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Multi-purpose silicon chip created for quantum information processing

An international team of researchers led by the University of Bristol have demonstrated that light can be used to implement a multi-functional quantum processor.

17min

Most international borders are surprisingly young

No international borders, no international order – and yet, most land borders are not very old: more than half were drawn after 1900. Read More

1h

Omfattende pesticidforurening af Københavns drikkevand

18 millioner kubikmeter af vandet indeholder DMS – svarede til 24 procent af vandet. Fem millioner kubikmeter er forurenet over grænseværdien.

5h

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LATEST

New kind of aurora is not an aurora at all

Thin ribbons of purple and white light that sometimes appear in the night sky were dubbed a new type of aurora when brought to scientists' attention in 2016. But new research suggests these mysterious streams of light are not an aurora at all but an entirely new celestial phenomenon.

5min

Malaysia makes record $12-mn rhino horn seizure

Malaysia has made a record seizure of 50 rhino horns worth an estimated $12 million at Kuala Lumpur airport as they were being flown to Vietnam, authorities said Monday.

5min

Stone tools reveal modern human-like gripping capabilities 500,000 years ago

This research is the first to link a stone tool production technique known as 'platform preparation' to the biology of human hands. Demonstrating that without the ability to perform highly forceful precision grips, our ancestors would not have been able to produce advanced types of stone tool like spear points.

5min

The Parasitic Vine That Slowly Sucks The Life Out of Wasps

Every year, Scott Egan and his students crisscross the country looking for odd, round things called galls that grow on plants. They are, essentially, plant tumors. Once you start looking, they’re everywhere. Egan stops at county parks, cemeteries, church parking lots, even the side of the road. It was on one of these trips, to Florida, that they picked up a gall unlike any Egan had seen in 15 yea

6min

Racial disparities in prescribing opioids for chronic pain

Researchers have identified racial disparities in the treatment of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain. Black patients who receive opioids long-term are more likely than whites to be tested for illicit drug use. Of those who test positive, blacks are more likely to have their opioid prescriptions discontinued, said the researchers.

9min

Helping surgical patients taper off opioids safely and successfully

A unique pain program is helping complex surgical patients wean off opioids safely and effectively, while offering alternative ways to cope with their pain and improve how they function.

9min

New in­form­a­tion on brain areas linked to tact­ile sense and meta­cog­nit­ive abil­ity

A new doctoral thesis gives information on the neural basis of the sense of touch. According to the results, magnetic stimulation of prefrontal cortex affected the subjects' performance in tactile tasks, and their ability to evaluate their performance in these tasks.

9min

DNA analysis of 6,500-year-old human remains with blue eye mutation

Scientists have discovered that waves of migration from Anatolia and the Zagros mountains to the Levant helped develop the Chalcolithic culture that existed in Israel's Upper Galilee region some 6,500 years ago. "Certain characteristics, such as genetic mutations contributing to blue eye color, were not seen in the DNA test results of earlier Levantine human remains," according to one of the resea

9min

Think Rivers Are Dangerous Now? Just Wait

Climate change could increase river flooding damage by as much as 1,000 percent, an ambitious new study finds.

11min

Blood management program safely reduces transfusions in orthopedic patients

A patient blood management program designed to limit the amount of transfused blood orthopedic patients undergoing common surgeries such as hip and knee replacement receive was associated with fewer transfusions, reduced blood use and improved outcomes, reports a study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (A

12min

15min

How women in rural India turned courage into capital | Chetna Gala Sinha

When bankers refused to serve her neighbors in rural India, Chetna Gala Sinha did the next best thing: she opened a bank of her own, the first ever for and by women in the country. In this inspiring talk, she shares stories of the women who encouraged her and continue to push her to come up with solutions for those denied traditional financial backing.

16min

Why multiple earthquakes are rattling one Indonesian island

The Indonesian holiday island of Lombok has been hammered by a series of powerful earthquakes in the past three weeks that have killed more than 500 people and left hundreds of thousands homeless.

17min

Scientists discover intricacies of serotonin receptor crucial for better therapeutics

Serotonin, known as the "happiness" neurotransmitter, is a chemical found in the body responsible for feelings of well-being. But serotonin isn't the only chemical that binds to the 13 serotonin receptors found on the surface of cells. Far from it. Many approved drugs also bind to serotonin receptors. And one of these receptors—called 5-HT2BR—has made drug developers very unhappy. That's because s

17min

Researchers succeed in imaging quantum events

Quantum technology is a growing field of physics and engineering which utilizes properties of quantum mechanics as a basis for advanced practical applications such as quantum computing, sensors, information, communication and medicine. This promises to lead to a new era of technology unlike anything we've known. Computers will be much more powerful, medical treatment will be non-invasive and far s

17min

To float or not to float? Mystery solved as to why algae balls float and sink

Scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered the age-old mystery of why marimo algae balls sink at night and float during the day.

17min

Carbon reserves in Central American soils still affected by ancient Mayan deforestation

Deforestation is suspected to have contributed to the mysterious collapse of Mayan civilization more than 1,000 years ago. A new study shows that the forest-clearing also decimated carbon reservoirs in the tropical soils of the Yucatan peninsula region long after ancient cities were abandoned and the forests grew back.

17min

California plain shows surprising winners and losers from prolonged drought

The Carrizo Plain National Monument is a little-known ecological hotspot in Southern California. Though small, it explodes in wildflowers each spring and is full of threatened or endangered species.

17min

New study identifies strategies in US climate litigation

The courts have played a central role in climate change policy, starting with a landmark Supreme Court case that led to the mandatory regulation of greenhouse gases in the United States. How do the courts address climate cases today? Who wins, who loses and what kinds of strategies make a difference in the courtroom?

17min

A dog's life: fitness trackers help put fat pets on a diet

When Czech entrepreneur Robert Hasek began jogging with his dog, Darwin, the three-mile runs were making the bull terrier sick with fatigue.

17min

A timescale for the origin and evolution of all of life on Earth

A new study led by scientists from the University of Bristol has used a combination of genomic and fossil data to explain the history of life on Earth, from its origin to the present day.

17min

The bright ways forests affect their environment

For decades scientists have tried to understand why forests emit the volatile gases that give pine forests their distinctive smell. A new study led by the University of Leeds may have found the answer.

17min

Parasitic love vine tangles with gall wasps, sucking the life out of their young

Two parasites, the love vine and the gall wasp, are both hosted by one species of oak tree, but on August 20 in the journal Current Biology, researchers at Rice University describe a new interaction between them. Rather than thriving at the expense of the oak alone, the vine leaches nutrients and moisture away from the wasp larvae developing in the tree. While the young insects mature, the oak gro

17min

Autonomous gene expression control nanodevice will contribute to medical care

Gene expression is a fundamental of life, where each cell switches specific genes on and off. Thus, an autonomous device that could control the on-off switching would have great value in medical care.

17min

Sweltering Summers Linked to Rapidly Warming Arctic

Rising polar temperatures may be changing summer weather patterns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19min

Gig economy drivers and riders at heightened risk of traffic collisions

The pressures that come with being a self-employed courier or taxi driver may significantly increase the risk of being involved in a collision, a new report by UCL finds.

23min

Scientist leads development of efficient method to characterize quantum computers

A Rice University computer scientist and his colleagues have proposed a method to accelerate and simplify the imposing task of diagnosing quantum computers.

23min

Graphene phase modulators hold the key to faster mobile technology

Researchers from Graphene Flagship Partners at the National Inter-University Consortium for Telecommunications (CNIT) in Italy, IMEC in Belgium and University of Cambridge in UK created and tested a graphene based phase modulator that outperforms existing silicon based ones.

23min

Under-fire Apple removes 25,000 apps in ChinaApple China App Store

Apple said Monday it had removed many gambling-related apps from its Chinese app store as the US giant comes under scrutiny amid trade tensions between Beijing and Washington.

23min

German prosecutors 'refuse to share dieselgate documents with France'

German investigators probing the "dieselgate" pollution scandal at Volkswagen have refused to share their findings with their French counterparts, according to a letter seen by AFP on Monday.

23min

Anger as Zambia announces tax on internet calls

Zambia will tax phone calls made over the internet to protect traditional telecoms companies, the government said Monday, a move activists warned would stifle freedom of expression.

23min

Autonomous gene expression control nanodevice will contribute to medical care

Researchers constructed integrated gene logic-chips called 'gene nanochips.' These self-contained nanochips can switch genes on or off according to the environment, where photo-reprogramming of the logic operation by UV irradiation is possible. Moreover, the researchers completed proof-of-concept experiments using artificial cells that produced the diagnostics and reactants (the desired RNA and pr

23min

New drug could prevent debilitating side effect of cancer treatment

About 50,000 people in the US are diagnosed annually with head, neck, nasal and oral cancers. Most are treated with radiation, and of those, 70-80 percent develop a painful and debilitating side effect called severe oral mucositis. A new drug could potentially prevent the condition.

23min

Simple score to diagnose heart attacks is safer, faster than current methods

An international team of researchers has developed a simple laboratory score that is safer and faster at diagnosing patients who visit the emergency department with heart attack symptoms. The score can also identify patients at risk of subsequent heart issues after discharge.

23min

A GPS for inside your body

Scientists have developed a system that can pinpoint the location of ingestible implants inside the body using low-power wireless signals.

23min

Teen tattoos: 1/2 of parents concerned about negative health effects, impact on employment

78 percent of parents said they would 'absolutely not consider it' if their teen asked about a tattoo.

23min

Techniques for reducing sugar content in dairy products show promise

Dairy foods are popular among consumers, and sales gross more than $125 billion per year (IDFA, 2017). With dairy product popularity comes new demands from consumers for healthier, low-calorie products that taste the same as their higher calorie counterparts. Researchers now review the options available to the dairy industry to reduce sugar in products such as ice cream, yogurt, and flavored milk

23min

Fotos viser store revner i amerikansk bro før fatalt kollaps

Store revner i den fodgængerbro, der kollapsede i Miami i marts, burde have fået alarmen til at gå, mener uafhængige ingeniører, der også mener at have fundet alvorlige fejl i projekteringsmaterialet.

25min

Let's count orangutan nests

Known for their distinctive red fur, orangutans are the largest arboreal mammal, spending most of their time in trees. They even build nests in trees every evening to sleep!

28min

Worst anthrax outbreak in 20 years hits French farms

More than 50 cows, sheep and horses have died in France's most serious outbreak of anthrax in two decades, according to officials who have warned of a vaccine shortage.

28min

Five reasons to forget Mars for now and return to the moon

Hopes of colonising Mars rest on the premise that we could terraform the red planet, making it habitable for humans with a breathable atmosphere and clement temperatures. However, a recent study cast doubt on the idea, concluding that terraforming is impossible with present technology.

28min

Alcohol brewed from trees and other fermented drinks in Australia's Indigenous history

There is no doubt that Europeans brought a culture of brewing and consuming alcohol during their early migration and colonisation of Australia.

28min

New kind of aurora is not an aurora at all

Thin ribbons of purple and white light that sometimes appear in the night sky were dubbed a new type of aurora when brought to scientists' attention in 2016. But new research suggests these mysterious streams of light are not an aurora at all but an entirely new celestial phenomenon.

34min

Tons of plastic trash enter the Great Lakes every year – where does it go?

Awareness is rising worldwide about the scourge of ocean plastic pollution, from Earth Day 2018 events to the cover of National Geographic magazine. But few people realize that similar concentrations of plastic pollution are accumulating in lakes and rivers. One recent study found microplastic particles – fragments measuring less then five millimeters – in globally sourced tap water and beer brewe

35min

Observing glaciers in 'real time'

Hot summers cause glaciers to melt. That not only changes the makeup of the landscape and hence the maps of Switzerland, it also affects every area of society. A new, dynamic glacier inventory makes the impact of climate change and the changing landscape visible.

35min

Stop worrying about how much energy bitcoin uses

The word "bitcoin" is as likely to garnish feverish excitement as it is glaring criticism. The financial community sees speculative promise in the form of trade that currently has little to no regulation. Meanwhile, others argue that it's a distraction that detracts from the overall longevity of U.S. financial institutions.

35min

Teens today spend more time on digital media, less time reading

If you can't remember the last time you saw a teenager reading a book, newspaper or magazine, you're not alone. In recent years, less than 20 percent of US teens report reading a book, magazine or newspaper daily for pleasure, while more than 80 percent say they use social media every day, according to new research.

38min

Next-gen insect repellents to combat mosquito-borne diseases

Nearly 700 million people suffer from mosquito-borne diseases — such as malaria, West Nile, Zika and dengue fever — each year, resulting in more than 1 million deaths. Today, researchers report a new class of mosquito repellents based on naturally occurring compounds that are effective in repelling the bugs, including those that are resistant to pyrethroid insecticides and repellents.

38min

Strawberries could help reduce harmful inflammation in the colon

Inflammatory bowel disease is a set of painful conditions that can cause severe diarrhea and fatigue. Researchers are now reporting that a simple dietary intervention could mitigate colonic inflammation and improve gut health. In this case, a strawberry — or rather, less than a cupful of strawberries — a day could help keep the doctor away.

38min

Maple leaf extract could nip skin wrinkles in the bud

Maple trees are best known for their maple syrup and lovely fall foliage. But it turns out that the beauty of those leaves could be skin-deep — and that's a good thing. Today, scientists report that an extract from the leaves may prevent wrinkles.

38min

A new generation of artificial retinas based on 2D materials

Scientists report they have successfully developed and tested the world's first ultrathin artificial retina that could vastly improve on existing implantable visualization technology for the blind. The flexible 2-D material-based device could someday restore sight to the millions of people with retinal diseases.

38min

E-cigarettes can damage DNA

The popularity of electronic cigarettes continues to grow worldwide, as many people view them as a safer alternative to smoking. But the long-term effects of e-cigarette usage, commonly called 'vaping,' are unknown. Today, researchers report that vaping may modify the genetic material, or DNA, in the oral cells of users, which could increase their cancer risk.

38min

Saliva could influence taste preferences

Saliva is crucial for tasting and digesting food. But scientists have now found that saliva could also be part of a feedback loop that influences how food tastes to people — and by extension, what foods they're willing to eat. They hope that, one day, the findings could help consumers stick to a healthier diet.

38min

Synthetic DNA-based enzymes

Enzymes perform very specific functions and require little energy – which is why biocatalysts are also of interest to the chemical industry. In a review article published in the journal Nature Reviews Chemistry, Professor Thomas Happe and Associate Professor Anja Hemschemeier from the Photobiotechnology work group at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have provided a summary on what is known about the mechan

41min

What makes some connected objects a success and others a flop?

Wearing the Oura connected ring on your finger day and night can help you find out how well you sleep. A connected patch diabetics wear on their arms enables them to monitor their blood sugar levels without pricking their fingers. On February 9, these two objects received one of the mobile healthcare trophies presented at Paris-Diderot IUT, awarded by a panel of experts, attesting to their signifi

47min

Technology hasn't killed public libraries – it's inspired them to transform and stay relevant

In 2017, archaeologists discovered the ruins of the oldest public library in Cologne, Germany. The building may have housed up to 20,000 scrolls, and dates back to the Roman era in the second century. When literacy was restricted to a tiny elite, this library was open to the public. Located in the centre of the city in the marketplace, it sat at the heart of public life.

47min

New technology could improve radiation risk warnings for future deep-space astronauts

New technology that detects radiation from the sun in real time and immediately predicts subsequent health risks could protect astronauts on future deep-space missions, according to a new study.

47min

Widespread dispersal of prisoners revealed in new data

Cardiff University's Wales Governance Centre today revealed the most detailed picture yet of the prison population in Wales.

47min

Flower-loving Mosquitos

Flower-loving Mosquitos Should we genetically modify all mosquitos to suck on nectar instead of blood? Flower-loving Mosquitos Video of Flower-loving Mosquitos Creature Monday, August 20, 2018 – 10:00 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) — As the hot summer months ramp up, so do biting, disease-carrying mosquitos — arguably the season's most annoying bug. But what if we could liv

50min

DNA analysis of 6,500-year-old human remains in Israel points to origin of ancient culture

An international team of researchers from Tel Aviv University, the Israel Antiquities Authority and Harvard University has discovered that waves of migration from Anatolia and the Zagros mountains to the Levant helped develop the Chalcolithic culture that existed in Israel's Upper Galilee region some 6,500 years ago. The study is one of the largest ancient DNA studies ever conducted in Israel.

55min

Gene therapy vectors carrying the telomerase gene do not increase the risk of cancer

Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have shown in a new study that the gene therapy with telomerase that they have developed, and which has proven to be effective in mice against diseases caused by excessive telomere shortening and ageing, does not cause cancer or increase the risk of developing it, even in a cancer-prone setting.

55min

Supercomputing simulations and machine learning help improve power plants

Researchers at the University of Stuttgart are exploring how supercritical carbon dioxide could serve as a cleaner, safer, and more flexible working fluid in power plants than supercritical water by using supercomputing resources and machine learning.

55min

Proposal seeks to improve assessment of drug risks

A drug policy researcher is proposing a suite of changes to overhaul the Multi-Criteria Drug Harm Scale, which informs drug policies across Europe. The changes focus on addressing use and abuse separately, collecting input from a broader range of stakeholders, and targeting substance-specific experts for drug review panels.

55min

The Sunday Shows Have a Renewed Sense of Purpose, Thanks to Trump

“I think, without any question , this is the biggest moment of the Trump presidency.” It was the day in June when Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement from the Supreme Court, and Chris Wallace was on Fox News explaining to viewers the gravity of the Court’s swing vote stepping down. I’d been interviewing Wallace when the Kennedy news broke, and he’d politely excused himself from our call and

1h

Stone tools reveal modern human-like gripping capabilities 500,000 years ago

Research demonstrates that a technique used to produce stone tools that were first found half a million years ago is likely to have needed a modern human-like hand. This links a stone tool production technique known as 'platform preparation' to the biology of human hands, demonstrating that without the ability to perform highly forceful precision grips, our ancestors would not have been able to pr

1h

Consuming milk at breakfast lowers blood glucose throughout the day

A change in breakfast routine may provide benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. A team of scientists found that milk consumed with breakfast cereal reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with water, and high dairy protein concentration reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with normal dairy protein concentration. The high-p

1h

Antidepressant restores youthful flexibility to aging inhibitory neurons in mice

Inhibitory neurons in the aging brain show reduced growth and plasticity, likely contributing to declines in brain function. In a new study in mice researchers show that treatment with fluoxetine restored substantial growth and plasticity.

1h

Illicit drug use could be higher than previously thought; soars during special events

America's drug problem may be even worse than officials realize. And illicit drugs are consumed at a higher rate during celebratory events. Those are just two of the conclusions scientists have drawn from recent studies of drug residues in sewage.

1h

How 'bling' makes us human

Sparkly jewelry, expensive shoes, designer watches – who doesn't love a bit of "bling?"

1h

How to sit ergonomically—without expensive equipment

DIY Create a more comfortable desk setup. Spending hours at your desk every day is bad for your health. Here are a few misconceptions about “ergonomic” office equipment—and the real effective behavior that can…

1h

How Network Math Can Help You Make Friends

When you start at a new school or job, or move to a new city, how do you go about making new friends? You could take an active approach, forging strategic connections with the popular kids and the movers and shakers. Or you could leave things to chance, relying on random groupings and associations. Whatever your approach, understanding the structure of existing friendships in your new community c

1h

Floating farm

An offshore dairy farm aims to help Rotterdam produce its own food more sustainably.

1h

Nice sunny days can grow into heat waves — and wildfires: summer weather is stalling

Stalling summer weather as we are experiencing right now in the Northern hemisphere can turn into 'extreme extremes' from heat to drought, from rain to flood.

1h

Study finds racial disparities in prescribing opioids for chronic pain

Yale researchers have identified racial disparities in the treatment of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain. Black patients who receive opioids long-term are more likely than whites to be tested for illicit drug use. Of those who test positive, blacks are more likely to have their opioid prescriptions discontinued, said the researchers.

1h

Stone tools reveal modern human-like gripping capabilities 500,000 years ago

Research carried out at the University of Kent demonstrates that a technique used to produce stone tools that were first found half a million years ago is likely to have needed a modern human-like hand.This links a stone tool production technique known as 'platform preparation' to the biology of human hands, demonstrating that without the ability to perform highly forceful precision grips, our anc

1h

Helping surgical patients taper off opioids safely and successfully

A unique pain program is helping complex surgical patients wean off opioids safely and effectively, while offering alternative ways to cope with their pain and improve how they function.

1h

Quantum bugs, meet your new swatter

A Rice University computer scientist and his colleagues have proposed a scalable algorithm for quantum state tomography to significantly accelerate the imposing task of validating the accuracy of quantum computers.

1h

Orangutan Kalimantan survey in Sebangau National Park—Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park Corridor

The population of orangutan in Sebangau National Park according to WWF-Indonesia are 5,826 individuals (WWF Central Kalimantan, 2015). Based on that number, the population is the largest within conservation areas in Central Kalimantan. Although based on Population and Habitat Viability Assessment Orangutan (2016) using Vortex Analysis, this number will last for next 100 years, there will be an eff

1h

Water stewardship revisited

Water stewardship remains a critical concept for companies and investors to embrace and implement, but one that is at a crossroads, according to a new WWF briefing—Water Stewardship Revisted: Shifting the narrative from risk to value creation.

1h

Upgraded Water Risk Filter can help transform business response to water risk

world assess their water risk. More than 200,000 sites have already been assessed by over 3,000 users. But now it's time for a change. Indeed, some big changes.

1h

Predictive models for gene regulation

In the field of systems biology, "big data" refers to the massive amounts of information that can be collected, stored and analyzed computationally and which can reveal previously unseen patterns or associations important to understanding, treating or preventing disease.

1h

Kühnau klar med strukturændringer

Regionsrådsformand Anders Kühnau (S) vil spare penge ved at samle midtjyske behandlinger på færre steder.

1h

Enhedslisten vil tilføre sundhedsvæsenet to milliarder

En saltvandsindsprøjtning og en automatisk mekanisme, der følger befolkning og velstandens udvikling, er en del af Enhedslisten forslag til at sikre sundheden.

1h

Great Barrier Reef hiding priceless tech treasures

Move over Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg – University of Queensland scientists say the humble sea sponge or snail could unlock technological breakthroughs that might alter the course of human existence.

1h

Studying climate change at opposite ends of the Earth

Her major in environmental sciences has given Griffin all kinds of opportunities. She competed with BYU's Mars Rover team. She presented at conferences in Leuven, Belgium; Portland, Oregon; Boulder, Colorado; and Davos, Switzerland. But visiting both poles, where she completed research with her team from BYU, was a unique experience.

1h

Nice sunny days can grow into heat waves and wildfires—summer weather is stalling

Stalling summer weather like that right now in the Northern hemisphere can turn into "extreme extremes," from heat to drought, from rain to flood.

1h

Sex in plants requires thrust

In a TECHNOLOGY paper to be published in the September 2018 issue of TECHNOLOGY, the thrust produced by the microscopic organ delivering sperm cells in plants has now been measured using microfluidic technology.

1h

Metamolds: Molding a mold

The method of fabricating objects via silicone molding has a long tradition. Until now, however, creating molds for casting complex objects required a lot of experience and still involved manual work, which made the process expensive and slow. Researchers have now developed a tool that not only automatically finds the best design of the molds but also delivers templates for so-called 'metamolds':

1h

Can we have a fire in a highly vacuumed environment?

Toyohashi University of Technology researchers have discovered that non-flaming combustion (smoldering) of a porous specimen can sustain, even under nearly 1 percent of atmospheric pressure. The thermal structure of a 2-mm-diameter burning specimen at very near extinction condition was successfully measured using an embedded ultra-fine thermocouple, clarifying the key issues that lead to fire exti

1h

Rogue proteins may underlie some ALS and frontotemporal dementia cases, says study

Some forms of ALS and frontotemporal dementia share a common loss of functioning of RNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression, says a new study by Columbia University and New York Genome Center researchers.

1h

In teen friendships, misery does love company

A longitudinal study examined anxiety, depression, social withdrawal, and submissiveness to predict the end of teen friendships. Do friendships end because of one child's mental health problems or do they end because of differences between friends on the degree to which each friend suffers from these problems? Findings show that children's personal struggles need not adversely impact their social

1h

Nearly 2 in 5 teen drivers text while driving

The study examined individual- and state-level factors associated with texting while driving among teens from 35 states. Researchers found that nearly 2 in 5 teen drivers age 14 years and older had texted while driving at least once in the month prior to the survey.

1h

Teens today spend more time on digital media, less time reading

If you can't remember the last time you saw a teenager reading a book, newspaper or magazine, you're not alone. In recent years, less than 20 percent of US teens report reading a book, magazine or newspaper daily for pleasure, while more than 80 percent say they use social media every day, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

1h

Thrombospondin-1 as a potential therapeutic target for Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

Researchers centered at the University of Tsukuba and Kansai Medical University in Japan reveal matricellular protein Thrombospondin-1 (Thbs1) contributes to the development of aortic aneurysm in mice and humans.This study reveals that Thbs1 is not only a critical component of mechanotransduction, but also a modulator of elastic fiber organization and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Thbs1 may serve

1h

Mechanism behind orchid beauty revealed

Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan have identified the gene related to the greenish flower mutation in the Habenaria orchid.

1h

A study by MSU scientists will help specify the models of the Earth atmosphere circulation

A team of scientists from the Institute of Mechanics, MSU demonstrated how random fluctuations in the rotation speed and noises influence the number of vortexes in the Couette spherical flow. It turned out that the level of noise and the flow regime have a complicated nonlinear correlation between them. The new data will help to develop more exact models of natural flows including the atmospheric

1h

Light from ancient quasars helps confirm quantum entanglement

Last year, physicists at MIT, the University of Vienna, and elsewhere provided strong support for quantum entanglement, the seemingly far-out idea that two particles, no matter how distant from each other in space and time, can be inextricably linked, in a way that defies the rules of classical physics.

1h

The Muscle Makes Kid-Approved Pancakes | Diesel Brothers

Waking up to pancakes is the best – especially when they're made with love by your dad. See how The Muscle cooks up his speciality for his two daughters. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discove

2h

Apple fjerner 25.000 apps fra det kinesiske marked

Efter pres fra de kinesiske internet-myndigheder har Apple fjernet, hvad der svarer til to procent af alle apps i den kinesiske app-butik.

2h

Researcher discusses bike-sharing programs

The yellow-and-green bicycles of the California bike-sharing startup LimeBike have popped up in more than a dozen Massachusetts communities in recent weeks, the latest fleet to follow in the tracks of Blue Bikes, which launched as Hubway in 2011. Anne Lusk studies bike environments, including safety and crashes, as a researcher at the Harvard Chan School. She's also a cyclist. We asked her about t

2h

Astronomers detect synchronous X-ray and radio mode switching of the pulsar PSR B0823+26

An international team of astronomers has detected synchronous X-ray and radio mode switching between radio-bright and a radio-quiet modes in the pulsar PSR B0823+26. The discovery marks the second time that such synchronous mode switching has been observed in a pulsar. The finding is detailed in a paper published August 6 on arXiv.org.

2h

Screen of human proteins reveals some with antimicrobial power

The human body produces many antimicrobial peptides that help the immune system fend off infection. Scientists hoping to harness these peptides as potential antibiotics have now discovered that other peptides in the human body can also have potent antimicrobial effects, expanding the pool of new antibiotic candidates.

2h

The environmental cost of contact lenses

Many people rely on contact lenses to improve their vision. But these sight-correcting devices don't last forever and they are eventually disposed of in various ways. Now, scientists are reporting that throwing these lenses down the drain at the end of their use could be contributing to microplastic pollution in waterways.

2h

Research advances state-of the-art vibration analysis of carbon nanotube

Research by Robert Hudson, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering, and Alok Sinha, professor of mechanical engineering, conducted in the Penn State Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, has resulted in computationally efficient methods to predict the vibratory behavior of carbon nanotubes with inevitable defects.

2h

The SurfSafe Browser Extension Will Save You From Fake Photos

Two UC Berkeley undergrads developed SurfSafe to alert people that their media diet is infected with misinformation, right when it happens.

2h

Fitbit's Charge 3 Offers a New Take on an Old Tracker

The Charge 3's build, guts, and software features have changed enough to warrant serious consideration if you’ve been thinking about updating your Fitbit.

2h

Why I’m flying to the solar system’s only all-metal world

Worth 10 quintillion dollars, the metal asteroid Psyche is a space miner's fantasy – but there are better reasons to want to visit it, says Lindy Elkins-Tanton

2h

The Most Dangerous Space Weapons Ever

Since Sputnik 1 launched in 1957, nations have been racing to gain a military advantage in space — the ultimate "high ground." Check out the top 10 space weapon concepts from over the years.

2h

Pseudo-Satellite Drone Flies for 25 Days Straight, Sets Endurance Record

The Zephyr drone could be used for military reconnaissance and wildfire monitoring, among other activities.

2h

Juelich researchers are developing fast-charging solid-state batteries

There are currently great hopes for solid-state batteries. They contain no liquid parts that could leak or catch fire. For this reason, they do not require cooling and are considered to be much safer, more reliable, and longer lasting than traditional lithium-ion batteries. Juelich scientists have now introduced a new concept that allows currents up to ten times greater during charging and dischar

2h

Synthetic DNA-based enzymes

Enzymes perform very specific functions and require only little energy — which is why the biocatalysts are also of interest to the chemical industry. In a review article published in the journal Nature Reviews Chemistry, biologists from Ruhr-Universität Bochum have provided a summary on what is known about the mechanisms of enzymes in nature. Moreover, the authors outline a future vision: artific

2h

Nanoparticles in our environment may have more harmful effects than we think

Researchers warn that a combination of nanoparticles and contaminants may form a cocktail that is harmful to our cells. In their study, 72 pct. of cells died after exposure to a cocktail of nano-silver and cadmium ions.

2h

Brain cancer potentially resists immunotherapies by trapping T cells in bone marrow

Researchers in collaboration with Osaka University found that brain tumors in mice and humans cause immune T-cells to become trapped in bone marrow. This occurs prior to cancer treatment and explains the low circulating levels of T-cells seen in some tumor patients. The effects that brain tumors have on the cell surface S1P1 protein appear to mediate the process. These findings open the door for p

2h

Autonomous gene expression control nanodevice will contribute to medical care

Osaka University-led researchers constructed integrated gene logic-chips called 'gene nanochips.' These self-contained nanochips can switch genes on or off according to the environment, where photo-reprogramming of the logic operation by UV irradiation is possible. Moreover, the researchers completed proof-of-concept experiments using artificial cells that produced the diagnostics and reactants (t

2h

STAT3 can be a therapeutic target for chronic active EBV infection, a fatal disorder

Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) is an inflammatory disorder with potential for tumor development. Here, unusual phosphorylation was observed on STAT3 in EBV-infected T- or NK-cells from patients with CAEBV. Tokyo Medical and Dental University(TMDU) researchers found that ruxolitinib, a drug that is currently used for treatment of myelofibrosis and polycythemia vera, could suppr

2h

Drug and alcohol use by pregnant women: the evolution of state policies

Policymakers and public health experts have long recognized the harm that can come to fetuses if women use drugs during pregnancy. As U.S. states legalize marijuana and as governmental attention focuses on the 'opioid crisis,' state policies pertaining to drug use during pregnancy are increasingly important. A new study examines the scope of state policies targeting drug use during pregnancy, how

2h

Should all babies have their genomes sequenced?

Researchers and clinicians are debating whether all newborns should be sequenced at birth. But while sequencing the genomes of some infants may be appropriate in specific contexts, genome-wide sequencing of all newborns should not be pursued at this time, states the lead article in The Ethics of Sequencing Newborns: Recommendations and Reflections, a new special report of the Hastings Center Repor

2h

Teens today spend more time on digital media, less time reading

If you can't remember the last time you saw a teenager reading a book, newspaper or magazine, you're not alone. In recent years, less than 20 percent of U.S. teens report reading a book, magazine or newspaper daily for pleasure, while more than 80 percent say they use social media every day, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

2h

A freshwater, saltwater tug-of-war is eating away at the Everglades

Saltwater is winning in the Everglades as sea levels rise and years of redirecting freshwater flow to support agriculture and population growth

2h

Honest Liars: Dishonest Leaders May Be Perceived as Authentic

Donald Trump’s election suggests supporters view an outsider’s lies as symbolic protests against the establishment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

"Interpassion" / "Ba$$in" | Yelle

Yelle and GrandMarnier bring their danceable electropop hits to the TED stage in an energizing performance of two songs, "Interpassion" and "Ba$$in."

2h

Mother tongue versus father tongue—a new study reconciles the two hypotheses

Does the mother or father have a stronger influence on their children's language? The mother tongue hypothesis suggests that language usage follows matrilineal inheritance. The father tongue hypothesis holds that paternal lines dominate the local language in an already populated region, which was proposed based on other genetic and anthropological research.

2h

Scientists identify enzyme that could accelerate biofuel production

Researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology report on an enzyme belonging to the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) family as a promising target for increasing biofuel production from the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

2h

Senator Burr’s Shortcomings Are Showing

Senator Richard Burr, the Republican chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, leads the only credible congressional investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. It is getting harder to have confidence in his leadership. Last week, The New York Times published an op-ed by John Brennan, the Obama administration national-security official who presided over extraju

2h

Regeringen vil afsætte 100 millioner kroner til de mest psykisk syge

Regeringen vil bruge 100 mio. kr. på nye specialiserede teams i børne- og ungdomspsykiatrien og en ny type intensive sengeafsnit til de mest plagede psykisk syge voksne.

2h

Beavers Made America Great, a New Book Explains

Castor canadensis constructed a continent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Danske forskere angriber kræftcellers kraftværk med naturens cellegift

Aarhus Universitet angriber kræft ved at finde og kopiere naturstoffer, der kan dræbe særligt sejlivede kræftceller.

2h

Researchers strengthen DNA nanostructures to help them survive harsh environments

A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a way to strengthen DNA nanostructures for improved survival under harsh environmental conditions. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their technique and why they believe it will be useful.

3h

Zippin's Checkout-Free Retail Store Uses Cameras to Watch You Shop

A new startup is offering a new kind of retail experience. Instead of humans handling cash, it's all apps, smartphones, sensors, and computer vision.

3h

Drive.ai Is the Self-Driving Startup Teaching Cars to Talk

Silicon Valley-based Drive.ai relies on machine learning to make its robots drive—and smart design to make them communicate.

3h

Scientists make leap in simulating quantum particles

New quantum theory research, led by academics at the University of St Andrews' School of Physics, could transform the way scientists predict how quantum particles behave.

3h

Image of the Day: The Long and Short of It

For flycatchers, the attractiveness of male birds is tied to the length of their sperm.

3h

The Bat Man: Neuroscience on the Fly

How does the brain know where it is? Nachum Ulanovsky hopes his flying friends can help him find the answer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Ancient Americans Bred Symbolically Important Scarlet Macaws

Genetic information from the bones of macaws found in abandoned pueblos suggests they were bred and distributed as a commodity. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Europæisk talentprogram satser på KU-forskere

De kvindelige forskere var stærkere repræsenteret end nogensinde før, da det Europæiske…

3h

Trilobites: Your Spit Might Help You Learn to Eat Your Greens

When people were repeatedly exposed to bitter compounds in a study, their saliva changed to produce proteins that rendered those flavors more palatable.

3h

A Superconductor Scandal? Scientists Question a Nobel Prize–Worthy Claim

Scientists claim to have achieved superconductivity at room temperature, but other physicists say the data looks doctored — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Dear Therapist: My Mom Used to Abuse Me. Should I Keep Her in My Life?

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My mother has textbook Borderline Personality Disorder—extreme insecurity, where anything can trigger her. When we were growing up, this manifested in physical abuse or destruction of some item, like throwing

4h

Ghostly antineutrinos could help ferret out nuclear tests

Antineutrino detectors could one day help reveal stealthy nuclear blasts.

4h

Self-Driving Cars Should Look Down, Not Just Ahead

A Boston-based startup wants to equip AVs with ground penetrating radar, which they can use to identify exactly where they are.

4h

The Globe-Trotting Show Bringing Science and Tech to Arab TV

In a given thirty minute episode, 4Tech's hosts might test for counterfeit medicines at a pharmacy in Ghana, try out a wetsuit in cold Russian waters, or peek into a zebrafish lab in Iceland.

4h

The Persistent Myth of Speed and "Productivity"

It’s not immoral to want relief from being too slow, scared, or fat, but speed could set you up for brain damage and psychosis—and life-­draining repetition.

4h

Worrying about robots stealing our jobs? How silly | Simon Jenkins

The digital age will free us up not only for leisure activities but also to take on caring roles that can only be filled by humans So we are doomed. Robots will steal our jobs. Algorithms will capture our children. Artificial intelligence will corrupt our free will. We are to be slaves to machines. The Bank of England economist Andy Haldane warns today that “large swathes” of current labour will d

4h

Why Are Pregnant Women Told to Sleep on Their Left Side?

Doctors have a very good reason for this recommendation.

4h

Here's What Happens When You Flush Contact Lenses Down the Toilet (and Why You Shouldn't)

Contact lenses don't last forever, so what do you do with yours when it's time to discard them?

4h

Overlæge bliver landets første professor i patientsikkerhed

Overlæge Alma Becic Pedersen fra Aarhus Universitet og Aarhus Universitetshospital er ny professor i patientsikkerhed. Hun forsker i komplikationer efter ortopædkirurgisk operation.

4h

Who needs democracy when you have data?

Here’s how China rules using data, AI, and internet surveillance.

4h

Lemurs in Crisis: 105 Species Now Threatened with Extinction

At least 95 percent of Madagascar’s beloved primates are now at risk, conservationists warn — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Poetry Is Everywhere

In April of 2015, The Washington Post published an article that combined insult, injury, and statistics with a ruthless efficiency. Headlined “Poetry Is Going Extinct, Government Data Show,” the piece—published (insult! injury!) at the height of National Poetry Month—was based on the most recent results of the survey that the National Endowment for the Arts conducts every five years as part of th

4h

Fresno’s Mason-Dixon Line

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series exploring the vast racial and economic inequality in Fresno, the poorest major city in California. These stories were reported by students at the University of California at Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. James Helming knew every corner in Fresno. He knew which roads were paved and he knew which way the smoke from nearby factories blew. H

4h

Contact Lenses Are a Surprising Source of Pollution

Wastewater contains billions of lenses, which eventually make their way into the environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Summer weather is getting 'stuck' due to Arctic warming

Rising arctic temperatures mean we face a future of ‘extreme extremes’ where sunny days become heatwaves and rain becomes floods, study says Summer weather patterns are increasingly likely to stall in Europe, North America and parts of Asia, according to a new climate study that explains why Arctic warming is making heatwaves elsewhere more persistent and dangerous. Rising temperatures in the Arc

4h

Send in the lawyers to win the fight against climate change

A rash of court cases is challenging governments and fossil-fuel interests on climate inaction. Some question whether such actions are legitimate – they are

4h

How a tiny festival could save Scotland’s coastal culture

A festival created on a tiny island and now touring the coastline of Scotland shows how the small and local can punch well above their weight in cultural influence

4h

5.000 styk om ugen: Tesla når vigtigt produktionsmål

Mens sommersolen har varmet danskerne, har Tesla fået fyret godt og grundigt op under produktionen. Målet om 5.000 styk Model 3 per uge er passeret, og nu ses der frem mod produktionsstart af basismodellen.

4h

Techtopia #66: Fremtidens internet er i 3D

Kevin Kelly fra Wired fortæller om 'The Mesh'; forfatteren og futuristens navn for fremtidens internet fuld af kunstig intelligens.

4h

America’s Invisible Pot Addicts

The proliferation of retail boutiques in California did not really bother him, Evan told me, but the billboards did. Advertisements for delivery, advertisements promoting the substance for relaxation, for fun, for health. “Shop. It’s legal.” “Hello marijuana, goodbye hangover.” “It’s not a trigger,” he told me. “But it is in your face.” When we spoke, he had been sober for a hard-fought seven wee

5h

Building Stratolaunch, the Most Audacious Flying Machine Ever

Here's how alt-aviation wizard Burt Rutan and Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen set out to build a dual-fuselage beast that could haul rockets to the edge of space.

5h

5h

Datatilsynet udfordret af firedobling af antal sager efter GDPR

Anmeldelser af menneskelige fejl og komplekse juridiske spørgsmål udfordrer Datatilsynet.

5h

Lovforslag i Australien: Op til 10 års fængsel for at nægte politiet telefonadgang

Australien øger den digitale indsats mod kriminelle. Et nyt lovforslag vil hæve fængselsstraffen til 10 år for mistænkte, der nægter politiet adgang til deres smartphones.

5h

Illicit drug use could be higher than previously thought; soars during special events

America's drug problem may be even worse than officials realize. And illicit drugs are consumed at a higher rate during celebratory events. Those are just two of the conclusions scientists have drawn from recent studies of drug residues in sewage.

5h

Next-gen insect repellents to combat mosquito-borne diseases

Nearly 700 million people suffer from mosquito-borne diseases—such as malaria, West Nile, Zika and dengue fever—each year, resulting in more than 1 million deaths. Increasingly, many species of mosquitoes have become resistant to the popular pyrethroid-based insecticides. Today, researchers report a new class of mosquito repellents based on naturally occurring compounds that are effective in repel

5h

Maple leaf extract could nip skin wrinkles in the bud

Maple trees are best known for their maple syrup and lovely fall foliage. But it turns out that the beauty of those leaves could be skin-deep—and that's a good thing. Today, scientists report that an extract from the leaves may prevent wrinkles.

5h

A new generation of artificial retinas based on 2-D materials

Scientists report they have successfully developed and tested the world's first ultrathin artificial retina that could vastly improve on existing implantable visualization technology for the blind. The flexible device, based on very thin 2-D materials, could someday restore sight to the millions of people with retinal diseases. And with a few modifications, the device could be used to track heart

5h

Saliva could influence taste preferences

Saliva is crucial for tasting and digesting food, but scientists have now found that it may have another, more subtle role. Salivary proteins could be part of a feedback loop that influences how food tastes to people—and by extension, what foods they're willing to eat. The researchers hope that, one day, their findings could help consumers stick to a healthier diet.

5h

The New Health Care: This Drug Is Safe and Effective. Wait. Compared With What?

Comparative effectiveness research may be the best way to answer questions that patients and physicians face every day.

5h

Understanding urban issues through credit cards

Digital traces from credit card and mobile phone usage can be used to map urban lifestyles and understand human mobility, according to a report led by UCL, MIT and UC Berkeley.

5h

Chagas disease, caused by a parasite, has spread outside of Latin America and carries a high risk of heart disease

Chagas disease is caused by a parasite, transmitted by a blood-sucking insect — Trypanosoma cruzi — and less frequently, from mother to fetus or by contaminated food or drink. About one third of infected individuals develop chronic heart disease. Though mostly found in Central and South America, Chagas disease has become more common worldwide, including an estimated 300,000 infected persons in t

5h

Nice sunny days can grow into heat waves — and wildfires: summer weather is stalling

Stalling summer weather as we are experiencing right now in the Northern hemisphere can turn into 'extreme extremes' from heat to drought, from rain to flood.

5h

Young, healthy people still vulnerable to CVD if their LDL cholesterol is high

A study of more than 36,000 people followed for over two decades revealed that healthy individuals considered 'low-risk' still died from cardiovascular disease if they had high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Without taking into account other risk factors, people with LDL cholesterol levels in the range of 100-159 mg/dL had a 30 to 40 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease death.

5h

Saliva could influence taste preferences

Saliva is crucial for tasting and digesting food. But scientists have now found that saliva could also be part of a feedback loop that influences how food tastes to people — and by extension, what foods they're willing to eat. They hope that, one day, the findings could help consumers stick to a healthier diet. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Expos

5h

New drug could prevent debilitating side effect of cancer treatment

About 50,000 people in the US are diagnosed annually with head, neck, nasal and oral cancers. Most are treated with radiation, and of those, 70-80 percent develop a painful and debilitating side effect called severe oral mucositis. Researchers will present their results on a new drug that could potentially prevent the condition today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemi

5h

E-cigarettes can damage DNA

The popularity of electronic cigarettes continues to grow worldwide, as many people view them as a safer alternative to smoking. But the long-term effects of e-cigarette usage, commonly called 'vaping,' are unknown. Today, researchers report that vaping may modify the genetic material, or DNA, in the oral cells of users, which could increase their cancer risk. The researchers will present their re

5h

A new generation of artificial retinas based on 2D materials

Scientists report they have successfully developed and tested the world's first ultrathin artificial retina that could vastly improve on existing implantable visualization technology for the blind. The flexible 2-D material-based device could someday restore sight to the millions of people with retinal diseases. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Expos

5h

Maple leaf extract could nip skin wrinkles in the bud

Maple trees are best known for their maple syrup and lovely fall foliage. But it turns out that the beauty of those leaves could be skin-deep — and that's a good thing. Today, scientists report that an extract from the leaves may prevent wrinkles. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

5h

Next-gen insect repellents to combat mosquito-borne diseases (video)

Nearly 700 million people suffer from mosquito-borne diseases — such as malaria, West Nile, Zika and dengue fever — each year, resulting in more than 1 million deaths. Today, researchers report a new class of mosquito repellents based on naturally occurring compounds that are effective in repelling the bugs, including those that are resistant to pyrethroid insecticides and repellents. The resear

5h

Strawberries could help reduce harmful inflammation in the colon

Inflammatory bowel disease is a set of painful conditions that can cause severe diarrhea and fatigue. Researchers are now reporting that a simple dietary intervention could mitigate colonic inflammation and improve gut health. In this case, a strawberry — or rather, less than a cupful of strawberries — a day could help keep the doctor away. The researchers will present their results today at the

5h

Illicit drug use could be higher than previously thought; soars during special events

America's drug problem may be even worse than officials realize. And illicit drugs are consumed at a higher rate during celebratory events. Those are just two of the conclusions scientists have drawn from recent studies of drug residues in sewage. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

5h

New drug could prevent debilitating side effect of cancer treatment

About 50,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed annually with head, neck, nasal and oral cancers. Most are treated with radiation, and of those, 70-80 percent develop a painful and debilitating side effect called severe oral mucositis (SOM). While some drugs are available to treat SOM once it develops, none can prevent it. But today, researchers are reporting on a new drug, called GC4419, that appea

6h

Understanding urban issues through credit cards

Digital traces from credit card and mobile phone usage can be used to map urban lifestyles and understand human mobility, according to a report led by UCL, MIT and UC Berkeley.

6h

The Secret to Keeping Black Men Healthy? Maybe Black Doctors

In an intriguing study, black patients were far more likely to agree to certain health tests if they discussed them with a black male doctor.

6h

The New Health Care: This Drug Is Safe and Effective. Wait. Compared With What?

Comparative effectiveness research may be the best way to answer questions that patients and physicians face every day.

6h

Vacation Days Piling Up? Here's How To Get The Most Out Of A Short Vacation

Americans forfeited about 200 million days of paid vacation leave last year. And many U.S. workers now take shorter, partial-week vacations. But even a mini-break can be good for your health. (Image credit: Kristen Uroda for NPR)

6h

Dorthe Crüger stopper som sygehusdirektør

Efter otte år som topleder på Sygehus Lillebælt har Dorthe Crüger valgt at sige sin stilling som administrerende sygehusdirektør op.

6h

Medie: Kameraer på kollapset bro viser, at beton sprænges af stagene

Kablerne i stagene på Morandi-broen sprang tilsyneladende så voldsomt, at betonindfatningen nærmest eksploderede. Der er angiveligt også fundet korrosion i stagenes kabler på den delvist kollapsede bro.

7h

Turnbull just showed what happens when 'ideology and idiocy take charge of energy policy' | Erwin Jackson

The PM had seemed to recognise that you can’t have an energy policy without a plan to cut emissions. No longer A note to our prime minister: you can’t have an energy policy that assumes that climate change does not exist. By dumping the commitment to take emissions targets to the federal parliament the PM is signalling climate change is not real. This leaves the rest of us paying the price for an

7h

Techniques for reducing sugar content in dairy products show promise

Dairy foods are popular among consumers, and sales gross more than $125 billion per year (IDFA, 2017). With dairy product popularity comes new demands from consumers for healthier, low-calorie products that taste the same as their higher calorie counterparts. In a report published in the Journal of Dairy Science researchers review the options available to the dairy industry to reduce sugar in prod

7h

Modern myths about cancer – from ‘chemicals’ in food to wifi

The idea that lifestyle changes have made the disease more common is a gross exaggeration – but increasingly prevalent. We separate fact from fiction Cancer is not up there with the most likely explanations for what caused the mass extinction 66m years ago of the T rex and the triceratops. That said, at least one species of dinosaur suffered from blood-vessel tumours – and a 1.7m-year-old toe wit

7h

Bouffant caps versus skull caps in the operating room: A no holds barred cage match

Over the last few years, AORN and the American College of Surgeons have been battling it out over AORN's 2014 guideline that has increasingly led to the banning of the surgical skull cap in the operating room in favor of the bouffant cap. Lacking from this kerfuffle has been much in the way of evidence to support AORN's guideline, but unfortunately that didn't stop the ACS from appealing mainly to

8h

TDC støtter metadata-forslag: »Man kender ikke fremtidens udnyttelsesmuligheder«

Nyeste udkast til ePrivacy-forordningen kan give teleselskaber større mulighed for indsamling og behandling af metadata uden samtykke. Et skridt i den rigtige retning, mener TDC.

8h

Norsk biometriløsning til Mastercard hacket: Det er så banalt og dumt

Bometri-sikkerhedsløsning kan omgås med et simpelt foto af en finger.

9h

Antidepressant restores youthful flexibility to aging inhibitory neurons in mice

Inhibitory neurons in the aging brain show reduced growth and plasticity, likely contributing to declines in brain function. In a new study in mice researchers at the Picower Institute at MIT show that treatment with fluoxetine restored substantial growth and plasticity.

10h

New assay to detect genetic abnormalities in sarcomas outperforms conventional techniques

A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new assay, anchored multiplex PCR (AMP)-based targeted next-generation-sequencing (NGS), with superior diagnostic utility compared to conventional techniques. This includes the ability to analyze numerous target genes simultaneously and identify new fusion partners. In four cases, the assay diagnosed sarcoma in samples deemed falsely neg

10h

Consuming milk at breakfast lowers blood glucose throughout the day

A change in breakfast routine may provide benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study published in the Journal of Dairy Science. A team of scientists found that milk consumed with breakfast cereal reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with water, and high dairy protein concentration reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with norm

10h

Socioeconomic status may explain racial & ethnic disparities in childhood cancer survival

A new study provides insights into the degree to which socioeconomic status explains racial and ethnic disparities in childhood cancer survival. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may inform where to allocate resources to best reduce racial and ethnic survival disparities for each of the major types of childhood cancer.

10h

Techniques for reducing sugar content in dairy products show promise

Dairy foods are popular among consumers, and sales gross more than $125 billion per year (IDFA, 2017). With dairy product popularity comes new demands from consumers for healthier, low-calorie products that taste the same as their higher calorie counterparts. In a report published in the Journal of Dairy Science researchers review the options available to the dairy industry to reduce sugar in prod

10h

Teen tattoos: 1/2 of parents concerned about negative health effects, impact on employment

78 percent of parents said they would 'absolutely not consider it' if their teen asked about a tattoo.

10h

A GPS for inside your body

An MIT team has developed a system that can pinpoint the location of ingestible implants inside the body using low-power wireless signals.

10h

Simple score to diagnose heart attacks is safer, faster than current methods

An international team of researchers has developed a simple laboratory score that is safer and faster at diagnosing patients who visit the emergency department with heart attack symptoms. The score, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), can also identify patients at risk of subsequent heart issues after discharge.

10h

#MeToo and the medical profession

The medical profession is not immune to bullying, harassment and discrimination, and in this #MeToo era, it is time that physicians, medical schools and institutions aim to abolish these behaviours, argue the authors of an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

10h

Meningsløse regler: Tungere biler må udlede mere CO2

EU's krav til CO2-udslip fra nye biler afhænger af bilens vægt – jo tungere biler, desto større udslip. Det forsinker den grønne omstilling, mener amerikansk organisation.

11h

A Preventable Tragedy in a Man with Semantic Dementia

TAKE HOME MESSAGE: All suicide attempts and parasuicidal gestures should be taken very seriously in patients with dementia. “Previous parasuicide is a predictor of suicide. The increased risk of subsequent suicide persists without decline for at least two decades.” A new case report on a 53 year old man 1 with semantic dementia (SD) presented his prior parasuicidal gestures as “stereotypic behavi

12h

Politicians must set aside blinkered ideologies in the climate end-game | David Spratt and Ian Dunlop

The rapidly disintegrating ‘agreement’ to the Neg yet again sees the Coalition refusing to face up to the threat of climate change Humanity has a big decision to make very soon about its future on warming planet, but the federal Coalition is still in denial that human-induced climate change even exists, let alone that the climate end-game is upon us. The national energy guarantee (Neg) is the lat

13h

Randy Schekman to Leave eLife

The founding editor-in-chief will redirect his focus to a Parkinson's organization.

14h

Mother tongue vs. father tongue: A new study reconciles the 2 hypotheses

Mother or father who has a stronger influence on their children's language has puzzled linguists for many years. The team of researchers, led by population geneticist Li Jin, found that in Indo-European populations, the paternal lineages (Y-chromosome) were correlated to the vocabulary (lexicon) of their languages, meanwhile the maternal lineages were associated with their pronunciations (phoneme)

14h

Largest oral HPV study in England shows infection rates lower than expected

Infection rates of high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) oral infection in England are lower than expected, compared to previous US studies.

15h

Evidence in the bones reveals rickets in Roman times

Research finds vitamin D deficiency was a widespread phenomenon 2,000 years ago Rickets is mostly seen as a 19th-century disease, but research has revealed that the Romans also had a big problem with getting enough vitamin D. Researchers from Historic England and McMaster University in Canada examined 2,787 skeletons from 18 cemeteries across the Roman empire and discovered that rickets was a wid

16h

Is religion a universal in human culture or an academic invention?

Jonathan Zittell Smith, the most influential scholar of religion of the past half-century, thought that religion "is created for the scholar’s analytic purposes." Read More

17h

Wildfires in the Arctic Circle spell the stark new reality of global warming

In July of 2018, there were 11 wildfires occurring north of the Arctic Circle. That's more than ever before. Read More

17h

Ethiopia opens plant to turn waste into energy

Ethiopia on Sunday inaugurated a power plant which converts waste into energy, next to a filthy open-air dump in Addis Ababa where a landslide last year killed more than 110 people.

18h

Elon Musk says cutting back on work hours isn't an optionElon Musk Tesla SA

Arianna Huffington is calling on Elon Musk to adopt a healthier work-life balance, but the Tesla CEO says that's not an option.

18h

Why STEM Students Need Humanities Courses

The more science and technology dominate our culture, the more we need the humanities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Starwatch: Sagittarius plays host to Saturn and the moon

Find both Saturn and the moon above the “teapot”, the most familiar asterism in the the constellation of the Archer This Tuesday, keep an eye open for a nice conjunction of Saturn and the moon. They will be visible in the southern sky as twilight turns into night. Saturn was at its closest approach to the earth in June but remains a bright yellowish light in the sky. It is located in the constell

18h

Weaponizing oxygen to kill infections and disease

The life-threatening bacteria MRSA can cripple a medical facility since it is resistant to treatment. But scientists report that they are now making advances in a new technique that avoids antibiotics, instead using light to activate oxygen, which wipes out bacteria. The method also could be used to treat other microbial infections, and possibly even cancer.

18h

A paper battery powered by bacteria

In remote areas of the world, everyday items like electrical outlets and batteries are luxuries. Health care workers in these areas often lack electricity to power diagnostic devices, and commercial batteries may be too expensive. Today, researchers report a new type of battery — made of paper and fueled by bacteria — that could overcome these challenges.

18h

Study: To boost your GPA, get some sleep

According to the study, for every extra day a student experienced sleep problems, they were 10% more likely to drop a course. Read More

19h

5 ways tracking animals from space can benefit us

The ICARUS Initiative aims to track migratory animals from space using special transmitters and antennae. The data retrieved from the project will help us conserve biodiversity but has the potential to promote human well-being and prosperity, too. Read More

19h

Math for America's Summer Think

Embracing shared identity, community and a chance to pursue excellence in teaching — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Fresh 6.9-magnitude quake rocks Indonesia's Lombok island (Update)

Multiple earthquakes—including a powerful and shallow 6.9-magnitude tremor—struck Indonesia's Lombok on Sunday, sending fresh panic coursing through the already battered island.

22h

Science Says: Hotter weather turbocharges US West wildfires

As temperatures rise in the U.S. West, so do the flames.

22h

Parasitic Plants Have a Surprising Accomplice

Plant stakeout reveals never-before-seen seed disperser — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

The New Enemies List

Reacting to The New York Times ’ story that White House Counsel Don McGahn has been speaking with Robert Mueller’s team, President Donald Trump tweeted out that McGahn is not a “John Dean type ‘RAT,’” and that the story was “fake news.” It’s odd that Trump should bring up John Dean this weekend, for it was only this week that we also learned Trump has an Enemies List, just like Richard Nixon did.

1d

Fire råd: Sådan undgår du tyveri fra din streamingtjeneste

Du kan sikre dine oplysninger på streamingtjenesterne langt bedre end med én kode.

1d

Chinese police nab suspects after $87 mn cryptocurrency theft

Chinese police have arrested three suspects alleged to have stolen assets worth 600 million yuan ($87 million) through hacking, state media reported Sunday, as cyber criminals target holders of bitcoin and other virtual currencies.

1d

South Korean swaps bitcoins for 2 mln euros in fake notes

The deal sounded murky from the start: in exchange for bitcoin worth two million euros ($2.3 million), the wealthy buyer would hand over the equivalent sum in cash in a luxury hotel on the French riviera.

1d

Three top Russian space industry execs held for 'fraud' (Update)

Three top executives of the Russian space company Energia, which designs and manufactures the Soyuz and Progress spacecrafts, have been arrested for alleged fraud, investigators said on Sunday.

1d

Bear Gets Wild at the New Homestead | Alaskan Bush People

The first thing Brother Bear does on a new property is scout the land. For Alaskan Bush People that includes climbing trees, covering yourself in dirt, and rolling down the hill. Stream Full Episodes of Alaskan Bush People: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskanBushPPL ht

1d

Wildfires Are Inevitable–Fatalities and Homes Losses Are Not

California needs to be better prepared for fires and change how it develops communities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

How to binge-watch with friends—even when you’re miles apart

DIY Stay social without going out. So you aren't in the same physical location as your friends—that doesn't mean you can't hang out. Here's how to watch online videos together, while you're apart.

1d

A Delicate Balance | Don't Blink

By looking closely at the common icicle, physicist Stephen Morris reveals how science can be a powerful lens through which to view the mystery and beauty of the everyday phenomena. Stream Don't Blink on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/dont-blink/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter:

1d

Får du for lidt søvn? Det kan gøre dig ensom og asocial

Bare en smule søvnmangel kan påvirke dit sociale liv, siger forskere bag ny undersøgelse.

1d

Why Hospitals Are Getting Into The Real Estate Business

These days hospitals are looking for ways to improve health in their communities to prevent illness and control costs. One hospital in Ohio decided that health might start with affordable housing. (Image credit: Courtesy Nationwide Children's Hospital)

1d

This Week in Cars: Elon Musk and the Future of TeslaElon Musk Tesla SA

As Elon Musk draws the wrath of investors and maybe the SEC, whither Tesla? Plus, the Boring Company heads to LA, and Alphabet's Sidewalk Labs tries to rethink the future of cities.

1d

Omarosa's Possible Trump Tapes Top This Week's Internet News Roundup

There are more tapes than people originally thought, apparently.

1d

Maximum Alienness

What might make life hard to recognize as life? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

ESA’s vindmåler er klar til opsendelse

Efter mange års udsættelser og store budgetoverskridelser er ESA klar til opsendelse af en satellit med et hidtil uprøvet måleprincip inden for rummissioner.

1d

Mountain Gets A Downgrade To A Hill

A mountain in Wales has been downgraded to a hill after a new satellite survey.

1d

Oil And Gas Drilling Could Endanger U.S. Archaeological Sites

A loophole in Pennsylvania law lets companies drill oil and gas wells in farms and fields where Native American and Colonial artifacts are buried.

1d

NASA's Opportunity Rover Still Silent on Mars

Two months into a planet-wide dust storm, the hardy rover remains in hibernation—or worse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Helium Was Discovered 150 Years Ago. Here's Why It's So Important

Aside from balloons and making our voice squeaky, what use is helium?

1d

15,000 Galaxies Shine in This 1 View from the Hubble Space Telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope has been at work for almost three decades, but it's still learning new skills — like how to squeeze an incredible 15,000 galaxies into a single image.

1d

How to Protect Your Phone Against a SIM Swap Attack

Your phone number is increasingly tied to your online identity. You need to do everything possible to protect it.

1d

The History of 'It's Not a Bug, It's a Feature'

It's an acknowledgment, half comic, half tragic, of the ambiguity that has always haunted computer programming.

1d

Tired of Twitter? Join Me on Mastodon

Forget Twitter's truncated timeline, terrible ad algorithm, spammy sponsored content, and overall bad vibes. Give Mastodon a shot.

1d

The Pursuit of Blondness

Turn on the TV or scroll through Instagram, and it’s not difficult to find a sea of blond politicians , news commentators, celebrities, and social-media influencers. Beyoncé, Ariana Grande, Kim Kardashian West, and Justin Bieber have all, at some point, traded their dark locks for golden hues. Hillary Clinton, the first woman to get a presidential nomination from a major political party, colored

1d

Kollapset bro var en plaget konstruktion

Morandi-broen, der kollapsede delvist i tirsdags med mindst 39 dødsfald til følge, var gennem flere store renoveringer, og den kollapsede pylon stod overfor en stor forstærkningsoperation.

1d

Plastic pollution: 'Stop flushing contact lenses down the loo'

Flushing daily disposable lenses down the toilet is increasing the threat from plastics, say experts.

1d

Paper batteries use electron-harvesting bacteria to make electricity

Many small devices require batteries, but they can be expensive and environmentally unfriendly. Paper batteries powered by bacteria may be the solution

1d

Democrats Don’t Need a National Message

On an early morning in June, I joined several dozen Democratic donors in a plush residence on the 64th floor of Trump World Tower to support the reelection of a Democratic congressman. The irony that we were raising money in the president’s building escaped no one, and the congressman took some questions from the audience about Trump’s tweets and Robert Mueller’s investigation. But most in the cr

1d

Trilobites: Before You Flush Your Contact Lenses, You Might Want to Know This

Flushing disposable contacts down the toilet or washing them down the drain may contribute to the problem of microplastic pollution, researchers said.

1d

The environmental cost of contact lenses

Many people rely on contact lenses to improve their vision. But these sight-correcting devices don't last forever and they are eventually disposed of in various ways. Now, scientists are reporting that throwing these lenses down the drain at the end of their use could be contributing to microplastic pollution in waterways. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meet

1d

A paper battery powered by bacteria

In remote areas of the world, everyday items like electrical outlets and batteries are luxuries. Health care workers in these areas often lack electricity to power diagnostic devices, and commercial batteries may be too expensive. Today, researchers report a new type of battery — made of paper and fueled by bacteria — that could overcome these challenges. The researchers will present their resul

1d

Weaponizing oxygen to kill infections and disease

The life-threatening bacteria MRSA can cripple a medical facility since it is resistant to treatment. But scientists report that they are now making advances in a new technique that avoids antibiotics, instead using light to activate oxygen, which wipes out bacteria. The method also could be used to treat other microbial infections, and possibly even cancer. The researchers will present their resu

1d

The environmental cost of contact lenses

Many people rely on contact lenses to improve their vision. But these sight-correcting devices don't last forever—some are intended for a single day's use—and they are eventually disposed of in various ways. Now, scientists are reporting that throwing these lenses down the drain at the end of their use could be contributing to microplastic pollution in waterways.

1d

Weaponizing oxygen to kill infections and disease

The life-threatening bacteria called MRSA can cripple a hospital since it spreads quickly and is resistant to treatment. But scientists report that they are now making advances in a new technique that avoids antibiotics. Instead, they are using light to activate oxygen, which then wipes out antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The method also could be used to treat other microbial infections, and possib

1d

Why Are So Many Americans Flushing Their Contacts Down the Toilet?

I hadn’t given much thought to throwing away my contacts in the toilet. I don’t do it often, just when the bathroom trash can is full. It doesn’t seem especially dangerous — contact lenses feel so impermanent, so flimsy and transparent that they’ll simply dissolve as they swirl down the train. When I confessed this habit to my editor, I was met with incredulity: Surely, this must be a quirk? But

1d

Haj-foster spiller død for at undgå rovdyr

Dansk hajart har udviklet et imponerende trick til at undgå at blive spist, mens den endnu er i ægget.

1d

Make sure co-workers get the message with an illuminated jacket

No time to chat? A jacket that literally spells out to colleagues when you are busy is the high-tech office wear you need

1d

Intelligent design? How come He made so many blunders? | Robin McKie

Whatever Tim Peake thinks, human bodies are so flawed we’re lucky to be here at all Take a look in the mirror and examine your eyes. Are they blurry? Bloodshot from last night’s alcoholic excess? Or perhaps they remain clear, bright and healthy? Whatever their state, our optic organs can tell us a great deal – not just about our wellbeing but about the nature of our species and our place in the un

1d

Spørg Scientariet: Kan man oplade sin mobiltelefon ved håndkraft med en dynamo?

En læser vil gerne belaste miljøet mindre og tænker, at håndproduceret strøm kunne være et skridt på vejen. Lektor på DTU Energi har regnet lidt på det.

1d

Australia ramps up aid to farmers as drought bites

Financial aid for drought-stricken Australian farmers will be increased to Aus$1.8 billion (US$1.3 billion) as they endure the driest conditions in half a century, the prime minister said Sunday.

1d

Strong, deep undersea quake shakes Fiji; no damage expected

A deep, undersea earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 8.2 has struck Fiji and small tsunami waves have been observed but no damage reported.

1d

French farm aims to grow new crop of farmers

They bandy about terms like "co-working" but instead of coding and developing algorithms in open space offices they work out in the open trying to tease tomatoes from the soil.

1d

Hammering of copper price a worrying signal for global growth

The plunge in the price of copper by more than 20 percent since the beginning of June has worried analysts who see it as a bad signal for the global economy.

1d

First satellite to measure global winds set for launch

A satellite designed to measure Earth's global wind patterns is set to be hoisted into orbit Tuesday from the Arianespace launch site in French Guiana.

1d

Sightings, satellites help track mysterious ocean giant

The sight of a basking shark's brooding silhouette gliding through the waters off western France is more than just a rare treat for sailors—it is a boon for scientists trying to trace its secretive migrations across the globe.

1d

China shows off automated doctors, teachers and combat stars

Robots that can diagnose diseases, play badminton and wow audiences with their musical skills are among the machines China hopes could revolutionise its economy, with visitors to a Beijing exhibition offered a glimpse of an automated future.

1d

I was scared of losing my sight… then writing brought me clarity

After being told disease would destroy her vision, Paola Peretti wrote a children’s novel – and found a template for life Paola Peretti is losing her eyesight and she wouldn’t have it any other way. When she was 14, she became very short-sighted, virtually overnight. Three years later came the diagnosis of Stargardt macular dystrophy , a degenerative disease that destroys central vision, damages

1d

It’s the end of the Earth as we know it. Read all about it! | Lucy Siegle

Continued emissions could reach a tipping point that will drive the planet into an irreversible, self-reinforcing hothouse state Achieving “cut through” is a nightmare for climate change science. It’s notoriously hard to get the mainstream engaged by changes in the concentration of an atmospheric gas, even if they’re life-or-death matters. So hats off to the crack team of Earth scientists, led by

1d

Batteribøvl: Derfor går din mobil ud med 20 procent tilbage

Din telefon lyver. Du ved faktisk ikke, hvor meget strøm der er på mobilen, siger batteriekspert.

1d

Eating more fish increases sex and pregnancy for humans… apparently

Couples who had fish more than 8 times a menstrual cycle had a 47% shorter time getting pregnant than those who didn't, and had 22% more sex than those that didn't. Read More

1d

Ode to joy: how to find happiness in balloons and rainbows

The key to feeling cheerful lies not in our inner wellbeing but in the world around us Your work gives me a feeling of joy,” one of the professors said. The others nodded. I should have been happy. Nine months before, I had left my career as a brand strategist to pursue a graduate degree in a field in which I had no experience: industrial design. Many times over the course of the year I had felt

1d

Germany: No preparations made in case of alien landing

The German government says it has made no preparations for the possibility that aliens might land in the European country.

1d

Trump’s Implicit Defense of Alex Jones Is an Echo of Birtherism

The news cameras showed up, like they always do, and Donald Trump was ready for them. He emerged from a helicopter with TRUMP stamped across the side. He grinned. Then he took one of the most absurd victory laps in modern American politics. With every tweetstorm of his presidency, this is the moment—April 27, 2011, on a tarmac in New Hampshire —that should flicker across the national memory. Dona

1d

Universal apocalypse: This is how all of creation could end

The ultimate fate of the universe is a mind-bogglingly thing to think about. So what’s the final outcome for it all? Read More

1d

Why universal basic income costs far less than you think

The Universal Basic Income (UBI) movement has a major problem: nobody really knows how much it would cost to implement it. Read More

1d

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending August 18, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

1d

Finding Your Own Way to Put the "A" in STEAM

Combining art and STEM can provide a relaxing outlet or a worthy challenge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Ældgammel og dødsensfarlig: Verdens ældste ost fundet i Egypten

– Fundet vidner om en verden, hvor folk har spist de samme ting og lidt af de samme sygdomme, siger madhistoriker.

1d

Acid coastal seas off US putting common fish species at risk

Scientists have shown that coastal waters and river estuaries can exhibit unique vulnerabilities to acidification than offshore waters. This acidification, detected in waters off the United States West Coast and the Gulf of Mexico, can lead to disorientation and cognitive problems in some marine fish species, such as salmon, sharks, and cod.

1d

World's first-ever 4D printing for ceramics

A ground-breaking advancement in materials research by successfully developing the world's first-ever 4D printing for ceramics, which are mechanically robust and can have complex shapes. This could turn a new page in the structural application of ceramics.

1d

Water-worlds are common: Exoplanets may contain vast amounts of water

Scientists have shown that water is likely to be a major component of those exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) which are between two to four times the size of Earth. It will have implications for the search of life in our Galaxy.

1d

Making aquafeed more sustainable: Scientists develop feeds using a marine microalga co-product

Scientists have created a more sustainable feed for aquaculture by using a marine microalga co-product as a feed ingredient. The study is the first of its kind to evaluate replacing fishmeal with a co-product in feed designed specifically for Nile tilapia.

1d

Insight into development of lung cancer

Lung cancer results from effects of smoking along with multiple genetic components. A new study identifies two main pathways for the role of chromosome 15q25.1 — a leader in increasing susceptibility to lung cancer — in modifying disease risk. One pathway is implicated in nicotine dependence. The other plays a part in biological processes such as nutrient transfer and immune system function. The

1d

Engineering team designs technology for smart materials

With inspiration from squid ring teeth, a multidisciplinary team has invented a novel way to manufacture smart materials, including fabrics, that can regulate their own thermal properties.

1d

Chemistry professor develops contaminant detection technique for heparin

In 2008, a contaminant eluded the quality safeguards in the pharmaceutical industry and infiltrated a large portion of the supply of the popular blood thinner heparin, sickening hundreds and killing about 100 in the US.

1d

A valley so low: Electrons congregate in ways that could be useful to 'valleytronics'

Researchers have made a finding that could help usher in new area of technology called 'valleytronics.' The study found that electrons in bismuth crystals prefer to collect in one valley rather than being distributed equally across valleys, setting up a type of electricity known as ferroelectricity.

1d

Perinatal hypoxia associated with long-term cerebellar learning deficits and Purkinje cell misfiring

The type of hypoxia that occurs with preterm birth is associated with locomotor miscoordination and long-term cerebellar learning deficits but can be partially alleviated with an off-the-shelf medicine, according to a study using a preclinical model.

1d

Students more likely to eat school breakfast when given extra time, new study finds

Using food weighting stations, the researchers collected information on the number of students who ate a school breakfast, how much they ate, and their exact nutritional intake.

1d

Don’t Miss: surreal objects, loving termites, and ethical dilemmas

Visit surreal objects created from old teaching aids, discover why we've got termites all wrong, and watch an ethical dilemma on blood transfusion play out

1d

Is the American public finally okay with GMOs? Um…

A new survey of 1,021 Americans finds that we still have lots of questions and concerns about GMOs and that we don’t even really know when we’re consuming them. Read More

1d

Two MIT students just solved Richard Feynman’s famed physics puzzle

Richard Feynman once asked a silly question. Two MIT students just answered it. Read More

1d

What Are the Jobs That Immigrants Do?

“The data reveals an important point: There is no singular industry or job where unauthorized immigrant workers are a majority. They are outnumbered by native-born workers when you consider the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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