abilities than had previously been assumed. Cognition researchers from the Messerli Research Institute showed in a new study that pigs not only discriminate between front and back views of human heads but also that the animals apparently use certain facial features such as our eyes or mouth as cues. The results shed a n

7h

The plastic waste crisis is an opportunity for the U.S. to get serious about recycling at home

A global plastic waste crisis is building, with major implications for health and the environment. Under its so-called "National Sword" policy, China has sharply reduced imports of foreign scrap materials. As a result, piles of plastic waste are building up in ports and recycling facilities across the United States.

7h

Warning colours are getting warmer

As temperatures in Australia and around the world increase, for hibiscus harlequin bugs, the future is orange.

7h

Approval of first RNA interference drug – why the excitement?

Small interfering RNA sounds like something from a science fiction novel rather than a revolutionary type of medicine. But this odd-sounding new drug offers a novel strategy for treating disease by targeting the root cause rather than just the symptoms. This is an exciting approach because it enhances the effectiveness of the treatment and reduces side effects.

7h

Progress toward personalized medicine

A few little cells that are different from the rest can have a big effect. For example, individual cancer cells may be resistant to a specific chemotherapy — causing a relapse in a patient who would otherwise be cured. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a microfluidics-based chip for the manipulation and subsequent nucleic-acid analysis of individual cells. The techn

7h

Scientists examine the relative impact of proximity to seed sources

A new research study published in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management tackles an important, unresolved question in the biology of invasive plants. Which is most important to the establishment of new invasive communities — proximity to seed sources, canopy disturbance, or soil disturbance?

7h

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional 'protein knockdown' in vertebrates

The research groups led by Dr. Jörg Mansfeld of the Biotechnology Center of the TU Dresden (BIOTEC) and Dr. Caren Norden of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) have developed a novel synthetic antibody that paves the way for an improved functional analysis of proteins.

7h

‘Teens get a bad rap’: the neuroscientist championing moody adolescents

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore’s studies of the adolescent brain have won her awards. So when she says GCSEs are damaging to teens’ health, perhaps we should listen Annual media coverage of August’s exam results has traditionally conformed to an unwritten rule that all photos must show euphoric teenagers celebrating multiple A*s. This year, the images may tell a different story. Radical reforms to GCSEs ar

7h

Seen from the air, the dry summer reveals an ancient harvest of archaeological finds

For an aerial archaeologist 2018 has been a bumper year. The long, hot summer has revealed ancient landscapes not visible from ground level, but easily recognised in fields of growing crops from the air.

7h

More color and smaller lasers could speed up computer chips

Researchers have simplified the manufacturing process for creating electronic chips that can use multiple colors of light at the same time instead of just one. The rainbow is not just colors—each color of light has its own frequency. The more frequencies you have, the higher the bandwidth for transmitting information. Using multiple colors at once would broaden the bandwidth of not only today’s e

7h

Disenchantment Subverts the Cartoon Fairy Tale

Disenchantment ’s biggest middle finger to fairy-tale tropes comes midway through the first episode, when Princess “Bean” Tiabeanie (Abbi Jacobson) refuses to marry the prince she’s been contracted to by her father. But the subtler subversions are more satisfying. Bean’s getting-ready routine involves not bluebirds and singing mice, but leeches, one for each cheek to give her a healthy glow (“Who

7h

Paul Gilding: How Do We Continue To Grow If The Earth Has Reached Its Limit?

Environmental activist Paul Gilding says the world has been growing too fast for too long. And now…the Earth is full. The only solution, he says, is to radically change the way we consume. (Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED)

7h

This gene mutation causes some repeat miscarriages

A couple’s tragic miscarriages have led to the discovery of a gene mutation underlying hydrops fetalis—a fatal condition to fetuses due to fluid buildup in the space among organs. The proteins at the center of this finding have already been implicated in a number of diseases, opening avenues of potential drug discovery related to migraines, diabetes, osteoporosis, and other conditions. The study

7h

Scientists Crack Spaghetti Snapping Mystery

Physics Researchers found that adding a full twist made it possible to break spaghetti in half. 08/16/2018 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor To read more…

7h

Robots as tools and partners in rehabilitation

Why trust should play a crucial part in the development of intelligent machines for medical therapies.

7h

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature

Up to now, electronic computer components have been run on electricity, generating unwanted heat. If spin current were employed instead, computers and similar devices could be operated in a much more energy-efficient manner. Researchers have now discovered an effect that could make such a transition to spin current a reality.

7h

Climate Benefits of Trendy E-Scooters Remain Unclear

Scooter companies tout low carbon footprints, but cities see regulatory headaches — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

How to make retro video games look good on your modern TV

DIY Play on. When you plug an old game console into an HDTV, you’ll see an underwhelming mess of blurry, laggy video with muted colors. Luckily, you can do a few things to make it…

7h

Are our wild animals growing old gracefully?

For most of us, the body's deterioration is an unavoidable part of getting older. This age-related decline, known as "senescence", can occur subtly and slowly for some individuals, while for others it happens much faster. A researcher from The Australian National University is trying to find out why.

8h

Novel nanoparticle-based approach detects and treats oral plaque without drugs

When the good and bad bacteria in our mouth become imbalanced, the bad bacteria form a biofilm (aka plaque), which can cause cavities, and if left untreated over time, can lead to cardiovascular and other inflammatory diseases like diabetes and bacterial pneumonia. A team of researchers from the University of Illinois has recently devised a practical nanotechnology-based method for detecting and t

8h

AI could make dodgy lip sync dubbing a thing of the past

Researchers have developed a system using artificial intelligence that can edit the facial expressions of actors to accurately match dubbed voices, saving time and reducing costs for the film industry.

8h

Scientists identify enzyme that could help accelerate biofuel production

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have honed in on an enzyme belonging to the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) family as a promising target for increasing biofuel production from the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

8h

Google just gave control over data center cooling to an AI

In a first, Google is trusting a self-taught algorithm to manage part of its infrastructure.

8h

Newly discovered class of molecules may boost cancer vaccine development

Cancer vaccines are designed to heighten the immune system's awareness of a tumor's unique features, boosting its ability to recognize, attack, and destroy the cancer. To date, effective cancer vaccines have focused on what are called "neoantigens," tumor-specific peptides that result from acquired mutations. But not every tumor produces distinct antigens that the immune system can recognize. As a

8h

Acceleration of mountain glacier melt could impact Pacific Northwest water supplies

Accelerated melting of mountain glaciers in the Cascade Range could impact water supplies in the Pacific Northwest region over the coming decades, according to new research.

8h

Historically black schools pay more to issue bonds, researchers find

A new study from the University of Notre Dame found that historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) pay higher fees to issue tax-exempt bonds than non-HBCUs. And the evidence points to racial discrimination as the cause.

8h

Racial and gender discrimination among teens exposed to dating violence

Teen dating violence (TDV) is an urgent public health concern associated with a range of lasting mental, sexual, and behavioral health consequences. Studies have revealed high rates of dating violence and sexual coercion among youth of color, with several studies finding black female teens reporting the highest rates of victimization among all demographic groups.

8h

What is NASA's Heat Melt Compactor?

Dealing with trash is a challenge wherever people work and live, and space is no exception. Astronauts produce a couple of pounds of trash per crew member per day. To better manage this, NASA is developing a new trash processing system to demonstrate on the International Space Station. This work is critical for potential future missions traveling farther from Earth, to the moon and Mars, and for l

8h

Physicists propose new model to study pairing properties of nuclei

A team of Ohio University nuclear physicists has proposed a new theoretical model for calculating pairing properties of atomic nuclei including those found in extreme astrophysical environments. As in some solids in which two interacting electrons pair up to act as one object that leads to superconductivity, interacting neutrons (or protons) in nuclei pair up to cause superfluidity (or superconduct

8h

Bioengineers borrow from electronics industry to get stem cells to shape up

To understand how cells in the body behave, bioengineers create miniature models of the cells' environment in their lab. But recreating this niche environment is incredibly complex in a controlled setting, because researchers are still learning all the factors that influence cell behavior and growth. By observing and then modifying their engineered mini-models, scientists are better able to identi

8h

Every (fifth) breath we take—friends of phytoplankton and why they matter

In the world's oceans, microbes capture solar energy, catalyze key biogeochemical transformations of important elements, produce and consume greenhouse gases, and comprise the base of the marine food web. Microbial ecologists working within Sonya Dyhrman's laboratory at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory strive to understand the oceans' ecosystem processes by studying a multitude of creatures, most

8h

Virtual reality providing real-world literacy and numeracy learning tool

Virtual reality is moving beyond purely entertainment to become a potential tool in improving literacy, and the University of Otago is behind one ground-breaking approach.

8h

Global study shows environmentally friendly farming can increase productivity

A major new study involving researchers from the University of York has measured a global shift towards more sustainable agricultural systems that provide environmental improvements at the same time as increases in food production.

8h

From pine cones to an adaptive shading system

An adjustable shading system that adapts itself independently over the course of the day, without sensors or motors and largely maintenance-free? It really is possible: an ETH doctoral student at the Institute for Building Materials has developed an alternative to motor-driven sunshades.

8h

Scientists improve deep learning method for neural networks

Researchers from the Institute of Cyber Intelligence Systems at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) have recently developed a new learning model for the restricted Boltzmann machine (a neural network), which optimizes the processes of semantic encoding, visualization and data recognition. The results of this research are published in the journal Optical Memory and Neural Networ

8h

Researchers unravel the age of fine tree roots

The researchers at the Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL used thin sections of roots less than two millimetres thick to identify the tree rings of several hundred spruce (Picea abies), pine (Pinus sylvestris), beech (Fagus sylvatica) and dwarf birch (Betula nana) roots. This approach enabled them to determine the age of the fine roots taken from trees in Switzerland, Germany, Sweden and Russia.

8h

The week in wildlife – in pictures

An anaesthetised polar bear, a surprising pine marten and a potty-mouthed parrot are among this week’s images Continue reading…

8h

To find and disarm: Scientists develop platform to kill cancer cells

The new treatment will serve as both diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors. This breakthrough in the technologies of cancer diagnosis and treatment was made by an interdisciplinary Russian-German collaboration of chemists, physicists, and biologists from NUST MISIS, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University (RNRMU), and the University of Duisburg

8h

Scientists find titanium dioxide from sunscreen is polluting beaches

Scientists have found that sunscreen from bathers releases significant quantities of polluting TiO2 (titanium dioxide) into the sea. This has the potential to harm marine life. This work, which comes from research on beaches in the South of France, was presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Boston (see below).

8h

Color effects from transparent 3D printed nanostructures

Structural coloration means that the microstructure of an object causes various colors to appear. For industry, this is an attractive alternative to coloring with pigments. But so far, scientists had primarily experimented with nanostructures observed in nature, or with simple, regular designs. Computer scientists from IST Austria and KAUST now take a different, innovative approach: their tool aut

8h

Shark Week's Biggest Breakthroughs

From the time scientists tagged an elusive, rarely seen shark to clocking the top speed of the Mako shark, take a look at some Shark Week firsts. Stream Shark Week Episodes: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twi

8h

Oh Hey, Don't Steal Reviews, and the Rest of This Week in Games

In this week's Replay column we've got a plagiarism scandal, 'Diablo III' on the Nintendo Switch, and other disruptions. Let's dive in.

8h

How Apple's iPhoneX Changed Smartphone Design in 2018

The notch. The biometrics. The animoji. Apple's flagship smartphone is the one everyone's trying to copy this year.

8h

Afsluttende testkørsler i gang: Letbane til Odder forventes at åbne inden 1. september

I Aarhus kører man nu de sidste testkørsler til Odder, og den officielle udmelding lyder stadig, at strækningen vil blive taget i brug i løbet af august. Antallet af afgange vil dog stort set være det samme som før Letbanen.

8h

Researchers develop irregular-shaped laser to tackle laser instability

An international research team of scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Yale University and Imperial College London has designed a new way to build high-powered lasers that could result in stable beams, overcoming a long-standing limitation in conventional lasers. In high-powered lasers, which are used in materials processing, laser surgery and LiDar, laser instabilities oft

8h

Statins associated with improvement of rare lung disease

Researchers have found that cholesterol-lowering statins may improve the conditions of people with a rare lung disease called autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The research also suggested that two new tests could help diagnose the condition.

8h

Why adding bugs to software can make it safer

Filling code with benign bugs overwhelms malicious attackers looking for more serious errors, cybersecurity researchers say.

8h

Cheese found in an Egyptian tomb is at least 3,200 years old

Solid cheese preserved in an ancient Egyptian tomb may be the world’s oldest.

8h

Image: Sun's magnetic field modeled

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) scientists used their computer models to generate a view of the Sun's magnetic field on August 10, 2018.

8h

Narrow-beam laser technology enables communications between underwater vehicles

Nearly five years ago, NASA and Lincoln Laboratory made history when the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) used a pulsed laser beam to transmit data from a satellite orbiting the moon to Earth—more than 239,000 miles—at a record-breaking download speed of 622 megabits per second.

8h

Rovio shares lifted as 'Angry Birds 2' sales fly higher

Finnish game maker Rovio Entertainment on Friday said sales of the sequel to its flagship Angry Birds game hit a new record as the group's profit and revenue in the second quarter beat analyst's expectations.

9h

How Einstein's equivalence principle extends to the quantum world

How Einstein's equivalence principle extends to the quantum world has been puzzling physicists for decades, but a team including a University of Queensland researcher has found the key to this question.

9h

Interactive software tool makes complex mold design simple

Most of the plastic objects we see are created using injection molding, but designing such molds is a difficult task, usually requiring experts. Now, computer scientists from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), the University of Tokyo, and CONICET have created an interactive design tool that allows non-experts to create molds for an object of their choice. The software w

9h

Top cancer scientist loses £3.5m of funding after bullying claims

Nazneen Rahman resigned from post before disciplinary action could be taken One of Britain’s leading cancer scientists has had £3.5m in grant money revoked after allegations of bullying by 45 current and former colleagues. Prof Nazneen Rahman, who resigned from her post at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) in London last month, is the first scientist to be sanctioned under anti-bullying rule

9h

Software predicts landslides weeks, not hours, in advance

Researchers have developed a new software tool that predicts the boundaries of where landslides will occur two weeks before they happen. Landslides—masses of rock, earth, or debris moving down a slope—happen everywhere. The effect on communities, the economy, and most importantly, lives, can be devastating. A recent landslide at a jade mine in Myanmar, for example, claimed at least 27 lives. In o

9h

Scientists turn to the quantum realm to improve energy transportation

Ant-Man knows the quantum realm holds shocking revelations and irrational solutions. Taking a page from the Marvel Universe, researchers based at the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Tokyo, Japan, designed a more efficient quantum transport system by adding even more noise to it. They published their results on July 24 in npj Quantum Information.

9h

Efficient glycopeptide separation achieved by interfacially polymerized polymer particles

Chinese researchers have developed interfacially polymerized porous polymer particles for low-abundance glycopeptide separation. These polymer particles with hydrophilic-hydrophobic heterostructured nanopores can separate low-abundance glycopeptides from complex biological samples with high-abundance background molecules efficiently.

9h

Scientists find coarse resolution models underestimate future Mei-yu rainfall

Climate models are indispensable tools for future climate projection, including predictions of the Mei-yu front rainfall, which is the major rain-bearing system of the East Asian summer monsoon. Adaptation to climate change relies heavily on the data of climate projection from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). However, resolutions of CMIP models such as CMIP5 are generally around 1

9h

Patients, doctors dissatisfied by Electronic Health Records

Electronic Health Records are intended to streamline and improve access to information — and have been shown to improve quality of care — but a new study shows they also leave both doctors and patients unsatisfied, even after full implementation.

9h

How do plants rest photosynthetic activity at night?

Photosynthesis, the process by which plants generate food, is a powerful piece of molecular machinery that needs sunlight to run. The proteins involved in photosynthesis need to be 'on' when they have the sunlight they need to function, but in the dark, when photosynthesis is not possible, they need to idle, like the engine of a car at a traffic light. They do this by a process called 'redox regul

9h

Volcano eruptions at different latitudes impact sea surface temperature differently

Volcanic eruptions are among the most important natural causes of climate change, playing a leading role over the past millennium. Injections of sulfate aerosols into the lower stratosphere reduce the incoming solar radiation, in turn cooling the surface. As a natural external forcing to the Earth's climate system, the impact of volcanic aerosols on the climate has been of great concern to the sci

9h

New 'droughty' soils model for Pacific Northwest could aid forest health in changing climate

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

9h

Six things about Opportunity's recovery efforts

NASA's Opportunity rover has been silent since June 10, when a planet-encircling dust storm cut off solar power for the nearly-15-year-old rover. Now that scientists think the global dust storm is "decaying"—meaning more dust is falling out of the atmosphere than is being raised back into it—skies might soon clear enough for the solar-powered rover to recharge and attempt to "phone home."

9h

Magnetized inflow accreting to center of Milky Way galaxy

Are magnetic fields an important guiding force for gas accreting to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) like the one that our Milky Way galaxy hosts? The role of magnetic fields in gas accretion is little understood, and trying to observe it has been challenging to astronomers. Researchers at the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA), Taiwan, led by Dr. Pei-Ying Hsieh, have

9h

Dominant men make decisions faster

Men who exhibit high social dominance make faster decisions than low-dominance men even outside a social context, finds a large behavioral study.

9h

Another way for stellar-mass black holes to grow larger

A trio of researchers with The University of Hong Kong, Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics in Taiwan and Northwestern University in the U.S., has come up with an alternative theory to explain how some stellar-mass black holes can grow bigger than others. In their paper published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Shu-Xu Yi, K.S. Cheng and Ronald Taam describe their theory a

9h

Rektor og ekspert: Smartphones hører til i skolen

I Frankrig har politikerne bandlyst mobiltelefoner i skoletiden. Men herhjemme bør vi holde os fra forbud, for teknologien er essentiel for børn og unges uddannelse.

9h

Entire Bread Wheat Genome Fully Annotated

It took an international group of researchers 13 years to crack the code and their efforts are already bearing fruit—one study has pinned down the genes responsible for wheat allergies and sensitivity.

9h

Protecting the power grid: Advanced plasma switch for more efficient transmission

Article describes research to design an advanced and cost-effective power switch to protect the US electric grid.

9h

Tibetan sheep highly susceptible to human plague, originates from marmots

In the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, one of the region's highest risk areas for human plague, Himalayan marmots are the primary carriers of the infectious bacterium Y. pestis. Y. pestis infection can be transmitted to humans and other animals by the marmots' parasitic fleas. Researchers determine that Tibetan sheep, who make up about one-third of China's total sheep population, also carry this disease an

9h

Whole blood test for toxoplasmosis is sensitive, specific

Transmission of toxoplasmosis from mother to fetus can lead to severe congenital problems and fetal death, and tests for the parasitic infection during pregnancy are critical. Now, researchers have showed the efficacy of a low-cost whole blood test for toxoplasmosis.

9h

99-million-year-old beetle trapped in amber served as pollinator to evergreen cycads

Flowering plants are well known for their special relationship to the insects and other animals that serve as their pollinators. But, before the rise of angiosperms, another group of unusual evergreen gymnosperms, known as cycads, may have been the first insect-pollinated plants. Now, researchers have uncovered the earliest definitive fossil evidence of that intimate relationship between cycads an

9h

Physicists fight laser chaos with quantum chaos to improve laser performance

To tame chaos in powerful semiconductor lasers, which causes instabilities, scientists have introduced another kind of chaos.

9h

Freaking out about heavy metals in your food? Here's what you should know

Health Testing has many concerned, but don’t panic just yet. Baby food is just the latest product to be found containing potentially hazardous levels of heavy metals. But what are heavy metals anyway, and why are they so…

9h

Genoa bridge collapse – what went wrong and are other bridges at risk?

A large portion of motorway bridge in Genoa, Italy has collapsed killing 38 people. Here’s what we know so far about what went wrong

9h

Banana-y bread and onion beer: How yeast can trick our tastebuds

Maker of beer, bread and wine, yeast is our biggest microbial friend. Now we're engineering weird new flavours with it – even lager that tastes of something

9h

It’s time to embrace video games as an Olympic sport

They may compete from the comfort of a chair, but video gamers are in the mix at this year's Asian games and are on track for Olympic stardom, says Mark Zastrow

9h

Her er køreplanen for opdatering af Sundhedsplatformen

17 nye forbedringer af medicinhåndtering i Sundhedsplatformen bliver udskudt til februar, viser ny plan fra Region Hovedstaden.

9h

Hovedstaden vil bruge syv mia. kr. på renovering af hospitaler

Tiden er inde til at iværksætte en stor og grundig renovering af hospitalerne i Region Hovedstaden. Derfor sætter regionsrådet penge af til en omfattende renovering.

9h

Løkke lader regionerne svæve i uvished

Regeringen vil fremlægge reform, der skal sikre bedre sammenhæng i det nære sundhedsvæsen. Det kan betyde »strukturelle forandringer i sundhedsvæsenet« siger statsministeren, der ikke vil frede regionerne.

9h

The Case of a Revolutionary (But Imaginary?) Superconductor

If the unconfirmed claims of a room temperature superconductor are real, this is _bonkers_.

9h

Sidewalk Labs Wants to Remake Toronto With Flexible Streets

Google's sister company intends to rethink how cities work, and that means adding some flexibility to how their public spaces are designed.

9h

A galaxy 11.3 billion light-years away appears filled with dark matter

The “Cosmic Seagull,” a distant galaxy magnified by a gravitational lens, seems chock-full of dark matter, in contrast with other galaxies almost as far away.

9h

Image of the Day: Revival

Salamanders’ and lizards’ tail regeneration depends on the quality of their neural stem cells.

9h

Sex, Drugs and Self-Control

It's not just about rebellion. Neuroscience is revealing adolescents' rich and nuanced relationship with risky behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Chipotle Outbreak That Sickened Nearly 650 People Was Caused by This Bacteria

The source of the outbreak that sickened nearly 650 people at a Chipotle in Ohio last month has been identified.

10h

Eating Some Carbs, But Not Too Many, Could Help You Live Longer, Study Suggests

Eating carbohydrates in moderation may be best for boosting longevity.

10h

Minister til sag om lange fastholdelser: En form for tvang skal ikke erstattes med andre

Sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) understreger, at den politiske målsætning om at reducere psykiatriens brug af tvang ikke kun handler om bæltefikseringer – den gælder alle former for tvang.

10h

When sulfur disappears without trace

Many natural products and drugs feature a so-called dicarbonyl motif— in certain cases, however, their preparation poses a challenge to organic chemists. In their most recent work, Nuno Maulide and his coworkers from the University of Vienna present a new route for these molecules. They use oxidized sulfur compounds, even though sulfur is not included in the final product. The results are now publ

10h

This company embeds microchips in its employees, and they love it

Last August, 50 employees at Three Square Market got RFID chips in their hands. Now 80 have them.

10h

The Dangerous Desires in Mitski’s Songs

“It’s not like it just pours out,” Mitski Miyawaki says of her music in the press materials for her new album, Be the Cowboy . “It’s not like I’m a vessel.” This is not, really, what artists are supposed to say. They’re supposed to go on about the mysteriousness of creation, about surrendering to the muse, and about works that spring fully formed from their flesh like xenomorphs from space travel

10h

Samsung Galaxy Note 9: Review, Price, and Where to Buy

The Note 9 comes with a spiffed up camera, more storage than you'll ever need, and a stylus that doubles as a remote control.

10h

AI Is the Future—But Where Are the Women?

Just 12 percent of machine learning researchers are women—a worrying statistic for a field supposedly reshaping society.

10h

Get an Inside Look at SpaceX's Astronaut Training Sims

SpaceX's first crew is starting training on cockpit simulators and replicas of the spacecraft that will take them to the ISS.

10h

DTU-professor: Brokollaps ser ud til at være udløst af bristet stag

Ud fra videooptagelser af italiensk brokollaps og konstruktionstegninger, mener DTU-professor at ulykken sandsynligvis skyldes, at et af broens stag er knækket eller gået løs.

10h

Fake America great again

Inside the race to catch the worryingly real fakes that can be made using artificial intelligence.

10h

Forget the Moon

It’s time to commit to human exploration of Mars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Rising CO2 Means Monarch Butterfly Bellyaches

Milkweed grown with more carbon dioxide in the air supplies fewer toxins to monarch butterflies that need the toxins to fight off gut parasites. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

How to Make a Robot Use Theory of Mind

Researchers give AI the ability to simulate the anticipated needs and actions of others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

World is finally waking up to climate change, says 'hothouse Earth' author

Report predicting spiralling global temperatures has been downloaded 270,000 times in just a few days The scorching temperatures and forest fires of this summer’s heatwave have finally stirred the world to face the onrushing threat of global warming, claims the climate scientist behind the recent “hothouse Earth” report . Following an unprecedented 270,000 downloads of his study , Johan Rockström

11h

Older than dinosaurs: last South African coelacanths threatened by oil exploration

Just 30 of the prehistoric fish known to exist, raising fears oil wells will push it to extinction Bright blue, older than dinosaurs and weighing as much as an average-sized man, coelacanths are the most endangered fish in South Africa and among the rarest in the world. Barely 30 of these critically-endangered fish are known to exist off the east coast of South Africa, raising concern that a new

11h

Regeringen vil flytte milliarder i kommende sundhedsreform

For mange penge bliver brugt på at indlægge borgere, som slet ikke burde have været indlagt. Det vil regeringen gøre op med i den kommende sundhedsreform.

11h

Flydedok på Hirtshals Havn kæntret med skib indeni

Flydedokken i Hirthals Havn er kæntret. Det skete, mens en norsk fisketrawler var i dokken.

11h

Why the FBI Fired an Agent Who Wrote Anti-Trump Texts

The paperwork was signed. The former FBI agent Peter Strzok, who had become a lightning rod for efforts to undermine the Russia investigation, was set to receive a two-month suspension and a demotion as punishment for his alleged misconduct during the 2016 election. Then the FBI’s deputy director, David Bowdich, stepped in and fired him, saying he had undermined “the credibility of the FBI.” Strz

11h

Feedback: Cat whisperer uses telepathy, drums, to evict lion

Plus: older generation less likely to admit their mistakes, missing math medal, why you shouldn't eat dragon's breath or centipedes, and more

11h

Over tusind Google-ansatte protesterer mod kinesisk censur-søgemaskine

»Vi har ikke de nødvendige oplysninger til træffe etisk oplyste beslutninger om vores arbejde, vores projekter og vores ansættelse,« skriver medarbejdere i brev.

12h

Flood death toll in India's Kerala jumps to 164

The death toll from major floods in India's tourist hotspot Kerala has jumped to 164, state chief minister Pinarayi Vijayan said Friday, issuing a fresh heavy rainfall warning for the battered region.

12h

Vietnam's caged bears dying off as bile prices plummet

Two moon bears are gently removed from the cramped cages where they have been held for 13 years, rescuers carefully checking their rotten teeth and matted paws before sending them to their new home in a grassy sanctuary in northern Vietnam.

12h

'Hacky hack hack': Australia teen breaches Apple's secure networkAustralian Teen Apple

A schoolboy who "dreamed" of working for Apple hacked the firm's computer systems, Australian media has reported, although the tech giant said Friday no customer data was compromised.

12h

Particulate pollution's impact varies greatly depending on where it originated

Aerosols are tiny particles that are spewed into the atmosphere by human activities, including burning coal and wood. They have negative effects on air quality — damaging human health and agricultural productivity. New work from Carnegie's Geeta Persad and Ken Caldeira demonstrates that the impact these fine particles have on the climate varies greatly depending on where they were released.

12h

Trilobites: Hundreds of Reindeer Died by Lightning. Their Carcasses Became a Laboratory.

“From death comes life,” said researchers who studied how decomposing bodies, with the help of scavengers, might alter plant diversity across a broad landscape.

12h

The New Old Age: A Retirement Community Turned Away These Married Women

According to the facility’s “cohabitation policy,” marriage is between one man and one woman, “as it is understood in the Bible.”

12h

Ny blog på ing.dk: Raketbyggerne på DTU

Til næste sommer skal en dansk studenterraket deltage i konkurrencen Spaceport America Cup. I en ny blog på ing.dk vil gruppen bag fortælle om hele processen.

12h

Study confirms truth behind 'Darwin's moth'

Scientists have revisited—and confirmed—one of the most famous textbook examples of evolution in action.

12h

Particulate pollution's impact varies greatly depending on where it originated

When it comes to aerosol pollution, as the old real estate adage says, location is everything.

12h

These Android phones have security defects out of the box, researchers say

At least 25 Android smartphone models—11 of which are sold by major U.S. carriers—carry vulnerabilities out of the box, making them easy prey for hackers, according to a new study from security researchers.

13h

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor har fugle ikke ’winglets’ ligesom fly?

Winglets på fly sparer masser af brændstof, så hvorfor har biologien ikke betænkt fuglene med disse? Det svarer professor i Lund på.

13h

Fejl i medicinmodul forsinkede behandling af kræftsyge

Problemer med Sundhedsplatformens medicinmodul var skyld i, at 11 patienter på hæmatologisk afdeling på Roskilde Sygehus ikke fik den ordinerede behandling med vækstfaktorer.

14h

Kukki je daeha yeo kyeong-ne!

Taekwondo på elite-plan og medicinstudiet på Aarhus Universitet er ingen sag for 21-årige Freja Beldam Løkke. »Det handler om selvdisciplin og hårdt arbejde, ikke talent,« siger hun selv.

14h

Heartworms, fear-mongering, and perilous advice. The bad recommendations of Dr. Peter Dobias regarding heartworm disease in dogs.

A veterinarian is claiming to expose the pharmaceutical industry by helping you avoid parasite-preventing medications. His message is based on a dangerous misunderstanding of heartworm biology, carries several contradictory claims, and will lead to some serious risk for your dogs if followed. But on the plus side, if you’re a heartworm, this is great news!

14h

Rare 'bamboo rat' photographed at Machu Picchu

A rare rodent species known as a "bamboo rat" that lives around the Inca ruins at Machu Picchu in Peru has resurfaced after a decade of absence and been photographed for the first time.

15h

Forskere skaber ny teknik og løser central gåde for cellers hukommelse

Med en helt ny, banebrydende teknik er det lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet at finde…

15h

Choking hazard: air pollution hangs over Asian Games

Indonesia is about to open the Asian Games but its traffic-clogged capital Jakarta remains shrouded in a haze of air pollution that threatens to mar the world's second-biggest multi-sport event.

15h

Google employees sign protest letter over China search engine: NYT

Hundreds of Google employees have signed a protest letter over the company's reported work on a censor-friendly search engine to get back into China, The New York Times said Thursday.

15h

Tesla's Musk says stress, overwork taking heavy tollElon Musk Tesla NYT

Electric car maker Tesla's CEO Elon Musk admitted to The New York Times that stress is taking a heavy toll on him personally in what he calls an "excruciating" year.

15h

Sådan løber scammere om hjørner med Facebook for at fange brugere

Facebook kan trods sine betydelige ressourcer ikke opdage scammere, der opretter reklamer med falsk indhold for at fange deres ofre.

16h

Ansatte bekymrede over fastholdelser i Hovedstadens Psykiatri

Medarbejdere i Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri oplever, at det ikke længere er legitimt at lægge et bælte på en patient. I stedet bliver de sat til at fastholde patienterne i timevis med risiko for patient- og personaleskader til følge. En række faglige organisationer har i fællesskab sendt en bekymringsskrivelse til direktionen med håb om at få stoppet den trend.

16h

Nej til bælter får psykiatrien til at ty til fastholdelser

Psykiatrien har rigtig svært ved at skrue ned for tvangen. Nye tal fra Sundhedsstyrelsen viser, at brugen af bælte slet ikke er reduceret nok i forhold til den aftale om en halvering inden 2020, som regeringen har indgået med regionerne. Til gengæld er der skruet op for antallet af fastholdelser, hvis varighed myndighederne ikke kender.

16h

Genopslag Regionsdirektør til Region Hovedstaden

Hovedstaden har brug for en virkelig stærk leder, som øjeblikkeligt og med stor styrke kan sætte ind over for regionens åbenlyse svagheder.

16h

Heatwaves: the next silent killer? – Science Weekly podcast

Heatwaves have ravaged much of the northern hemisphere, causing wildfires, destruction and death. Some are blaming heat stress for an increase in chronic kidney disease in Central America. Graihagh Jackson investigates the causes and health effects of heatwaves Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Heatwa

16h

Heatwaves: the next silent killer? – Science Weekly podcast

Heatwaves have ravaged much of the northern hemisphere, causing wildfires, destruction and death. Some are blaming heat stress for an increase in chronic kidney disease in Central America. Graihagh Jackson investigates the causes and health effects of heatwaves

16h

Hedebølge får britiske flamingoer til at lægge æg

Det er 15 år siden, at flamingoerne i en britisk dyrepark sidst lagde æg. Danske flamingoer har ikke været glade for varmen.

16h

Refleksioner over en magtliste

Dagens Medicins årlige oversigt over sundhedssektorens mest indflydelsesrige personer viser, at lægerne præger listen mere end djøfferne. Faktisk er der brug for, at de mange hospitalsdirektører kommer mere på banen. Andre står også for svagt. Og så er det på tide, at der ‘blandes blod’ på tværs af sektorerne.

17h

Coal miners at growing risk of developing debilitating, deadly lung fibrosis

The number of cases of progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) among US coal miners has risen during the past two decades, even as the number of coal miners has declined, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

17h

Lægefaglig vicedirektør på pension: Man skal stoppe, mens legen er god

I knap ni år har Peter Treufeldt haft ansvaret for den sundhedsfaglige udvikling af psykiatrien i Region Hovedstaden. Næste måned giver han stafetten videre og takker af fra posten, der har gjort det muligt for ham at indfri flere af de visioner, han havde, da han tiltrådte, men som også har kastet sager af sig, han ikke ønsker for nogen at skulle stå igennem.

17h

Facts About Megalodon: The Long-Gone Shark

Megalodon was the largest shark ever documented and one of the largest fish on record. It died out about 2.6 million years ago.

18h

18h

Podcast-special: Kursen er sat mod autonome skibe

Ingeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, er tilbage efter sommerferien og sætter denne gang fokus på ubemandede autonome skibe, som kan reducere fragtpriserne og eliminere den menneskelige faktor ved ulykker til søs.

18h

Earliest galaxies found 'on our cosmic doorstep'

Some of the earliest galaxies to form in the Universe are sitting on our cosmic doorstep, a study says.

18h

Wheat gene map to help 'feed the world'

Researchers are set to develop higher yield wheat varieties requiring less water after making a gene map.

18h

Ancient Egyptian mummification 'recipe' revealed

Forensic examination of a mummy shows the original ancient Egyptian embalming recipe, scientists say.

18h

Life at the Improv: The Power of Imagination

Stephen Asma, professor of philosophy at Columbia College Chicago, talks about his two latest books, The Evolution of Imagination and Why We Need Religion. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Scientists turn to the quantum realm to improve energy transportation

Scientists have designed a more efficient quantum transport system using a creative, yet counterintuitive solution.

21h

Smart fluorescent dyes

Controlling the excited electronic states in luminescent systems remains a challenge in the development of fluorescent and phosphorescent dyes. Now, scientists in Japan have developed a unique organic fluorophore that changes its emission color without loss of efficiency when externally stimulated.

21h

There is not one kind of 'good sperm' — it depends on other qualities in the male, bird study shows

In a new study, researchers show that the same type of sperm is not always the best for all male birds. Depending on how attractive or dominant you are you might be more successful with longer or shorter sperm.

21h

It's okay when you're not okay: A re-evaluation of resilience in adults

Researchers closely examined a series of studies on resilience in adults that report most people are unaffected by adversity. Psychologists discovered problems with how many of the studies were designed and how the data were analyzed. In a new article, the researchers explain the problems and re-evaluate adult resilience research and find that most people struggle to some degree following adversit

21h

Miscarriage cause, key cellular targets of potential drugs, revealed in new research

Researchers have discovered a gene mutation underlying hydrops fetalis — a fatal condition to fetuses due to fluid buildup in the space between organs. The proteins at the center of this finding have already been implicated in a number of diseases, opening avenues of potential drug discovery related to migraines, diabetes, osteoporosis, and other conditions.

21h

New lithium batteries last longer and don’t burst into flames

Researchers have developed a rechargeable battery technology that could double the output of today’s lithium ion cells. The new battery could drastically extend electric vehicle ranges and time between cell phone charges without taking up any added space. By using a ceramic, solid-state electrolyte, engineers can harness the power of lithium metal batteries without the historic issues of poor dur

21h

Fracking water use rose by up to 770% over a few years

The amount of water that hydraulic fracturing uses per well surged by up to 770 percent between 2011 and 2016 in all major US shale gas and oil production regions, according to a new study. If this rapid intensification continues, fracking’s water footprint could grow by up to 50-fold in some regions by the year 2030. The volume of brine-laden wastewater that fracked oil and gas wells generated d

21h

How a 'jellyfish'-shaped structure relieves pressure in your cells

Scientists have solved the structure of a key protein that senses when our cells swell.

21h

Genetic differences in trees untouched by mountain pine beetles

A researcher has discovered that mountain pine beetles may avoid certain trees within a population they normally would kill due to genetics in the trees.

21h

Most Americans accept genetic engineering of animals that benefits human health

Americans' views of possible uses of genetic engineering in animals vary depending on the mechanism and intended purpose of the technology, particularly the extent to which it would bring health benefits to humans.

21h

Opt-out organ donation register unlikely to increase number of donations

An opt-out organ donation register is unlikely to increase the number of donations, according to a new study. The researchers say donors should actively choose to be on the register by opting-in to ensure they genuinely want to donate their organs and to limit families from refusing the donation of their deceased relatives' organs.

21h

The Thucydides Trap: How to stop the looming war between China and the U.S.

The Thucydides Trap leads us to believe a U.S.-China war is inevitable. But is a 2,400-year-old school of thought really what the U.S. should base its foreign policy on? Read More

21h

The eyes may have it, an early sign of Parkinson's disease

The eyes may be a window to the brain for people with early Parkinson's disease. People with the disease gradually lose brain cells that produce dopamine, a substance that helps control movement. Now a new study has found that the thinning of the retina, the lining of nerve cells in the back of the eye, is linked to the loss of such brain cells.

22h

Cardiovascular disease related to type 2 diabetes can be reduced significantly

Properly composed treatment and refraining from cigarette consumption can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease resulting from type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. In some cases, the increased risks could theoretically be eliminated.

22h

Retinoic acid may improve immune response against melanoma

Clinical trial results describe a promising strategy to remove one of melanoma's most powerful defenses: By adding retinoic acid to standard-of-care treatment, researchers were able to turn off myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that turn off the immune system, leading to more immune system activity directed at melanoma.

22h

How do plants turn off photosynthetic activity at night?

Scientists have identified two proteins that allow plants to respond to changes in surrounding light conditions and thereby make photosynthesis more efficient.

22h

Stress during pregnancy increases risk of mood disorders for female offspring

High maternal levels of the stress hormone cortisol during pregnancy increase anxious and depressive-like behaviors in female offspring at the age of 2, reports a new study. The effect of elevated maternal cortisol on the negative offspring behavior appeared to result from patterns of stronger communication between brain regions important for sensory and emotion processing. The findings emphasize

22h

PARP inhibitor improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancers

In a randomized, Phase III trial, the PARP inhibitor talazoparib extended progression-free survival (PFS) and improved quality-of-life measures over available chemotherapies for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes.

22h

Luxury stuff may keep us from making new friends

Designer clothes, expensive watches, and luxury cars may convey high status, but these flashy items can actually deter new friends, according to a new study. “…it turns out that potential friends are repelled by the high status symbols…” The study finds that people are likely to want to be your friend if you are of more modest means. “When trying to make new friendships, people think that high st

22h

Eating a low-carb diet may shorten your life – unless you go vegan too

People following low-carb diets have been found to have a higher risk of mortality, except when people shun animal fats and protein too

22h

North Korea nukes the US in a Trump-bashing new thriller

This is the way the world ends in Jeffrey Lewis's satirical portrayal of future war – not with a bang but a tweet

22h

2017 solar eclipse got Americans curious about science

A follow-up survey of American adults who viewed the August 2017 total solar eclipse shows that the eclipse drove people to gather information about 16 times in the three months following the event. …there was a substantial amount of people going online, going to libraries, talking to their friends, trying to figure out what was going to happen with the eclipse before and after the event.” This l

22h

How people use, and lose, preexisting biases to make decisions

From love and politics to health and finances, humans can sometimes make decisions that appear irrational, or dictated by an existing bias or belief. But a new study uncovers a surprisingly rational feature of the human brain: a previously held bias can be set aside so that the brain can apply logical, mathematical reasoning to the decision at hand.

22h

Smallest transistor switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

Researchers have developed a single-atom transistor, the world's smallest. This quantum electronics component switches electrical current by controlled repositioning of a single atom, now also in the solid state in a gel electrolyte. The single-atom transistor works at room temperature and consumes very little energy, which opens up entirely new perspectives for information technology.

22h

Logging site slash removal may be boon for wild bees in managed forests

New research suggests the removal of timber harvest residue during harvesting may be a boon for wild bees, an important step toward better understanding the planet's top group of pollinators.

22h

Engineered rice makes anti-HIV extract

Extracts from transgenic rice plants could help stop the spread of HIV, according to new research. Researchers successfully developed a transgenic rice plant that expresses three different proteins that can stop human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from entering human cells. The finding could lead to a less costly, easier way of producing prophylactics that could stop the spread of HIV, particularl

22h

Tidlig diabetes fører til kortere liv

Tidspunktet for patienternes type 1-diabetes diagnose har betydning for, hvor lang tid de lever, viser nyt studie. Formand for Dansk Selskab for Børne- og Ungdomsdiabetes kalder resultaterne »skræmmende« og understreger behovet for mere dialog med patienterne.

22h

Relaxing vaping laws would cut smoking deaths, say MPs

Government urged to rethink ban on vaping in public places and reduce taxes The government is missing an important opportunity to cut deaths from smoking, says a committee of MPs who are calling for a cut in the tax on e-cigarettes. They are also urging the government to allow more advertising and to rethink the ban on vaping on buses, trains and in other public places. A hard-hitting report from

22h

New CRISPR technique skips over portions of genes that can cause disease

In a new study in cells, researchers have adapted CRISPR gene-editing technology to cause the cell's internal machinery to skip over a small portion of a gene when transcribing it into a template for protein building. Such targeted editing could one day be useful for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in the genome, such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease or some can

22h

Bird communities dwindle on New Mexico's Pajarito Plateau

Researchers have found declines in the number and diversity of bird populations at nine sites surveyed in northern New Mexico, where eight species vanished over time while others had considerably dropped.

22h

Super-resolution microscope reveals secrets of deadly Nipah virus

The deadly Nipah virus and others like it assemble themselves in a much more haphazard manner than previously thought, new research has found. The discovery could allow scientists to develop more effective vaccines and rule out many approaches to fighting these viruses.

22h

Trigger, target, trigger: Scientists explore controlled carbon monoxide release

Scientists have developed flavonoid-based, organic carbon monoxide-releasing molecules that exhibit CO release only when triggered by visible light. Using fluorescence microscopy, the researchers demonstrate targeted CO delivery by the photoCORMs to human lung cancer cells, as well as the ability of the molecules to produce anti-inflammatory effects.

22h

Immune cell dysfunction linked to photosensitivity, study finds

Researchers have discovered that a type of immune cell known as Langerhans appears to play an important role in photosensitivity, an immune system reaction to sunlight that can trigger severe skin rashes.

22h

Key factor may be missing from models that predict disease outbreaks from climate change

A new study suggests that computer models used to predict the spread of epidemics from climate change — such as crop blights or disease outbreaks — may not take into account an important factor in predicting their severity.

22h

This matrix delivers healing stem cells to injured elderly muscles

Muscles of the elderly and of patients with Duchene muscular dystrophy have trouble regenerating. A new nanohydrogel with muscle stem cells has boosted muscle growth in mouse models while protecting the stem cells from immune reactions that usually weaken or destroy them.

22h

Removing common mutation curbs colorectal cancer

Genetically manipulating and removing the most common mutant form of the p53 gene that promotes colorectal cancer in humans reduces tumor growth and tissue invasion, according to new research. Specific “hotspot” mutations of p53 have recently been recognized as strong promoters of cancer in humans. About 60 percent of colorectal cancers harbor p53 mutations. The challenge for scientists has been

22h

Autism linked to egg cells' difficulty creating large proteins

New work reveals that the genetic factors underlying fragile X syndrome, and potentially from other autism-related disorders, stem from defects in the cell's ability to create unusually large protein structures. They found that mutations in the gene Fmr1 create problems in the and the reproductive system. They can lead to the most-common form of inherited autism, fragile X syndrome, as well as to

23h

Logging permit fraud threatens timber species in Brazilian Amazon

Timber harvested illegally under fraudulent permits is undercutting conservation efforts in the Brazilian Amazon, new research by an international collaboration shows.

23h

The Lancet Public Health: Moderate carbohydrate intake may be best for health

Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fats from plant sources associated with lower risk of mortality compared to those that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fat from animal sources.

23h

Nye anbefalinger sætter fokus på senfølger ved kræftsygdom

Sundhedsstyrelsen har offentliggjoret nye anbefalinger for at styrke den faglige indsats ved rehabilitering og palliation i forbindelse med kræftsygdom.

23h

Both low- and high-carb diets can raise risk of early death, study finds

Eating a moderate amount of carbohydrates best for healthy lifespan, say researchers Eating either a low-carb diet or a high-carb diet raises the risk of an early death, according to a major new study which will dismay the many people who have ditched the likes of bread, rice and potatoes for weight loss or health reasons. Related: Moderation in all things – so don’t ditch the biscuits just yet |

23h

Archaeologists Find 3,200-Year-Old Cheese in an Egyptian Tomb

The cheese was found in a tomb that had been thought lost to shifting sands until it was rediscovered in 2010.

23h

F.D.A. Approves Generic EpiPen That May Be Cheaper

Teva Pharmaceuticals will sell a generic copy of Mylan’s EpiPen, which became the target of public outrage over its price.

23h

Oldest galaxies in the universe discovered right on our doorstep

Astronomers have previously looked for ancient galaxies by peering into the deep reaches of the universe, but it turns out they were right here all the time

23h

The Atlantic Daily: Revolutionary Force

What We’re Following A Natural Woman: Aretha Franklin, the singer known as the Queen of Soul, has died at the age of 76. Here are photos from throughout her decades-long career. Franklin’s music and her activism made her a revolutionary force in both the entertainment industry and the civil-rights movement. For many of her fans, though, her appeal lies in a deeply personal sense of transcendence.

23h

What Exactly Is K2, The Synthetic Cannabinoid?

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks to Dr. Kathryn Hawk, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, about synthetic marijuana, also known as K2.

23h

Can Twitter change its 'core' and remain Twitter?

After long resisting change, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey wants to revamp the "core" of the service to fight rampant abuse and misinformation. But it's not clear if changing that essence—how it rewards interactions and values popularity—would even work.

23h

Tesla files lawsuit against Ontario government

Electric car maker Tesla Motors said Thursday it is suing Ontario's new government, claiming it was treated unfairly in the cancellation of a program providing rebates to residents who bought electric vehicles.

23h

Infrared NASA imagery shows Tropical Storm Soulik strengthening

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over recently developed Tropical Storm Soulik in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean it analyzed temperatures in the storm.

23h

NASA sees Tropical Storm Rumbia off China's East Coast

Tropical Storm Rumbia was off the eastern coast of China when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm on Aug. 16.

23h

NASA sees Tropical Storm Bebinca along Vietnam's coast

Tropical Storm Bebinca showed powerful, heavy rain-making thunderstorms on infrared satellite imagery when NASA's Terra satellite saw the storm along the northern Vietnam coast.

23h

Report: High levels of weedkiller chemical found in cereals, snacks aimed at U.S. children

Out of 45 samples, glyphosate was present in all but two, and almost three-quarters of the samples were found to have glyphosate levels that exceeded the EWG’s ‘health benchmark’. Read More

23h

'Zombie genes' could be why so few elephants die of cancer

Animals Elephants are bringing a genetic gun to a cancer knife-fight. Elephants are some of the biggest mammals who roam the Earth, so mathematically they should be hounded by cancer at 100 times the rate of humans. Yet death by cancer…

23h

NASA water vapor data shows a 'patchy' Sub-Tropical Storm Ernesto

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at water vapor in the Atlantic Ocean's Sub-Tropical Storm Ernesto and found the storm looking somewhat "patchy." NASA's GPM satellite provided an earlier look at Ernesto's rainfall and cloud heights. Ernesto is on track to visit the United Kingdom by the end of the week.

23h

New CRISPR technique skips over portions of genes that can cause disease

In a new study in cells, University of Illinois researchers have adapted CRISPR gene-editing technology to cause the cell's internal machinery to skip over a small portion of a gene when transcribing it into a template for protein building. This gives researchers a way not only to eliminate a mutated gene sequence, but to influence how the gene is expressed and regulated.

23h

Researcher discovers genetic differences in trees untouched by mountain pine beetles

A University of Montana researcher has discovered that mountain pine beetles may avoid certain trees within a population they normally would kill due to genetics in the trees.

23h

Protecting the power grid: Advanced plasma switch for more efficient transmission

Inside your home and office, low-voltage alternating current (AC) powers the lights, computers and electronic devices for everyday use. But when the electricity comes from remote long-distance sources such as hydro-power or solar generating plants, transporting it as direct current (DC) is more efficient—and converting it back to AC current requires bulky and expensive switches. Now the General El

23h

New ultrathin optic cavities allow simultaneous color production on an electronic chip

The rainbow is not just colors—each color of light has its own frequency. The more frequencies you have, the higher the bandwidth for transmitting information.

23h

Twisted electronics open the door to tunable 2-D materials

Researchers report an advance that may revolutionize the field of 2-D materials such as graphene: a 'twistronic' device whose characteristics can be varied by simply varying the angle between two different 2-D layers placed on top of one another. The device provides unprecedented control over the angular orientation in twisted-layer devices, and enables researchers to study the effects of twist an

23h

Reverse osmosis membranes with tunable thickness

Researchers used electrospray technology to create ultra-thin, ultra-smooth polyamide membranes for reverse osmosis. This scalable process allows for better control of a membrane's fundamental properties, avoids the use of chemical baths, and can be applied to a variety of membrane separation processes.

23h

That stinks! One American in 15 smells odors that aren't there

A new study finds that one in 15 Americans (or 6.5 percent) over the age of 40 experiences phantom odors. The study is the first in the US to use nationally representative data to examine the prevalence of and risk factors for phantom odor perception. The study could inform future research aiming to unlock the mysteries of phantom odors.

23h

Blood test may identify gestational diabetes risk in first trimester, NIH study indicates

A blood test conducted as early as the 10th week of pregnancy may help identify women at risk for gestational diabetes, a pregnancy-related condition that poses potentially serious health risks for mothers and infants, according to researchers.

23h

Female mosquitoes get choosy quickly to offset invasions

Certain female mosquitoes quickly evolve more selective mating behavior when faced with existential threats from other invasive mosquito species, with concurrent changes to certain genetic regions, according to new research.

23h

A unique combination of catalysts opens doors to making useful compounds

All organisms rely on chemical reactions in order to make various natural products. Chemical reactions can be caused by a number of catalysts, such as enzymatic or chemical catalysts. Researchers have developed a new method that aids in the process of making valuable compounds by using a new catalytic method that combines enzymatic catalysts with photocatalysts.

23h

Diagnosing cancer with malaria protein: New method discovered

Researchers have discovered a method of diagnosing a broad range of cancers at their early stages by utilizing a particular malaria protein, which sticks to cancer cells in blood samples. The researchers hope that this method can be used in cancer screenings in the near future.

23h

Key protein involved in the development of autism discovered

The protein CPEB4, which coordinates the expression of hundreds of genes required for neuronal activity, is altered in the brains of individuals with autism, according to new research.

23h

Structurally 'inside-out' planetary nebula discovered

Researchers have discovered the unusual evolution of the central star of a planetary nebula in our Milky Way galaxy. The finding sheds light on the future evolution, and more importantly, the ultimate fate of the Sun.

23h

Babies Born Dependent On Opioids Need Touch, Not Tech

A pediatrician is working to make sure every hospital in Kansas can give babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome the soft start they need, ideally right next to their mothers. (Image credit: Alex Smith/KCUR)

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump’s 92 Million Dollar Baby

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Omarosa Manigault Newman, a former aide to President Trump, released a recording of Lara Trump offering her $15,000-a-month job after she was fired from the administration. Manigault Newman told NBC the offer was an attempt “to buy my silence.” Trump’s November military parade will reportedly cost $92 million, $80 million more than in

23h

Hubble paints picture of the evolving universe

Hubble and other space and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe's evolutionary history.

1d

'Abrupt thaw' of permafrost beneath lakes could significantly affect climate change models

Methane released by thawing permafrost from some Arctic lakes could significantly accelerate climate change, according to a new study. Unlike shallow, gradual thawing of terrestrial permafrost, the abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes is irreversible this century. Even climate models that project only moderate warming this century will have to factor in their emissions, according to the researche

1d

Most wear-resistant metal alloy in the world

A materials science team has engineered a platinum-gold alloy believed to be the most wear-resistant metal in the world. It's 100 times more durable than high-strength steel, making it the first alloy, or combination of metals, in the same class as diamond and sapphire, nature's most wear-resistant materials.

1d

Expecting to learn: Language acquisition in toddlers improved by predictable situations

Two-year-old children were taught novel words in predictable and unpredictable situations. Children learned words significantly better in predictable situations.

1d

Det nære, farlige sundhedsvæsen

Det ’nære sundhedsvæsen’ er blevet sundhedsvæsenets redning. Men der er grund til virkelig at tænke sig om.

1d

The best rain jackets to wear when it's hot out

Technology Our guide for how to choose the right tech for the moment. How to find the right rain jacket for the weather.

1d

Trump Can't Even Honor Aretha Franklin Properly

Donald Trump isn’t particularly nice to anyone. His standard demeanor and language in disagreement or debate resemble the union of a road-rage incident and a bad game of the dozens. Even in agreement, he’s not a person for whom respect—of others or of the office he holds—is necessarily a guiding light. He does not run out of venom for opponents, and rarely has a word of unqualified praise for peo

1d

82 mio. kr. til at udklække specialister i sundhedsinnovation

Nyt tværfagligt talentprogram skal være med til at skabe fremtidens dygtigste innovationsledere….

1d

MSU plant sciences faculty part of international discovery in wheat genome sequence

Hikmet Budak, Winifred Asbjornson Plant Sciences Chair, is one of 200 international scientists who co-published an article this week detailing the description of the genome of bread wheat. The implications of the publication include greater food security.

1d

Scientists discover why some people with brain markers of Alzheimer's have no dementia

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered why some people that have brain markers of Alzheimer's never develop the classic dementia that others do. The study is now available in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

1d

Microfossils, possibly world's oldest, had biological characteristics

Scientists have confirmed that the 3.4 billion year old Strelley Pool microfossils had chemical characteristics similar to modern bacteria. This all but confirms their biological origin and ranks them amongst the world's oldest microfossils. The work is presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Boston, with simultaneous publication in the peer-reviewed journal Geochemical Perspective

1d

Astronomers identify some of the oldest galaxies in the universe

Astronomers have identified some of the earliest galaxies in the universe. The team from the Institute for Computational Cosmology at Durham University and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, has found evidence that the faintest satellite galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way galaxy are amongst the very first galaxies that formed in our universe.

1d

Microfossils, possibly world's oldest, had biological characteristics

Scientists have confirmed that the 3.4 billion year old Strelley Pool microfossils had chemical characteristics similar to modern bacteria. This all but confirms their biological origin and ranks them amongst the world's oldest microfossils. The work is presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Boston, with simultaneous publication in the peer-reviewed journal Geochemical Perspective

1d

Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion

Researchers have found an unexpected difference between men and women. On average, their studies show, men pick up on visual motion significantly faster than women do.

1d

Astronomers identify some of the oldest galaxies in the universe

Astronomers have identified some of the earliest galaxies in the Universe.

1d

For Some Crows, Migration is Optional

Crows are what's known as 'partial migrants'—as cold weather approaches some crows fly south, while others stay put. And that behavior appears to be ingrained. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Why the U.S. Should Provide Universal Basic Income

America is the richest civilization in history. Why, then, are our living standards so low compared to those of other wealthy democracies? “There’s a big idea out there that could help solve this,” says The Atlantic writer Annie Lowrey. “It’s called a universal basic income.” In a new animated video, Lowrey argues that UBI—a concept that has existed for more than 500 years—would help close the in

1d

New in the Hastings Center report, July-August 2018

Advanced directives for dementia, differentiating obese children from abused children, and more in the (July-August 2018 issue.

1d

Blood test could detect kidney cancer up to five years prior to clinical diagnosis

A team of investigators led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) medical oncologist Rupal Bhatt, M.D., Ph.D., has demonstrated that a molecule called KIM-1, a protein present in the blood of some patients with renal cell carcinoma is present at elevated levels at the time of diagnosis, can also serve as a tool to predict the disease's onset up to five years prior to diagnosis.

1d

Quantum material is promising 'ion conductor' for research, new technologies

Researchers have shown how to shuttle lithium ions back and forth into the crystal structure of a quantum material, representing a new avenue for research and potential applications in batteries, 'smart windows' and brain-inspired computers containing artificial synapses.

1d

The NIH Loosens Grip on Gene Therapy Trials

The agency proposes ceding its scrutiny of these studies to the FDA.

1d

Space mining is officially a thing, and now there are classes in how to do it

Want to go to school to learn how to mine in space? Now you can. Read More

1d

Adults conversing with kids strengthens their brain development

A new study discovers that engaging in back-and-forth conversations with a child builds stronger connections between two of their brains’ vital critical speech areas, regardless of socioeconomic status. Read More

1d

How Drought Turned an African Savanna Into a Lush Wildlife Paradise

How Drought Turned an African Savanna Into a Lush Wildlife Paradise Drought killed off inedible plants in Kruger National Park, making room for other plants that animals like to eat. buffalo-skull.jpg Image credits: BlackstoneAustria via Shutterstock Earth Thursday, August 16, 2018 – 16:15 Nala Rogers, Contributor (Inside Science) — In 2015, disaster struck South Africa's Kruger National Park —

1d

Low bandwidth? Use more colors at once

As researchers engineer solutions for eventually replacing electronics with photonics, a Purdue University-led team has simplified the manufacturing process that allows utilizing multiple colors at the same time on an electronic chip instead of a single color at a time.

1d

Researchers are developing vaccines for human parasites

Researchers outline their lessons learned while creating vaccine candidates for hookworm and schistosomiasis.

1d

Printable tags turn everyday objects into smart, connected devices

Engineers have developed printable metal tags that could be attached to plain objects, like water bottles, walls or doors, and turn them into 'smart' Internet of Things devices. The tags can also be fashioned into paper-thin control panels that can be used to remotely operate WiFi-connected speakers, smart lights and other smart home appliances. The metal tags are made from patterns of copper foil

1d

NASA sees Tropical Storm Bebinca along Vietnam's coast

Tropical Storm Bebinca showed powerful, heavy rain-making thunderstorms on infrared satellite imagery when NASA's Terra satellite saw the storm along the northern Vietnam coast.

1d

NASA sees Tropical Storm Rumbia off China's East Coast

Tropical Storm Rumbia was off the eastern coast of China when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm on Aug. 16.

1d

Novel sensors could enable smarter textiles

A fabric coating with thin, lightweight and flexible pressure sensors that can be embedded into shoes and other functional garments, sensors that can measure everything from the light touch of a finger to being driven over by a forklift. And it's comfortable to boot!

1d

Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics

It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries, says a new study.

1d

How cancer cells communicate — and how we can slow them down | Hasini Jayatilaka

When cancer cells are closely packed together in a tumor, they're able to communicate with each other and coordinate their movement throughout the body. What if we could interrupt this process? In this accessible talk about cutting-edge science, Hasini Jayatilaka shares her work on an innovative method to stop cancer cells from communicating — and halt their fatal ability to spread.

1d

Three Science Experiments You Can Do With Your Phone

Your phone can measure acceleration, magnetic field, sound, location, and maybe more—which turns it into a portable data collector for science projects.

1d

When rain is just as dangerous as drought

Environment Raindrops keep falling—and it's a big problem. The entire continental United States has seen an uptick in extreme precipitation events in the last half-century. But nowhere is it raining harder than the Northeast.

1d

An Asteroid Named Aretha

In 2001, Aretha Franklin took the stage at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. She wore a bleach-white jumpsuit and feather boa, her hair teased up in her trademark style, glossy as obsidian. A guitar twanged over the cheers of a packed house. “What is that, Teddy?” Franklin said , addressing her son, the evening’s guitarist. “Play that riff again. We all know that, don’t we?” They did, and a

1d

Under pressure, hydrogen offers a reflection of giant planet interiors

Lab-based mimicry allowed an international team of physicists to probe hydrogen under the conditions found in the interiors of giant planets — where experts believe it gets squeezed until it becomes a liquid metal, capable of conducting electricity.

1d

Infrared NASA imagery shows Tropical Storm Soulik strengthening

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over recently developed Tropical Storm Soulik in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean it analyzed temperatures in the storm.

1d

Future robot swarms should copy lazy ants who let others do the work

The optimum strategy for tunnelling ants is to leave all of the digging to just a few workers. Swarms of robots could use similar techniques for clearing rubble

1d

Including population control in climate policy risks human tragedy

Making population issues part of the world's efforts to avert climate change could cause human rights abuses including forced sterilisation, says Ian Angus

1d

1d

Protecting the power grid: Advanced plasma switch for more efficient transmission

Article describes PPPL research to help General Electric design an advanced and cost-effective power switch to protect the US electric grid.

1d

UM Researcher discovers genetic differences in trees untouched by mountain pine beetles

A University of Montana researcher has discovered that mountain pine beetles may avoid certain trees within a population they normally would kill due to genetics in the trees.

1d

GW researchers publish review article on developing vaccines for human parasites

Researchers from the George Washington University published an article in Trends in Parasitology outlining their lessons learned while creating vaccine candidates for hookworm and schistosomiasis.

1d

NASA water vapor data shows a 'patchy' Sub-Tropical Storm Ernesto

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at water vapor in the Atlantic Ocean's Sub-Tropical Storm Ernesto and found the storm looking somewhat "patchy." NASA's GPM satellite provided an earlier look at Ernesto's rainfall and cloud heights. Ernesto is on track to visit the United Kingdom by the end of the week.

1d

Previously grainy wheat genome comes into focus

An international consortium has completed the sequence of wheat's colossal genome.

1d

California Logged Its Hottest Month Ever, and Things Are Only Going to Get Worse

July 2018 was the hottest month on record in the state of California.

1d

This 1491 Map May Have Influenced Christopher Columbus

A 1491 map that likely influenced Christopher Columbus's conception of world geography is getting a new lease on life, now that researchers have revealed its faded, hidden details with cutting-edge technology.

1d

Photos: Christopher Columbus Likely Saw This 1491 Map

A faded map that Christopher Columbus likely saw is now getting a second life.

1d

More workers working might not get more work done, ants (and robots) show

For ants and robots operating in confined spaces like tunnels, having more workers does not necessarily mean getting more work done. Just as too many cooks in a kitchen get in each other's way, having too many robots in tunnels creates clogs that can bring the work to a grinding halt.

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Wheat code finally cracked; wheat genome sequence will bring stronger varieties to farmers

Kansas State University scientists, in collaboration with the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, published today in the international journal Science a detailed description of the complete genome of bread wheat, the world's most widely cultivated crop.

1d

New CRISPR technique skips over portions of genes that can cause disease

In a new study in cells, University of Illinois researchers have adapted CRISPR gene-editing technology to cause the cell's internal machinery to skip over a small portion of a gene when transcribing it into a template for protein building. Such targeted editing could one day be useful for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in the genome, such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, Huntingto

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Study: Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics

It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries, says a new study by University of Illinois researchers.

1d

NASA finds intensifying Tropical Storm Lane

Tropical Storm Lane continues to strengthen and NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery that showed storms have intensified around its center.

1d

How a 'jellyfish'-shaped structure relieves pressure in your cells

Scientists at Scripps Research have solved the structure of a key protein that senses when our cells swell. This protein, called SWELL1 (or LRRC8A), works as an "ion channel" on the cell membrane to relieve pressure inside cells.

1d

Novel sensors could enable smarter textiles

A team of engineers at the University of Delaware is developing next-generation smart textiles by creating flexible carbon nanotube composite coatings on a wide range of fibers, including cotton, nylon and wool. Their discovery is reported in the journal ACS Sensors where they demonstrate the ability to measure an exceptionally wide range of pressure—from the light touch of a fingertip to being dr

1d

Microbiologists are testing blood-sensing pills in pigs' bellies

Animals Researchers developed a sensor to detect blood in the stomach. Researchers developed a sensor to detect blood in the stomach. The result was a big pill to swallow, so before giving it to humans, the scientists tested it in pigs.

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Battery breakthrough: Doubling performance with lithium metal that doesn't catch fire

A rechargeable battery technology could double the output of today's lithium ion cells — drastically extending electric vehicle ranges and time between cell phone charges — without taking up any added space.

1d

Lowering pH inside cells may put the brakes on cancer growth

A new study focusing on the environment inside cancer cells may lead to new targeted treatment strategies. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Maryland and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine Barcelona, suggest that lowering the pH inside cancer cells to make it more acidic can slow down the growth and spread of the disease, and possibly

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UTHealth-led study shows much work remains to ensure e-health record safety

Four years after their publication by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), voluntary guidelines designed to increase the safety of e-health records have yet to be implemented fully, according to a survey led by a researcher at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Findings appeared recently in the Journal of the American Med

1d

NASA finds intensifying Tropical Storm Lane

Tropical Storm Lane continues to strengthen and NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery that showed storms have intensified around its center.

1d

How a 'jellyfish'-shaped structure relieves pressure in your cells

Scientists at Scripps Research have solved the structure of a key protein that senses when our cells swell.

1d

Novel sensors could enable smarter textiles

A fabric coating with thin, lightweight and flexible pressure sensors that can be embedded into shoes and other functional garments, sensors that can measure everything from the light touch of a finger to being driven over by a forklift. And it's comfortable to boot!

1d

First mouse model to mimic lung disease could speed discovery of more effective treatments

A team of researchers from Penn Medicine has developed the first mouse model with an IPF-associated mutation, which induces scarring and other damage similar to what is observed in humans suffering from the condition.

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Elon Musk proposes Los Angeles tunnel to Dodger Stadium

Traffic-weary baseball fans could someday travel to and from Dodger Stadium on a public transportation system underneath Los Angeles—if Elon Musk's latest bold plan comes to fruition.

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Was a great white shark to blame for Cape Cod attack?

On a windswept dune overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, hastily erected signs warned Cape Cod beachgoers to stay out of the water on Thursday, a day after a New York man became the first person to be attacked by a shark off the coast of Massachusetts since 2012.

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'Abrupt thaw' of permafrost beneath lakes could significantly affect climate change models

Methane released by thawing permafrost from some Arctic lakes could significantly accelerate climate change, according to a new University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study.

1d

The ‘culture of secrecy’ and blackmail that perpetuates abuse in the Catholic Church

Over the past 70 years, the Roman Catholic Church in Pennsylvania has been covering up child sexual abuse by hundreds of priests, according to a new report issued by a grand jury on Tuesday. Read More

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A radical theory says major crises remake America every 80 years

A theory of history says America is in the grips of a crisis called "The Fourth Turning" that will change it forever. Read More

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Why some U.S. school districts are adopting a 4-day school week

Many school districts are switching over to a four day week. Is this a good idea? Read More

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Hubble paints picture of the evolving universe

Astronomers using the ultraviolet vision of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have captured one of the largest panoramic views of the fire and fury of star birth in the distant universe. The field features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are forming stars. Hubble's ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion

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AI-Driven Dermatology Could Leave Dark-Skinned Patients Behind

LaToya Smith was 29 years old when she died from skin cancer. The young doctor had gotten her degree in podiatry from Rosalind Franklin University, in Chicago, just four years prior, and had recently finished a medical mission in Eritrea. But a diagnosis of melanoma in 2010 meant she would work in private practice for only a year before her death. As a black woman, LaToya reflected a stark imbala

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Aretha Franklin’s Revolution

If the Great Migration could be condensed into a single personal narrative, it might be Aretha Franklin’s. Born in 1942 in Memphis, Tennessee, to a traveling, womanizing preacher and a gospel-singing mother, Franklin was whisked north by the same currents that brought millions of black souls to the great industrial and financial centers of the country. Settling with her father in Detroit, she rec

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Taking a closer look at unevenly charged biomolecules

In clinical diagnostics, it is critical to monitor biomolecules in a simple, rapid and sensitive way. Clinicians most often monitor antibodies because these small proteins attach to antigens, or foreign substances, we face every day. Most biomolecules, however, have complicated charge characteristics, and the sensor response from conventional carbon nanotube systems can be erratic. A team in Japan

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Novel research optimizes both elasticity and rigidity in the same material without the usual tradeoffs

In the world of materials, rigidity and elasticity are usually on opposite ends of the continuum. Typically, the more elastic a material, the less able it is to bear loads and resist forces. The more rigid it is, the more prone it is to rupture at lower strains when the load or force exceeds its capacity. A goal for many materials scientists is to create a material that brings together the best of

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'Abrupt thaw' of permafrost beneath lakes could significantly affect climate change models

Methane released by thawing permafrost from some Arctic lakes could significantly accelerate climate change, according to a new University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study.

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Obesity, infertility and oxidative stress in mouse egg cells

Proteomic analysis of oocytes from obese mice showed changes in a protein that promotes antioxidant production and may alter meiotic spindles.

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New approach to fight tuberculosis, a leading cause of death worldwide

A group of researchers from the Gladstone Institutes, UC San Francisco (UCSF), and UC Berkeley used a systematic approach to get an entirely new look at the way tuberculosis infects people. Their study, published in the scientific journal Molecular Cell, uncovered interactions between tuberculosis and human proteins that could provide new approaches to combat infection.

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UMD researcher helps to crack the genetic code for wheat for the first time

The University of Maryland as part of the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium published findings in Science detailing the full wheat genome, the world's most widely cultivated crop. A companion paper is available in the same issue with UMD and the John Innes Centre, using this sequence to examine gene expression in wheat, specifically relating to heat, drought, and disease. This paves

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When sulfur disappears without trace

Many natural products and drugs feature a so-called dicarbonyl motif — in certain cases however their preparation poses a challange to organic chemists. In their most recent work, Nuno Maulide and his coworkers from the University of Vienna present a new route for these molecules. They use oxidized sulfur compounds even though sulfur is not included in the final product. The results are now publi

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Scientists create new technology and solve a key puzzle for cellular memory

With a new groundbreaking technique, researchers from University of Copenhagen have managed to identify a protein that is responsible for cellular memory being transmitted when cells divide. The finding is crucial for understanding development from one cell to a whole body.

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Physicists fight laser chaos with quantum chaos to improve laser performance

To tame chaos in powerful semiconductor lasers, which causes instabilities, scientists have introduced another kind of chaos.

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The cure for chaotic lasers? More chaos, of course

An international, Yale-led research team has taken a new approach to stabilizing high-power lasers: They're fighting chaos with chaos.

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How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant

Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), the economically most important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition. With these insights, researchers provide a new explanation f

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One giant leap for wheat

'For me, as a functional genomics and genetics researcher, having a continuous and fully annotated sequence for each of the 21 wheat chromosomes is of paramount importance,' says Kostya Kanyuka who, with bioinformatician Rob King, represented Rothamsted Research in the IWGSC.'This will greatly speed up our efforts on identification of agriculturally important wheat genes, including those that woul

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Societies release updated guideline for treating adult congenital heart disease patients

The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Associated today released an updated guideline for the management of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients.

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Previously grainy wheat genome comes into focus

An international consortium has completed the sequence of wheat's colossal genome.

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Nematode can rebuild muscle and neurons after complete degradation

What can scientists learn about human neurodegenerative disease from a major soybean pest? It's not a trick question; the answer lies in the soybean cyst nematode, one of two classes of microscopic roundworms known to lose and then regain mobility as part of their life cycle. A new study from the University of Illinois explains how it works.

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Autism linked to egg cells' difficulty creating large proteins

New work from Carnegie's Ethan Greenblatt and Allan Spradling reveals that the genetic factors underlying fragile X syndrome, and potentially from other autism-related disorders, stem from defects in the cell's ability to create unusually large protein structures. They found that mutations in the gene Fmr1 create problems in the and the reproductive system. They can lead to the most-common form of

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Under pressure, hydrogen offers a reflection of giant planet interiors

Lab-based mimicry allowed an international team of physicists including Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov to probe hydrogen under the conditions found in the interiors of giant planets — where experts believe it gets squeezed until it becomes a liquid metal, capable of conducting electricity.

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Presenting the first fully annotated reference genome of bread wheat

An international team of researchers has presented a fully annotated reference genome for bread wheat, one of the world's most important and widely cultivated crops.

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Can population policy lessen future climate impacts?

Population has been seemingly left out of climate change assessments, including by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

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Electrospraying a better desalinization membrane

Following 30 years during which the membrane hasn't changed much, researchers have introduced a new method for making the membranes used to turn saltwater fresh.

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Collective clog control: What ants can teach us about traffic flow

Observing how ants excavate their narrow underground tunnels provides new insight into how to orchestrate optimal traffic flow in confined and crowded environments, researchers say.

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Reliable point-of-care blood test can help prevent toxoplasmosis

A new point-of-care test for the parasite Toxoplasma gondii can be performed with a drop of the mother's blood. The test meets the WHO's criteria. It is sensitive, specific, quick, easy to perform, and inexpensive.

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Scientists discover why silver clusters emit light

Clusters of silver atoms captured in zeolites, a porous material with small channels and voids, have remarkable light emitting properties. They can be used for more efficient lighting applications as a substitute for LED and TL lamps. Until recently, scientists did not know exactly how and why these small particles emit light. An interdisciplinary team of physicists and chemists led by KU Leuven h

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UConn scientists create reverse osmosis membranes with tunable thickness

Researchers at the University of Connecticut used electrospray technology to create ultra-thin, ultra-smooth polyamide membranes for reverse osmosis. This scalable process allows for better control of a membrane's fundamental properties, avoids the use of chemical baths, and can be applied to a variety of membrane separation processes.

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More workers working might not get more work done, ants (and robots) show

For ants and robots operating in confined spaces like tunnels, having more workers does not necessarily mean getting more work done. Just as too many cooks in a kitchen get in each other's way, having too many robots in tunnels creates clogs that can bring the work to a grinding halt.

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Twisted electronics open the door to tunable 2D materials

Columbia University researchers report an advance that may revolutionize the field of 2D materials such as graphene: a 'twistronic' device whose characteristics can be varied by simply varying the angle between two different 2D layers placed on top of one another. The device provides unprecedented control over the angular orientation in twisted-layer devices, and enables researchers to study the e

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The wheat code is finally cracked

The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) published today in the international journal Science a detailed description of the genome of bread wheat, the world's most widely cultivated crop. This work will pave the way for the production of wheat varieties better adapted to climate challenges, with higher yields, enhanced nutritional quality and improved sustainability.

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Whole blood test for toxoplasmosis is sensitive, specific

Transmission of toxoplasmosis from mother to fetus can lead to severe congenital problems and fetal death, and tests for the parasitic infection during pregnancy are critical. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have showed the efficacy of a low-cost whole blood test for toxoplasmosis.

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Tibetan sheep highly susceptible to human plague, originates from marmots

In the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, one of the region's highest risk areas for human plague, Himalayan marmots are the primary carriers of the infectious bacterium Y. pestis. Y. pestis infection can be transmitted to humans and other animals by the marmots' parasitic fleas. In a new study recently published with PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, researchers determine that Tibetan sheep, who make up abou

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Forget the bling: High status-signaling deters new friendships

When it comes to making new friends, status symbols actually repel people from making friends with us, according to new research.

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Here’s what robots could learn from fire ants

Fire ants’ secret to success is prioritizing efficiency over fairness. Robot teams could use that strategy to work more efficiently in tight, crowded quarters.

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Here’s what robots could learn from fire ants

Fire ants’ secret to success is prioritizing efficiency over fairness. Robot teams could use that strategy to work more efficiently in tight, crowded quarters.

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A filter that turns saltwater into freshwater just got an upgrade

Smoothing out a material used in desalination filters could help combat worldwide water shortages.

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More protein after weight loss may reduce fatty liver disease

Increasing the amount of protein in the diet may reduce the liver's fat content and lower the risk of diabetes in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Hubble paints picture of the evolving universe

Hubble and other space and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe's evolutionary history.

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Taking a closer look at unevenly charged biomolecules

Clinicians most often monitor antibodies because these small proteins attach to antigens, or foreign substances, we face every day. Most biomolecules, however, have complicated charge characteristics, and the sensor response from conventional carbon nanotube systems can be erratic. A team in Japan recently revealed how these systems work and proposed changes to dramatically improve biomolecule det

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After 13 Years, Scientists Finally Map the Massive Wheat Genome

The first high-quality, complete sequence of the bread wheat genome could support the creation of the first genetically modified wheat.

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ScienceTake: The Secret to Ant Efficiency Is Idleness

To dig a nest tunnel quickly and get the most out of their efforts, 30 percent of fire ants do 70 percent of the work.

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How Ants Avoid Traffic Jams

Ants have a lesson for humans on how to be more productive: Less is more. Here’s the ingenious trick the insects deploy for maximizing efficiency.

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Settling Arguments About Hydrogen With 168 Giant Lasers

Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory said they were “converging on the truth” in an experiment to understand hydrogen in its liquid metallic state.

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Scientists Finally Crack Wheat’s Absurdly Complex Genome

Scientists decoded the genome of rice in 2002. They completed the soybean genome in 2008. They mapped the maize genome in 2009. But only now has the long-awaited wheat genome been fully sequenced . That delay says nothing about wheat’s importance. It is arguably the most critical crop in the world. It’s grown on more land than anything else. It provides humanity with a fifth of our calories. But

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The Perfect Aretha Franklin Song

Aretha Franklin defied the boundaries of time and tragedy. The legendary Queen of Soul, who died in her Detroit home Thursday morning at the age of 76, didn’t just perform; she enraptured. Franklin sang with a power and conviction that healed. She transformed pain—both others’ and her own—into jubilation. This alchemy was studied, strenuous. Aretha Franklin gave us, her listeners, everything. To

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Tide of lies

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Time is the key

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All together now

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Stereodivergent synthesis of 1,4-dicarbonyls by traceless charge-accelerated sulfonium rearrangement

The chemistry of the carbonyl group is essential to modern organic synthesis. The preparation of substituted, enantioenriched 1,3- or 1,5-dicarbonyls is well developed, as their disconnection naturally follows from the intrinsic polarity of the carbonyl group. By contrast, a general enantioselective access to quaternary stereocenters in acyclic 1,4-dicarbonyl systems remains an unresolved problem

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Selective functionalization of methane, ethane, and higher alkanes by cerium photocatalysis

With the recent soaring production of natural gas, the use of methane and other light hydrocarbon feedstocks as starting materials in synthetic transformations is becoming increasingly economically attractive, although it remains chemically challenging. We report the development of photocatalytic C–H amination, alkylation, and arylation of methane, ethane, and higher alkanes under visible light i

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Collective clog control: Optimizing traffic flow in confined biological and robophysical excavation

Groups of interacting active particles, insects, or humans can form clusters that hinder the goals of the collective; therefore, development of robust strategies for control of such clogs is essential, particularly in confined environments. Our biological and robophysical excavation experiments, supported by computational and theoretical models, reveal that digging performance can be robustly opt

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Insulator-metal transition in dense fluid deuterium

Dense fluid metallic hydrogen occupies the interiors of Jupiter, Saturn, and many extrasolar planets, where pressures reach millions of atmospheres. Planetary structure models must describe accurately the transition from the outer molecular envelopes to the interior metallic regions. We report optical measurements of dynamically compressed fluid deuterium to 600 gigapascals (GPa) that reveal an i

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3D printed polyamide membranes for desalination

Polyamide thickness and roughness have been identified as critical properties that affect thin-film composite membrane performance for reverse osmosis. Conventional formation methodologies lack the ability to control these properties independently with high resolution or precision. An additive approach is presented that uses electrospraying to deposit monomers directly onto a substrate, where the

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Origin of the bright photoluminescence of few-atom silver clusters confined in LTA zeolites

Silver (Ag) clusters confined in matrices possess remarkable luminescence properties, but little is known about their structural and electronic properties. We characterized the bright green luminescence of Ag clusters confined in partially exchanged Ag–Linde Type A (LTA) zeolites by means of a combination of x-ray excited optical luminescence-extended x-ray absorption fine structure, time-depende

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Twistable electronics with dynamically rotatable heterostructures

In heterostructures of two-dimensional materials, electronic properties can vary dramatically with relative interlayer angle. This effect makes it theoretically possible to realize a new class of twistable electronics in which properties can be manipulated on demand by means of rotation. We demonstrate a device architecture in which a layered heterostructure can be dynamically twisted in situ. We

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Plant iron acquisition strategy exploited by an insect herbivore

Insect herbivores depend on their host plants to acquire macro- and micronutrients. Here we asked how a specialist herbivore and damaging maize pest, the western corn rootworm, finds and accesses plant-derived micronutrients. We show that the root-feeding larvae use complexes between iron and benzoxazinoid secondary metabolites to identify maize as a host, to forage within the maize root system,

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Abrupt cloud clearing of marine stratocumulus in the subtropical southeast Atlantic

We document rapid and abrupt clearings of large portions of the subtropical marine low cloud deck that have implications for the global radiation balance and climate sensitivity. Over the southeast Atlantic, large areas of stratocumulus are quickly eroded, yielding partial or complete clearing along sharp transitions hundreds to thousands of kilometers in length that move westward at 8 to 12 mete

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Mixed tailing by TENT4A and TENT4B shields mRNA from rapid deadenylation

RNA tails play integral roles in the regulation of messenger RNA (mRNA) translation and decay. Guanylation of the poly(A) tail was discovered recently, yet the enzymology and function remain obscure. Here we identify TENT4A (PAPD7) and TENT4B (PAPD5) as the enzymes responsible for mRNA guanylation. Purified TENT4 proteins generate a mixed poly(A) tail with intermittent non-adenosine residues, the

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DNA-induced liquid phase condensation of cGAS activates innate immune signaling

The binding of DNA to cyclic GMP–AMP synthase (cGAS) leads to the production of the secondary messenger cyclic GMP–AMP (cGAMP), which activates innate immune responses. We have shown that DNA binding to cGAS robustly induced the formation of liquidlike droplets in which cGAS was activated. The disordered and positively charged cGAS N terminus enhanced cGAS-DNA phase separation by increasing the v

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Fragile X mental retardation 1 gene enhances the translation of large autism-related proteins

Mutations in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene ( FMR1 ) cause the most common inherited human autism spectrum disorder. FMR1 influences messenger RNA (mRNA) translation, but identifying functional targets has been difficult. We analyzed quiescent Drosophila oocytes, which, like neural synapses, depend heavily on translating stored mRNA. Ribosome profiling revealed that FMR1 enhances rather

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A molecular mechanism for Wnt ligand-specific signaling

Wnt signaling is key to many developmental, physiological, and disease processes in which cells seem able to discriminate between multiple Wnt ligands. This selective Wnt recognition or "decoding" capacity has remained enigmatic because Wnt/Frizzled interactions are largely incompatible with monospecific recognition. Gpr124 and Reck enable brain endothelial cells to selectively respond to Wnt7. W

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Quantum-inspired computational imaging

Computational imaging combines measurement and computational methods with the aim of forming images even when the measurement conditions are weak, few in number, or highly indirect. The recent surge in quantum-inspired imaging sensors, together with a new wave of algorithms allowing on-chip, scalable and robust data processing, has induced an increase of activity with notable results in the domai

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The transcriptional landscape of polyploid wheat

The coordinated expression of highly related homoeologous genes in polyploid species underlies the phenotypes of many of the world’s major crops. Here we combine extensive gene expression datasets to produce a comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of homoeolog expression patterns in hexaploid bread wheat. Bias in homoeolog expression varies between tissues, with ~30% of wheat homoeologs showing non

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Shifting the limits in wheat research and breeding using a fully annotated reference genome

An annotated reference sequence representing the hexaploid bread wheat genome in 21 pseudomolecules has been analyzed to identify the distribution and genomic context of coding and noncoding elements across the A, B, and D subgenomes. With an estimated coverage of 94% of the genome and containing 107,891 high-confidence gene models, this assembly enabled the discovery of tissue- and developmental

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Scientists sequence wheat genome in breakthrough once thought 'impossible'

Genome able to be used to produce hardier wheat varieties as greater food security needed Sequencing the wheat genome – once considered by scientists to be an insurmountable task – has been achieved through a worldwide collaboration of researchers spanning 13 years. On Friday the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) published a detailed description of the genome of bread wheat

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Nematode can rebuild muscle and neurons after complete degradation

What can scientists learn about human neurodegenerative disease from a major soybean pest? It's not a trick question; the answer lies in the soybean cyst nematode, one of two classes of microscopic roundworms known to lose and then regain mobility as part of their life cycle. A new study from the University of Illinois explains how it works.

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Twisted electronics open the door to tunable 2-D materials

Two-dimensional (2-D) materials such as graphene have unique electronic, magnetic, optical, and mechanical properties that promise to drive innovation in areas from electronics to energy to materials to medicine. Columbia University researchers report a major advance that may revolutionize the field, a "twistronic" device whose characteristics can be varied by simply varying the angle between two

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How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant

Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), the most economically important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition. With these insights, researchers have provided a new explana

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Scientists create new technology and solve a key puzzle for cellular memory

With a new groundbreaking technique, researchers from University of Copenhagen have managed to identify a protein that is responsible for cellular memory transmission when cells divide. The finding is crucial for understanding development from one cell to a whole body.

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Scientists discover why silver clusters emit light

Clusters of silver atoms captured in zeolites, a porous material with small channels and voids, have remarkable light-emitting properties. They can be used for more efficient lighting applications as a substitute for LED and TL lamps. Until recently, scientists did not know exactly how and why these small particles emit light. An interdisciplinary team of physicists and chemists led by KU Leuven h

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Physicists fight laser chaos with quantum chaos to improve laser performance

To tame chaos in powerful semiconductor lasers, which causes instabilities, scientists have introduced another kind of chaos.

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More workers working might not get more work done, ants (and robots) show

For ants and robots operating in confined spaces like tunnels, having more workers does not necessarily mean getting more work done. Just as too many cooks in a kitchen get in each other's way, having too many robots in tunnels creates clogs that can bring the work to a grinding halt.

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Scientists create reverse osmosis membranes with tunable thickness

Currently, more than 300 million people around the world rely on desalinated water for part or all of their daily needs. That demand will only grow with larger populations and improved standards of living around the world.

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Under pressure, hydrogen offers a reflection of giant planet interiors

Lab-based mimicry allowed an international team of physicists including Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov to probe hydrogen under the conditions found in the interiors of giant planets—where experts believe it gets squeezed until it becomes a liquid metal, capable of conducting electricity. Their work is published in Science.

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The wheat code is finally cracked

Today in the international journal Science, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) published a detailed description of the genome of bread wheat, the world's most widely cultivated crop. This work will pave the way for the production of wheat varieties better adapted to climate challenges, with higher yields, enhanced nutritional quality and improved sustainability.

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Social class and communication situation

Whether individuals grow up in a working-class environment or in an academic household, they take on behaviors that are typical for their class — so goes the hypothesis. A social-psychologist has now found new evidence to support this hypothesis. Her study also shows, however, that people don't just rigidly exhibit class-specific behavior, but respond flexibly to counterparts from other social cl

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Extending palm oil production in Africa threatens primate conservation

Future expansion of the palm oil industry could have a dramatic impact on African primates.

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Apathy towards poachers widespread in world's marine protected areas

A new study has found that nearly half of fishers from seven countries had witnessed someone poaching in marine protected areas in the past year and most of them did nothing about it.

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The Plastic Brain: Neurotransmitter Switching

What comes to mind when you think of the word “plastic”? For me, this word conjures images of water bottles and tupperware. So in my high school psychology class, when we were told that our brains are “plastic”, I was pretty confused. However, we soon learned that the word “plastic” can be used to describe […]

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#TBT to 1947: Introducing the Polaroid Camera

Technology And other vintage photo news from Popular Science ’s May 1947 issue. Today we’re taking you way back to 1947 for some photographic wisdom from our friend’s at Popular Science . Happy Throwback Thursday!

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KAL’s cartoon

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New manufacturing technique could improve common problem in printing technology

A new manufacturing technique may be able to avoid the 'coffee ring' effect that plagues inkjet printers.

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Sprawling galaxy cluster found hiding in plain sight

Scientists have uncovered a sprawling new galaxy cluster hiding in plain sight. The cluster, which sits a mere 2.4 billion light years from Earth, is made up of hundreds of individual galaxies and surrounds an extremely active supermassive black hole, or quasar.

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Autoimmunity plays role in development of COPD, study finds

Autoimmunity plays a role in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study led by Georgia State University and Vanderbilt University Medical Center that analyzed human genome information stored in Vanderbilt's DNA biobank.

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Stretching beyond limits

Novel research optimizes both elasticity and rigidity in the same material without the usual tradeoffs

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'Cursed' Mummy Cheese Might Be the World's Oldest, Researchers Say

Let us (not) eat the whitish mummy cheese.

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Trump and the N Word

Omarosa Manigault-Newman has provided recordings on which nervous aides discuss how to cover for something hideous they believe Donald Trump has uttered. And we hardly need question whether the N word is the one at issue. What would that hideous utterance have been if not the word currently treated as the most taboo in the English language? In an episode of The Dick Van Dyke Show , Rob and Laura

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‘I’m an Undocumented Citizen of This Country’

“I'm here as an undocumented immigrant with no papers, no green card, no passport, and no legal documents, but I am still a citizen of this country,” says Jose Antonio Vargas in a new video filmed at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival. Vargas, an accomplished journalist whose work has garnered him a Pulitzer Prize, was smuggled into the U.S. at age 12 by his Filipino mother. Although he was raised by

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We Regret to Inform You That Russia Is (Probably) At It Again

Earlier this month, Facebook announced it had detected and shut down more than 30 Russia-linked fake pages created as part of a campaign to influence the U.S. midterm elections. In case there was any doubt, Russia’s effort to influence American politics continues. The Russian government has one overriding objective with regard to the United States: to weaken America so that it loses its will and

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Please, Please, Please Don't Sleep in Contact Lenses, CDC Says

Why the "it's just one night — it'll be fine" thinking might not work for contact lenses.

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Sprawling galaxy cluster found hiding in plain sight

MIT scientists have uncovered a sprawling new galaxy cluster hiding in plain sight. The cluster, which sits a mere 2.4 billion light years from Earth, is made up of hundreds of individual galaxies and surrounds an extremely active supermassive black hole, or quasar.

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UTA professor leads federal advisory group on the prevention of acute, chronic pain

A University of Texas at Arlington professor led a federal advisory group that has published its recommendations on the prevention of acute and chronic pain to the Federal Research Pain Strategy, an interagency committee that oversees the government's long-term strategic plan to support pain research.

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Does Drinking Ayahuasca Really Feel Like a Near-Death Experience?

A new study appears to confirm popular wisdom that using DMT is a lot like dying, but not everyone is convinced.

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Password managers vulnerable to insider hacking

A new study shows that communication channels between different parts and pieces of computer software are prone to security breaches. Anyone with access to a shared computer — co-workers, family members, or guests — can attack or involuntarily subject it to security breaches.

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How Fertility Apps Exclude Fathers

Jillian Wanner dutifully took birth-control pills for years to avoid getting pregnant by accident. When she stopped taking it, in 2016, at age 32, so she and her husband could try for a baby, she says she was a little surprised when she didn’t conceive right away. “You spend so much time trying not to get pregnant,” she says, “and then the minute you want to get pregnant, you think it’s going to

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