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Nyheder2018august21

 

No healthy level of alcohol consumption, says major study

Governments should consider advising people to abstain entirely, say authors Even the occasional drink is harmful to health, according to the largest and most detailed research carried out on the effects of alcohol, which suggests governments should think of advising people to abstain completely. The uncompromising message comes from the authors of the Global Burden of Diseases study , a rolling

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Kritikere: Bred energiaftale svigter solcellerne

Sommeren viste tydeligt, at solceller har en vigtig plads i det danske energimiks. Men den nye energiaftale siger intet om, hvordan vi får mest muligt ud af dem.

4h

The Lancet: Alcohol is associated with 2.8 million deaths each year worldwide

Globally, one in three people drink alcohol (equivalent to 2.4 billion people), and 2.2 percent of women and 6.8 percent of men die from alcohol-related health problems each year. Alcohol use was ranked as the seventh leading risk factor for premature death and disability worldwide in 2016, and was the leading cause for people aged 15-49 years old. In this age group, it is associated with tubercul

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PET-scanning kan finde karbetændelse i ansigtet

Karbetændelse i ansigtets små blodkar kan diagnosticeres tidligere, viser ny dansk forskning.

13min

Hør ugens podcast: Solcelleanlæg og Facebook-svindel

Den nye energiaftale tager ikke højde for solcelleteknologiens potentiale, og det vil fordyre den grønne omstilling. Skumle firmaer udnytter Facebooks reklamenetværk til at udbrede deres scams.

20min

Isolated tribe members in Brazil spotted in drone footage

In the sprawling greenery of the Brazilian Amazon, near the border with Peru, a group of people—small in the distance—walk through a clearing.

49min

Salt of the Alps: ancient Austrian mine holds Bronze Age secrets

All mines need regular reinforcement against collapse, and Hallstatt, the world's oldest salt mine perched in the Austrian Alps, is no exception.

1h

Brexit nightmare: Video game shows grim vision of life after EU

Set in a dystopian post-Brexit Britain, a new video game follows the struggles of a bouncer of foreign ancestry in a world of xenophobia and immigrant camps, but gamers are divided over its message.

1h

5 rescued from flooding as hurricane pelts Hawaii with rain

Hurricane Lane unleashed torrents of rain and landslides that blocked roads on Hawaii's mostly rural Big Island on Thursday as residents and tourists in the state's biggest city braced for the dangerous storm to come their way.

1h

Forskere: En betydelig del af DNS-forespørgslerne bliver aflyttet

Global undersøgelse viser, at ganske meget webtrafik omdirigeres, men kun lidt manipuleres med.

1h

Drought In Central Europe Reveals Cautionary 'Hunger Stones' In Czech River

For hundreds of years, these boulders have warned about the consequence of devastating droughts — and documented them for posterity. One says "if you see me, weep." (Image credit: Petr David Josek/AP)

1h

Female basketball players face disproportionate racial bias: New study

New research has uncovered a recurring pattern of referee bias in women's college basketball.

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Martens recolonized Isle Royale in the '90s, showing island's dynamism

After decades of trapping, the last known American marten was spotted on Isle Royale in 1917. Fifty years later, in 1966, the National Park Service planned to reintroduce martens to the national park situated in Lake Superior, but nobody knows if the agency ever followed through. Then, in 1993, martens were confirmed on the island for the first time in 76 years.

1h

Female basketball players face disproportionate racial bias: New study

New research has uncovered a recurring pattern of referee bias in women's college basketball.

2h

Ingeniøren får PLUS indhold

De store historier fra ing.dk vil fra idag ligge bag betalingsmur. Læs hvorfor.

2h

The silver lining in Huntington's disease – Science Weekly podcast

This degenerative illness has a few genetic quirks which scientists believe could cause secondary health benefits. Emerging research suggests that people with Huntington’s are less sickly, don’t get cancer as often and even have more brain cells. Hannah Devlin investigates. Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and T

2h

The silver lining in Huntington's disease – Science Weekly podcast

This degenerative illness has a few genetic quirks which scientists believe could cause secondary health benefits. Emerging research suggests that people with Huntington’s are less sickly, don’t get cancer as often and even have more brain cells. Hannah Devlin investigates.

2h

Kjeld holder øje med afrikansk vandboring fra sit sommerhus

Tusinder af afrikanske vandværker og -boringer står ubrugte hen. De bliver ikke vedligeholdt og går i stykker. Nu har danske ingeniører fundet en løsning på det.

2h

An avatar uses your gait to predict how many calories you will burn

New avatar-based software developed at EPFL looks at how people walk in order to predict their energy expenditure. The software, originally intended for roboticists and for researchers who develop prosthetics and exoskeletons, could have many uses in both medicine and sports. It can be tested online through a downloadable app.

3h

Energiaftalen lægger vægt på de store linjer

Aftalen, som alle partier i juni sagde ja til, maler mest med den store pensel og efterlader mange spørgsmål og rum for fortolkning.

4h

Scientists Are Puzzled By Mysterious Lights In The Sky. They Call Them STEVE

Scientists don't know what's causing the aurora-like phenomenon, which has been known to amateur photographers for decades but only recently came to the attention of researchers. (Image credit: Ryan Sault )

4h

The festivals mixing music and science

Why are music festivals increasingly becoming a venue for science as well as bands?

6h

Lies, damned lies and favourite stats

The Royal Statistical Society wants people to send in their favourite stat of 2018 for a competition.

7h

Risk factors for fast-spreading facial gangrene

Noma, a rare disease found predominantly in underserved areas, causes progressive destruction, or gangrene, of the tissues of the face and jaw within just the span of one week. Now, researchers have analyzed 74 cases of noma in northwest Nigeria to pinpoint the risk factors for developing the disease.

7h

Japanese encephalitis is transmitted to pigs as rapidly in Cambodian peri-urban areas as rural areas

Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, which causes acute encephalitis in Eastern and Southern Asia, is traditionally considered a rural disease. Now, researchers have shown that pigs in a peri-urban and a rural farm were infected by the virus at the same rate. This finding suggests vaccination efforts should be widened to encourage travelers to receive JE virus immunization.

7h

Fighting lung infection trumps wound healing

The innate immune response to lung infection takes priority at the expense of wound healing, according to a new study.

7h

Dramatic development of immune system after birth

As soon as a baby is born, its immune system starts to change dramatically in response to the bacteria, viruses and so forth in its new environment, a phenomenon that is common to all babies.

7h

Heart abnormalities may trigger sudden unexplained death in epilepsy

Patients with a rare disease called Dravet syndrome are at heightened risk for sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. Researchers are using stem cells to identify the effects of a gene mutation on the heart, which may lead to fatal arrhythmias.

7h

Martens recolonized Isle Royale in the '90s, showing island's dynamism

Researchers have traced the recolonization by martens of Isle Royale in Lake Superior to martens likely arriving in the 1990s, solving a mystery and showing the island's dynamism.

7h

Autobiographical memory tested for early Alzheimer's detection

A psychologist found that carriers of a gene variant that increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease have greater difficulty describing detailed memories of past events. The goal of his research is to help detect Alzheimer's disease-related brain changes before they begin to have an obvious effect on cognition and memory.

7h

How the human immune system protects against Ebola

'The current approach for treatment of filovirus infections with antibody cocktails tested in animal models utilizes the principle of targeting of non-overlapping epitopes. Our study suggests that possible synergistic effects of antibodies which block various steps of viral replication should be also considered.'

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New online tool for clinicians could predict long-term risk of breast cancer returning

A new, simple web-based calculator that could better predict the long term risk of breast cancer returning in other areas of the body has today been published online by researchers at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Queen Mary University of London.

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What to do if you see fake news on Facebook

Technology Plus, what to know about the Iranian influence report. The goal of this kind of online activity was “to promote themes and attitudes inline with Iranian political interests."…

8h

'One weird trick' to cut belly fat? Follow a heart-healthy diet!

Do you wish you could decrease your waistline? Reducing abdominal obesity can lower health risks – but despite claims you may have seen on the Internet, no trending diet can help you specifically eliminate belly fat.

8h

Handheld probe images photoreceptors in children

Researchers have developed a handheld probe that can image individual photoreceptors in the eyes of infants. The technology, based on adaptive optics, will make it easier for physicians and researchers to observe these cells to diagnosis eye diseases and make early detection of brain-related diseases and trauma.

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The Atlantic Daily: Strangely Invisible

What We’re Following Trump’s Troubles: With all Washington eyes turned to his mood in the wake of federal convictions for two of his former associates, Donald Trump denounced the court proceedings as a “RIGGED WITCH HUNT” and praised Paul Manafort for refusing to cooperate with law enforcement. Trump is used to a business environment in which white-collar crime is rarely prosecuted. But now, as p

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New scientific study: no safe level of alcohol

A new scientific study concludes there is no safe level of drinking alcohol.

8h

Juan Pujol Garcia: The WWII double-agent who invented a fake army

A movie depicting the story of Juan Pujol Garcia, played by Oscar Isaac, is set to be released soon. Juan was instrumental in ensuring the success of the Allied invasion of Europe but his actions during the war aren’t widely known. Read More

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Bitcoin burglaries: The 5 biggest cryptocurrency heists in history

At the beginning of July 2018, blockchain security firm CipherTrace reported that $731 million has been stolen from crypto exchanges this year alone. Read More

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Researchers found proof of Neanderthals reproducing with other species

Science But the hybrid girl raises more questions than she answers. About 90,000 years ago, two people boinked inside of a Russian cave and had a child. Nothing totally unusual about that—except they were different species.

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Ebola Update: More Experimental Treatments, Health Workers at Risk

The number of cases in Democratic Republic of Congo’s latest outbreak of the virus has now surpassed 100.

9h

Mauna Kea’s Observatories Brace for Hurricane Lane

Mauna Kea’s Observatories Brace for Hurricane Lane As Hurricane Lane races toward Hawaii, some of the world’s most powerful telescopes prepare for wild weather. mauna-kea_cropped.jpg Image credits: Humpback_Whale/ Shutterstock Earth Thursday, August 23, 2018 – 17:30 Jennifer Leman, Contributor (Inside Science) — Shops and restaurants have been shuttered. Locals and tourists alike are battening d

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The Hajj Is a Perfect Laboratory for Disease Warning Systems

This year, the pilgrimage of more than 2 million Muslims gets an electronic surveillance system that will sound an alarm at the first signal of an outbreak.*emphasized text*

9h

This company thinks it can help solve Bitcoin’s energy problem

Soluna says its new business model can be good for blockchains and clean energy development.

9h

Fresh and raw diets for dogs may have health benefits, study says

Many dog owners think of their furry companions as part of the family, and now products are available to feed them that way, too. Some owners are moving away from traditional extruded kibble products, instead choosing ultra-premium fresh and raw diets found in the refrigerated aisle. The foods may look more similar to what we'd feed a member of the family, but many of the newer diets haven't been

9h

Improving cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease

Researchers describe a new set of cell surface markers on dopaminergic progenitor cells, which allow isolation of a more beneficial population of induced neurons for cell replacement therapy. Animals that received transplanted cells that had been selected for the new marker fared better than their counterparts with a typical transplant.

9h

Cryopreserving ladybird beetle ovaries

A new study has found an effective way to cryopreserve — preservation by cooling to very low temperature — and subsequently transplant ovaries of the multicolored Asian ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis.

9h

Garlic ingredient from the lab bench

Fresh garlic extracts contain a variety of healthy organosulfur compounds, among which ajoene forms a major oil-extractable ingredient. Now, chemists have synthesized ajoene from readily available components for the first time. The results show that ajoene is accessible on a large scale with very few synthetic steps. Chemical synthesis of biologically active compounds is important for their furthe

9h

Prospect of a new treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

An international research group has completed testing a new drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The drug is effective in patients with moderate to severe forms of the disease who have shown an inadequate response to conventional disease modifying drugs.

9h

Research into deadly 2016 Italian earthquakes could improve future seismic forecasts

The timing and size of three deadly earthquakes that struck Italy in 2016 may have been pre-determined, according to new research that could improve future earthquake forecasts.

9h

Increased phosphate intake elevates blood pressure in healthy adults

If more phosphate is consumed with food, blood pressure and pulse rate increase in healthy young adults, according to a new study.

9h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Session and Off Again

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Attorney General Jeff Sessions responded to attacks from President Trump in a statement, saying the Justice Department “will not be improperly influenced by political considerations.” Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani said Trump discussed pardoning his former

9h

Bots and Russian trolls influenced vaccine discussion on Twitter, research finds

Social media bots and Russian trolls promoted discord and spread false information about vaccines on Twitter using tactics similar to those at work during the 2016 United States presidential election, according to new research led by the George Washington University.

10h

Welcome to the Age of Privacy Nihilism

A barista gets burned at work, buys first-aid cream at Target, and later that day sees a Facebook ad for the same product. In another Target, someone shouts down the aisle to a companion to pick up some Red Bull; on the ride home, Instagram serves a sponsored post for the beverage. A home baker wishes aloud for a KitchenAid mixer, and moments after there’s an ad for one on his phone. Two friends

10h

How sleep loss may contribute to adverse weight gain

One night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans, according to researchers. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition.

10h

Biomimetic chemistry: Carbohydrate capture

Chemists have designed and synthesized a helical molecule that specifically recognizes and binds to a disaccharide consisting of two five-carbon sugar units.

10h

Global Health: Russian Trolls Used Vaccine Debate to Sow Discord, Study Finds

Twitter accounts that were used to meddle in the 2016 presidential election also sent both pro- and anti-vaccine messages and insulted parents.

10h

Researchers test autobiographical memory for early Alzheimer's detection

UA psychologist Matthew Grilli found that carriers of a gene variant that increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease have greater difficulty describing detailed memories of past events. The goal of his research is to help detect Alzheimer's disease-related brain changes before they begin to have an obvious effect on cognition and memory.

10h

Martens recolonized Isle Royale in the '90s, showing island's dynamism

In a new study, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers collaborating with the National Park Service, traced the recolonization by martens of Isle Royale in Lake Superior to martens likely arriving in the 1990s, solving a mystery and showing the island's dynamism.

10h

When Invasive Species Help: Armadillos Provide Shelter to Native Species

When Invasive Species Help: Armadillos Provide Shelter to Native Species Armadillos could help fill ecological voids left by the Southeast's waning gopher tortoise populations. armadillo_cropped.jpg Image credits: Arto Hakola via Shutterstock Creature Thursday, August 23, 2018 – 16:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Before the armadillos came, there were no large burrows on Georgia'

10h

How to prepare for a hurricane barging in on your vacation

Environment What to do if your trip of a lifetime gets interrupted by a natural hazard. Millions of tourists visit Hawaii every year. But this week, the islands are expecting another visitor: Hurricane Lane.

10h

There is no difference between computer art and human art

Computer art does not rival human art. Rather, art created by artificial intelligence is at once a compliment to the human brain, and a corollary to the achievements of oil paintings and classical music. Read More

10h

The 10 greatest works of art in the world… and the stories behind them

What inspired the Mona Lisa, China's Terracotta Warriors, and more? Read More

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The U.K. steps up on puppy and kitten rights

As of October 1, the U.K. will make it illegal to sell puppies and kittens from third-party sources in a bid to end puppy mills and commercial breeding catteries, eliminate pet-shop sales, and to rein in unscrupulous breeders. Read More

10h

Here’s how Mueller could file criminal charges against President Trump

The Justice Department has long held the view that a sitting president cannot be indicted; however there is a fail-safe mechanism in the law reserved for special circumstances. Read More

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Spacewatch: Aeolus to track the winds

A satellite launched by rocket from French Guiana this week will be the first to directly measure winds around the globe The European Space Agency launched the Aeolus mission at 10.20pm BST (18:20 local time) on 22 August from its spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. It took 55 minutes for the Vega rocket to place the spacecraft into a 320km (198-mile) high orbit. Contact was then established thro

10h

'One weird trick' to cut belly fat? Follow a heart-healthy diet!

Do you wish you could decrease your waistline? Reducing abdominal obesity can lower health risks – but despite claims you may have seen on the Internet, no trending diet can help you specifically eliminate belly fat, according to an article in ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal®, an official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfoli

10h

Dead great white shark found on Cape Cod beach

A great white shark has washed up on a Cape Cod beach.

10h

Some Of The Oldest Ice In The Arctic Is Now Breaking Apart

A massive ice pack that normally clings to northern Greenland's coastline is splitting apart and floating out to sea. Climate change is to blame, scientists say. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

10h

Research finds bots and Russian trolls influenced vaccine discussion on Twitter

Social media bots and Russian trolls promoted discord and spread false information about vaccines on Twitter using tactics similar to those at work during the 2016 United States presidential election, according to new research led by the George Washington University.

11h

Stanford researchers' model could help stem opioid crisis

Stanford University researchers have developed a mathematical model that could help public health officials and policymakers curb an opioid epidemic that took the lives of an estimated 49,000 Americans last year.

11h

Russian trolls 'spreading discord' over vaccine safety online

Study discovered several accounts, now known to belong to the same Russian trolls who interfered in the US election, tweeting about vaccines Bots and Russian trolls spread misinformation about vaccines on Twitter to sow division and distribute malicious content before and during the American presidential election, according to a new study. Scientists at George Washington University, in Washington

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Twitter Bots and Trolls Fuel Online Discord About Vaccines

Twitter bots and trolls appear to be skewing online discussions about vaccinations, according to a new study.

11h

Handheld probe images photoreceptors in children

Duke researchers have developed a handheld probe that can image individual photoreceptors in the eyes of infants. The technology, based on adaptive optics, will make it easier for physicians and researchers to observe these cells to diagnosis eye diseases and make early detection of brain-related diseases and trauma.

11h

Deadly 'Love Vine' Penetrates Wasps' Homes (and Drains Their Bodies)

For a wasp in the tenacious grip of a hug from a "love vine," death is the only escape.

11h

Asteroid Ryugu Poses Landing Risks for Japanese Mission

Mission planners have chosen the first landing sites on boulder-strewn body for Hayabusa 2 and its rovers to touch down — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

How enzyme detects ultraviolet light damage

Researchers describe for the first time how one type of RNA polymerase gets stalled by DNA lesions caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light.

11h

A Whole Lot of the Planet Is on Fire Right Now

NASA's latest images of the world from space reveal just how much of planet Earth is straight-up burning right now.

11h

The Neuroscience of Laughter

Think back to the last time you had a real, hearty laugh: mouth in a wide smile, eyes crinkled and tearing, breath leaving your body in short bursts if you could get any breath out at all. For humans, there are few more pleasurable experiences or greater expressions of joy as laughter. We use laughter […]

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The American Obsession With Donald Trump’s Mood

President Donald Trump isn’t mad—in fact, he’s having the time of his life. That was more or less the spin coming out of the White House on Wednesday evening when I spoke to a senior Trump aide about the ruinous news cycle it was in the midst of enduring. Over the past 36 hours, Trump’s former campaign chairman had been convicted of financial crimes while his ex-lawyer had turned in a guilty plea

11h

How Did Things Get So Bad for Turkey’s Journalists?

ISTANBUL —When a diplomatic row with the United States sent Turkey’s national currency into free fall in early August, the news made headlines around the world. In Turkey, however, readers were hard-pressed to find any mention of the crisis on the next day’s front pages. There was no ban on reporting the news—or, rather, the government had no need to impose one. The vast majority of the country’s

11h

Here’s where the Hayabusa2 spacecraft will land on the asteroid Ryugu

Japan’s Hayabusa2 probe and its landers will touch down on the asteroid Ryugu in the next few months to pick up dust samples and return them to Earth.

11h

Scientists Battle Red Tide That Turned Florida Coast Into Wildlife Killing Field

Scientists are exploring how they can combat the spread of the toxic algae bloom known as red tide along Florida's southwest coast. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

11h

Improving cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease

Researchers describe a new set of cell surface markers on dopaminergic progenitor cells, which allow isolation of a more beneficial population of induced neurons for cell replacement therapy. Animals that received transplanted cells that had been selected for the new marker fared better than their counterparts with a typical transplant.

11h

Purveyors of Juice-Box Style, Nicotine-Filled E-Liquids Quit Selling the Products

The Food and Drug Administration had targeted 17 makers and sellers of items loaded with nicotine in packaging that could appeal to children.

11h

Helium 150 Years After Its Discovery

Technology One hundred fifty years ago, scientists observed in light from the sun the first evidence of the inert gas. 08/17/2018 Inside Science Staff To read more…

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Avian flu, distemper may be to blame for rash of seal deaths

Two common diseases, avian flu and distemper, may be to blame for a rash of seal deaths that caused dozens of them to wash ashore in Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts in the biggest die-off of seals since 2011, federal scientists said Thursday.

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Science Says: Hawaii hurricanes rare, but getting less so

Hurricanes seldom get close to Hawaii and it's even rarer for one of the islands to take a direct hit.

11h

Fresh and raw diets for dogs may have health benefits, study says

Many dog owners think of their furry companions as part of the family, and now products are available to feed them that way, too. Some owners are moving away from traditional extruded kibble products, instead choosing ultra-premium fresh and raw diets found in the refrigerated aisle. The foods may look more similar to what we'd feed a member of the family, but many of the newer diets haven't been

11h

Siemens could cut up to 20,000 jobs: report

German engineering giant Siemens sees potential for axing up to 20,000 jobs worldwide as part of a major cost-cutting drive, the monthly Manager Magazin reported on Thursday.

11h

Trump’s White-Nationalist Pipeline

There is no “large-scale killing” of white farmers in South Africa. The government, led by the African National Congress and President Cyril Ramaphosa, is not currently dispossessing white farmers of entire countrysides’ worth of farmland. Claims that either of these things are happening are false. Claims that both are happening are part of well-worn white-nationalist talking points designed expr

11h

The Athletic Acrobatics of Sepak Takraw

The Southeast Asian game of sepak takraw , sometimes also called chinlone or simply “kick volleyball,” is a team sport in which competitors volley a small woven ball (made of synthetic rubber or rattan) over a five-foot-high (1.52-meter-high) net, using any body part except for their arms or hands. The rules are very similar to volleyball, but the play is much different, as players stretch and la

11h

More than a label: shelter dog genotyping reveals inaccuracy of breed assignments

Scientists used genetic testing in over 900 shelter dogs to identify breed heritage in the largest study of its kind. The researchers found widespread genetic diversity: 125 breeds in the sample and an average of three breed matches per dog. The accuracy of shelter staff in identifying more than one breed in the dog's heritage based just on physical appearance was only 10 percent. How breed labels

11h

Microbes hitch a ride inland on coastal fog

Fog can act as a vector for microbes, transferring them long distances and introducing them into new environments.

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A human enzyme can biodegrade graphene

Scientists have discovered that a natural human enzyme can biodegrade graphene. These findings could have great implications in the development of graphene-based biomedical devices.

11h

Fresh and raw diets for dogs may have health benefits, study says

Many dog owners think of their furry companions as part of the family, and now products are available to feed them that way, too. Some owners are moving away from traditional extruded kibble products, instead choosing ultra-premium fresh and raw diets found in the refrigerated aisle. The foods may look more similar to what we'd feed a member of the family, but many of the newer diets haven't been

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World’s cleanest drop of water reveals why nothing is ever truly clean

A thin film of molecular dirt coats everything the air touches. But until now, nobody knew what it was, or where it came from

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Does just using Facebook really make racist attacks more likely?

According to a popular New York Times story, general activity on Facebook can fuel racist attacks in Germany. It doesn’t add up, says Tom Chivers

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Here’s why the ban on vaping on trains and buses should stay for now

You can't use e-cigarettes on public transport or in most workplaces in the UK but there is a fresh call to lift this ban. It's a non-starter, says Lara Williams

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World Bank says demand for blockchain bond tops expectations

The World Bank raised Aus$110 million ($80.9 million) in the first-ever blockchain bond offering following investor demand that exceeded expectations, the global lender announced Thursday.

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Mucosal environment of older pigs helps newborn piglets with intestinal injury recover

Researchers have found that the intestinal mucosal environment of juvenile pigs can stimulate repair of intestinal injuries in newborn piglets. The findings have implications both for understanding why newborns of many species — including humans — are unable to repair these injuries on their own, as well as for potential future treatments.

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Wind technology advancements continue to drive down wind energy prices

Wind energy pricing remains attractive, according to a new annual report. At an average of around 2 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), prices offered by newly built wind projects in the United States are being driven lower by technology advancements and cost reductions.

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How rabies virus moves through nerve cells, and how it might be stopped

Researchers found that the rabies virus travels through neurons differently than other neuron-invading viruses, and that its journey can be stopped by a drug commonly used to treat amoebic dysentery.

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Traumatic brain injury recovery via petri dish

Researchers have succeeded in reproducing the effects of traumatic brain injury and stimulating recovery in neuron cells grown in a petri dish. This makes them the first known scientific team in the country to do so using stem cell-derived neurons.

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Chemists make breakthrough on road to creating a rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery

Chemists have successfully resolved two of the most challenging issues surrounding lithium-oxygen batteries, and in the process created a working battery with near 100 per cent coulombic efficiency. The new work demonstrates that four-electron conversion for lithium-oxygen electrochemistry is highly reversible. The team is the first to achieve four-electron conversion, which doubles the electron s

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Infiniti Prepares for an Electric Future With a Sleek New Concept

The newly unveiled Prototype 10 has just one seat, needs no fuel, and is a sign of where the cars of the future are headed.

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NASA water vapor data shows cimaron making landfall in Japan

NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at water vapor Typhoon Cimaron and found the strongest storms displaced from the center as it began a landfall in southeastern Japan.

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In 1973, an MIT computer predicted the end of civilization. So far, it's on target.

An MIT model predicted when and how human civilization would end. Hint: it's soon. Read More

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Mucosal environment of older pigs helps newborn piglets with intestinal injury recover

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that the intestinal mucosal environment of juvenile pigs can stimulate repair of intestinal injuries in newborn piglets. The findings have implications both for understanding why newborns of many species—including humans—are unable to repair these injuries on their own, as well as for potential future treatments.

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NASA water vapor data shows cimaron making landfall in Japan

NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at water vapor Typhoon Cimaron and found the strongest storms displaced from the center as it began a landfall in southeastern Japan.

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NIH Investigating Researchers Who May Have Failed to Disclose Foreign Government Contributions

Multiple institutions may have such conflicts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Loved Crazy Rich Asians? Here's 7 more films that changed Hollywood forever

Crazy Rich Asians is the first film to feature an all-Asian cast in 25 years. It is also a bonafide success, both financially and culturally. Inspired by its fanfare, Big Think looks at seven other films that shook American society. Read More

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Gamma-Rays Spewed As a Black Hole Forms Might 'Reverse Time'

Gamma ray bursts may contain "time-reversed" structures.

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Research reveals gene regulation can be digital and stochastic

Scientists have discovered that DNA methylation involved in gene regulation is largely digital and stochastic, with maternal and paternal copies of genes in each cell being on or off a certain fraction of time.

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Evidence of matter-matter coupling

Physicists find the first instance of Dicke cooperativity in a matter-matter system. The discovery could help advance the understanding of magnetic phenomena.

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Blood vessels instruct brain development

Scientists have discovered a novel function of blood vessels in orchestrating the proper development of neuronal cellular networks in the brain.

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Rare intermediate fossils give researchers insight into evolution of bird-like dinosaur

An international team of researchers has discovered new species of alvarezsaurs, an enigmatic group of dinosaurs that share many characteristics with birds.

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Radical transformations likely needed to achieve universal health care

Technological innovation, expansion of the use of frontline personnel such as community health workers, and rapid increases in health care financing are likely to be instrumental to achieving universal health care (UHC) in countries around the world, according to a wide-ranging review of the scientific evidence on UHC.

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Natural sugar defends against metabolic syndrome, in mice

New research, in mice, indicates that a natural sugar called trehalose blocks glucose from the liver and activates a gene that boosts insulin sensitivity, reducing the chance of developing diabetes. The findings suggest new possibilities for treating metabolic syndrome, a cluster of related conditions that includes obesity, diabetes and fatty liver disease.

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Why the DNC Thought a Phishing Test Was a Real Attack

The Democratic National Committee now says a fraudulent voter data website it found was evidence of an unauthorized test organized by Michigan Democrats.

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Our brains have ‘auto-correct’ to handle tricky sounds

Our brains have an “auto-correct” feature that we deploy when re-interpreting ambiguous sounds, according to new research. “What a person thinks they hear does not always match the actual signals that reach the ear…” The study sheds light on how the brain uses information gathered after the detection of an initial sound to aid speech comprehension. The findings, which appear in the Journal of Neu

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A Caramel-Flavored Drag: The Truth About E-Cigarettes And Teenagers

Sneaking a smoke in school isn't what it used to be. (Image credit: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images)

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Mucosal environment of older pigs helps newborn piglets with intestinal injury recover

Researchers have found that the intestinal mucosal environment of juvenile pigs can stimulate repair of intestinal injuries in newborn piglets. The findings have implications both for understanding why newborns of many species — including humans — are unable to repair these injuries on their own, as well as for potential future treatments.

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Crowdsourcing the hunt for software bugs is a booming business—and a risky one

Freelance cybersleuths can help companies find flaws in their code. But the bug hunters could fall afoul of anti-hacking laws.

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7 famous psych studies with troubling backstories

Science From stutters to shocks, this research is unlikely to be performed again. Some of your favorite stories from the history of psychology deserve a second look.

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Two steps ahead—neutrons help explore future HIV treatments

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a quick learner. As fast as researchers get effective anti-viral drugs into clinical trials, the virus evolves, deploying potent resistance mutations that render the medicine useless and put researchers back at square one.

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Samsung's $1,000 Note 9 is great—but so is the cheaper S9

For $1,000, the premium Galaxy Note 9 is a superb phone that showcases the best Samsung has to offer.

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Hurricane Lane soaks Hawaii's Big Island with foot of rain

Hurricane Lane soaked Hawaii's Big Island on Thursday, dumping 12 inches of rain in as many hours as residents stocked up on supplies and tried to protect their homes ahead of the state's first hurricane since 1992.

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Katydids and their kin can also pollinate flowers

Insects like grasshoppers and crickets may play a role in pollination, new research finds. We tend to think of these critters, called orthopterans, as agricultural pests, but their tropical relatives provide a valuable service to plants by serving as pollinators, according to the study. “When people think of pollinators, bees and butterflies are usually the first that come to mind. There are very

12h

Life as a bug bounty hunter: a struggle every day, just to get paid

Independent cybersleuthing is a realistic career path, if you can live cheaply.

12h

The world's cleanest water droplet

The 'molecular dirt' found on any surface can change the properties of the material. A new method has been developed to study this. By creating ultra-pure ice in a vacuum chamber and melting it the world's cleanest water drops were created and applied to titanium dioxide surfaces. The 'dirt' turns out to be a single-molecule-thick layer of two organic acids. This is surprising, because only minute

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Tracking the evolution and transmission of yellow fever

A pioneering research collaboration into yellow fever virus (YFV) has shed new light on the exceptional recent outbreak in Brazil and how the virus spreads. The findings have implications for monitoring viral transmission and could potentially contribute to a strategy for eliminating YFV worldwide.

12h

Secrets of plant development unlocked

Researchers have discovered an internal messaging system that plants use to manage the growth and division of their cells. Understanding this negative-feedback loop that helps plants survive under harsh conditions could enable innovations in agriculture, forestry and conservation as climate change takes hold.

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Treatment for severe heartburn prevents cancer of esophagus, study shows

Medical or surgical treatment of severe heartburn prevents cancer of the esophagus, a study with almost one million Nordic patients reveals.

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Chemists make breakthrough on road to creating a rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery

Chemists from the University of Waterloo have successfully resolved two of the most challenging issues surrounding lithium-oxygen batteries, and in the process created a working battery with near 100 per cent coulombic efficiency.

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Chemists make breakthrough on road to creating a rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery

Chemists from the University of Waterloo have successfully resolved two of the most challenging issues surrounding lithium-oxygen batteries, and in the process created a working battery with near 100 per cent coulombic efficiency.The new work, which appears this week in Science, proves that four-electron conversion for lithium-oxygen electrochemistry is highly reversible. The team is the first to

13h

Traumatic brain injury recovery via petri dish

Researchers in the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center have succeeded in reproducing the effects of traumatic brain injury and stimulating recovery in neuron cells grown in a petri dish. This makes them the first known scientific team in the country to do so using stem cell-derived neurons.

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How rabies virus moves through nerve cells, and how it might be stopped

Researchers found that the rabies virus travels through neurons differently than other neuron-invading viruses, and that its journey can be stopped by a drug commonly used to treat amoebic dysentery.

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Research reveals gene regulation can be digital and stochastic

A team of researchers from the National Institutes of Health Roadmap Epigenomics Project has discovered that DNA methylation involved in gene regulation is largely digital and stochastic, with maternal and paternal copies of genes in each cell being on or off a certain fraction of time.

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A novel graphene quantum dot structure takes the cake

In a marriage of quantum science and solid-state physics, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used magnetic fields to confine groups of electrons to a series of concentric rings within graphene. The findings could have practical applications in quantum computing.

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Radical transformations likely needed to achieve universal health care

Technological innovation, expansion of the use of frontline personnel such as community health workers, and rapid increases in health care financing are likely to be instrumental to achieving universal health care (UHC) in countries around the world, according to a wide-ranging review of the scientific evidence on UHC.

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Blood vessels instruct brain development

The group of Amparo Acker-Palmer (Buchmann Institute of Molecular Life Sciences and the Institute of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Goethe University) reported in a Research Article in the last issue of the journal Science a novel function of blood vessels in orchestrating the proper development of neuronal cellular networks in the brain.

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More than a label: Shelter dog genotyping reveals inaccuracy of breed assignments

Arizona State University scientists used genetic testing in over 900 shelter dogs to identify breed heritage in the largest study of its kind. The researchers found widespread genetic diversity: 125 breeds in the sample and an average of three breed matches per dog. The accuracy of shelter staff in identifying more than one breed in the dog's heritage based just on physical appearance was only 10

13h

Rice U. lab finds evidence of matter-matter coupling

Rice University physicists and their international colleagues find the first instance of Dicke cooperativity in a matter-matter system. The discovery could help advance the understanding of magnetic phenomena.

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Japanese encephalitis also affects urban areas

Several research results have recently disproved the theory that Japanese encephalitis is limited to rural areas. The work in question, led by CIRAD, has provided new information on the mechanisms involved in the transmission, persistence and spread of this emerging disease. Half the world's population is now under threat from Japanese encephalitis. Although vaccination remains the best way of pro

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Oxford University: Tracking the evolution and transmission of yellow fever

A pioneering Oxford University research collaboration into yellow fever virus (YFV) has shed new light on the exceptional recent outbreak in Brazil and how the virus spreads. The findings have implications for monitoring viral transmission and could potentially contribute to a strategy for eliminating YFV worldwide.

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When irrigation efficiency increases, so does water use

Increased irrigation efficiency does not necessarily lead to reduced agricultural water consumption — a paradox largely ignored by the public policies that seek to reconcile high water demands amid finite water supply.

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Predicting when virus outbreaks will peak

Using long-term data on enteroviruses, researchers have developed a model that can accurately predict the transmission dynamics of various strains and types of viruses.

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Lithium-oxygen battery technology charges ahead

A new report overcomes hurdles related to the electrochemistry underlying the lithium-oxygen battery, making it a little more likely this high-powered battery could be broadly adopted in years ahead.

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Zeroing in: What triggered the recent yellow fever outbreak in Brazil

In a 'tour de force genetic investigation of the outbreak' according to a related Perspective, scientists have shown how the recent yellow fever outbreak in Brazil originated in nonhuman primates in the forest and spilled over into human populations.

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The world's cleanest water droplet

The 'molecular dirt' found on any surface can change the properties of the material. A new method has been developed to study this. By creating ultra-pure ice in a vacuum chamber and melting it the world's cleanest water drops were created and applied to titanium dioxide surfaces. The 'dirt' turns out to be a single-molecule-thick layer of two organic acids. This is surprising, because only minute

13h

Fighting lung infection trumps wound healing

The innate immune response to lung infection takes priority at the expense of wound healing, according to a study published Aug. 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by a team of researcher at Brown University led by Amanda Jamieson.

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How the human immune system protects against Ebola

'The current approach for treatment of filovirus infections with antibody cocktails tested in animal models utilizes the principle of targeting of non-overlapping epitopes. Our study suggests that possible synergistic effects of antibodies which block various steps of viral replication should be also considered.'

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JE is transmitted to pigs as rapidly in Cambodian peri-urban areas as rural areas

Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, which causes acute encephalitis in Eastern and Southern Asia, is traditionally considered a rural disease. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that pigs in a peri-urban and a rural farm were infected by the virus at the same rate. This finding suggests vaccination efforts should be widened to encourage travelers to receive JE

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Researchers outline risk factors for facial gangrene

Noma, a rare disease found predominantly in underserved areas, causes progressive destruction, or gangrene, of the tissues of the face and jaw within just the span of one week. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have analyzed 74 cases of noma in northwest Nigeria to pinpoint the risk factors for developing the disease.

13h

Eyewire Brain Zoo: Lion and Sloth Accuracy Happy Hours

Our first stop on our Eyewire Zoo tour is to see the lions, and then we’ll make our way to the sloths! Lion and Sloth Accuracy Happy Hours Aug 24 @2 PM & 10 PM US ET Unlike most big cats, lions are social creatures that live in groups called “prides.” In these groups the females do 90% of the hunting, while the males keep watch over the group. So keep a watchful eye on your cubes like the male li

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Watching the clock: faster countdowns may make people more patient

In a series of experiments, the speed of a countdown clock affected the patience and decision-making of video game players, both during and after the game. Researchers found that participants displayed more patience when the clock quickly counted down the time remaining, compared to when the clock slowly ticked off the countdown.

13h

Why are tropical forests so diverse? New study examines role of 'natural enemies'

A new study affirms a long-held hypothesis that the presence of specialized 'natural enemies' promotes tropical biodiversity. Except when it doesn't.

13h

Caution needed when prescribing antibiotics to hypertension patients

Individual variations in genetic makeup and gut bacteria may explain the different effects of antibiotics on blood pressure, a new rat study suggests.

13h

Combination immunotherapy shrinks melanoma brain metastases

Combination immunotherapy shrank melanoma that has spread to the brain in more than half of the patients in a clinical trial.

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Reimagining MRI contrast: Iron outperforms gadolinium

Nanoscientists have demonstrated a method for loading nanoparticles with iron ions to create MRI contrast agents that outperform gadolinium chelates, the mainstay contrast agent that is facing increased scrutiny due to potential safety concerns.

13h

Policy pivot: A new emphasis on restoration to protect Puget Sound

Researchers have found policies are shifting toward restoration projects that include input from more groups and offer a range of benefits to Puget Sound, including flood control, salmon recovery, recreation and habitat protection.

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Glycans at the 'I' of the storm in humoral immunity and melanoma progression

Two new studies have unveiled how a peculiar molecule impacts how antibody-producing cells develop and function as well as how normal melanocytes progress to melanoma malignancy.

13h

Scientists find perfectly preserved ancient foal in Siberia

Russian scientists have found the carcass of an ancient foal perfectly preserved in the Siberian permafrost.

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Lithium-oxygen batteries are getting an energy boost

A new version of the lithium-oxygen battery could pack more energy and last longer than its predecessors.

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We may now know when hand, foot and mouth disease outbreaks will occur

Birthrates and immunity rates predict the spread of viruses that cause hand, foot and mouth disease.

13h

A novel graphene quantum dot structure takes the cake

In a marriage of quantum science and solid-state physics, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used magnetic fields to confine groups of electrons to a series of concentric rings within graphene, a single layer of tightly packed carbon atoms.

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The world's cleanest water droplet

In nature, there is no such thing as a truly clean surface. Contact with normal air is sufficient to coat any material with a thin layer of molecules. This "molecular dirt" can change the properties of the material considerably, yet the molecules themselves are difficult to study. Some have speculated that this "dirt" is simply a single layer of water molecules. To test this idea, a new investigat

13h

More than a label—shelter dog genotyping reveals inaccuracy of breed assignments

Imagine meeting a potential roommate for coffee but instead of questions that gauge how compatible you both would be living together, you were asked about the ancestry of your parents' families. Though this situation seems ridiculous, it happens all the time in animal shelters where dogs are assigned breeds that are often just guessed from their physical appearance. These assigned breeds are then

13h

Research team finds evidence of matter-matter coupling

After their recent pioneering experiments to couple light and matter to an extreme degree, Rice University scientists decided to look for a similar effect in matter alone. They didn't expect to find it so soon.

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Earth's Magnetic Field Can Reverse Poles Ridiculously Quickly, Study Suggests

Earth's magnetic field is far less stable than scientists thought.

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Daring to hope

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Snowy bat caves

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Layers of bone repair

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Co-regulatory networks of human serum proteins link genetics to disease

Proteins circulating in the blood are critical for age-related disease processes; however, the serum proteome has remained largely unexplored. To this end, 4137 proteins covering most predicted extracellular proteins were measured in the serum of 5457 Icelanders over 65 years of age. Pairwise correlation between proteins as they varied across individuals revealed 27 different network modules of s

13h

Juno observations of spot structures and a split tail in Io-induced aurorae on Jupiter

Jupiter’s aurorae are produced in its upper atmosphere when incoming high-energy electrons precipitate along the planet’s magnetic field lines. A northern and a southern main auroral oval are visible, surrounded by small emission features associated with the Galilean moons. We present infrared observations, obtained with the Juno spacecraft, showing that in the case of Io, this emission exhibits

13h

A high-energy-density lithium-oxygen battery based on a reversible four-electron conversion to lithium oxide

Lithium-oxygen (Li-O 2 ) batteries have attracted much attention owing to the high theoretical energy density afforded by the two-electron reduction of O 2 to lithium peroxide (Li 2 O 2 ). We report an inorganic-electrolyte Li-O 2 cell that cycles at an elevated temperature via highly reversible four-electron redox to form crystalline lithium oxide (Li 2 O). It relies on a bifunctional metal oxid

13h

Dirac electrons in a dodecagonal graphene quasicrystal

Quantum states of quasiparticles in solids are dictated by symmetry. We have experimentally demonstrated quantum states of Dirac electrons in a two-dimensional quasicrystal without translational symmetry. A dodecagonal quasicrystalline order was realized by epitaxial growth of twisted bilayer graphene rotated exactly 30°. We grew the graphene quasicrystal up to a millimeter scale on a silicon car

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High-affinity adsorption leads to molecularly ordered interfaces on TiO2 in air and solution

Researchers around the world have observed the formation of molecularly ordered structures of unknown origin on the surface of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) photocatalysts exposed to air and solution. Using a combination of atomic-scale microscopy and spectroscopy, we show that TiO 2 selectively adsorbs atmospheric carboxylic acids that are typically present in parts-per-billion concentrations while

13h

Interaction-driven quantum Hall wedding cake-like structures in graphene quantum dots

Quantum-relativistic matter is ubiquitous in nature; however, it is notoriously difficult to probe. The ease with which external electric and magnetic fields can be introduced in graphene opens a door to creating a tabletop prototype of strongly confined relativistic matter. Here, through a detailed spectroscopic mapping, we directly visualize the interplay between spatial and magnetic confinemen

13h

Observation of Dicke cooperativity in magnetic interactions

The interaction of N two-level atoms with a single-mode light field is an extensively studied many-body problem in quantum optics, first analyzed by Dicke in the context of superradiance. A characteristic of such systems is the cooperative enhancement of the coupling strength by a factor of . In this study, we extended this cooperatively enhanced coupling to a solid-state system, demonstrating th

13h

Diatom ooze–A large marine mercury sink

The role of algae for sequestration of atmospheric mercury in the ocean is largely unknown owing to a lack of marine sediment data. We used high-resolution cores from marine Antarctica to estimate Holocene global mercury accumulation in biogenic siliceous sediments (diatom ooze). Diatom ooze exhibits the highest mercury accumulation rates ever reported for the marine environment and provides a la

13h

Serotype-specific immunity explains the incidence of diseases caused by human enteroviruses

Human enteroviruses are a major cause of neurological and other diseases. More than 100 serotypes are known that exhibit unexplained complex patterns of incidence, from regular cycles to more irregular patterns, and new emergences. Using 15 years of surveillance data from Japan (2000–2014) and a stochastic transmission model with accurate demography, we show that acquired serotype-specific immuni

13h

Large-scale ocean deoxygenation during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

The consequences of global warming for fisheries are not well understood, but the geological record demonstrates that carbon cycle perturbations are frequently associated with ocean deoxygenation. Of particular interest is the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), where the carbon dioxide input into the atmosphere was similar to the IPCC RCP8.5 emission scenario. Here we present sulfur-isotope

13h

An intrinsic S/G2 checkpoint enforced by ATR

The cell cycle is strictly ordered to ensure faithful genome duplication and chromosome segregation. Control mechanisms establish this order by dictating when a cell transitions from one phase to the next. Much is known about the control of the G 1 /S, G 2 /M, and metaphase/anaphase transitions, but thus far, no control mechanism has been identified for the S/G 2 transition. Here we show that cel

13h

Biallelic RIPK1 mutations in humans cause severe immunodeficiency, arthritis, and intestinal inflammation

RIPK1 (receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 1) is a master regulator of signaling pathways leading to inflammation and cell death and is of medical interest as a drug target. We report four patients from three unrelated families with complete RIPK1 deficiency caused by rare homozygous mutations. The patients suffered from recurrent infections, early-onset inflammatory bowel disease, and p

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Severing enzymes amplify microtubule arrays through lattice GTP-tubulin incorporation

Spastin and katanin sever and destabilize microtubules. Paradoxically, despite their destructive activity they increase microtubule mass in vivo. We combined single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy to show that the elemental step in microtubule severing is the generation of nanoscale damage throughout the microtubule by active extraction of tubuli

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Endothelial Dab1 signaling orchestrates neuro-glia-vessel communication in the central nervous system

The architecture of the neurovascular unit (NVU) is controlled by the communication of neurons, glia, and vascular cells. We found that the neuronal guidance cue reelin possesses proangiogenic activities that ensure the communication of endothelial cells (ECs) with the glia to control neuronal migration and the establishment of the blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain. Apolipoprotein E receptor

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Comment on "Tracking the global footprint of fisheries"

Kroodsma et al . (Reports, 23 February 2018, p. 904) mapped the global footprint of fisheries. Their estimates of footprint and resulting contrasts between the scale of fishing and agriculture are an artifact of the spatial scale of analysis. Reanalyses of their global (all vessels) and regional (trawling) data at higher resolution reduced footprint estimates by factors of >10 and >5, respectivel

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Response to Comment on "Tracking the global footprint of fisheries"

Amoroso et al . demonstrate the power of our data by estimating the high-resolution trawling footprint on seafloor habitat. Yet we argue that a coarser grid is required to understand full ecosystem impacts. Vessel tracking data allow us to estimate the footprint of human activities across a variety of scales, and the proper scale depends on the specific impact being investigated.

13h

The promise and peril of universal health care

Universal health care (UHC) is garnering growing support throughout the world, a reflection of social and economic progress and of the recognition that population health is both an indicator and an instrument of national development. Substantial human and financial resources will be required to achieve UHC in any of the various ways it has been conceived and defined. Progress toward achieving UHC

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StemExpress expands into clinical market

StemExpress, a Folsom, California based leading supplier of human biospecimens, announces the release of its Clinical Grade Non-Transfusable products to researchers and clinicians developing studies related to transplantation, cell therapy, regenerative medicine, investigational new drug development and medical devices in preclinical and clinical phases. These new Clinical Grade Non-Transfusable p

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The DJI Mavic 2 Pro and Zoom drones are covered in sensors and filled with AI to prevent crashesDJI Mavic Pro Zoom

Gadgets This consumer-grade flying machine can see in every direction. Look out for that tree! Oh, you did. Awesome. Thanks, DJI Mavic 2.

13h

Two new truffle species discovered in Florida pecan orchards

Two new species of truffles were recently discovered on the roots of pecan trees in Florida orchards. The good news is that you can eat them – the bad news is that you wouldn't want to.

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For the first time, biologists track cownose rays to Florida and back

Every summer, cownose rays stream into Chesapeake Bay to mate and give birth to their pups. In autumn they disappear, presumably to migrate south, but no one knew for certain where they spent winter. Now, after a three-year tagging study, scientists have solved the mystery. Cownose rays all along the Atlantic winter near Cape Canaveral, Florida, and it is likely they return to the same spots each

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Parents' behavior during playtime may affect toddler's weight later on

Researchers have found that toddlers who had poor self-regulation skills — the ability to control their behaviors and emotions — went on to have lower BMIs as preschoolers if their mothers engaged with them during playtime and then helped direct them during clean up.

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Fires overwhelming British Columbia; smoke choking the skies

British Columbia is on fire. In this Canadian province, 56 wildfires 'of note' are active and continuing to blow smoke into the skies overhead.

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New biomarkers of inflammation identified as risk of polyneuropathy

Polyneuropathy is one of the most common complications in people with diabetes. First symptoms are often pins-and-needles sensations in the feet. Although polyneuropathy is present in about 30 percent of people with diabetes, it often remains undiagnosed. Scientists have now been able to show for the first time that six biomarkers of inflammation indicate the risk of polyneuropathy.

13h

Texas A&M team's pic of crack in the act could prevent engineering failures

In work that could help prevent the failure of everything from bridges to dental implants, a team has taken the first 3D image of a microscopic crack propagating through a metal damaged by hydrogen.

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Radio Atlantic: Trump’s Worst Day

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Matt and Gillian discuss Paul Manafort’s guilty verdict and Michael Cohen’s guilty plea with Franklin Foer and David A. Graham. Was Tuesday a turning point for the Trump administration? Links – “The Day That Everything Changed for Trump” (David A. Graham, August 22, 2018) – “Trump’s Victory Was a Disaster for Michael C

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On-and-off relationships take a mental toll

A pattern of breaking up and getting back together can be bad for your mental health, according to a new study. While on-and-off-again couples like Sam and Diane from Cheers or Ross and Rachel from Friends may keep audiences watching, Kale Monk, assistant professor of human development and family science at the University of Missouri, suggests people in these kinds of relationships should make in

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Trump Believes Fox News—And South Africa Pays the Price

In July, an American ex-president stopped briefly in South Africa. Barack Obama had forgotten the season in the Southern Hemisphere, he told an audience, and had needed to send an aide to buy a coat for him. The opportunity to lecture reminded him of the gray-haired ex-professor he might have become had he not entered politics. He thanked his hosts, calling South Africa’s new president, Cyril Ram

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Sony to release AI-infused robotic pups in the USSony Dog Aibo US Japan

Sony on Thursday announced that its Aibo robotic dogs infused with artificial intelligence will be unleashed on the US market by the year-end holiday season, with a price tag of $2,899.

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Algal blooms a threat to small lakes and ponds, too

Harmful algae isn't just a problem for high-profile bodies of water—it poses serious, toxic threats in small ponds and lakes as well, new research has found.

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Two new truffle species discovered in Florida pecan orchards

Two new species of truffles were recently discovered on the roots of pecan trees in Florida orchards. The good news is that you can eat them—the bad news is that you wouldn't want to.

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New study highlights shark protections, vulnerability to fishing

A new analysis shows that the habitats of three shark species (great hammerhead, tiger, and bull sharks) are relatively well protected from longline fishing in federal waters off the southeastern United States, but that that some prime locations are still vulnerable to fishing.

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Report confirms wind technology advancements continue to drive down wind energy prices

Wind energy pricing remains attractive, according to an annual report released by the U.S. Department of Energy and prepared by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). At an average of around 2 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), prices offered by newly built wind projects in the United States are being driven lower by technology advancements and cost reductions.

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Video: How drug expiration dates work

We've all seen the expiration dates on prescription and over-the-counter medications.

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Report confirms wind technology advancements continue to drive down wind energy prices

Wind energy pricing remains attractive, according to an annual report released by the U.S. Department of Energy and prepared by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). At an average of around 2 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), prices offered by newly built wind projects in the United States are being driven lower by technology advancements and cost reductions.

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On-again, off-again relationships might be toxic for mental health

A researcher from the University of Missouri says that the pattern of breaking up and getting back together can impact an individual's mental health and not for the better. He suggests people in these kinds of relationships should make informed decisions about stabilizing or safely terminating their relationships.

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Two new truffle species discovered in Florida pecan orchards

Two new species of truffles were recently discovered on the roots of pecan trees in Florida orchards. The good news is that you can eat them – the bad news is that you wouldn't want to.

14h

Fires overwhelming British Columbia; smoke choking the skies

British Columbia is on fire. In this Canadian province 56 wildfires "of note" are active and continuing to blow smoke into the skies overhead.

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A world on fire

The world is on fire. Or so it appears in this image from NASA's Worldview. The red points overlaid on the image designate those areas that by using thermal bands detect actively burning fires. Africa seems to have the most concentrated fires. This could be due to the fact that these are most likely agricultural fires. The location, widespread nature, and number of fires suggest that these fires w

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Computing catalysts—team unlocks the molecular secrets to a popular polymer

Polyisobutylene (PIB) is a workhorse polymer that is found in a multitude of products, ranging from chewing gum, to tires, to engine oil and gasoline additives. Although commercially produced in large quantities since the 1940s, PIB chemistry was a mystery—scientists weren't sure how the reaction mechanism that creates the polymer happens at the molecular level, which limited further potential.

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Researchers unlock secrets of plant development

University of British Columbia researchers have discovered an internal messaging system that plants use to manage the growth and division of their cells. These growth-management processes are critical for all organisms, because without them, cells can proliferate out of control—as they do in cancers and bacterial infections.

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Why So Many Democratic Candidates Are Dissing Corporate PACs

Updated at 5:06 p.m. ET on August 23 Across the country, dozens of Democratic candidates, from the democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to the more moderate Conor Lamb, have proclaimed that they won’t accept campaign donations from corporate political-action committees. The promise, which is becoming a sort of progressive litmus test, is designed to excite the base and allows candidates

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The Audacious Idea to Arm Teachers Using Federal Dollars

During a listening session on live television in February, President Donald Trump, surrounded by students and parents directly affected by school shootings, offered a bold suggestion. He highlighted a coach who had died protecting students just one week prior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. “If he had a firearm, he wouldn’t have had to run, he would’ve shot, and that would’ve

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The Universal Pattern Popping Up in Math, Physics and Biology

“Hello! I am David Kaplan, and I am not an expert. But I hope in this series to learn as much as possible and explain it to you the best way I can.” So began Quanta Magazine ’s In Theory video series , hosted by David Kaplan, a theoretical particle physicist and co-creator of the award-winning documentary Particle Fever . Our first video, published in the summer of 2015, asked and attempted to an

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Sid helt stille, frue

Dr.med. Steffen Jacobsen leverer i sin bog harsk kritik, der også rammer den politiske beslutning om at bruge 2,8 mia. kr. på indkøb af Sundhedsplatformen. Det har ikke gjort ham til en ringere læge eller menneske. Tværtimod har han stadig lægeløftet som et ubetinget fundament.

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Molecular link between aging and neurodegeneration

Researchers have discovered a molecular link between aging and a major genetic cause of both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, two related neurodegenerative diseases with shared genetic risk factors. The findings reveal possible new targets for treatment of these and other neurodegenerative diseases.

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IBM files patent for coffee-delivering drones that can sense your mood

"Hang on, Mom. My coffee just flew in." IBM just filed a patent for drones to deliver coffee to people that they “sense” need it. Read More

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Algal blooms a threat to small lakes and ponds, too

Harmful algae isn't just a problem for high-profile bodies of water — it poses serious, toxic threats in small ponds and lakes as well, new research has found.

14h

New study highlights shark protections, vulnerability to fishing

A new analysis shows that the habitats of three shark species (great hammerhead, tiger, and bull sharks) are relatively well protected from longline fishing in federal waters off the southeastern United States, but that that some prime locations are still vulnerable to fishing.

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Brain’s Unconscious Loss Processing May Support Grief Resolution

Guest blog by Brenda Patoine A whole-brain representation of the neural signature associated with processing the loss of a loved one. Activation of this signature in the absence of a conscious thought of the loss correlated with less severe grieving. (GIF courtesy of Noam Schneck; adapted with permission from Biological Psychiatry: CNNI 2018 in press.) What might grief look like in the brain? Is

14h

Trump Put a Low Cost on Carbon Emissions. Here’s Why It Matters.

How much economic damage will global warming cause? It’s a tough calculation, and the answer, to a big extent, determines how easily the government can roll back environmental rules.

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Du kan kun holde fokus i et kvart sekund ad gangen

Udover ny viden om hjernens evne til at håndtere sanseindtryk gav denne uge os også ny viden om lysets strålingstryk og sammenhængen mellem magnetfelt og temperatur for kvantefænomener.

14h

Modifying the major model of a modern major mouse model

Study describes progress toward 'humanized' mouse: Adding second stem-cell type improves model, allows better testing of cancer immunotherapies.

14h

Unlocking the molecular secrets of a popular polymer

Chemists have unlocked the secrets of polyisobutylene's reaction mechanism. The group's findings could potentially be used to design different catalysts and to control the reaction — and hence, the potential range of products.

14h

Pay attention to the 'noise' in your brain

Researchers find that the 'noise' in the brain can be attributed to fluctuations in internally generated signals such as attention.

14h

Alvarezsaurs in transition

Two new dinosaurs — dubbed Bannykus and Xiyunykus — have been discovered in north China. Researchers say the animals, which show adaptations related to eating insects that live in colonies, are alvarezsaurs: the dinosaurian analogue to today's aardvarks and anteaters.

14h

The most trusted meerkats are those with impeccable reputations

Small foraging animals often put their trust in high-ranking or old group members to watch for danger – but meerkats trust sentries based on reputation

14h

Why the end of cash could cause a new data disaster

The convenience of card and mobile payments means cash use is in freefall globally. But we haven't thought through the consequences of an all-digital world

14h

Freak gravitational waves could form black holes and destroy Earth

Gravitational waves that are flat instead of curved could form black holes when a pair of them crash together and tangle up space-time. Don't worry though, they probably won't

14h

Artificial stupidity could help save humanity from an AI takeover

To avoid an artificial intelligence apocalypse where machines take over the world, some computer scientists are suggesting an idea called artificial stupidity

14h

'Safe' UV light may prevent infections in catheters, cardiac drivelines

Columbia researchers developed an optical fiber system that diffuses a type of UV light that can sterilize skin-penetrating medical devices.

14h

What I Learned by Studying Militarized Policing

In the summer of 2014, unarmed protestors in Ferguson, Missouri were met with a startling and aggressive police response, and a national debate over the proper role of law enforcement in American communities—a dialogue we’ve initiated many times in our history, but never adequately resolved—reignited. For days, cable news networks saturated broadcasts with images of police in armored vehicles des

14h

Crazy/Genius Season 2: Five Radical Ideas to Save the World

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play In the first season of Crazy/Genius, The Atlantic ’s podcast on tech and culture, I asked experts to help me answer some of the hardest questions I could imagine. Would the U.S. economy be better off if the government broke up Amazon? Is smartphone use a behavioral addiction? And, seriously , where are all the aliens? I

14h

Support the Girls Is Breezy, Bracing, and Brilliant

Lisa Conroy (Regina Hall), the protagonist of Support the Girls , is the master of the thin smile, the deflected compliment, and the steely glare—in short, she is a middle manager. So she has to put up with the short temper of her idiotic boss, Cubby (James Le Gros), massage the growing pains that come with training a new cadre of hires, and maintain a low ebb of empathy and support for her emplo

14h

Will Trump Listen to His Science Advisor?

Even with bipartisan support, it is unclear how much the president’s pick can influence administration policy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Iron-based MRI contrast outperforms less safe method

A new method for loading iron inside nanoparticles creates MRI contrast agents that work better than the mainstay gadolinium chelates, which face increased scrutiny due to potential safety concerns, researchers say. “The possibility of eliminating gadolinium exposure and getting a two-fold improvement in T1 MRI contrast performance is going to intrigue radiologists,” says lead researcher Naomi Ha

15h

A Monitor’s Ultrasonic Sounds Can Reveal What’s on the Screen

Researchers have demonstrated that they can discern individual letters on a display based only on the ultrasonic whine it emits.

15h

A mechanism underlying activity of cancer and autism associated proteins was discovered

The team studied a family of proteins that includes MCT-1, which is a product of an oncogene (a gene that can trigger tumour formation); its partner DENR, which is associated with autism; and the translation factor elF2D. As a result, they have found out that factors eIF2D, MCT-1 and DENR are required for the ribosome to detach timely from the mRNA once the translation is complete.

15h

For the first time, biologists track cownose rays to Florida and back

Every summer, cownose rays stream into Chesapeake Bay to mate and give birth to their pups. In autumn they disappear, presumably to migrate south, but no one knew for certain where they spent winter. Now, after a three-year tagging study led by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, scientists have solved the mystery. Cownose rays all along the Atlantic winter near Cape Canaveral, Florida,

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Back-to-school supplies that'll get your kids excited to hit the books

Gadgets For the fourth year running, the hottest backpack accessory is … hand sanitizer. You've purchased every item on the teacher-issued classroom list, but you're not done yet. Here's a list of hand-picked items that will make them happy to kiss summer…

15h

Better particle tracking software using artificial intelligence

Scientists have created a new method of particle tracking based on machine learning that is far more accurate and provides better automation than techniques currently in use.

15h

Children take longer to learn two languages at once compared to just one — don't fret

Bilingual children from immigrant families are not two monolinguals in one. They develop each language at a slower pace because their learning is spread across two languages. A researcher shows strong evidence that the rate of language growth is influenced by the quantity of language input. She challenges the belief, held in and out of scientific circles that children are linguistic sponges who qu

15h

What is the maximum possible number of Atlantic tropical cyclones? See the year 2005

Climate simulations and analyses of Atlantic hurricane activity indicate that the record number of tropical cyclones that occurred in 2005 (28 storms) is close to the maximum number that might occur in this region, given existing climate conditions.

15h

Why Trump Can't Understand the Cases Against Manafort and Cohen

Justice is blind, but she is also often tardy. This week, Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen were each convicted of eight counts in federal court, but the crimes they committed happened some time ago. Manafort has been operating on the fringes of the law for decades, sometimes worrying his business partners . Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s indictment cited alleged crimes going back to 2006. Cohen

15h

The Problem With ‘Hey Guys’

“Okay, guys,” a female coworker of mine recently began, as she addressed me and a female colleague. Then she stopped herself, said she was making an effort to use more gender-neutral language, and carried on talking. It was a small self-correction, and a glimpse at the conflicted feelings stirred up by one of the most common greetings in the English language. Guys is an easygoing way to address a

15h

Donald Trump’s Mafia Mind-Set

Salvatore “Sammy the Bull” Gravano, the former underboss of the Gambino organized-crime family, is a mass murderer (19 bodies, maybe more, across his distinguished career), and also the most consequential turncoat in the history of organized crime. Gravano, whom I came to know while covering the Mob in the 1990s, had many thoughts about respect and loyalty, which he shared with me in a number of

15h

Et skønmaleri af de helt sjældne over psykiatrien

Psykiatrien i Hovedstaden er hårdt ramt, og en Peter Treufeldt på vej på pension viser i Dagens Medicin den sædvanlige ansvarsfralægning. Han siger dog en enkelt ting med mening i.

15h

‘Growing pains’ persist in elections with multiple women on ballot

Gender stereotypes and biases still influence voters, especially in elections with more than one woman on the ballot, according to new research. Gender had the greatest effect on down-ballot races, in which women were running for a legislative office and another woman appeared on the ballot for a higher office, such as governor or president, according to findings in the Journal of Women, Politics

15h

For the first time, biologists track cownose rays to Florida and back

Every summer, cownose rays stream into Chesapeake Bay to mate and give birth to their pups. When autumn comes, they disappear—presumably to migrate south, but no one knew for certain where they spent the winter. Now, after a three-year tagging study published Aug. 23 and led by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC), scientists have solved the mystery. Cownose rays all along the Atla

15h

Parents' behavior during playtime may affect toddler's weight later on

Researchers have found that toddlers who had poor self-regulation skills — the ability to control their behaviors and emotions — went on to have lower BMIs as preschoolers if their mothers engaged with them during playtime and then helped direct them during clean up.

15h

The molecular link between aging and neurodegeneration

Harvard Medical School researchers have discovered a molecular link between aging and a major genetic cause of both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, two related neurodegenerative diseases with shared genetic risk factors. The findings reveal possible new targets for treatment of these and other neurodegenerative diseases.

15h

Pay attention to the 'noise' in your brain

Researchers find that the 'noise' in the brain can be attributed to fluctuations in internally generated signals such as attention.

15h

Fires overwhelming British Columbia; smoke choking the skies

British Columbia is on fire. In this Canadian province 56 wildfires 'of note' are active and continuing to blow smoke into the skies overhead.

15h

Two methods for measuring children's exposure to radio frequencies are compared

A study has quantified emissions coming from radio frequency sources, and by means of personal and spot measurements has analysed which levels of exposure children find themselves in.

15h

Trace metals in the air make big splash on life under the sea

A new study shows that trace metals, deposited by aerosols like dust and other particles in the atmosphere, have a hefty impact on marine life, affecting biological productivity and changing the ocean ecosystem.

15h

Suspect In Decade-Old Serial Rapes Arrested, With Help Of Genealogy Database

A suspect in the "Ramsey Street Rapist" case in Fayetteville, N.C., was located after a search through a public genealogy database. It's the same process used in the case of the Golden State Killer. (Image credit: Fayetteville Police Department)

15h

Why are tropical forests so diverse? New study examines role of 'natural enemies'

Ecologists have long struggled to explain why tropical forests have so many different species of trees. One dominant theory to emerge contends that each plant has a specialist natural enemy that helps keep populations of that plant in check—and allows others to thrive.

15h

Microbes hitch a ride inland on coastal fog

Fog can act as a vector for microbes, transferring them long distances and introducing them into new environments. So reports an analysis of the microbiology of coastal fog, recently published in the journal Science of the Total Environment.

15h

How can parents help children navigate an increasingly diverse world?

Multicultural dynamics. Economic disparities. LGTBQ subtleties. Single-parent prevalence. Diversification of the American family is happening at an unprecedented rate, and while awareness of this increased diversity rises, research for what impact it has on parenting adolescents has been limited.

15h

Smartphones may be used to better predict the weather

Flash floods occur with little warning. Earlier this year, a flash flood that struck Ellicott City, MD, demolished the main street, swept away parked cars, pummeled buildings and left one man dead.

15h

A world on fire

The world is on fire. Or so it appears in this image from NASA's Worldview.

15h

Research reveals dangerous midlife switch of ditching activity to sit still

People are falling into a trap of greater inactivity during middle age, according to new research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), which calls for its findings to be considered in future national physical activity guidelines.

15h

Computing catalysts

A collaboration between the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering and Lubrizol Corporation has unlocked the secrets of polyisobutylene's reaction mechanism. The group's findings could potentially be used to design different catalysts and to control the reaction — and hence, the potential range of products.

15h

Friends who are former smokers are key to helping people with serious mental illness quit

An estimated 53 percent of adults with serious mental illness (SMI) smoke, whereas, only 18 percent of adults in the general population smoke. While studies have shown that most smokers with SMI want to quit, they are less likely to do so. To better understand why quit rates were so low among this group, researchers from Dartmouth College and Harvard Medical School explored how social networks inf

15h

Modifying the major model of a modern major mouse model

Study describes progress toward 'humanized' mouse: Adding second stem-cell type improves model, allows better testing of cancer immunotherapies.

15h

A human enzyme can biodegrade graphene

Graphene Flagship partners discovered that a natural human enzyme can biodegrade graphene. These findings could have great implications in the development of graphene-based biomedical devices.

15h

How antibodies attack the brain and muddle memory

Human antibodies that target key brain proteins cause memory trouble when delivered into mice’s brains.

15h

In Serial Rape Case That Stumped Police, Genealogy Database Leads to Arrest

The police in Fayetteville, N.C., used DNA records to track down a suspect in six rape investigations tied to the Ramsey Street Rapist.

15h

Hvordan kan Rudkjøbing bakke regionerne op?

Regionerne har i 11 år martret og frustreret landets læger, som løbende i en lind strøm har tilkendegivet deres frustrationer. Alligevel ønsker Lægeforeningen nu at bevare regionerne. Herrens veje er i sandhed uransagelige.

15h

Top Priorities for Trump's Science Advisor

If he's confirmed, Kelvin Droegemeier should champion research and evidence-based policy, but his primary task is to get the president’s ear — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Man in Germany killed when AA-battery charger explodes

Police say a man in Germany has died after a battery-charging device exploded, firing an object into the man's chest.

15h

Researchers develop novel process to 3-D print one of the strongest materials on earth

Researchers from Virginia Tech and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed a novel way to 3-D print complex objects of one of the highest-performing materials used in the battery and aerospace industries.

15h

Team builds better particle tracking software using artificial intelligence

Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have created a new method of particle tracking based on machine learning that is far more accurate and provides better automation than techniques currently in use.

15h

Patient diagnosed with first case of Mers virus in England since 2013

Health authorities are tracing people who were in close contact with Middle East resident A person who was diagnosed with the first case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (Mers) in England since 2013 is said to be in a stable condition. Public Health England (PHE) said the patient is a resident of the Middle East, where they are believed to have contracted the infection before travelling to the

15h

Research into deadly 2016 Italian earthquakes could improve future seismic forecasts

The timing and size of three deadly earthquakes that struck Italy in 2016 may have been pre-determined, according to new research that could improve future earthquake forecasts.

15h

Inbreeding and disease are factors in decline of yellow-banded bumblebee

By sequencing the genome of the yellow-banded bumblebee, York University researchers have found that inbreeding and disease are likely culprits in their rapid decline in North America.

15h

Care access not main driver of racial disparities in kidney disease

Although black and Hispanic veterans with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are more likely than white patients to see a kidney specialist–a nephrologist–they are more likely to suffer disease progression from early stage to advanced kidney disease, reports a study published this month in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the Univ

16h

UBC researchers unlock secrets of plant development

University of British Columbia researchers have discovered an internal messaging system that plants use to manage the growth and division of their cells. Understanding this negative-feedback loop that helps plants survive under harsh conditions could enable innovations in agriculture, forestry and conservation as climate change takes hold.

16h

Treatment for severe heartburn prevents cancer

Medical or surgical treatment of severe heartburn prevents cancer of the oesophagus, a study from Karolinska Institutet with almost one million Nordic patients reveals. The results are published in the scientific journal JAMA Oncology.

16h

Watching the clock: faster countdowns may make people more patient

In a series of experiments, the speed of a countdown clock affected the patience and decision-making of video game players, both during and after the game, according to David Reitter, associate professor of information sciences and technology, Penn State. He added that participants displayed more patience when the clock quickly counted down the time remaining, compared to when the clock slowly tic

16h

Microbes hitch a ride inland on coastal fog

Fog can act as a vector for microbes, transferring them long distances and introducing them into new environments. So reports an analysis of the microbiology of coastal fog, recently published in the journal Science of the Total Environment.

16h

Scientists find link between water pollution and morbidity in Murmansk region

Researchers at the Institute of Ecology at the Higher School of Economics, together with other Russian researchers, have discovered that drinking water in lakes in the Murmansk region is contaminated. The most prevalent contaminants were found to be nickel and copper. Furthermore, water treatment systems in the region do not remove toxic metals. Heavy metals that accumulate in the water also inclu

16h

How did alvarezsaurian dinosaurs evolve monodactyl hand?

An international research team led by XU Xing from the Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology announced the discovery of two new Chinese dinosaurs: Bannykus and Xiyunykus, in the journal Current Biology, which shed light on how alvarezsaurian dinosaurs reduced and lost their fingers.

16h

Movement control: how our brain responds to unexpected situations

Scientists have demonstrated that the motor cortex is necessary for the execution of corrective movements in response to unexpected changes of sensory input but not when the same movements are executed spontaneously. Signatures of differential neuronal usage in the cortex accompany these two phenomena. The study by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum and the Friedrich Miescher In

16h

Discovery of two new Chinese dinosaurs by international research team

An international research team today announces the discovery of two new Chinese dinosaurs: Bannykus and Xiyunykus.

16h

Integrated analysis finds vulnerabilities to target in a high-risk pediatric tumor

Research from the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital–Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has revealed new vulnerabilities and leads for treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma

16h

Scientists discover how RNA regulates genes in embryo that affect seizure susceptibility

Scientists at the Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago and colleagues discovered how a type of RNA, called Evf2 enhancer RNA, regulates key genes during a critical stage in embryonic brain development.

16h

Alzheimer's one day may be predicted during eye exam

Using technology similar to what is found in many eye doctors' offices, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have detected evidence suggesting Alzheimer's in older patients who had no symptoms of the disease.

16h

The unexpected upside of E. coli

The often maligned bacterium E. coli plays an instrumental role in helping its host absorb iron, according to new research that could lead to novel therapies for iron-deficiency anemia.

16h

Rare intermediate fossils give researchers insight into evolution of bird-like dinosaur

An international team of researchers discovered a new species of dinosaur, Xiyunykus pengi, during an expedition to Xinjiang, China. The discovery is the latest stemming from a partnership between the George Washington University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

16h

Study: Heart abnormalities may trigger sudden unexplained death in epilepsy

Patients with a rare disease called Dravet syndrome are at heightened risk for sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. Michigan Medicine researchers are using stem cells to identify the effects of a gene mutation on the heart, which may lead to fatal arrhythmias.

16h

The birth and death of proteins in a single cell

A new method developed by EPFL bioengineers has disentangled the 'see-saw' balance of protein synthesis and degradation in single cells.

16h

Dramatic development of immune system after birth

As soon as a baby is born, its immune system starts to change dramatically in response to the bacteria, viruses and so forth in its new environment, a phenomenon that is common to all babies, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden write in a paper published in Cell. The study was made possible using new techniques of immune cell analysis.

16h

How not saying 'cancer' for low-risk thyroid cancer may affect treatment preferences, patient anxiety

Could removing 'cancer' from the terminology for low-risk small papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs) reduce patients' anxiety so they consider less invasive treatment than surgery and avoid possible overtreatment for what can be indolent tumors? An online survey study of 550 Australian men and women without thyroid cancer suggests the answer is 'maybe.' Total and partial surgical removal of the thyroi

16h

Study explores use of eye imaging for identification of preclinical Alzheimer's disease

It is important to identify people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) who could potentially benefit from treatment but current testing to do this is invasive and expensive. Optical coherence tomographic angiography (OCTA) is a noninvasive imaging technique of the eye that allows for analysis of certain changes of the retina that are altered in preclinical AD even prior to any symptoms.

16h

Keeping cancer out of breath blocks drug resistance

Chemists have demonstrated a new approach to blocking cancer-drug resistance that they believe could be applied to any type of cancer. In a dramatic result, the approach — which involves chemically combining two existing drugs in a new way — produced 50 percent smaller tumors in mice compared with a traditional treatment with the same drugs given separately.

16h

3D cell environment key for divvying up chromosomes — find could explain cancer hallmark

Epithelial cells grown on a plastic dish are worse at segregating their chromosomes than epithelial cells growing in mice, a new study shows. The results may help explain why chromosomes go awry in cancer.

16h

Experts voice safety concerns about new pebble-bed nuclear reactors

Researchers advise caution as a commercial-scale nuclear reactor known as HTR-PM prepares to become operational in China. The reactor is a pebble-bed, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), a design that is ostensibly safer but that researchers in the US and Germany warn does not eliminate the possibility of a serious accident. Their commentary, publishing Aug. 23, 2018 in the journal Joule,

16h

Shrimp heal injured fish

James Cook University scientists have discovered that shrimp help heal injured fish.

16h

What happens when a hurricane unleashes toxic chemicals? The EPA is putting off figuring it out.

Environment Judges just ordered the agency to stop dawdling. The judges’ decision can’t come soon enough, especially for Gulf communities during hurricane season.

16h

Smartphones may be used to better predict the weather

A recent study suggests that weather patterns that lead to flash floods may one day be tracked and anticipated by our smartphones.

16h

90,000-year-old Neanderthal-Denisovan human hybrid found in ancient cave

Researchers have just discovered the remains of a hybrid human. Read More

16h

Philly start-up Kapsul is making a quieter air conditioner thanks to $2.3 million from crowdfunding

The summer months when air conditioning is considered a necessity are winding down, but a Philadelphia start-up is working to offer improved window units to make it through next year's scorching heat.

16h

Don't fail fast — fail mindfully | Leticia Gasca

We celebrate bold entrepreneurs whose ingenuity led them to success, but what happens to those who fail? Far too often, they bury their stories out of shame or humiliation — and miss out on a valuable opportunity for growth, says author and entrepreneur Leticia Gasca. In this thoughtful talk, Gasca calls for business owners to open up about their failures and makes the case for replacing the idea

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Novel process to 3-D print interconnected layers of 2-D graphene

Previously, researchers could only print this material, known as graphene, in 2D sheets or basic structures. But engineers have now 3-D printed graphene objects at a resolution an order of magnitude greater than ever before printed, which unlocks the ability to theoretically create any size or shape of graphene.

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Fish lice could be early indicators of metal pollution in freshwater

Water quality in rivers and dams is decaying all over the world, and metal pollution is a major factor. Meanwhile, freshwater resources are very limited. A tiny fish louse shows promise as a sensitive early indicator for metal pollution in freshwater.

16h

Baby feces may be source of beneficial probiotics

Probiotics seem to be everywhere these days — in yogurt, pickles, bread, even dog food. But there's one place that may surprise you: There are probiotics in dirty diapers.

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How healthy is the American diet? The Healthy Eating Index helps determine the answer

Leading nutrition experts describe and evaluate the latest version of the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), which has been issued to correspond to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

16h

Kelp forests function differently in warming ocean

Kelp forests will experience a marked change in ecosystem functioning in response to continued ocean warming and the increase of warm-water kelp species, according to a new study.

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Tracking Sargassum's ocean path could help predict coastal inundation events

In recent years, large amounts of Sargassum have been washing up on beaches from the Caribbean to west Africa. This floating seaweed drifts on the oceans currents. New research explores how the Sargassum might grow while it is meandering along the currents, not just where it floats, combining both ocean physics and seaweed biology for the first time to understand the distribution patterns. Knowing

16h

3-D cell environment key for divvying up chromosomes—find could explain cancer hallmark

For some cells, context is everything. Cells plucked out of their native environs have trouble divvying up their chromosomes correctly, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Angelika Amon and colleagues have found.

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Rare intermediate fossils give researchers insight into evolution of bird-like dinosaur

An international team of researchers discovered a new species of dinosaur, Xiyunykus pengi, during an expedition to Xinjiang, China. The discovery is the latest stemming from a partnership between the George Washington University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The findings were published today in Current Biology along with the description of a second new intermediate species, Bannykus wulate

16h

E. coli bacterium key for boosting iron absorption, new study shows

Best known as a pathogen that causes food poisoning or steals nutrients away from its host, the E. coli bacterium actually plays a critical role in promoting health by producing a compound that helps cells take up iron, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows.

16h

The birth and death of proteins in a single cell

The amount of proteins inside cells fluctuates over time, and this affects various functions of the cells. Cells are constantly synthesizing and degrading proteins, and studies have shown that this "see-saw" effect actually impacts the function of the cell.

16h

Physicians with personal cancer experience report adherence to screening guidelines less

A new study has found that physicians with nonprofessional experience of cancer were less likely to report adhering to recommendations against screening for ovarian cancer compared with physicians without this experience.

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Majority of current and former cancer patients age 50+ are happy with their life

Two-thirds of current cancer patients, and more than three-quarters of former cancer patients aged 50 and over, are mentally flourishing despite their illness, according to a large, new, nationally representative study from researchers at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work.

16h

Why are tropical forests so diverse? New study examines role of 'natural enemies'

A new Yale study affirms a long-held hypothesis that the presence of specialized 'natural enemies' promotes tropical biodiversity. Except when it doesn't.

16h

Barbering af internationale studiepladser vækker harme

De fleste udenlandske studerende siger farvel til Danmark efter endt studium. Derfor vil videnskabsministeren nedlægge studiepladser. Han burde fokusere på at fastholde kandidater frem for at forhindre flere i at kommer hertil, mener IDA og PF

16h

What's the password? Millennials leaders in getting streaming TV for free

It's no secret that people would rather get something for free than pay for it. And faced with the possibility of paying $10.99 a month for Netflix or getting it for nothing, it should come as no surprise that someone might want to use another person's password to log in and binge on the latest season of "Orange Is The New Black."

16h

Microsoft hopes to protect candidates without skirting laws

Tech companies want to protect U.S. political candidates from Russian hackers ahead of the midterm elections, but could that free help count as an illegal campaign contribution?

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Facebook users demand Cambridge Analytica secrets in bankruptcy

Facebook users who say their personal data was misused, potentially to distort the last U.S. election, will have to wait to see if they can wring more information from Cambridge Analytica, the disappearing company that played a key role in the drama.

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Could a super snake emerge from Everglades pythons? New DNA study raises possibility

What started out as a straightforward genetic study of Florida's invasive python population has turned up a surprising plot twist: a small number of crossbred Burmese and Indian pythons with the potential to become a kind of Everglades super snake.

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Rolling robots could be coming to Dallas sidewalks

A rolling robot may be coming to a Dallas sidewalk near you.

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Drought reveals ancient 'hunger stones' in European river

Due to this summer's drought in Central Europe, boulders known as "hunger stones" are reappearing in the Elbe River.

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Mike Pence’s Outer-Space Gospel

For decades, outer space has been described by U.S. leaders as the final frontier, and so it has been infused with the characteristics that are often said to have defined other frontiers in American history: wilderness, lawlessness, unknowable perils but ample opportunity, and the stubborn, pioneering will to conquer it all. “We set sail on this new sea because there is new knowledge to be gained

16h

Waymo’s Robot Cars, and the Humans Who Tend to Them

Google’s self-driving corporate sibling, Waymo, is preparing to launch a commercial robotaxi service outside Phoenix. As that’s happened, the focus of the program has shifted from the technical details of lasers and sensors to the operational details of how to build the system that surrounds the driverless vehicles. And although they are the defining (or at least the most charismatic) achievement

16h

New biomarkers of inflammation identified as risk of polyneuropathy

Polyneuropathy is one of the most common complications in people with diabetes. First symptoms are often pins-and-needles sensations in the feet. Although polyneuropathy is present in about 30 percent of people with diabetes, it often remains undiagnosed. Scientists from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), have now been able to show for the first time that six biomarkers of inflammation

16h

Researchers develop novel process to 3D print one of the strongest materials on Earth

Previously, researchers could only print this material, known as graphene, in 2D sheets or basic structures. But Virginia Tech engineers have now collaborated on a project that allows them to 3D print graphene objects at a resolution an order of magnitude greater than ever before printed, which unlocks the ability to theoretically create any size or shape of graphene.

16h

Smartphones may be used to better predict the weather

A recent Tel Aviv University study suggests that weather patterns that lead to flash floods may one day be tracked and anticipated by our smartphones.

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How can parents help children navigate an increasingly diverse world?

A special edition of the Journal of Research on Adolescence recently published is devoted to engineering conversations that better equip parents to help their children navigate through the dynamics of an ever-changing world — identifying how parenting may or may not be shaped by increasing population diversity. A team of multidisciplinary researchers, initiated through the Center for Developmenta

16h

Tons of Major Quakes Have Rattled the World Recently. Does That Mean Anything?

Yes, California will have a big earthquake, but the chances of "the big one" happening now didn't suddenly increase.

16h

Få alle nyheder fra den store hjertekongres i München

Dagens Medicin har to videnskabsjournalister klar til rapportere om ny forskning, når ESC 2018 åbner i München.

16h

Rapid development in Central Africa increases the risk of infectious disease outbreaks

The Central Africa region is experiencing rapid urbanization, economic growth and infrastructure development. These changes, while generally positive, also make the region more vulnerable to infectious disease outbreaks. Efforts to build up the health care infrastructure in Central Africa are critically needed to mitigate or prevent a large outbreak of Ebola or other infectious disease in the regi

16h

Shrimp heal injured fish

Scientists have discovered that shrimp help heal injured fish.

16h

Landslides triggered by human activity on the rise

More than 50,000 people were killed by landslides around the world between 2004 and 2016, according to a new study. The team, who compiled data on over 4,800 fatal landslides during the 13-year period, also revealed for the first time that landslides resulting from human activity have increased over time.

16h

Antibiotic side-effects in kids lead to nearly 70,000 ER visits in the US each year

The use of antibiotics drives the development of antibiotic resistance, a major threat to public health worldwide. But these drugs also carry the risk of harm to individual patients, including children. According to a new analysis, antibiotics led to nearly 70,000 estimated emergency room visits in the US each year from 2011-2015 for allergic reactions and other side effects in children.

16h

Watching neurons in action

Scientists have devised a way of observing the working of single neurons in unsurpassed detail in a live animal.

16h

Scientists close in on mystery surrounding dangerous blood syndromes

Scientists may be on the road to solving the mystery of a group of mostly incurable blood diseases called myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), which cause people to have immature, malfunctioning bone marrow cells that fuel a diverse set of health problems and can lead to leukemia. Researchers report identifying a gene that in laboratory experiments fuels the biological processes that cause the differe

16h

Bird feared extinct rediscovered in the Bahamas

One of the rarest birds in the western hemisphere, the Bahama Nuthatch, has been rediscovered by research teams searching the island of Grand Bahama. The finding is particularly significant because the species had been feared extinct following the catastrophic damage caused by Hurricane Matthew in 2016, and had not been found in subsequent searches. But it is feared that there could only be two le

16h

Social media's not all bad – it's saving lives in disaster zones

Social media was recently credited with reducing the number of casualties caused by air strikes in the Syrian civil war. The early warning system, developed by tech startup Hala Systems, uses remote sensors to detect aircraft flying over the opposition-held northern province of Idlib. Alerts are then sent via Facebook and instant messaging apps such as WhatsApp to civilians and aid workers in affe

16h

UNC builds better particle tracking software using artificial intelligence

Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have created a new method of particle tracking based on machine learning that is far more accurate and provides better automation than techniques currently in use.

17h

Two methods for measuring children's exposure to radio frequencies are compared

A study has quantified emissions coming from radio frequency sources, and by means of personal and spot measurements has analysed which levels of exposure children find themselves in. The international journal Environment International has just published the results of this work conducted by a research group at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country and the Biodonostia Institute, in collabor

17h

Handheld imager poised to provide new insights into eye and brain diseases

A new portable instrument will allow for improved diagnosis of eye diseases and could enable early detection of brain-related diseases and trauma.

17h

Inbreeding and disease are factors in decline of yellow-banded bumblebee

By sequencing the genome of the yellow-banded bumblebee, researchers have found that inbreeding and disease are likely culprits in their rapid decline in North America. This is believed to be the first time the genome of an at-risk bumblebee has been sequenced and it allows researchers to take a deeper look into the potential reason for their diminishing numbers. What they found surprised them.

17h

Building bricks on the moon from lunar dust

In the coming decades, many space agencies hope to conduct crewed missions to the moon and even establish outposts there. In fact, between NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), Roscosmos, and the Indian and Chinese space agencies, there are no shortages of plans to construct lunar bases and settlements. These will not only establish a human presence on the moon, but facilitate missions to Mars an

17h

Scientists crack mystery behind shape of bird eggs

A centuries-old mystery behind the shape of a bird's egg has been solved by scientists at the University of Sheffield as part of one of the longest-running scientific studies of its kind.

17h

An alternative to propping up coal power plants: Retrain workers for solar

The Trump administration announced new pollution rules for coal-fired power plants designed to keep existing coal power plants operating more and save American coal mining jobs.

17h

Social media provides critical information missed by FEMA

Social media sites can be a valuable tool for assessing the impact of natural disasters like Hurricane Harvey, but a new report indicates much of the critical information conveyed by those sites is overlooked by federal authorities.

17h

Perfect inversion of complex structures

Perfectly inverting complex structures is of great technical importance. Researchers at ETH have now succeeded in turning the magnetic and electric structure of materials into their opposites using a single magnetic field pulse.

17h

Locating the production site of glucan in grass cell walls

Where an item is manufactured tells you a lot about it. Is it made by an assembly line or handcrafted one at a time? To learn more about glucose, the sugary feedstock of biofuel refineries, scientists want to know where a polymer of glucose, mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), resides in grasses as grass species are a major potential renewable biomass feedstock. Scientists from the center demonstrated tha

17h

CSI Tromso—where forensics meets Vikings

Insect remains have their own tale to tell in the mystery that surrounds the Øsknes Viking burial boat, as Eva Pangiotakopulu and colleagues investigate in their recent PLOS ONE study.

17h

Sequencing the genomes of a microbial ecosystem

Corn stalks rustle and tractors trundle along, their wheels grinding into the Kansas soil. While it seems like farmers and machinery conduct most of the work on a modern farm, much of the heavy lifting goes on below the surface. The American Midwest's Great Prairie is home to one of the planet's most complex systems of organisms that can't be seen with the naked eye. Researchers supported by the D

17h

The glass ceiling: Three reasons why it still exists and is hurting the economy

New research finds the glass ceiling — that invisible barrier to advancement that women face at the top levels of the workplace — remains as intractable as ever and is a drag on the economy.

17h

Rapid-onset gender dysphoria

Rapid-onset gender dysphoria might spread through groups of friends and may be a harmful coping mechanism, a new study suggests, but more research is needed.

17h

One Way That Crazy Rich Asians Is a Step Backward

In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 classic, The Great Gatsby , the transformation of the working-class Jimmy Gatz into the upper-crust socialite Jay Gatsby is made possible through the assimilating veneer of decadence. Behind his impeccably tailored suits and grandiose parties, Gatsby masks his ambiguous ethnic origins, playing the part of an old-money Anglo-American elite to ultimately tragic results

17h

How sleep loss may contribute to adverse weight gain

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University now demonstrate that one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition. The study is published in the scientific journal Science Advances.

17h

Polymer antibodies efficiently target and eliminate cancer cells

For the first time, researchers have produced polyfunctional nanoMIPs capable of selective target protein recognition and suitable for specific drug delivery. This used to be impossible, because the available technology for nanoMIP synthesis did not allow us to standardize the conditions in which the particles were obtained, so the efficiency of the end product was unpredictable. The next goal is

17h

Increased phosphate intake elevates blood pressure in healthy adults

If more phosphate is consumed with food, blood pressure and pulse rate increase in healthy young adults. These findings were shown by a study led by the University of Basel and published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

17h

Research into deadly 2016 Italian earthquakes could improve future seismic forecasts

The timing and size of three deadly earthquakes that struck Italy in 2016 may have been pre-determined, according to new research that could improve future earthquake forecasts.

17h

Researchers develop cryopreservation method of ladybird beetle ovaries

A new study has found an effective way to cryopreserve — preservation by cooling to very low temperature — and subsequently transplant ovaries of the multicolored Asian ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis.

17h

Finally, a way for cities to track and meet sustainability benchmarks

We have apps that track our caloric consumption, our impulsive spending, and how many steps we take in a day. They help us keep tabs on ourselves so we maintain an optimum lifestyle. They even foster competition among our virtual followers. So why couldn't we have something similar for energy or water consumption? Imagine an app that tracks how an entire city performs, how much fuel it needs or ho

17h

Cleverly located surface proteins make some pneumococcal strains especially dangerous

Successful pathogenic strains of pneumococci have two proteins that, owing to their location on the surface of the bacteria, enhance their survival and ability to cause disease, according to a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in Nature Communications .

17h

Handheld imager poised to provide new insights into eye and brain diseases

Researchers have developed and demonstrated the first handheld ophthalmology instrument with resolution-boosting adaptive optics technology that can image individual photoreceptors in the eye. The new portable instrument will allow improved diagnosis of eye diseases and could enable early detection of brain-related diseases and trauma.

17h

First chance to see…or last? Spectacular new footage of Vietnam's primates

Vietnam is famous for several reasons: it was a notorious theatre of war during an unspeakably horrific but generation-defining conflict; it has become an extremely popular 'new' tourism destination; and it boasts a world-conquering, some would say unparalleled, cuisine. What Vietnam is not famous for – outside the conservation community, at least – is its wildlife. And yet the country is one of t

17h

Why the weather forecast will always be a bit wrong

The science of weather forecasting falls to public scrutiny every single day. When the forecast is correct, we rarely comment, but we are often quick to complain when the forecast is wrong. Are we ever likely to achieve a perfect forecast that is accurate to the hour?

17h

What an MIT professor learned analyzing 1 million credit card offers

Shopping for a new credit card? MIT Sloan finance professor Antoinette Schoar has some advice: Read the fine print, or at least the Schumer box. And double-check that your financial adviser is looking out for your well-being.

17h

Banedanmark har udbetalt resultatbonus til direktører trods manglende resultater

Rigsrevisionen kritiserer Banedanmarks udbetaling af resultatløn til syv direktører uden de resultater, de bliver belønnet for. En kritik, som bør give røde ører, siger økonomiprofessor.

17h

A Molecular Reason Why Obese People Have Trouble Losing Weight

Fat desensitizes the brain to a hormone that diminishes appetite — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

"Truth Isn't Truth": Giuliani Borrows from the Climate Denial/Tobacco Company Playbook

By suggesting that “alternative facts” are just as valid as actual facts, he attempts to pull off an all-too-familiar scam — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Why bright, poor students fail to achieve top grades

The fourth Thursday in August is a day that is anticipated with equal measures of hope and trepidation by hundreds of thousands of young people across England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

17h

Six important points about the Affordable Clean Energy Rule

On Tuesday, August 21, EPA published a proposed rule to replace the Clean Power Plan. The proposal, entitled the "Affordable Clean Energy Rule," would establish a framework for controlling CO2 emissions from existing power plants which is significantly less effective and environmentally protective than its predecessor. Here are six important things to know about the proposed rule:

17h

Large-scale simulations could shed light on the 'dark' elements that make up most of our cosmos

If you only account for the matter we can see, our entire galaxy shouldn't exist. The combined gravitational pull of every known moon, planet, and star should not have been strong enough to produce a system as dense and complex as the Milky Way.

17h

Polymer antibodies efficiently target and eliminate cancer cells

A joint research team from Russia and the U.K. has demonstrated the possibility of developing a new type of anti-neoplastic drugs based on nanoMIPs, or "plastic antibodies." NanoMIPs are synthetic polymers that can function as antibodies, selectively binding to target proteins on the surface of cancer cells. This approach could lead to a paradigm shift in the development of new methods for cancer

17h

Short total synthesis of ajoene, a biologically active component in oil extracts of garlic

Fresh garlic extracts contain a variety of healthy organosulfur compounds, among which ajoene forms a major oil-extractable ingredient. Now, chemists in the United Kingdom have synthesized ajoene from readily available components for the first time. The results, which are published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, show that ajoene is accessible on a large scale with very few synthetic steps. Chem

17h

Coordinating Wi-Fi traffic

The surge in demand for Wi-Fi networks has created a need to better coordinate the immense traffic. An EU initiative introduced an architecture to reduce interference and boost performance in very congested environments.

17h

Everybody’s equal in this 5,000-year-old African cemetery

Research has found the earliest and largest monumental cemetery in eastern Africa, which early pastoralists living around Lake Turkana in Kenya built 5,000 years ago. This group is believed to have lived without major inequalities and hierarchies, contradicting long-standing narratives about the origins of early civilizations. The Lothagam North Pillar Site was a communal cemetery constructed and

17h

See an Alligator Devour Another Alligator in These Gruesome Photos

Gator eats gator! Photos show an alligator nomming a smaller gator in a Texas swamp.

17h

Reseachers find out why a supermassive black hole appears to move

Researchers often assume that massive galaxies host supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in their nuclei. In recent years, observers have sought galaxies that might contain an SMBH that is displaced from its equilibrium position. Among the scenarios that could cause such a displacement are the merger of two SMBHs or the existence of a binary pair of SMBHs, and finding an example would give astronomers

17h

Carbohydrate capture

LMU chemists have designed and synthesized a helical molecule that specifically recognizes and binds to a disaccharide consisting of two five-carbon sugar units.

17h

Consumers aren't necessarily sold on 'cultured meat'

It's been a busy summer for food-based biotech. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration made headlines when it approved the plant-based "Impossible Burger," which relies on an ingredient from genetically modified yeast for its meaty taste. The European Union sparked controversy by extending heavy restrictions on genetically modified organisms by classifying them as gene-edited crops.

17h

Trump's coal plan—neither clean nor affordable

Is climate change a problem? Consider the evidence: wildfires in California, Sweden and Siberia; flooding in coastal areas due to sea level rise; droughts in some places and extreme weather and rainfall in others; new and emerging patterns of disease; heat waves; and much more. Yet, looking at the policy changes announced in the last 17 months by the Trump administration, one would think there is

17h

A year after Hurricane Harvey, some Texans are using outdated flood risk maps to rebuild

One year ago, on August 25, 2017, Hurricane Harvey struck Texas – the first major hurricane to make landfall in the United States since Wilma in 2005. Harvey dumped record-breaking rain and flooded hundreds of thousands of homes in and around Houston. It caused some US$125 billion in damages, making it one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history.

17h

Biomimetic chemistry: Carbohydrate capture

LMU chemists have designed and synthesized a helical molecule that specifically recognizes and binds to a disaccharide consisting of two five-carbon sugar units.

17h

Prospect of a new treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

An international research group led by Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin has completed testing a new drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The drug is effective in patients with moderate to severe forms of the disease who have shown an inadequate response to conventional disease modifying drugs. Results from this research have been published in The Lancet.

17h

Garlic ingredient from the lab bench

Fresh garlic extracts contain a variety of healthy organosulfur compounds, among which ajoene forms a major oil-extractable ingredient. Now, chemists in the United Kingdom have synthesized ajoene from readily available components for the first time. The results, which are published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, show that ajoene is accessible on a large scale with very few synthetic steps. Chem

17h

On the genesis of shape: There is no magic in remote synchronization

In some physical systems, even elements quite distant from one another are able to synchronize their actions. At a first glance, the phenomenon looks rather mysterious. Using a network of simple electronic oscillators interconnected as a ring, researchers from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow have shown that, in fact, remote synchronization can, at least

17h

Don't buy stolen artifacts—here's how to ethically collect science memorabilia

DIY Don’t destroy what you love. Collecting scientific memorabilia lets you literally touch great moments from humanity's past. But you have to do it the right way.

17h

Hurricane Lane Bears Down on Hawaii

Hurricane Lane is nearing Hawaii from the southeast, and the first tendrils of the storm have already reached the Big Island.

17h

Biologiske lægemidler har markant dårligere effekt på mænd end kvinder

Kvindelige patienter med psoriasisgigt har markant dårligere respons og er i større risiko for at falde fra en behandling med biologiske lægemidler end mænd.

17h

Sundhed ligger i top på vælgernes dagsorden

Vælgerne har sundhed som det højest prioriterede politikområde, viser måling.

17h

Ny ledende overlæge på Ortopædkirurgi i Kolding

At tilpasse patientforløb efter den enkelte patient bliver et fokusområde for Anders Jordy, der tiltræder som ledende overlæge på Ortopædkirurgi på Kolding Sygehus 1. september.

17h

Forfatterspiren, der gik lægevejen

Anette Ellegaard Dalum arbejder som forfatter og læge og har gjort det siden medicinstudiet. Som læge får hun intellektuel stimuli og samvær med kollegaer, mens forfattergerningen giver kreativitet og frihed. Hun kan ikke leve uden nogle af dem.

17h

Minister: Danmark skal ikke rense drikkevandet

Miljø- og fødevareministeren er bekymret over pesticidfund, men afventer et bedre overblik i løbet af efteråret, hvor han også indkalder til nye drøftelser om screening for stoffer i drikkevandet, og om hvordan man beskytter drikkevandet bedst muligt.

17h

NotPetya: Maersk skrinlagde opgradering af sikkerhed – det var ikke bonusgrundlag

Planer om sikkerhedstiltag, der kunne begrænse NotPetya ransomwaren, der kostede Maersk mindst 1,9 milliarder kroner, blev skrinlagt bl.a. på grund af manglende bonusser til chefer.

17h

Scientists stumped by 'STEVE', a mysterious ribbon of light in the sky

The first serious scientific study of STEVE, the ribbons of white and purple light in northern skies, reveals they’re not auroras—they’re something new and unexplained. Read More

17h

Head and neck position may affect concussion risk

The way you position your head and neck during a head-on impact may significantly affect your risk of concussion, according to a new study. The study also shows tensed up neck muscles don’t seem to offer much protection. It all comes down to how your head accelerates backward after impact, which some think is the major factor controlling concussion risk, researchers say. “We found it really inter

18h

Inbreeding and disease are factors in decline of yellow-banded bumblebee, York U study

By sequencing the genome of the yellow-banded bumblebee, York University researchers have found that inbreeding and disease are likely culprits in their rapid decline in North America.This is believed to be the first time the genome of an at-risk bumblebee has been sequenced and it allows researchers to take a deeper look into the potential reason for their diminishing numbers. What they found sur

18h

Large scale preparation method of high quality SWNT sponges

In a NANO paper published in NANO, a group of researchers have developed a simple flame burning method to prepare single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) sponges on a large scale. The SWNT sponge has multifunctional properties and can be used in the fields of cleaning-up, sensing and energy storage.

18h

Children take longer to learn two languages at once compared to just one — don't fret

Bilingual children from immigrant families are not two monolinguals in one. They develop each language at a slower pace because their learning is spread across two languages. A researcher shows strong evidence that the rate of language growth is influenced by the quantity of language input. She challenges the belief, held in and out of scientific circles that children are linguistic sponges who qu

18h

Natural sugar defends against metabolic syndrome, in mice

New research, in mice, indicates that a natural sugar called trehalose blocks glucose from the liver and activates a gene that boosts insulin sensitivity, reducing the chance of developing diabetes. The findings, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggest new possibilities for treating metabolic syndrome, a cluster of related conditions that includes obesity, diabetes and

18h

Study suggests need to include overweight subjects in metabolic research

Children's Hospital Los Angeles investigators have demonstrated the need to include a growing constituency of obese and overweight children and adults in clinical research, with their study of a key marker for metabolism and body temperature control. The study, 'Post-prandial Uridine Physiology is Altered by Obesity,' was published online on August 22 in a letter to the Editorial Board of Gastroen

18h

How to Join an Avalanche Control Team

Avalanche control experts must make sure mountains stay safe, and sometimes that means triggering an avalanche yourself… by throwing explosives out of a helicopter. Tim Kennedy breaks down what it takes to master this deadly job. Stream Full Episodes of Hard to Kill: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/hard-to-kill/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: http

18h

4 things people need to thrive after disaster

Why do some populations thrive after disasters, while others barely survive? “Societies try and build those things that will protect their populations—to build infrastructures, civic institutions, effective governance,” says David Abramson, clinical associate professor at the New York University College of Global Public Health and director of the Population Impact, Recovery, and Resilience Progra

18h

‘No Collusion—Rigged Witch Hunt!’ Is the New ‘I’m Not a Crook!’

At midnight Thursday, the president of the United States was awake, agitated, and preparing to impart a message to the 54 million people who follow him on Twitter—but not that the country was under attack, necessitating a presidential response at that late hour, or that its government had only just finished devising a promising new approach to its crumbling infrastructure or to the ongoing carnag

18h

Danske Regioner: Vi lever op til den frie ordinationsret

Patienterstatningens afvisning af syv Spinraza-sager har fået flere aktører på banen med hård kritik af overholdelsen af den frie ordninationsret. Danske Regioner og Medicinrådet afviser.

18h

How Much Energy Can You Store in a Stack of Cement Blocks?

It's not a trick question: You can make a battery out of concrete by storing gravitational potential energy.

18h

NewsGuard Fights Fake News With Humans, Not Algorithms

A new Chrome extension rates news sites on trustworthiness, with input from experienced reporters.

18h

Shrimp heal injured fish

James Cook University scientists in Australia have discovered that shrimp help heal injured fish.

18h

Researchers explore retention of minorities in TBI Model System Study of race/ethnicity

'These findings illustrate the pitfalls associated with grouping different minorities when looking at retention rates in TBI research,' noted co-author Anthony H. Lequerica, PhD. Clearly, race/ethnicity is important to consider when developing strategies for retaining participants in our longitudinal rehabilitation research. We need to develop retention strategies that engage Hispanic individuals,

18h

Ny AI- og datalinje på DTU: »Klassisk data science er baseret på en illusion«

DTU Compute byder snart velkommen til det første hold studerende på den nye linje Kunstig Intelligens og Data, der skal lære de studerende om machine learning, dataindsamling, databehandling og dataetik.

18h

How Can We Tell If a Comatose Patient Is Conscious?

Neurologist Steven Laureys looks for signs of consciousness in unresponsive patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Rising seas will displace millions of people – and Australia must be ready

Sea-level rise is already threatening some communities around the world, particularly small island states, as it exacerbates disasters resulting from storm surges and flooding.

18h

Improved understanding of industrial electrode processes

In the industrial production of chlorine, special electrodes have been recently introduced, which consume much less current than conventional systems. The method requires oxygen to be introduced into a hot, highly concentrated sodium hydroxide solution in which it is poorly soluble. It is still unclear how industrial current densities can be achieved under these conditions. In collaboration with e

18h

Crystalline silica in meteorite brings scientists closer to understanding solar evolution

A multi-institutional team of researchers has discovered silica mineral quartz in a primitive meteorite, comprising direct evidence of silica condensation within the solar protoplanetary disk, and offering new clues to understanding solar formation and evolution. Though previous infrared spectroscopic observations have suggested the existence of silica in young and newly formed T Tauri stars as we

18h

Study of bird migration tricky due to hybridization

Hybridization among bird species is a widespread phenomenon, which is best illustrated in Estonia by the lesser spotted eagle and the greater spotted eagle. However, due to the fact that the migration strategies of both bird species are completely different, studying their hybrid offspring helps ornithologists discover a lot about their migration secrets.

18h

Mechanisms of hair follicle-specific fibroblast formation unraveled

Hair growth is regulated by a small cluster of hair-specific fibroblasts, the dermal papilla. But exactly how the dermal papilla forms has remained elusive until now. In a recent study, professor Marja Mikkola's research group at the University of Helsinki used confocal microscopy of live skin to show that the dermal condensate forms via cell migration.

18h

NASA launching advanced laser to measure Earth's changing ice

Next month, NASA will launch into space the most advanced laser instrument of its kind, beginning a mission to measure – in unprecedented detail – changes in the heights of Earth's polar ice.

18h

Predicting, preventing spread of opioid epidemic in rural and micropolitan areas

The rapid increase of opioid overdose deaths in rural communities across the country has far outpaced the overdose rate in urban areas, and an Iowa State University-led research team wants to know why.

18h

Theory aids analysis of nuclear materials

Nuclear emergency teams, safeguards specialists and others may one day benefit from an expanded nuclear fission chain theory and detectors developed by a team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) physicists.

18h

Alibaba revenue jumps 61% but one-time expense hits profit

Chinese retail giant Alibaba said on Thursday that its revenue jumped 61 percent in the latest quarter as its core e-commerce segment chugged along, but profit for the period was dragged down by a one-off expense.

18h

Rapid development in Central Africa increases the risk of infectious disease outbreaks

The Central Africa region is experiencing rapid urbanization, economic growth and infrastructure development. These changes, while generally positive, also make the region more vulnerable to infectious disease outbreaks. Efforts to build up the health care infrastructure in Central Africa are critically needed to mitigate or prevent a large outbreak of Ebola or other infectious disease in the regi

18h

World's biggest shipping firm to test Russian Arctic route

Danish shipping group A.P. Moller-Maersk said Thursday it will send a cargo vessel through the Russian Arctic for the first time as a result of melting sea ice.

18h

Landslides triggered by human activity on the rise

More than 50,000 people were killed by landslides around the world between 2004 and 2016, according to a new study by researchers at UK's Sheffield University. The team, who compiled data on over 4800 fatal landslides during the 13-year period, also revealed for the first time that landslides resulting from human activity have increased over time. The research is published today in the European Ge

18h

Praksislæger frasagde sig 458 patienter i 2017

Tal tyder på, at praktiserende læger oftere vælger besværlige patienter fra. Det er dog tale om relativt få patienter, påpeger formand for PLO i Region Syddanmark.

18h

Applying deep learning to motion capture with DeepLabCut

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany and the U.S. has developed a deep learning algorithm that can be used for motion capture of animals of any kind. In their paper published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, the group describes their tracking tool called DeepLabCut, how it works and how to use it. Kunlin Wei and Konrad Kording with the University of Peking and t

18h

The Origins of Human Morality

How we learned to put our fate in one another’s hands — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Massive Pyramid, Lost City and Ancient Human Sacrifices Unearthed in China

This ancient city, which houses a massive pyramid, may have conquered a nearby city and taken its residents as captives.

19h

Landslides triggered by human activity on the rise

More than 50,000 people were killed by landslides around the world between 2004 and 2016, according to a new study by researchers at UK's Sheffield University. The team, who compiled data on over 4,800 fatal landslides during the 13-year period, also revealed for the first time that landslides resulting from human activity have increased over time. The research is published today in the European G

19h

"Survival of the laziest" may help some species avoid extinction

Science Scientists are still working out why some species are more likely to die out than others. Estimates suggest 99.99 percent of all species that have ever lived are now extinct . All species that exist today – including human beings – will invariably go extinct…

19h

Efter kokosolie-kritik: SÅ slemt er det ikke – men brug hellere andre olier

Dansk overlæge og professor maner til besindighed om kokosolie, efter at en Harvard-professor i går kaldte olien for "gift".

19h

Letters: Would Democratic Socialism Really Threaten Minorities?

Democratic Socialism Threatens Minorities Earlier this month, Conor Friedersdorf wrote a critique of democratic socialism as defined by a recent article in the leftist magazine Jacobin. “Socialists,” he argued, “are attuned to the ways individuals are vulnerable in capitalism but blind to ways that it frees us from the preferences of the majority. Nearly all of us would hate abiding by the will o

19h

Best Latte and Cappuccino Machines (2018): Keurig, Mr. Coffee, Nespresso, Breville

We've tested a bunch of the best latte machines and best cappuccino makers. These are the absolute best devices to make awesome milk and espresso drinks at home.

19h

Image of the Day: Divide and Conquer

Even in groups with only six individuals, ants begin to take on particular roles.

19h

The Battle for the Soul of Biodiversity

An ideological clash may undermine a crucial assessment of the world’s disappearing plant and animal life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Regeringsplan rammer naturfaglige uddannelser og internationale ambitioner

Uddannelses- og forskningsminister Tommy Ahlers' indgreb, der skal reducere optaget af internationale…

19h

Robot Bartender Will Take Your Order

Digital assistants have to respond quickly, but correctly—so researchers are studying how real humans navigate that trade-off, to design better machines. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

A 55-Foot Fin Whale Washed Up on a Massachusetts Beach. What Killed It?

A Massachusetts beach became the site of a whale necropsy this week.

20h

Just One Night of Poor Sleep May Add to Weight Gain, Muscle Loss

Skimping on just one night's sleep may lead to changes that could promote weight gain and muscle loss.

20h

Volkswagen to offer all-electric car-sharing from 2019

German auto giant Volkswagen said Thursday it would launch an all-electric car-sharing service in Berlin next year, hoping to show off new models and break into a fast-growing market.

20h

Facebook bans second quiz app on concerns user data misused

Facebook banned a quiz app from its platform for refusing an inspection and concerns that data on as many as 4 million users was misused.

20h

Plant roots evolved at least twice, and step by step | Susannah Lydon

The discover of a unique rooting anatomy from 407m years ago supports theory roots evolved at least twice, and step by step Most of us do not spend much time contemplating plant roots. Not only do they suffer from the wider issue of plant blindness , but they are also the bit of the plant that is not visible. In terms of getting people excited about plant science, it’s a tough gig. This is a sham

20h

You can’t breathe through your stomach

Some bottle water is claimed to have extra oxygen which is claimed to give a performance benefit. Are these claims valid?

20h

The Solo JavaScript Developer Challenging Google and Facebook

Vue, an open-source framework, is winning fans among the creators of web applications.

20h

How NASA Built a *Shark Tank* for Space Inventions

At an event in Denver, companies faced off in a battle to win NASA mentorship—and maybe the chance to put their tech in space.

20h

Setting the Record Straight on Medical Psilocybin

A recent critique of an article in Neuropharmacology was unfair, say the study's authors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

A new quantum device defies the concepts of ‘before’ and ‘after’

Two events can happen in different orders at the same time, thanks to quantum physics.

20h

»Man kan se en ny Kattegatforbindelse som positiv, eller man kan vælge at polemisere, politisere eller være useriøs«

Transportminister Ole Birk Olesen var i dag indkaldt til samråd om de beregninger om en vejbro over Kattegat, som har vist sig at bygge på et løst grundlag og misvisende forudsætninger. Ministeren lægger ikke skjul på sin utilfredshed med kritikken af beregningerne.

20h

A Mother’s Zip Code Could Signal Whether Her Baby Will Be Born Too Early

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series exploring the vast racial and economic inequality in Fresno, the poorest major city in California. These stories were reported by students at the University of California at Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. W hen baby Rodrigo was born, he didn’t make a sound. Lucy Gomez had been in a Fresno County hospital for a week since she first showed

20h

India’s “Vyomanauts” Seek to Join the Elite Club of Spacefaring Nations by 2022

Based on more than a decade of preparations, the nation’s ambitious time line for human spaceflight seems feasible to many senior space scientists — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Nanobot er novichoks overmand

I en proces, som kemikere endnu ikke helt begriber, har de formået at skabe en pumpe, der fortærer nervegift og samtidig kan udskille modgift.

20h

New research proposes using local data in resolving malnutrition

Kwashiorkor, one of the most extreme forms of malnutrition, is estimated to affect more than a hundred thousand children annually. However, it has largely been overlooked by the scientific community. Researchers have recently attempted to increase its recognition by conducting a global study of more than 1.7 million children, but a new study published in the Food and Nutrition Bulletin reveals tha

21h

New research presents alternative methods, like robo-advisors, to manage retirement income

The need to help retirees make prudent spending decisions has led to the growth of a large industry of financial advisors, but a new article suggests that improved policy approaches may be more effective. Published in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, the study reviews the psychology behind rapid spending decisions and presents five policy options that lead to the smarter sel

21h

Unlikely survival

A reef near a polluted port raises hopes for the conservation of other endangered coral.

21h

Trump’s Troubles Are Just Getting Started

Tuesday’s news had an almost surreal quality, like something out of a political thriller: While President Donald Trump’s former campaign chair Paul Manafort was convicted of fraud, his former attorney Michael Cohen told a federal court that the commander in chief had ordered him to violate campaign-finance laws by paying hush money to at least two women with whom the president had affairs. But as

21h

The Immigration Fight That May Soon Land in the Supreme Court

Six months. That’s how long the Trump administration gave Congress to find a legislative fix or replacement for the Obama-era program aimed at shielding young undocumented immigrants from deportation when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a phaseout of the program in September 2017. But after many attempts and failures in Congress to pass legislation, a court ruling expected any day from a

21h

Ariana Grande’s Weird Take on Love

In her best songs, Ariana Grande makes it feel like she has mastered gravity. She’ll arc out her light, sharp voice as if it’s a dart while her producers kick up a windstorm, making it all the more gratifying when she hits the bulls-eye. For the girl-group frenzy of “ Problem ,” bwongs of bass seemed to launch her upwards as if by trampoline. The EDM juggernaut of “ Into You ” crackled and groane

21h

Why It's So Hard to Treat Compulsive Hair Pulling

Christina Pearson was 14 years old when she started pulling out her hair, creating bald patches on her head. She was taken to a psychiatrist, but in 1970 there was no name for her disorder, and certainly no treatment. The doctor issued a psychiatric discharge that removed Pearson from high school. In that moment, she felt relief. Going to high school meant that somebody might pull off her hat and

21h

LA: Afskaf seksårsfristen

Unge mennesker skal have frihed til selv at forme deres karriere og fremtid. De har ikke brug for statslig tvang. Og læger er altså ikke dominobrikker, som man kan flytte rundt på efter for godt befindende.

21h

What Happened in the Dark: Puerto Rico's Fight for Power

More Americans rely on Puerto Rico's grid than on any other public electric utility. How one renegade plant worker led them through the shadows.

21h

Puerto Rico’s Governor: The Island Is Ready to Welcome Tech

Opinion: The governor of Puerto Rico writes that the island is a perfect place for tech companies to set up shop.

21h

What Tech Has—and Hasn’t—Done for Puerto Rico

Balloons, batteries, and the crypto invasion. A progress report on the industry's aid to the island.

21h

10 chefer bag EFI blev forgyldt med bonus for it-skandalen

Både i SKAT, Digitaliseringssstyrelsen og i Sundhedsdatastyrelsen har chefer fået bonus, selv om de ikke har opfyldt aftalte mål, som lå til grund for bonussen.

21h

Dæmning brast i Norge: Motorvej lukket og 133 evakueret

En midlertidig dæmning i Bergen i Norge brast som følge af forhøjet vandstand. 133 mennesker venter stadig på at vende hjem efter en evakuering.

21h

Tapping into water's therapeutic power to cut health costs

Living close to bodies of water such as a river or even a fountain could help people be healthier while also reducing medical costs for governments, according to researchers.

21h

Aeolus: How a satellite will measure wind across Earth

Meteorologists are hopeful Aeolus will have a big impact on the quality of medium-range weather forecasts.

21h

Baby poop may be source of beneficial probiotics

Probiotics seem to be everywhere these days — in yogurt, pickles, bread, even dog food. But there's one place that may surprise you: There are probiotics in dirty diapers.

22h

Texas A&M team's pic of crack in the act could prevent engineering failures

In work that could help prevent the failure of everything from bridges to dental implants, a team led by a researcher at Texas A&M University has taken the first 3D image of a microscopic crack propagating through a metal damaged by hydrogen.

22h

Watching neurons in action

OIST scientists have devised a way of observing the working of single neurons in unsurpassed detail in a live animal.

22h

Strike-hit Ryanair announces deal with Irish union

Ryanair on Thursday said it had "reached agreement" with an Irish union representing pilots, in a move that could end strike action that has resulted in cancelled flights across Europe.

22h

Trilobites: Giraffe Parts Sales Are Booming in the U.S., and It’s Legal

An investigation showed imports made into pillows, boots and other items have become increasingly popular, at a time when the animal’s global population is dwindling.

22h

The Humanities Are in Crisis

P eople have been proclaiming the imminent extinction of the humanities for decades. A best-selling volume in 1964 warned that a science-focused world left no room for humane pursuits, even as Baby Boomers began to flood the English and history departments of new universities. Allan Bloom warned about academics putting liberal ideology before scholarship in 1987; humanities degrees quickly rose.

22h

Punishing Putin Just Makes Him Stronger

For Vladimir Putin, winter is coming. The “Crimea effect” that saw his approval ratings rocket after he annexed a part of neighboring Ukraine in 2014 is certainly over, and the popularity boost he expected after Russia hosted the World Cup never really materialized. Instead, Russian politics are currently dominated by a slate of controversial pension reforms introduced by Putin’s government in re

22h

Team's pic of crack in the act could prevent engineering failures

In work that could help prevent the failure of everything from bridges to dental implants, a team led by a researcher at Texas A&M University has taken the first 3-D image of a microscopic crack propagating through a metal damaged by hydrogen.

22h

Trumps kulplan stopper ikke den grønne energi

Tirsdag spillede Trump-regeringen ud med sin plan, der lemper kravene til kulfyrede kraftværker. Men investeringer i vedvarende energi vil fortsætte, siger eksperter.

22h

Open science is now the only way forward for psychology

Next week the Guardian will be closing the Science Blog Network. We take a final look at the journey psychology has made toward becoming a robust and mature science When we launched Head Quarters five years ago, psychology was in a pretty dark place. The field was still reeling from the impact of the Diederik Stapel fraud case – the largest perpetrated in psychology and one of the greatest ever u

22h

Survival of the slackest: now that’s what I call an evolved theory | Larry Ryan

Fellow captains of indolence, rejoice. A study of molluscs holds out hope for those of us of the laid-back persuasion Back when I was at university in Dublin, I once gave blood at a nearby donation clinic. They gave you a free sandwich beforehand to prevent blood-depleted fainting so it was a good deal in straitened, student times (I had the chicken). Post-lunch, a nurse hooked up my arm to get th

22h

Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan ved en gærcelle, om den er alene?

En læser interesserer sig for ølbrygning og den mængde næring, som gærcellerne spiser undervejs. Men forholder gærcellen sig til, om der er andre celler til stede? Det svarer to professorer i systembiologi på.

23h

Study reports successful kidney transplants from donors with a history of hepatitis C

Researchers at Loma Linda University Health found that kidney transplantation can be safely performed using organs testing positive for the hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody but negative for active viral infection. Findings could expand kidney donor options for recipients.

23h

Video: How pro gamers went from bedroom hobbyists to sports superstars

Will Heaven went to one of the world’s biggest pro gaming events to discover how esports became an arena-filling spectacle

23h

China reports 4th outbreak this month of African swine fever

China on Thursday reported another outbreak of African swine fever that threatens the country's crucial pork industry, but officials say they have the situation under control.

23h

Bird feared extinct rediscovered in the Bahamas

One of the rarest birds in the western hemisphere, the Bahama Nuthatch, has been rediscovered by research teams searching the island of Grand Bahama.

23h

Fish lice could be early indicators of metal pollution in freshwater

Everyone needs safe and clean water to drink. Yet industry, agriculture and urban activities threaten fresh water. In particular, metal pollution can be very hard to detect early. Because of this, scientists are always searching for sensitive indicators of water quality. Now, a fish louse shows great promise as an early indicator for monitoring pollution in rivers and dams.

23h

Tracking Sargassum's ocean path could help predict coastal inundation events

The word Sargassum conjures up images of a vast floating island off the coast of Bermuda, the mystical Sargasso Sea that has fascinated and inspired sailors' tales for hundreds of years.

23h

Kelp forests function differently in warming ocean

Kelp forests in the UK and the wider North-East Atlantic will experience a marked change in ecosystem functioning in response to continued ocean warming and the increase of warm-water kelp species, according to a new study led by a team from the Marine Biological Association and the University of Plymouth.

23h

Facebook suspends hundreds of apps over data concerns

Facebook on Wednesday said it has suspended more than 400 of thousands of applications it has investigated to determine whether people's personal information was being improperly shared.

23h

Facebook to pull VPN app from App Store over data worry

Facebook will pull Onavo Protect virtual private network application from the App Store after getting word that it violates Apple's data collection rules, The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday.

1d

US mobile network limits access to firefighters battling blaze

A US mobile network has come under criticism after severely limiting service to firefighters battling the biggest wildfire in California's history.

1d

Sofia theatre group explores 'invisible hands' of recycling

In a neighbourhood in downtown Sofia, theatregoers are looking for entertainment among the city's rubbish—quite literally.

1d

Big Island feels the effects of approaching hurricane

As emergency shelters opened, rain began to pour and cellphone alerts went out, the approaching hurricane started to feel real for Hawaii residents.

1d

China's Huawei, ZTE blocked from Australia's 5G network

Chinese telecom giants Huawei and ZTE have effectively been banned from rolling out Australia's 5G network, after Canberra said Thursday there were security risks with companies beholden to foreign governments.

1d

Antibiotic side effects in kids lead to nearly 70,000 ER visits in the US each year

The use of antibiotics drives the development of antibiotic resistance, a major threat to public health worldwide. But these drugs also carry the risk of harm to individual patients, including children. According to a new analysis published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, antibiotics led to nearly 70,000 estimated emergency room visits in the US each year from 2011-201

1d

Michael Gove’s puppy-farm ban shows he gets the politics of pets | Anne Perkins

Is the environment secretary pandering to sentimentality – or on to the fact that our understanding of animals is changing? Ever since Michael Gove inadvertently found himself on the wrong side of a row over animal sentience at the end of last year, he has been all over animal welfare with the uninhibited enthusiasm of a python preparing its dinner. His latest move is a bid to stamp out the hideou

1d

Nye gældstab truer: EFI-afløser er forsinket i to år og lever ikke op til en række krav

Afløseren for SKATs EFI-system er flere år forsinket, er præget af problematisk egenudvikling, kan ikke levere betryggende inddrivelse og der er sammenlagt risiko for mere offentlig gæld, der tabes på gulvet.

1d

It-projekter i København forsømmer business case og gevinstrealisering

Københavns Kommunes IT-projektråd har vurderet 20 af kommunens største it-projekter. Og de har problemer med business case og gevinstrealisering, lyder det i ny rapport.

1d

Scientists close in on mystery surrounding dangerous blood syndromes

Scientists may be on the road to solving the mystery of a group of mostly incurable blood diseases called myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), which cause people to have immature, malfunctioning bone marrow cells that fuel a diverse set of health problems and can lead to leukemia. Researchers report in the journal Cancer Discovery identifying a gene that in laboratory experiments fuels the biological

1d

Fido får fitness-halsbånd: Slut med dovne hunde

Fitness-halsbånd løser ikke problemet med tykke kæledyr alene. Der skal også skæres ned på frikadellerne, siger dyrlæge.

1d

Caution needed when prescribing antibiotics to hypertension patients, study finds

Individual variations in genetic makeup and gut bacteria may explain the different effects of antibiotics on blood pressure, a new rat study suggests. The findings are published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.

1d

Tracking Sargassum's ocean path could help predict coastal inundation events

In recent years, large amounts of Sargassum have been washing up on beaches from the Caribbean to west Africa. This floating seaweed drifts on the oceans currents. New research explores how the Sargassum might grow while it is meandering along the currents, not just where it floats, combining both ocean physics and seaweed biology for the first time to understand the distribution patterns. Knowing

1d

Fish lice could be early indicators of metal pollution in freshwater

Water quality in rivers and dams is decaying all over the world, and metal pollution is a major factor. Meanwhile, freshwater resources are very limited. A tiny fish louse shows promise as a sensitive early indicator for metal pollution in freshwater.

1d

Bird feared extinct rediscovered in the Bahamas

One of the rarest birds in the western hemisphere, the Bahama Nuthatch, has been rediscovered by research teams searching the island of Grand Bahama. The finding is particularly significant because the species had been feared extinct following the catastrophic damage caused by Hurricane Matthew in 2016, and had not been found in subsequent searches. But it is feared that there could only be two le

1d

Kelp forests function differently in warming ocean

Kelp forests in the UK and the wider North-East Atlantic will experience a marked change in ecosystem functioning in response to continued ocean warming and the increase of warm-water kelp species, according to a new study led by a team from the Marine Biological Association and the University of Plymouth.

1d

How healthy is the American diet? The Healthy Eating Index helps determine the answer

In the latest issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, leading nutrition experts describe and evaluate the latest version of the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), which has been issued to correspond to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

1d

New research uncovers 'one of the tobacco industry's greatest scams'

Parallel studies published in Tobacco Control, highlight fresh evidence on smuggled tobacco and industry-funded studies that routinely overestimate its scale.

1d

Early-life alcohol intake may increase the odds of high-grade prostate cancer

Compared with non-drinkers, men who consumed at least seven drinks per week during adolescence (ages 15-19) had three times the odds of being diagnosed with clinically significant prostate cancer.

1d

Pro-‘Dota 2’ Players Fend off Elon Musk-Backed AI Bots—for Now

Algorithms have conquered backgammon, chess, and Go, but they fall short against the best humans in a complex, multiplayer strategy game.

1d

Danmark fortynder sig ud af pesticidproblemet – er det tid til at rense vandet?

Pesticidfund i grundvandet understreger behovet for sprøjteforbud ved vandboringer, men også bedre håndtering af de nuværende forureninger, der vil vare ved i årtier, siger DTU-professor og Dansk Miljøteknologi.

1d

Facts About Neon

Properties, sources and uses of the element neon.

1d

Aeolus satellite launched in 'world-first' space mission to map Earth's winds

Aeolus will boost climate research and weather forecasting, particularly in data blindspot of the tropics Europe launched a rocket from French Guyana on Wednesday, to put a satellite into orbit as part of what company Arianespace called the world’s first space mission to map the Earth’s wind on a global scale. Related: Ice found on moon surface, raising prospect of lunar colony Continue reading..

1d

The spotlight of attention is more like a strobe light

Despite the 'illusion' of continuity, human perception pulses in and out four times per second, say researchers, a rate that is identical in human and monkey brains.

1d

New method grows brain cells from stem cells quickly and efficiently

Researchers have developed a faster method to generate functional brain cells, called astrocytes, from embryonic stem cells. Astrocytes play a significant role in neurodegenerative diseases. The new method reduces the time required to produce the cells from months to two weeks.

1d

Bees need it colorful

Stopping bee extinction is a goal of scientists. Researchers have discovered that a diversified plant environment helps bees in maintaining stable populations.

1d

Strategic indulgence key to maximizing the college experience

Students who are focused on long term goals maximize their college experience by engaging in 'strategic indulgence,' according to new research.

1d

Breastfeeding may help protect mothers against stroke

Breastfeeding was associated with a lower risk of stroke in post-menopausal women who reported breastfeeding at least one child. The association between breastfeeding and lower risk of stroke was stronger in women who breastfed for longer than six months and for black women.

1d

Maternal depression may alter stress and immune markers in children

New research suggests that depression in women may affect their children's stress and physical well-being throughout life.

1d

Sleep disorder linked with abnormal lipid levels

New research reveals a potential link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

1d

Murky lakes now surpass clear, blue lakes in US

New research reveals that many lakes in the continental United States are becoming murkier, with potentially negative consequences for water quality and aquatic life.

1d

Does it matter where students sit in lecture halls?

Lectures are a staple of higher education, and understanding how students interact and learn within the lecture theater environment is central to successful learning. In a new study researchers examined students' reasons for choosing particular seats in a lecture hall, and investigated how seating positions correlate with student performance.

1d

Cool indoor temperatures linked to high blood pressure

Turning up the thermostat may help manage hypertension, finds a new UCL study into the link between indoor temperatures and high blood pressure.Comparing blood pressure readings of people in their own homes with temperature readings, the researchers found that lower indoor temperatures were associated with higher blood pressure, according to the new study in the Journal of Hypertension.

1d

Two-thirds of alcohol sales are to heavy drinkers

68 percent of alcohol industry revenue in England comes from consumers drinking at risky levels.

1d

For exotic pets, the most popular are also most likely to be released in the wild

Among pet snakes and lizards, the biggest-selling species are also the most likely to be released by their owners — and to potentially become invasive species, according to a new study. The study provides new clarity on how and why the exotic pet trade has become the primary venue by which reptiles and amphibians arrive in non-native lands, the first step to becoming ecologically damaging invader

1d

Head and neck positioning affects concussion risk

The way our head and neck are positioned during a head-on impact may significantly affect the risk of concussion — but tensed up neck muscles seem to offer far less protection.

1d

European wind survey satellite launched from French Guyana

A new satellite that will use advanced laser technology to track global winds and improve weather forecasts has been successfully put into orbit, launch company Arianespace said.

1d

The Atlantic Daily: Do Cohen’s and Manafort’s Crimes Mark a Turning Point for Trump?

What We’re Following Corruption Convictions: Michael Cohen’s guilty plea for campaign-finance violations poses a serious problem for Donald Trump—not only because it implicates the president in a crime, but also because the Justice Department evidently accepts Cohen’s allegation that Trump directed his actions. Even so, the white-collar crimes to which Cohen pleaded guilty and of which Trump’s fo

1d

Can tech giants work together against their common enemies?

Facebook, Twitter and Google routinely squabble for users, engineers and advertising money. Yet it makes sense for these tech giants to work together on security threats, elections meddling and other common ills.

1d

How to keep peace in outer space? Create commercial development.

“To promote the development of a commercial asteroid resources industry for outer space in the United States and to increase the exploration and utilization of asteroid resources in outer space.” Read More

1d

Research determines reasons for massive fires in south-central Chile

A Montana State University-led team has discovered several reasons why massive fires continue to burn through south-central Chile.

1d

Kids aren't reading enough. One solution? Robots.

Technology Take a look, it's in a book. It's reading robot. One study suggests social robots might make kids more excited about reading at home—by turning solo reading time into a group activity.

1d

Hurricane Lane Looms Over Hawaii in These Astronaut and Satellite Photos

Government weather satellites are watching closely as a massive storm called Hurricane Lane threatens Hawaii.

1d

My Dead Dad’s Porno Tapes

When his father died, Charlie Tyrell realized he knew next to nothing about him. Tyrell and his reticent father hadn’t been close; as a young adult, Tyrell had been waiting for “the strange distance he felt between them to close,” as he describes it in his short documentary, My Dead Dad’s Porno Tapes . Now, he wouldn’t have the chance. Still, Tyrell thought that there must be some skeleton key to

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Dunc Hunt

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders maintained that President Trump “did nothing wrong” after Michael Cohen said he violated campaign-finance laws at Trump’s behest . Cohen’s lawyer, Lanny Davis, said his client would refuse a pardon from Trump if it was offered and said Cohen is willing to testify before any congressio

1d

Combination immunotherapy shrinks melanoma brain metastases

Combination immunotherapy shrank melanoma that has spread to the brain in more than half of the patients in a clinical trial reported in the New England Journal of Medicine led by an investigator at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

1d

Girl Had a Denisovan Dad and Neanderthal Mom

Genetic analysis of a bone fragment reveals the girl’s mixed ancestry 90,000 years ago.

1d

Ancient Bone Reveals Surprising Sex Lives Of Neanderthals

Genomic sequencing reveals new evidence of interbreeding among different groups of our ancient relatives. A scientist calls the find "almost too lucky to be true." (Image credit: Sergei Zelensky/IAET SB RAS)

1d

Design new materials with specific properties: Breaking down band structures

Despite a deep understanding of the properties of individual atoms — the 'ingredients' that make up a crystal — scientists found that, when they are combined they often display new, unanticipated properties, making efforts to design new materials little more than guesswork. To make that process more predictable, scientists have produced a system to represent band structures — energy bands, simi

1d

A milestone for forecasting earthquake hazards

Researchers report that their physics-based model of California earthquake hazards replicated estimates from the state's leading statistical model.

1d

Immunotherapy Drugs Slow Skin Cancer That Has Spread to the Brain

Drugs that activate the immune system shrank tumors and prolonged life among patients with an aggressive form of melanoma, a small study shows.

1d

Japanese Authorities Recommend Not Regulating Gene Editing

Unlike judges in the European Union, a government panel in Japan says transgenic modification and genome editing are not the same.

1d

Is Trump an ‘unindicted co-conspirator’? Here’s what the term means

Some Democrats and political analysts are calling Trump an ‘unindicted co-conspirator’ after his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, pleaded guilty to eight felonies. Read More

1d

Remembering Kofi Annan

Kofi Annan, the former United Nations Secretary-General and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has died at the age of 80. Who was he? Read More

1d

Other people are having way, way less sex than you think they are

As part of Ipsos’ long-running studies on misperceptions, researchers asked people in Britain and the U.S. to guess how often people aged 18-29 in their country had sex in the past four weeks. Read More

1d

Why it’s only science that can answer all the big questions

There are two classes of so-called "big questions." The former are invented, and the latter can be fully answered by science. Read More

1d

This Professor Called Coconut Oil 'Pure Poison.' Is She Right?

Coconut oil has become the latest focal point in the nutrition wars.

1d

UK Woman Contracts Rare 'Flesh-Eating' STD

A rare sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can destroy genital tissue has been diagnosed in a woman in the United Kingdom.

1d

Montana State research determines reasons for massive fires in south-central Chile

David McWethy, an assistant professor in MSU's Department of Earth Sciences, and his collaborators found that non-native pine and eucalypt forests planted to supply pulp and timber mills in central Chile are contributing to the massive fires.

1d

These quality diets may promote healthy aging in women

Eating a diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and low in added sugar, sodium, and processed meats could help promote healthy cellular aging in women, according to a new study. “The key takeaway is that following a healthy diet can help us maintain healthy cells and avoid certain chronic diseases,” says lead author Cindy Leung, assistant professor of nutritional sciences at th

1d

Fortidssex: Forskere opdager krydsning mellem to menneskearter

For første gang har forskere fundet resterne af et menneske, som er et resultat af sex mellem to arter.

1d

Trace metals in the air make big splash on life under the sea

In the ocean, a little bit of metal can go a long way.

1d

Glycans at the 'I' of the storm in humoral immunity and melanoma progression

Two new studies have unveiled how a peculiar molecule impacts how antibody-producing cells develop and function as well as how normal melanocytes progress to melanoma malignancy.

1d

Healing after harm: Addressing the emotional toll of harmful medical events

A multidisciplinary group of leaders from the Healing After Harm Conference Group, led by Sigall Bell, MD, Researcher at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has established consensus-driven research agenda designed to create a path forward to inform approaches that better support harmed patients and families.

1d

Noninvasive brain stimulation may help treat symptoms of rare movement disorders

Electrical stimulation of the brain and spinal cord may help treat the symptoms of rare movement disorders called neurodegenerative ataxias, according to a study published in the Aug. 22, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

1d

Bush Welding with Matt Brown | Alaskan Bush People

Equipped with scrap materials from the junkyard, Matt Brown looks to create his very own makeshift welder. Catch an all-new ALASKAN BUSH PEOPLE Sunday 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Alaskan Bush People: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskanBushPPL https://www.f

1d

Under Pressure: HPLC 101

In this eBook, learn about the basics of HPLC and its wide range of applications!

1d

Walmart teams with Rakuten on digital book shop

Walmart on Wednesday launched a digital book shop in a collaboration with Japanese e-commerce powerhouse Rakuten's electronic book service Kobo.

1d

Long-Sought Hearing Channel Protein Found

After a decades-long pursuit, researchers have confirmed the identity of the pore of the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrates’ inner ear hair cells.

1d

Bat signal: Fireflies' glow tells bats they taste awful

Fireflies flash not just for sex, but survival, a new study suggests.

1d

Steady as she goes: Scientists tame damaging plasma instabilities in fusion facilities

In a set of recent experiments, scientists have tamed a damaging plasma instability in a way that could lead to the efficient and steady-state operation of ITER, the international tokamak experiment under construction in France to demonstrate the practicality of fusion power.

1d

The long-term financial toll of breast cancer

The financial fallout from breast cancer can last years after diagnosis, particularly for those with lymphedema, a common side effect from treatment, causing cumulative and cascading economic consequences for survivors, their families, and society, a new study suggests.

1d

Epic genetic: the hidden story of wheat

Biologists have uncovered the hidden genetic secrets that give wheat its remarkable ability for local adaptation — revealing a previously untapped resource for breeding better, more resilient wheat.

1d

Reimagining MRI contrast: Iron outperforms gadolinium

Rice University nanoscientists have demonstrated a method for loading iron inside nanoparticles to create MRI contrast agents that outperform gadolinium chelates, the mainstay contrast agent that is facing increased scrutiny due to potential safety concerns.

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Study reveals how enzyme detects ultraviolet light damage

Damage to DNA is a constant threat to cellular life, and so it is constantly monitored and detected by a family of enzymes called RNA polymerases, resulting in subsequent repair to maintain genome integrity. In a paper published this week in the journal PNAS, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Spain and Finland, describe for the first time how

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Helping the microchip industry go (very low) with the flow

A new study by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has uncovered a source of error in an industry-standard calibration method that could lead microchip manufacturers to lose a million dollars or more in a single fabrication run. The problem is expected to become progressively more acute as chipmakers pack ever more features into ever smaller space.

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Policy pivot: A new emphasis on restoration to protect Puget Sound

For years, a commonly used tactic for protecting threatened and endangered animals in Puget Sound was to cordon off areas to fishing. More than 100 marine protected areas exist around the Sound to protect shoreline critters and help fish populations such as rockfish recover to healthy numbers.

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Trace metals in the air make big splash on life under the sea

A new Cornell University-led study shows that trace metals, deposited by aerosols like dust and other particles in the atmosphere, have a hefty impact on marine life, affecting biological productivity and changing the ocean ecosystem.

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Connecting the (nano) dots: Big-picture thinking can advance nanoparticle manufacturing

Nanoparticle manufacturing, the production of material units less than 100 nanometers in size (100,000 times smaller than a marble), is proving the adage that "good things come in small packages." Today's engineered nanoparticles are integral components of everything from the quantum dot nanocrystals coloring the brilliant displays of state-of-the-art televisions to the miniscule bits of silver he