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Nyheder2018august22

Theory aids analysis of nuclear materials

Nuclear emergency teams, safeguards specialists and others may one day benefit from an expanded nuclear fission chain theory and detectors developed by a team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) physicists.

18h

Alibaba revenue jumps 61% but one-time expense hits profit

Chinese retail giant Alibaba said on Thursday that its revenue jumped 61 percent in the latest quarter as its core e-commerce segment chugged along, but profit for the period was dragged down by a one-off expense.

18h

Rapid development in Central Africa increases the risk of infectious disease outbreaks

The Central Africa region is experiencing rapid urbanization, economic growth and infrastructure development. These changes, while generally positive, also make the region more vulnerable to infectious disease outbreaks. Efforts to build up the health care infrastructure in Central Africa are critically needed to mitigate or prevent a large outbreak of Ebola or other infectious disease in the regi

18h

World's biggest shipping firm to test Russian Arctic route

Danish shipping group A.P. Moller-Maersk said Thursday it will send a cargo vessel through the Russian Arctic for the first time as a result of melting sea ice.

18h

Landslides triggered by human activity on the rise

More than 50,000 people were killed by landslides around the world between 2004 and 2016, according to a new study by researchers at UK's Sheffield University. The team, who compiled data on over 4800 fatal landslides during the 13-year period, also revealed for the first time that landslides resulting from human activity have increased over time. The research is published today in the European Ge

18h

Praksislæger frasagde sig 458 patienter i 2017

Tal tyder på, at praktiserende læger oftere vælger besværlige patienter fra. Det er dog tale om relativt få patienter, påpeger formand for PLO i Region Syddanmark.

18h

Applying deep learning to motion capture with DeepLabCut

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany and the U.S. has developed a deep learning algorithm that can be used for motion capture of animals of any kind. In their paper published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, the group describes their tracking tool called DeepLabCut, how it works and how to use it. Kunlin Wei and Konrad Kording with the University of Peking and t

18h

The Origins of Human Morality

How we learned to put our fate in one another’s hands — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Massive Pyramid, Lost City and Ancient Human Sacrifices Unearthed in China

This ancient city, which houses a massive pyramid, may have conquered a nearby city and taken its residents as captives.

19h

Landslides triggered by human activity on the rise

More than 50,000 people were killed by landslides around the world between 2004 and 2016, according to a new study by researchers at UK's Sheffield University. The team, who compiled data on over 4,800 fatal landslides during the 13-year period, also revealed for the first time that landslides resulting from human activity have increased over time. The research is published today in the European G

19h

"Survival of the laziest" may help some species avoid extinction

Science Scientists are still working out why some species are more likely to die out than others. Estimates suggest 99.99 percent of all species that have ever lived are now extinct . All species that exist today – including human beings – will invariably go extinct…

19h

Efter kokosolie-kritik: SÅ slemt er det ikke – men brug hellere andre olier

Dansk overlæge og professor maner til besindighed om kokosolie, efter at en Harvard-professor i går kaldte olien for "gift".

19h

Letters: Would Democratic Socialism Really Threaten Minorities?

Democratic Socialism Threatens Minorities Earlier this month, Conor Friedersdorf wrote a critique of democratic socialism as defined by a recent article in the leftist magazine Jacobin. “Socialists,” he argued, “are attuned to the ways individuals are vulnerable in capitalism but blind to ways that it frees us from the preferences of the majority. Nearly all of us would hate abiding by the will o

19h

Best Latte and Cappuccino Machines (2018): Keurig, Mr. Coffee, Nespresso, Breville

We've tested a bunch of the best latte machines and best cappuccino makers. These are the absolute best devices to make awesome milk and espresso drinks at home.

19h

Image of the Day: Divide and Conquer

Even in groups with only six individuals, ants begin to take on particular roles.

19h

The Battle for the Soul of Biodiversity

An ideological clash may undermine a crucial assessment of the world’s disappearing plant and animal life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Regeringsplan rammer naturfaglige uddannelser og internationale ambitioner

Uddannelses- og forskningsminister Tommy Ahlers' indgreb, der skal reducere optaget af internationale…

19h

Robot Bartender Will Take Your Order

Digital assistants have to respond quickly, but correctly—so researchers are studying how real humans navigate that trade-off, to design better machines. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

A 55-Foot Fin Whale Washed Up on a Massachusetts Beach. What Killed It?

A Massachusetts beach became the site of a whale necropsy this week.

20h

Just One Night of Poor Sleep May Add to Weight Gain, Muscle Loss

Skimping on just one night's sleep may lead to changes that could promote weight gain and muscle loss.

20h

Volkswagen to offer all-electric car-sharing from 2019

German auto giant Volkswagen said Thursday it would launch an all-electric car-sharing service in Berlin next year, hoping to show off new models and break into a fast-growing market.

20h

Facebook bans second quiz app on concerns user data misused

Facebook banned a quiz app from its platform for refusing an inspection and concerns that data on as many as 4 million users was misused.

20h

Plant roots evolved at least twice, and step by step | Susannah Lydon

The discover of a unique rooting anatomy from 407m years ago supports theory roots evolved at least twice, and step by step Most of us do not spend much time contemplating plant roots. Not only do they suffer from the wider issue of plant blindness , but they are also the bit of the plant that is not visible. In terms of getting people excited about plant science, it’s a tough gig. This is a sham

20h

You can’t breathe through your stomach

Some bottle water is claimed to have extra oxygen which is claimed to give a performance benefit. Are these claims valid?

20h

The Solo JavaScript Developer Challenging Google and Facebook

Vue, an open-source framework, is winning fans among the creators of web applications.

20h

How NASA Built a *Shark Tank* for Space Inventions

At an event in Denver, companies faced off in a battle to win NASA mentorship—and maybe the chance to put their tech in space.

20h

Setting the Record Straight on Medical Psilocybin

A recent critique of an article in Neuropharmacology was unfair, say the study's authors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

A new quantum device defies the concepts of ‘before’ and ‘after’

Two events can happen in different orders at the same time, thanks to quantum physics.

20h

»Man kan se en ny Kattegatforbindelse som positiv, eller man kan vælge at polemisere, politisere eller være useriøs«

Transportminister Ole Birk Olesen var i dag indkaldt til samråd om de beregninger om en vejbro over Kattegat, som har vist sig at bygge på et løst grundlag og misvisende forudsætninger. Ministeren lægger ikke skjul på sin utilfredshed med kritikken af beregningerne.

20h

A Mother’s Zip Code Could Signal Whether Her Baby Will Be Born Too Early

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series exploring the vast racial and economic inequality in Fresno, the poorest major city in California. These stories were reported by students at the University of California at Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. W hen baby Rodrigo was born, he didn’t make a sound. Lucy Gomez had been in a Fresno County hospital for a week since she first showed

20h

India’s “Vyomanauts” Seek to Join the Elite Club of Spacefaring Nations by 2022

Based on more than a decade of preparations, the nation’s ambitious time line for human spaceflight seems feasible to many senior space scientists — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Nanobot er novichoks overmand

I en proces, som kemikere endnu ikke helt begriber, har de formået at skabe en pumpe, der fortærer nervegift og samtidig kan udskille modgift.

20h

New research proposes using local data in resolving malnutrition

Kwashiorkor, one of the most extreme forms of malnutrition, is estimated to affect more than a hundred thousand children annually. However, it has largely been overlooked by the scientific community. Researchers have recently attempted to increase its recognition by conducting a global study of more than 1.7 million children, but a new study published in the Food and Nutrition Bulletin reveals tha

21h

New research presents alternative methods, like robo-advisors, to manage retirement income

The need to help retirees make prudent spending decisions has led to the growth of a large industry of financial advisors, but a new article suggests that improved policy approaches may be more effective. Published in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, the study reviews the psychology behind rapid spending decisions and presents five policy options that lead to the smarter sel

21h

Unlikely survival

A reef near a polluted port raises hopes for the conservation of other endangered coral.

21h

Trump’s Troubles Are Just Getting Started

Tuesday’s news had an almost surreal quality, like something out of a political thriller: While President Donald Trump’s former campaign chair Paul Manafort was convicted of fraud, his former attorney Michael Cohen told a federal court that the commander in chief had ordered him to violate campaign-finance laws by paying hush money to at least two women with whom the president had affairs. But as

21h

The Immigration Fight That May Soon Land in the Supreme Court

Six months. That’s how long the Trump administration gave Congress to find a legislative fix or replacement for the Obama-era program aimed at shielding young undocumented immigrants from deportation when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a phaseout of the program in September 2017. But after many attempts and failures in Congress to pass legislation, a court ruling expected any day from a

21h

Ariana Grande’s Weird Take on Love

In her best songs, Ariana Grande makes it feel like she has mastered gravity. She’ll arc out her light, sharp voice as if it’s a dart while her producers kick up a windstorm, making it all the more gratifying when she hits the bulls-eye. For the girl-group frenzy of “ Problem ,” bwongs of bass seemed to launch her upwards as if by trampoline. The EDM juggernaut of “ Into You ” crackled and groane

21h

Why It's So Hard to Treat Compulsive Hair Pulling

Christina Pearson was 14 years old when she started pulling out her hair, creating bald patches on her head. She was taken to a psychiatrist, but in 1970 there was no name for her disorder, and certainly no treatment. The doctor issued a psychiatric discharge that removed Pearson from high school. In that moment, she felt relief. Going to high school meant that somebody might pull off her hat and

21h

LA: Afskaf seksårsfristen

Unge mennesker skal have frihed til selv at forme deres karriere og fremtid. De har ikke brug for statslig tvang. Og læger er altså ikke dominobrikker, som man kan flytte rundt på efter for godt befindende.

21h

What Happened in the Dark: Puerto Rico's Fight for Power

More Americans rely on Puerto Rico's grid than on any other public electric utility. How one renegade plant worker led them through the shadows.

21h

Puerto Rico’s Governor: The Island Is Ready to Welcome Tech

Opinion: The governor of Puerto Rico writes that the island is a perfect place for tech companies to set up shop.

21h

What Tech Has—and Hasn’t—Done for Puerto Rico

Balloons, batteries, and the crypto invasion. A progress report on the industry's aid to the island.

21h

10 chefer bag EFI blev forgyldt med bonus for it-skandalen

Både i SKAT, Digitaliseringssstyrelsen og i Sundhedsdatastyrelsen har chefer fået bonus, selv om de ikke har opfyldt aftalte mål, som lå til grund for bonussen.

21h

Dæmning brast i Norge: Motorvej lukket og 133 evakueret

En midlertidig dæmning i Bergen i Norge brast som følge af forhøjet vandstand. 133 mennesker venter stadig på at vende hjem efter en evakuering.

21h

Tapping into water's therapeutic power to cut health costs

Living close to bodies of water such as a river or even a fountain could help people be healthier while also reducing medical costs for governments, according to researchers.

21h

Aeolus: How a satellite will measure wind across Earth

Meteorologists are hopeful Aeolus will have a big impact on the quality of medium-range weather forecasts.

21h

Baby poop may be source of beneficial probiotics

Probiotics seem to be everywhere these days — in yogurt, pickles, bread, even dog food. But there's one place that may surprise you: There are probiotics in dirty diapers.

22h

Texas A&M team's pic of crack in the act could prevent engineering failures

In work that could help prevent the failure of everything from bridges to dental implants, a team led by a researcher at Texas A&M University has taken the first 3D image of a microscopic crack propagating through a metal damaged by hydrogen.

22h

Watching neurons in action

OIST scientists have devised a way of observing the working of single neurons in unsurpassed detail in a live animal.

22h

Strike-hit Ryanair announces deal with Irish union

Ryanair on Thursday said it had "reached agreement" with an Irish union representing pilots, in a move that could end strike action that has resulted in cancelled flights across Europe.

22h

Trilobites: Giraffe Parts Sales Are Booming in the U.S., and It’s Legal

An investigation showed imports made into pillows, boots and other items have become increasingly popular, at a time when the animal’s global population is dwindling.

22h

The Humanities Are in Crisis

P eople have been proclaiming the imminent extinction of the humanities for decades. A best-selling volume in 1964 warned that a science-focused world left no room for humane pursuits, even as Baby Boomers began to flood the English and history departments of new universities. Allan Bloom warned about academics putting liberal ideology before scholarship in 1987; humanities degrees quickly rose.

22h

Punishing Putin Just Makes Him Stronger

For Vladimir Putin, winter is coming. The “Crimea effect” that saw his approval ratings rocket after he annexed a part of neighboring Ukraine in 2014 is certainly over, and the popularity boost he expected after Russia hosted the World Cup never really materialized. Instead, Russian politics are currently dominated by a slate of controversial pension reforms introduced by Putin’s government in re

22h

Team's pic of crack in the act could prevent engineering failures

In work that could help prevent the failure of everything from bridges to dental implants, a team led by a researcher at Texas A&M University has taken the first 3-D image of a microscopic crack propagating through a metal damaged by hydrogen.

22h

Trumps kulplan stopper ikke den grønne energi

Tirsdag spillede Trump-regeringen ud med sin plan, der lemper kravene til kulfyrede kraftværker. Men investeringer i vedvarende energi vil fortsætte, siger eksperter.

22h

Open science is now the only way forward for psychology

Next week the Guardian will be closing the Science Blog Network. We take a final look at the journey psychology has made toward becoming a robust and mature science When we launched Head Quarters five years ago, psychology was in a pretty dark place. The field was still reeling from the impact of the Diederik Stapel fraud case – the largest perpetrated in psychology and one of the greatest ever u

22h

Survival of the slackest: now that’s what I call an evolved theory | Larry Ryan

Fellow captains of indolence, rejoice. A study of molluscs holds out hope for those of us of the laid-back persuasion Back when I was at university in Dublin, I once gave blood at a nearby donation clinic. They gave you a free sandwich beforehand to prevent blood-depleted fainting so it was a good deal in straitened, student times (I had the chicken). Post-lunch, a nurse hooked up my arm to get th

22h

Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan ved en gærcelle, om den er alene?

En læser interesserer sig for ølbrygning og den mængde næring, som gærcellerne spiser undervejs. Men forholder gærcellen sig til, om der er andre celler til stede? Det svarer to professorer i systembiologi på.

23h

Study reports successful kidney transplants from donors with a history of hepatitis C

Researchers at Loma Linda University Health found that kidney transplantation can be safely performed using organs testing positive for the hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody but negative for active viral infection. Findings could expand kidney donor options for recipients.

23h

Video: How pro gamers went from bedroom hobbyists to sports superstars

Will Heaven went to one of the world’s biggest pro gaming events to discover how esports became an arena-filling spectacle

23h

China reports 4th outbreak this month of African swine fever

China on Thursday reported another outbreak of African swine fever that threatens the country's crucial pork industry, but officials say they have the situation under control.

23h

Bird feared extinct rediscovered in the Bahamas

One of the rarest birds in the western hemisphere, the Bahama Nuthatch, has been rediscovered by research teams searching the island of Grand Bahama.

23h

Fish lice could be early indicators of metal pollution in freshwater

Everyone needs safe and clean water to drink. Yet industry, agriculture and urban activities threaten fresh water. In particular, metal pollution can be very hard to detect early. Because of this, scientists are always searching for sensitive indicators of water quality. Now, a fish louse shows great promise as an early indicator for monitoring pollution in rivers and dams.

23h

Tracking Sargassum's ocean path could help predict coastal inundation events

The word Sargassum conjures up images of a vast floating island off the coast of Bermuda, the mystical Sargasso Sea that has fascinated and inspired sailors' tales for hundreds of years.

23h

Kelp forests function differently in warming ocean

Kelp forests in the UK and the wider North-East Atlantic will experience a marked change in ecosystem functioning in response to continued ocean warming and the increase of warm-water kelp species, according to a new study led by a team from the Marine Biological Association and the University of Plymouth.

23h

Facebook suspends hundreds of apps over data concerns

Facebook on Wednesday said it has suspended more than 400 of thousands of applications it has investigated to determine whether people's personal information was being improperly shared.

23h

Facebook to pull VPN app from App Store over data worry

Facebook will pull Onavo Protect virtual private network application from the App Store after getting word that it violates Apple's data collection rules, The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday.

1d

US mobile network limits access to firefighters battling blaze

A US mobile network has come under criticism after severely limiting service to firefighters battling the biggest wildfire in California's history.

1d

Sofia theatre group explores 'invisible hands' of recycling

In a neighbourhood in downtown Sofia, theatregoers are looking for entertainment among the city's rubbish—quite literally.

1d

Big Island feels the effects of approaching hurricane

As emergency shelters opened, rain began to pour and cellphone alerts went out, the approaching hurricane started to feel real for Hawaii residents.

1d

China's Huawei, ZTE blocked from Australia's 5G network

Chinese telecom giants Huawei and ZTE have effectively been banned from rolling out Australia's 5G network, after Canberra said Thursday there were security risks with companies beholden to foreign governments.

1d

Antibiotic side effects in kids lead to nearly 70,000 ER visits in the US each year

The use of antibiotics drives the development of antibiotic resistance, a major threat to public health worldwide. But these drugs also carry the risk of harm to individual patients, including children. According to a new analysis published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, antibiotics led to nearly 70,000 estimated emergency room visits in the US each year from 2011-201

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Michael Gove’s puppy-farm ban shows he gets the politics of pets | Anne Perkins

Is the environment secretary pandering to sentimentality – or on to the fact that our understanding of animals is changing? Ever since Michael Gove inadvertently found himself on the wrong side of a row over animal sentience at the end of last year, he has been all over animal welfare with the uninhibited enthusiasm of a python preparing its dinner. His latest move is a bid to stamp out the hideou

1d

Nye gældstab truer: EFI-afløser er forsinket i to år og lever ikke op til en række krav

Afløseren for SKATs EFI-system er flere år forsinket, er præget af problematisk egenudvikling, kan ikke levere betryggende inddrivelse og der er sammenlagt risiko for mere offentlig gæld, der tabes på gulvet.

1d

It-projekter i København forsømmer business case og gevinstrealisering

Københavns Kommunes IT-projektråd har vurderet 20 af kommunens største it-projekter. Og de har problemer med business case og gevinstrealisering, lyder det i ny rapport.

1d

Scientists close in on mystery surrounding dangerous blood syndromes

Scientists may be on the road to solving the mystery of a group of mostly incurable blood diseases called myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), which cause people to have immature, malfunctioning bone marrow cells that fuel a diverse set of health problems and can lead to leukemia. Researchers report in the journal Cancer Discovery identifying a gene that in laboratory experiments fuels the biological

1d

Fido får fitness-halsbånd: Slut med dovne hunde

Fitness-halsbånd løser ikke problemet med tykke kæledyr alene. Der skal også skæres ned på frikadellerne, siger dyrlæge.

1d

Caution needed when prescribing antibiotics to hypertension patients, study finds

Individual variations in genetic makeup and gut bacteria may explain the different effects of antibiotics on blood pressure, a new rat study suggests. The findings are published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.

1d

Tracking Sargassum's ocean path could help predict coastal inundation events

In recent years, large amounts of Sargassum have been washing up on beaches from the Caribbean to west Africa. This floating seaweed drifts on the oceans currents. New research explores how the Sargassum might grow while it is meandering along the currents, not just where it floats, combining both ocean physics and seaweed biology for the first time to understand the distribution patterns. Knowing

1d

Fish lice could be early indicators of metal pollution in freshwater

Water quality in rivers and dams is decaying all over the world, and metal pollution is a major factor. Meanwhile, freshwater resources are very limited. A tiny fish louse shows promise as a sensitive early indicator for metal pollution in freshwater.

1d

Bird feared extinct rediscovered in the Bahamas

One of the rarest birds in the western hemisphere, the Bahama Nuthatch, has been rediscovered by research teams searching the island of Grand Bahama. The finding is particularly significant because the species had been feared extinct following the catastrophic damage caused by Hurricane Matthew in 2016, and had not been found in subsequent searches. But it is feared that there could only be two le

1d

Kelp forests function differently in warming ocean

Kelp forests in the UK and the wider North-East Atlantic will experience a marked change in ecosystem functioning in response to continued ocean warming and the increase of warm-water kelp species, according to a new study led by a team from the Marine Biological Association and the University of Plymouth.

1d

How healthy is the American diet? The Healthy Eating Index helps determine the answer

In the latest issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, leading nutrition experts describe and evaluate the latest version of the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), which has been issued to correspond to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

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New research uncovers 'one of the tobacco industry's greatest scams'

Parallel studies published in Tobacco Control, highlight fresh evidence on smuggled tobacco and industry-funded studies that routinely overestimate its scale.

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Early-life alcohol intake may increase the odds of high-grade prostate cancer

Compared with non-drinkers, men who consumed at least seven drinks per week during adolescence (ages 15-19) had three times the odds of being diagnosed with clinically significant prostate cancer.

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Pro-‘Dota 2’ Players Fend off Elon Musk-Backed AI Bots—for Now

Algorithms have conquered backgammon, chess, and Go, but they fall short against the best humans in a complex, multiplayer strategy game.

1d

Danmark fortynder sig ud af pesticidproblemet – er det tid til at rense vandet?

Pesticidfund i grundvandet understreger behovet for sprøjteforbud ved vandboringer, men også bedre håndtering af de nuværende forureninger, der vil vare ved i årtier, siger DTU-professor og Dansk Miljøteknologi.

1d

Facts About Neon

Properties, sources and uses of the element neon.

1d

Aeolus satellite launched in 'world-first' space mission to map Earth's winds

Aeolus will boost climate research and weather forecasting, particularly in data blindspot of the tropics Europe launched a rocket from French Guyana on Wednesday, to put a satellite into orbit as part of what company Arianespace called the world’s first space mission to map the Earth’s wind on a global scale. Related: Ice found on moon surface, raising prospect of lunar colony Continue reading..

1d

The spotlight of attention is more like a strobe light

Despite the 'illusion' of continuity, human perception pulses in and out four times per second, say researchers, a rate that is identical in human and monkey brains.

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New method grows brain cells from stem cells quickly and efficiently

Researchers have developed a faster method to generate functional brain cells, called astrocytes, from embryonic stem cells. Astrocytes play a significant role in neurodegenerative diseases. The new method reduces the time required to produce the cells from months to two weeks.

1d

Bees need it colorful

Stopping bee extinction is a goal of scientists. Researchers have discovered that a diversified plant environment helps bees in maintaining stable populations.

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Strategic indulgence key to maximizing the college experience

Students who are focused on long term goals maximize their college experience by engaging in 'strategic indulgence,' according to new research.

1d

Breastfeeding may help protect mothers against stroke

Breastfeeding was associated with a lower risk of stroke in post-menopausal women who reported breastfeeding at least one child. The association between breastfeeding and lower risk of stroke was stronger in women who breastfed for longer than six months and for black women.

1d

Maternal depression may alter stress and immune markers in children

New research suggests that depression in women may affect their children's stress and physical well-being throughout life.

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Sleep disorder linked with abnormal lipid levels

New research reveals a potential link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

1d

Murky lakes now surpass clear, blue lakes in US

New research reveals that many lakes in the continental United States are becoming murkier, with potentially negative consequences for water quality and aquatic life.

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Does it matter where students sit in lecture halls?

Lectures are a staple of higher education, and understanding how students interact and learn within the lecture theater environment is central to successful learning. In a new study researchers examined students' reasons for choosing particular seats in a lecture hall, and investigated how seating positions correlate with student performance.

1d

Cool indoor temperatures linked to high blood pressure

Turning up the thermostat may help manage hypertension, finds a new UCL study into the link between indoor temperatures and high blood pressure.Comparing blood pressure readings of people in their own homes with temperature readings, the researchers found that lower indoor temperatures were associated with higher blood pressure, according to the new study in the Journal of Hypertension.

1d

Two-thirds of alcohol sales are to heavy drinkers

68 percent of alcohol industry revenue in England comes from consumers drinking at risky levels.

1d

For exotic pets, the most popular are also most likely to be released in the wild

Among pet snakes and lizards, the biggest-selling species are also the most likely to be released by their owners — and to potentially become invasive species, according to a new study. The study provides new clarity on how and why the exotic pet trade has become the primary venue by which reptiles and amphibians arrive in non-native lands, the first step to becoming ecologically damaging invader

1d

Head and neck positioning affects concussion risk

The way our head and neck are positioned during a head-on impact may significantly affect the risk of concussion — but tensed up neck muscles seem to offer far less protection.

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European wind survey satellite launched from French Guyana

A new satellite that will use advanced laser technology to track global winds and improve weather forecasts has been successfully put into orbit, launch company Arianespace said.

1d

The Atlantic Daily: Do Cohen’s and Manafort’s Crimes Mark a Turning Point for Trump?

What We’re Following Corruption Convictions: Michael Cohen’s guilty plea for campaign-finance violations poses a serious problem for Donald Trump—not only because it implicates the president in a crime, but also because the Justice Department evidently accepts Cohen’s allegation that Trump directed his actions. Even so, the white-collar crimes to which Cohen pleaded guilty and of which Trump’s fo

1d

Can tech giants work together against their common enemies?

Facebook, Twitter and Google routinely squabble for users, engineers and advertising money. Yet it makes sense for these tech giants to work together on security threats, elections meddling and other common ills.

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How to keep peace in outer space? Create commercial development.

“To promote the development of a commercial asteroid resources industry for outer space in the United States and to increase the exploration and utilization of asteroid resources in outer space.” Read More

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Research determines reasons for massive fires in south-central Chile

A Montana State University-led team has discovered several reasons why massive fires continue to burn through south-central Chile.

1d

Kids aren't reading enough. One solution? Robots.

Technology Take a look, it's in a book. It's reading robot. One study suggests social robots might make kids more excited about reading at home—by turning solo reading time into a group activity.

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Hurricane Lane Looms Over Hawaii in These Astronaut and Satellite Photos

Government weather satellites are watching closely as a massive storm called Hurricane Lane threatens Hawaii.

1d

My Dead Dad’s Porno Tapes

When his father died, Charlie Tyrell realized he knew next to nothing about him. Tyrell and his reticent father hadn’t been close; as a young adult, Tyrell had been waiting for “the strange distance he felt between them to close,” as he describes it in his short documentary, My Dead Dad’s Porno Tapes . Now, he wouldn’t have the chance. Still, Tyrell thought that there must be some skeleton key to

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Dunc Hunt

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders maintained that President Trump “did nothing wrong” after Michael Cohen said he violated campaign-finance laws at Trump’s behest . Cohen’s lawyer, Lanny Davis, said his client would refuse a pardon from Trump if it was offered and said Cohen is willing to testify before any congressio

1d

Combination immunotherapy shrinks melanoma brain metastases

Combination immunotherapy shrank melanoma that has spread to the brain in more than half of the patients in a clinical trial reported in the New England Journal of Medicine led by an investigator at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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Girl Had a Denisovan Dad and Neanderthal Mom

Genetic analysis of a bone fragment reveals the girl’s mixed ancestry 90,000 years ago.

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Ancient Bone Reveals Surprising Sex Lives Of Neanderthals

Genomic sequencing reveals new evidence of interbreeding among different groups of our ancient relatives. A scientist calls the find "almost too lucky to be true." (Image credit: Sergei Zelensky/IAET SB RAS)

1d

Design new materials with specific properties: Breaking down band structures

Despite a deep understanding of the properties of individual atoms — the 'ingredients' that make up a crystal — scientists found that, when they are combined they often display new, unanticipated properties, making efforts to design new materials little more than guesswork. To make that process more predictable, scientists have produced a system to represent band structures — energy bands, simi

1d

A milestone for forecasting earthquake hazards

Researchers report that their physics-based model of California earthquake hazards replicated estimates from the state's leading statistical model.

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Immunotherapy Drugs Slow Skin Cancer That Has Spread to the Brain

Drugs that activate the immune system shrank tumors and prolonged life among patients with an aggressive form of melanoma, a small study shows.

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Japanese Authorities Recommend Not Regulating Gene Editing

Unlike judges in the European Union, a government panel in Japan says transgenic modification and genome editing are not the same.

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Is Trump an ‘unindicted co-conspirator’? Here’s what the term means

Some Democrats and political analysts are calling Trump an ‘unindicted co-conspirator’ after his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, pleaded guilty to eight felonies. Read More

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Remembering Kofi Annan

Kofi Annan, the former United Nations Secretary-General and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has died at the age of 80. Who was he? Read More

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Other people are having way, way less sex than you think they are

As part of Ipsos’ long-running studies on misperceptions, researchers asked people in Britain and the U.S. to guess how often people aged 18-29 in their country had sex in the past four weeks. Read More

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Why it’s only science that can answer all the big questions

There are two classes of so-called "big questions." The former are invented, and the latter can be fully answered by science. Read More

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This Professor Called Coconut Oil 'Pure Poison.' Is She Right?

Coconut oil has become the latest focal point in the nutrition wars.

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UK Woman Contracts Rare 'Flesh-Eating' STD

A rare sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can destroy genital tissue has been diagnosed in a woman in the United Kingdom.

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Montana State research determines reasons for massive fires in south-central Chile

David McWethy, an assistant professor in MSU's Department of Earth Sciences, and his collaborators found that non-native pine and eucalypt forests planted to supply pulp and timber mills in central Chile are contributing to the massive fires.

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These quality diets may promote healthy aging in women

Eating a diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and low in added sugar, sodium, and processed meats could help promote healthy cellular aging in women, according to a new study. “The key takeaway is that following a healthy diet can help us maintain healthy cells and avoid certain chronic diseases,” says lead author Cindy Leung, assistant professor of nutritional sciences at th

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Fortidssex: Forskere opdager krydsning mellem to menneskearter

For første gang har forskere fundet resterne af et menneske, som er et resultat af sex mellem to arter.

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Trace metals in the air make big splash on life under the sea

In the ocean, a little bit of metal can go a long way.

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Glycans at the 'I' of the storm in humoral immunity and melanoma progression

Two new studies have unveiled how a peculiar molecule impacts how antibody-producing cells develop and function as well as how normal melanocytes progress to melanoma malignancy.

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Healing after harm: Addressing the emotional toll of harmful medical events

A multidisciplinary group of leaders from the Healing After Harm Conference Group, led by Sigall Bell, MD, Researcher at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has established consensus-driven research agenda designed to create a path forward to inform approaches that better support harmed patients and families.

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Noninvasive brain stimulation may help treat symptoms of rare movement disorders

Electrical stimulation of the brain and spinal cord may help treat the symptoms of rare movement disorders called neurodegenerative ataxias, according to a study published in the Aug. 22, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Bush Welding with Matt Brown | Alaskan Bush People

Equipped with scrap materials from the junkyard, Matt Brown looks to create his very own makeshift welder. Catch an all-new ALASKAN BUSH PEOPLE Sunday 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Alaskan Bush People: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskanBushPPL https://www.f

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Under Pressure: HPLC 101

In this eBook, learn about the basics of HPLC and its wide range of applications!

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Walmart teams with Rakuten on digital book shop

Walmart on Wednesday launched a digital book shop in a collaboration with Japanese e-commerce powerhouse Rakuten's electronic book service Kobo.

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Long-Sought Hearing Channel Protein Found

After a decades-long pursuit, researchers have confirmed the identity of the pore of the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrates’ inner ear hair cells.

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Bat signal: Fireflies' glow tells bats they taste awful

Fireflies flash not just for sex, but survival, a new study suggests.

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Steady as she goes: Scientists tame damaging plasma instabilities in fusion facilities

In a set of recent experiments, scientists have tamed a damaging plasma instability in a way that could lead to the efficient and steady-state operation of ITER, the international tokamak experiment under construction in France to demonstrate the practicality of fusion power.

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The long-term financial toll of breast cancer

The financial fallout from breast cancer can last years after diagnosis, particularly for those with lymphedema, a common side effect from treatment, causing cumulative and cascading economic consequences for survivors, their families, and society, a new study suggests.

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Epic genetic: the hidden story of wheat

Biologists have uncovered the hidden genetic secrets that give wheat its remarkable ability for local adaptation — revealing a previously untapped resource for breeding better, more resilient wheat.

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Reimagining MRI contrast: Iron outperforms gadolinium

Rice University nanoscientists have demonstrated a method for loading iron inside nanoparticles to create MRI contrast agents that outperform gadolinium chelates, the mainstay contrast agent that is facing increased scrutiny due to potential safety concerns.

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Study reveals how enzyme detects ultraviolet light damage

Damage to DNA is a constant threat to cellular life, and so it is constantly monitored and detected by a family of enzymes called RNA polymerases, resulting in subsequent repair to maintain genome integrity. In a paper published this week in the journal PNAS, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Spain and Finland, describe for the first time how

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Helping the microchip industry go (very low) with the flow

A new study by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has uncovered a source of error in an industry-standard calibration method that could lead microchip manufacturers to lose a million dollars or more in a single fabrication run. The problem is expected to become progressively more acute as chipmakers pack ever more features into ever smaller space.

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Policy pivot: A new emphasis on restoration to protect Puget Sound

For years, a commonly used tactic for protecting threatened and endangered animals in Puget Sound was to cordon off areas to fishing. More than 100 marine protected areas exist around the Sound to protect shoreline critters and help fish populations such as rockfish recover to healthy numbers.

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Trace metals in the air make big splash on life under the sea

A new Cornell University-led study shows that trace metals, deposited by aerosols like dust and other particles in the atmosphere, have a hefty impact on marine life, affecting biological productivity and changing the ocean ecosystem.

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Connecting the (nano) dots: Big-picture thinking can advance nanoparticle manufacturing

Nanoparticle manufacturing, the production of material units less than 100 nanometers in size (100,000 times smaller than a marble), is proving the adage that "good things come in small packages." Today's engineered nanoparticles are integral components of everything from the quantum dot nanocrystals coloring the brilliant displays of state-of-the-art televisions to the miniscule bits of silver he

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Study uses seismic noise to track water levels in underground aquifers

Seismic noise—the low-level vibrations caused by everything from subway trains to waves crashing on the beach—is most often something seismologists work to avoid. They factor it out of models and create algorithms aimed at eliminating it so they can identify the signals of earthquakes.

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Hurricanes like Lane rarely hit Hawaii. Here’s why.

Science The islands almost never encounter storms like this Lane , currently a category 4 hurricane, is heading for Hawaii. The hurricane is forecast to approach the main islands starting on Thursday. It’s a dangerous situation for…

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Hawaii Faces Huge Hurricane: Why That's So Rare

A very big storm is coming for Hawaii, an island state that's largely avoided encounters with major cyclones in recent memory.

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Policy pivot: A new emphasis on restoration to protect Puget Sound

University of Washington researchers have found policies are shifting toward restoration projects that include input from more groups and offer a range of benefits to Puget Sound, including flood control, salmon recovery, recreation and habitat protection.

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Getting high on worms

Like mammals, parasitic worms have an endocannabinoid system that may help the worm and the hosts it infects survive by reducing pain and inflammation in the host, according to a discovery by an interdisciplinary research team at the University of California, Riverside. The research, done on a mouse model, identifies cell signaling pathways associated with the endocannabinoid system that could be

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New paper addresses human/wildlife conflict through use of social and ecological theory

Successfully limiting human-wildlife conflicts requires an understanding of the roles of both animal and human behavior. However, it is difficult to understand both of these things, because researchers struggle to collect data that is similar, communicate with other specialties, and apply information about human behavior to conservation actions.

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New book: Entertainment media shape our politics more than we know

Are you a fan of the HBO series "Game of Thrones"? What about the Avengers film franchise? Maybe you love "House of Cards" on Netflix or the "Hunger Games" movies?

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Connecting the (nano) dots: Big-picture thinking can advance nanoparticle manufacturing

Scientists advocate that researchers, manufacturers and administrators wanting to advance the nanoparticle manufacturing industry 'connect the dots' by considering shared quality control challenges broadly and tackling them collectively rather than individually.

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Big data and technology in disasters: Better integration needed for effective response

Disasters are becoming more commonplace and complex, and the challenges for rescue and humanitarian organizations increase. Increasingly these groups turn to big data to help provide solutions. Researchers wished to examine how ICT tools and big data were being used in disaster responses. By conducting a structured literature search and developing a data extraction tool on the use of ICT and big d

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Found: A destructive mechanism that blocks the brain from knowing when to stop eating

Researchers have uncovered a destructive mechanism at the molecular level that causes a well-known phenomenon associated with obesity: leptin resistance. They found that mice fed a high-fat diet produce an enzyme named MMP-2 that clips receptors for the hormone leptin from the surface of neuronal cells in the hypothalamus. This blocks leptin from binding to its receptors. This in turn keeps the ne

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Mixed trends in teenage 'new smoker' rates in Europe

In most of Europe, the rates of smoking initiation among older teens have declined since the 1970s, while 'new smoker' rates among younger teens have risen in recent years.

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Air pollution reduces global life expectancy by more than one year

Air pollution shortens human lives by more than a year, according to a new study from a team of leading environmental engineers and public health researchers. Better air quality could lead to a significant extension of lifespans around the world.

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Plant virus alters competition between aphid species

In the world of plant-feeding insects, who shows up first to the party determines the overall success of the gathering; yet viruses can disrupt these intricate relationships, according to researchers.

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People pick gifts that will 'wow' rather than satisfy recipients

Gift givers tend to focus on the 'big reveal,' leading them to choose whichever gift is more likely to surprise and delight the recipient in the moment — even when other options are more likely to bring recipients the greatest satisfaction, according to new findings.

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New material could improve efficiency of computer processing and memory

A team of researchers has developed a new material that could potentially improve the efficiency of computer processing and memory.

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Research identifies all the different ways the sea supports human wellbeing

A study led by the University of Liverpool that catalogued all of the links between marine biodiversity and the different ways we rely on the sea found more than 30 ways it supports well-being including providing a source of nutrition, supplying raw materials and supporting recreational activities.

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The glass ceiling: Three reasons why it still exists and is hurting the economy

The glass ceiling, that invisible barrier to advancement that women face at the top levels of the workplace, remains as intractable as ever and is a drag on the economy.

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Duncan Hunter's Indictment Is a Threat to the Republican House Majority

Updated on August 21 at 4:02 p.m. ET The congressman and his wife looted his campaign account for tens of thousands of dollars to take their family on vacations to Italy, Lake Tahoe, and Las Vegas. He illegally used funds raised from donors to buy video games and then tried to cover it up by claiming he was the victim of credit-card fraud. When the congressman wanted to buy himself Hawaiian short

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Reimagining MRI contrast: Iron outperforms gadolinium

Rice University nanoscientists have demonstrated a method for loading nanoparticles with iron ions to create MRI contrast agents that outperform gadolinium chelates, the mainstay contrast agent that is facing increased scrutiny due to potential safety concerns.

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Helping the microchip industry go (very low) with the flow

A new NIST study has uncovered a source of error in an industry-standard calibration method that could lead microchip manufacturers to lose a million dollars or more in a single fabrication run.

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Study reveals how enzyme detects ultraviolet light damage

In a paper published this week in the journal PNAS, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Spain and Finland, describe for the first time how one type of RNA polymerase gets stalled by DNA lesions caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light.

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The ancient palaces of Iraq glittered with a special type of glass

The ancient city of Samarra was famed for its palaces. Now we know they were made with unique glass found nowhere else.

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One bad night’s sleep can make you put on fat and lose muscle mass

Sleep restriction seems to drive extra fat storage and loss of lean muscle, which could explain why troubled sleepers and shift workers are prone to obesity

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Fireflies don’t just glow for sex – they do it to warn away bats too

We’ve long known that fireflies light up to woo mates, but now we know they also do it to warn bats that they taste disgusting

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It’s too soon to tell if robots help autistic children’s social skills

A US study is the latest to suggest robots could help autistic children learn social skills. Unfortunately, it's far from proven

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Catholics Are Desperate for Tangible Reforms on Clergy Sex Abuse

This week, Pope Francis convenes the World Meeting of Families in Dublin, a massive, triennial gathering of Catholics to celebrate “joy for the world.” The timing could not be more awkward. The event comes in the wake of a terrible period for Catholic families amid revelations about clergy sex abuse, including the release of a massive new report detailing years of misconduct and cover-up in Penns

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Hawaii’s Biggest Hurricane Threat in More Than Two Decades

Residents of Hawaii awoke to a flurry of emergency alerts Wednesday morning as a major hurricane spun toward the state, threatening the entire island chain with heavy rains, damaging winds, and severe flooding. Hurricane Lane had grown to a Category 5 storm Tuesday night, packing maximum sustained winds of 160 miles an hour, according to the National Weather Service. Lane then weakened to a Categ

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Why memories can feel like movies

When Adele sings "It felt like a movie…", there's a scientific reason that it did. Your brain is technically unconscious about 240 times a minute. Read More

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Why President Trump (probably) can’t be criminally prosecuted

Two men formerly close to President Donald Trump are now facing prison in a development that could prove consequential for Trump’s longevity in office and the U.S. political system in general. Read More

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Archaeological evidence for glass industry in ninth-century city of Samarra

The palace-city of Samarra, capital of the former Abbasid Caliphate, was home to an advanced industry of glass production and trade, according to a new study.

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Want to know what ancient koalas ate? Check modern koalas' teeth

New research confirms the shape of tooth wear best indicates the kind of food modern koalas and kangaroos ate, not whether it was covered in dust and dirt.

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Tech Giants Are Becoming Defenders of Democracy. Now What?

Microsoft, Facebook, and others are ramping up efforts to thwart attacks on elections—making the US government look woefully underprepared in the process.

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Metal in the air really messes with ocean life

Trace metals in the atmosphere have a hefty impact on marine life, according to a new paper. The sources of these aerosol particles include volcanoes, wildfires, and desert dust, and the burning of fossil fuels. After being spewed up and undergoing chemical reactions in the atmosphere, they often make their way to remote ocean regions via precipitation or dry deposition. “If you change the ecosys

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Brown researcher first to describe rapid-onset gender dysphoria

Rapid-onset gender dysphoria might spread through groups of friends and may be a harmful coping mechanism, a new study suggests, but more research is needed.

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Study investigates shortcoming of ITQ systems for fisheries

Individual transferable quota systems for fisheries around the world may be ideal for some fisheries, but they can exclude rural, indigenous, low-income and next-generation fishermen from the industry, according to a new paper co-authored by a University of Alaska Fairbanks professor.

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The weirdest things we learned this week: eating organs, celebrating sweat, and banning dogs

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

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How the ’90s Kinda World of Living Single Lives on Today

T he success of Living Single may have been unanticipated, but it was no accident. Over 25 years ago, a determined 27-year-old writer named Yvette Denise Lee (now Yvette Lee Bowser) found herself with a rare, welcome opportunity: the chance to create a show around the comic legend Kim Coles and the rap phenom Queen Latifah. Having cut her teeth writing on shows like A Different World and Hangin’

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Devastating Monsoon Floods in Kerala, India

India’s southern state of Kerala is suffering its worst monsoon flooding in a century, with more than one million people displaced, and more than 400 reported deaths in the past two weeks. Aid agencies and government groups have set up more than 4,000 relief camps, while rescue personnel are making their way to submerged villages in helicopters and boats, bringing supplies, and evacuating those t

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Water monitor

A recent study that used seismic noise to measure the size and the water levels in underground aquifers in California. The technique could even be used to track whether and how aquifers rebound following precipitation, and understand geological changes that might occur as water is pumped out.

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The glass ceiling: Three reasons why it still exists and is hurting the economy

New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds the glass ceiling — that invisible barrier to advancement that women face at the top levels of the workplace — remains as intractable as ever and is a drag on the economy.

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Kids connect with robot reading partners

Researchers have built a robot, named Minnie, to serve as a reading buddy to middle school kids, and Minnie's new friends grew more excited about books and more attached to the robot over two weeks of reading together.

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Macaws may communicate visually with 'blushing,' ruffled feathers

Parrots — highly intelligent and highly verbal — may also ruffle their head feathers and blush to communicate visually, according to a new study. The study extends the understanding of the complex social lives of these remarkable birds.

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Parrot economics: More later makes sense

Can parrots can make economic decisions just as humans do? That was the question a group of researchers recently attempted to answer by investigating whether the birds could learn how to trade a token for a low, medium or high-value food.

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Playtime May Bolster Kids’ Mental Health

“Play has become a four-letter word.” So says Kathy Hirsh-Pasek , a psychologist at Temple University and one of the authors of a new paper about the importance of play in children’s lives. The clinical report , published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommends that pediatricians write a “prescription for play” at doctor visits in the first two years of life. Years of research have show

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New paper addresses human/wildlife conflict through use of social and ecological theory

In a new paper in the journal Biological Conservation, the researchers apply a new approach to understand human-black bear conflicts in Durango, Colo.

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Improving health insurance literacy aids Missourians' ACA enrollment

Community outreach and educational support for navigating health insurance options available in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace are crucial for helping people choose the best plan based on their individual needs. Such efforts at the state level likely contributed to a higher enrollment in ACA plans among Missourians in 2018 than in 2017.

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Want to know what ancient koalas ate? Check modern koalas' teeth

Larisa DeSantis' latest research confirms the shape of tooth wear best indicates the kind of food modern koalas and kangaroos ate, not whether it was covered in dust and dirt.

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Stimulation excites the brain to form better memories

While previous research from Northwestern University has shown it is possible to improve memory with stimulation, a new study is novel because it successfully identified how the brain changed — its level of excitability increased — in order to improve memory. The findings deepen our understanding of how memory is organized in the brain, how memory works and could have positive future implication

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Kids connect with robot reading partners

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have built a robot, named Minnie, to serve as a reading buddy to middle school kids, and Minnie's new friends grew more excited about books and more attached to the robot over two weeks of reading together.

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Fragments of a support structure drive airway abnormalities in asthma

Dhiren Patel and colleagues have found that leftover fragments of the body's support structure for cells can promote inflammation and harmful changes in the airways in a mouse model of asthma.

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Nighttime satellite data reveals global flood response patterns

By harnessing repositories of satellite data, scientists have discovered that human settlements with low flood protection levels tend to resettle further away from rivers after catastrophic flood events compared to settlements with more protective infrastructure. The findings shed light on the various strategies that communities adapt to cope with flood risk, a key topic in an age when booming pop

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Catastrophic floods can trigger human resettlement away from rivers

A new study by researchers at Uppsala University, published in the journal Science Advances, uses satellite nighttime light data to reveal how flood protection shapes the average distance of settlements from rivers.

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What is the maximum possible number of Atlantic tropical cyclones? See the year 2005

Climate simulations and analyses of Atlantic hurricane activity indicate that the record number of tropical cyclones that occurred in 2005 (28 storms) is close to the maximum number that might occur in this region, given existing climate conditions.

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Receptor protein in the brain controls the body's fat 'rheostat'

Scientists at the University of Michigan and Vanderbilt University have identified the function of a protein that has been confounding metabolism researchers for more than two decades. And it may have implications both for treating obesity and for understanding weight gain during pregnancy and menopause.

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A milestone for forecasting earthquake hazards

In a new study in Science Advances, researchers report that their physics-based model of California earthquake hazards replicated estimates from the state's leading statistical model.

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Found: A destructive mechanism that blocks the brain from knowing when to stop eating

Researchers have uncovered a destructive mechanism at the molecular level that causes a well-known phenomenon associated with obesity: leptin resistance.They found that mice fed a high-fat diet produce an enzyme named MMP-2 that clips receptors for the hormone leptin from the surface of neuronal cells in the hypothalamus. This blocks leptin from binding to its receptors. This in turn keeps the neu

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Mixed trends in teenage 'new smoker' rates in Europe

In most of Europe, the rates of smoking initiation among older teens have declined since the 1970s, while 'new smoker' rates among younger teens have risen in recent years, according to a study published Aug. 22, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by an international team of researchers involved in the Ageing Lungs in European Cohorts (ALEC) study, coordinated by Deborah Jarvis, Imperial Co

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Macaws may communicate visually with blushing, ruffled feathers

Parrots — highly intelligent and highly verbal — may also ruffle their head feathers and blush to communicate visually, according to a new study published Aug. 22 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Aline Bertin of the INRA Centre Val de Loire, France and colleagues. The study extends the understanding of the complex social lives of these remarkable birds.

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Archaeological evidence for glass industry in ninth-century city of Samarra

The palace-city of Samarra, capital of the former Abbasid Caliphate, was home to an advanced industry of glass production and trade, according to a study published Aug. 22, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nadine Schibille of the CNRS, France and colleagues.

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The big slowdown: 6 reasons why UK life expectancy growth is stalling

Life expectancy has grown massively in recent decades, but in the UK the gains are starting to ease off. Could dementia, austerity, or something else be to blame?

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Prehistoric girl had parents belonging to different human species

A sliver of bone once belonged to “Denny”, the child of a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father – the first such first-generation hybrid ever found

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Record measles outbreak in Europe reaches 41,000 cases

The failure of parents to vaccinate their children has contributed to the biggest surge in measles cases Europe has seen in a decade, included 37 deaths

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Laser breakthrough has physicists close to cooling down antimatter

For the first time, physicists at CERN have observed a benchmark atomic energy transition in anithydrogen, a major step toward cooling and manipulating the basic form of antimatter. Antimatter, annihilated on impact with matter, is notoriously tricky to capture and work with. But its study is key to solving one of the great mysteries of the universe: why anti-matter, which should have existed in e

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Ending a 40-year quest, scientists reveal the identity of 'hearing' protein

Scientists have identified the sensor protein responsible for hearing and balance. The findings put an end to a 40-year quest for the protein that converts sound and head movement into electrical signals that travel to the brain.

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Epigenetic patterns determine if honeybee larvae become queens or workers

Scientists have unraveled how changes in nutrition in the early development of honeybees can result in vastly different adult characteristics.

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Hawaii braces for major hurricane

Residents of Hawaii on Wednesday braced for a powerful hurricane bearing down on the US state, with warnings issued in several counties in the island chain.

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Lack of sleep makes people pile on the pounds

Disrupted sleep alters metabolism and boosts body’s ability to store fat, data shows Lack of sleep has long been linked to obesity, but a new study suggests late night snacking may not be the primary culprit. The latest findings provide the most compelling evidence to date that disrupted sleep alters the metabolism and boosts the body’s ability to store fat. The findings add to mounting scientifi

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Cubans getting early taste of mobile internet in system test

One of the world's least-wired countries was a little more connected on Wednesday.

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Want to know what ancient koalas ate? Check modern koalas' teeth

Paleontologist Larisa DeSantis studies the teeth of ancient and modern mammals to determine how their diets changed across the millennia and, by extension, their responses to climate change.

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Archaeological evidence for glass industry in ninth-century city of Samarra

The palace-city of Samarra, capital of the former Abbasid Caliphate, was home to an advanced industry of glass production and trade, according to a study published August 22, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nadine Schibille of the CNRS, France and colleagues.

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Macaws may communicate visually with blushing, ruffled feathers

Parrots—highly intelligent and highly verbal—may also ruffle their head feathers and blush to communicate visually, according to a new study published August 22 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Aline Bertin of the INRA Centre Val de Loire, France and colleagues. The study extends the understanding of the complex social lives of these remarkable birds.

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Catastrophic floods can trigger human resettlement away from rivers

A new study by researchers at Uppsala University, published in the journal Science Advances, uses satellite nighttime light data to reveal how flood protection shapes the average distance of settlements from rivers.

1d

What is the maximum possible number of Atlantic tropical cyclones? See the year 2005

Climate simulations and analyses of Atlantic hurricane activity indicate that the record number of tropical cyclones that occurred in 2005 (28 storms) is close to the maximum number that might occur in this region, given existing climate conditions.

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Breaking down band structures—system could help researchers design new materials with specific properties

Most of the time, cooking is a matter of following a recipe—combine specific amounts of specific ingredients in the right way and the predictable outcome is that you'll wind up with a tasty meal.

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A milestone for forecasting earthquake hazards

Earthquakes pose a profound danger to people and cities worldwide, but with the right hazard-mitigation efforts, from stricter building requirements to careful zoning, the potential for catastrophic collapses of roads and buildings and loss of human lives can be limited.

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Flint water crisis: How AI is finding thousands of hazardous pipes

Artificial intelligence is helping to find the thousands of lead pipes responsible for the water crisis in Flint, Michigan

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Chances of an Atlantic hurricane season busier than 2005’s are slim — for now

The 28 named tropical storms that swirled through the Atlantic Ocean in 2005 is about as many as the region can produce in a year.

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Big data and technology in disasters: Better integration needed for effective response

Disasters are becoming more commonplace and complex, and the challenges for rescue and humanitarian organizations increase. Increasingly these groups turn to big data to help provde solutions. The authors wished to examine how ICT tools and big data were being used in disaster responses. By conducting a structured literature search and developing a data extraction tool on the use of ICT and big da

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Connecting the (nano) dots: Big-picture thinking can advance nanoparticle manufacturing

As described in a new paper, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nonprofit World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC) advocate that researchers, manufacturers and administrators wanting to advance the nanoparticle manufacturing industry 'connect the dots' by considering shared quality control challenges broadly and tackling them collectively rather than individually.

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Risk of heart attacks is double for daily e-cigarette users

Use of e-cigarettes every day can nearly double the odds of a heart attack, according to a new analysis of a survey of nearly 70,000 people. The research also found that dual use of e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes — the most common use pattern among e-cigarette users — appears to be more dangerous than using either product alone.

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Experimental drug takes aim at cancers associated with Epstein-Barr virus

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) doesn't directly cause cancer, but infection with this common herpes virus brings an increased risk of some cancers, including fast-growing lymphomas. This week in mSphere, researchers report on a new drug that works by targeting EBV-positive tumors.

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Getting to the root of plant evolution

Despite plants and vegetation being key to the Earth's ecosystem, little is known about the origin of their roots. However in new research, scientists describe a transitional root fossils from the earliest land ecosystem that sheds light on how roots have evolved.

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NASA looks at water vapor in Typhoon Soulik

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at water vapor in Typhoon Soulik as it passed just south of Japan.

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Adults aren’t stepping up for vulnerable kids in school

Adults need to do a better job when dealing with vulnerable children who face barriers to success in the classroom, a new study reports. Researchers asked young adults to look back on their experiences with maltreatment, homelessness, and their time in school. “Whatever our roles might be—teacher, social worker, or child welfare worker—we have to take that role seriously and understand its import

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How hospitals prepare for increasingly dangerous hurricane seasons

Environment Better design could mean fewer evacuations. As climate change encroaches, hospitals are taking a hard look at their design, and finding many facilities come up short.

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Flertal forsvarer lukrative vilkår for biomasse

Biomasse slipper for afgifter på over seks milliarder kroner i det nye energiforlig, hvilket de toneangivende partier mener er et nødvendigt onde for at undgå usikkerhed overfor de langsigtede vilkår i forsyningssektoren.

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Air pollution is shaving a year off our average life expectancy

The first country-by-country look at how dirty air affects when we die shows it can have more impact on mortality than breast or lung cancer.

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Breaking down band structures

Despite a deep understanding of the properties of individual atoms — the 'ingredients' that make up a crystal — scientists found that, when they are combined they often display new, unanticipated properties, making efforts to design new materials little more than guesswork. To make that process more predictable, Harvard scientists have produced a system to represent band structures — energy ban

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NASA looks at water vapor in Typhoon Soulik

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at water vapor in Typhoon Soulik as it passed just south of Japan.

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Algorithm beats humans for sniffing out fake news

An algorithm-based system that identifies telltale linguistic cues in fake news stories could provide news aggregator and social media sites like Google News with a new weapon in the fight against misinformation, according to new research. The researchers who developed the system demonstrated that it’s comparable to and sometimes better than humans at correctly identifying fake news stories. In a

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A deep look at nasal polyps offers insights into allergic diseases

Investigators have used some of the most advanced sequencing technology to peer into nasal polyps, gleaning new insights not only into this condition but also the severe form of inflammation that may lead to other disorders, such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and allergic eczema.

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Fossil turtle didn't have a shell yet, but had the first toothless turtle beak

There are a couple of key features that make a turtle a turtle: its shell, for one, but also its toothless beak. A newly-discovered fossil turtle that lived 228 million years ago is shedding light on how modern turtles developed these traits. It had a beak, but while its body was Frisbee-shaped, its wide ribs hadn't grown to form a shell like we see in turtles today.

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Ant-y social: Study of ants reveals the evolutionary benefits of group living

A new study in ants demonstrates that living in groups leads to improved fitness. The researchers show that, in larger groups, ants take on specialized roles and colony stability increases.

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Neanderthal mother, Denisovan father! Hybrid fossil

Up until 40,000 years ago, at least two groups of hominins inhabited Eurasia — Neanderthals in the west and Denisovans in the east. Now, researchers have sequenced the genome of an ancient hominin individual from Siberia, and discovered that she had a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father.

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Air pollution leads to cardiovascular diseases

Scientists reviewed the mechanisms responsible for vascular damage from air pollution.

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How plastic waste has been turned into benches

Plastic waste collected at the Volvo Ocean Race is recycled and used to make items such as plastic benches.

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GPM sees Hurricane Lane threatening Hawaiian islands with heavy rainfall

The GPM core observatory satellite flew over the Central Pacific Ocean and Hurricane Lane on Aug. 22, 2018 and analyzed rainfall rates and cloud heights. Watches and Warnings are in effect in the Hawaiian Islands.

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D-Wave demonstrates first large-scale quantum simulation of topological state of matter

D-Wave Systems today published a milestone study demonstrating a topological phase transition using its 2048-qubit annealing quantum computer. This complex quantum simulation of materials is a major step toward reducing the need for time-consuming and expensive physical research and development.

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15 years in space for NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope

Initially scheduled for a minimum 2.5-year primary mission, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has gone far beyond its expected lifetime—and is still going strong after 15 years.

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Offspring of Neanderthal and Denisovan identified for first time

Discovery suggests that distinct ancient human species may have mingled and interbred happily A small piece of bone found in a cave in Siberia has been identified as the remnant of a child whose mother was a Neanderthal and father was a Denisovan, a mysterious human ancestor that lived in the region. Researchers made the discovery when they examined DNA extracted from the bone and found that it c

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D-Wave demonstrates first large-scale quantum simulation of topological state of matter

Fully-programmable annealing quantum computer simulates phenomenon behind 2016 Nobel Prize. Promises faster materials prototyping at lower cost.

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Head and neck positioning affects concussion risk

The way our head and neck are positioned during a head-on impact may significantly affect the risk of concussion — but tensed up neck muscles seem to offer far less protection.

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GPM sees Hurricane Lane threatening Hawaiian islands with heavy rainfall

The GPM core observatory satellite flew over the Central Pacific Ocean and Hurricane Lane on Aug. 22, 2018 and analyzed rainfall rates and cloud heights. Watches and Warnings are in effect in the Hawaiian Islands.

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A deep look at nasal polyps offers insights into allergic diseases

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, along with collaborators from the Broad Institute and MIT, have used some of the most advanced sequencing technology to peer into nasal polyps, gleaning new insights not only into this condition but also the severe form of inflammation that may lead to other disorders, such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and allergic eczema. The team's findings are pu

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Excited atoms throw light on anti-hydrogen research

Swansea University scientists working at CERN have published a study detailing a breakthrough in antihydrogen research.The ALPHA team experiment shows how the scientists improved efficiency in the synthesis of antihydrogen, and for the first time succeeded in accumulating the anti-atoms, which has allowed for greater scope in their experimentation.

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Getting to the root of plant evolution

Despite plants and vegetation being key to the Earth's ecosystem, little is known about the origin of their roots. However in new research, published in Nature, Oxford University scientists describe a transitional root fossils from the earliest land ecosystem that sheds light on how roots have evolved.

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Laser breakthrough has physicists close to cooling down antimatter

For the first time, physicists at CERN have observed a benchmark atomic energy transition in anithydrogen, a major step toward cooling and manipulating the basic form of antimatter. Antimatter, annihilated on impact with matter, is notoriously tricky to capture and work with. But its study is key to solving one of the great mysteries of the universe: why anti-matter, which should have existed in e

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Epigenetic patterns determine if honeybee larvae become queens or workers

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London and Australian National University have unravelled how changes in nutrition in the early development of honeybees can result in vastly different adult characteristics.

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Neandertal mother, Denisovan father!

Up until 40,000 years ago, at least two groups of hominins inhabited Eurasia — Neandertals in the west and Denisovans in the east. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI-EVA) in Leipzig (Germany) sequenced the genome of an ancient hominin individual from Siberia, and discovered that she had a Neandertal mother and a Denisovan father.

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Ant-y social: Study of ants reveals the evolutionary benefits of group living

A new study in ants demonstrates that living in groups leads to improved fitness. The researchers show that, in larger groups, ants take on specialized roles and colony stability increases.

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Study: Cellular changes lead to chronic allergic inflammation in the sinus

Study uncovers cellular changes that lead to chronic allergic inflammation in the sinus.

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Fossil turtle didn't have a shell yet, but had the first toothless turtle beak

There are a couple of key features that make a turtle a turtle: its shell, for one, but also its toothless beak. A newly-discovered fossil turtle that lived 228 million years ago is shedding light on how modern turtles developed these traits. It had a beak, but while its body was Frisbee-shaped, its wide ribs hadn't grown to form a shell like we see in turtles today.

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Unexplained illness in Tanzania puts pathogen discovery to the test

When patients presented with unexplained fever at Mwananyamala Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, scientists compared two genetic sequencing methods used to identify the potential viruses behind the illnesses: VirCapSeq-VERT, a method developed at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, and unbiased high-throughput sequencing. Both me

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Experimental drug takes aim at cancers associated with Epstein-Barr virus

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) doesn't directly cause cancer, but infection with this common herpes virus brings an increased risk of some cancers, including fast-growing lymphomas. This week in mSphere, researchers report on a new drug that works by targeting EBV-positive tumors.

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Why are young adults wasting so much food? Study looks at perceptions and food behaviors

Researchers wanted to get a better idea why 18- to 24-year-olds, especially college students, have a higher tendency to waste food, and how their residence type — on or off campus — plays a role. Findings show that during the transitionary time of young adulthood, many of the food management behaviors that might prevent food waste haven't been learned yet or haven't been necessary.

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'NASA Selfies' and TRAPPIST-1 VR apps now available

The universe is at your fingertips with two new digital products from NASA.

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New satellite will bounce light off air to measure winds (Update)

Whichever way the wind blows, a new satellite launched Wednesday will be watching it.

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Moral communities in an immoral culture: Why rural America feels left behind.

What causes the urban-rural cultural divide? According to this author, its how we view our communities. Read More

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The Rebirth of Radio Astronomy

The National Science Foundation has backed away from three of its headlining radio telescopes in the last decade. What comes next?

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Ford recalls electric car power cables due to fire risk

Ford is recalling the charging cords for more than 50,000 plug-in hybrid and electric cars in North America because they could cause fires in electrical outlets.

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Evolution and the concrete jungle

New research conducted by evolutionary biologists worldwide paints cities as evolutionary "change agents", says a trio of biologists from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) who selected and edited the studies.

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Steady as she goes: Scientists tame damaging plasma instabilities in fusion facilities

Before scientists can capture and recreate the fusion process that powers the sun and stars to produce virtually limitless energy on Earth, they must first learn to control the hot plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions. In a set of recent experiments, scientists have tamed a plasma instability in a way that could lead to the efficient and steady state operation of ITER, the international experime

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Getting to the root of plant evolution

Despite plants and vegetation being key to the Earth's ecosystem, little is known about the origin of their roots. However in new research, published in Nature, Oxford University scientists describe a transitional root fossils from the earliest land ecosystem that sheds light on how roots have evolved.

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Black Colleges Have to Pay More for Loans Than Other Schools

It’s expensive to be poor. And few places in higher education feel that more acutely than historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), where endowments are typically smaller and enrollments have fluctuated wildly over the past decade. Now, to be clear, the financial misfortune of black colleges does not rest squarely on their shoulders. Born out of necessity primarily after the Civil War

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Scientists Stunned by a Neanderthal Hybrid Discovered in a Siberian Cave

A single cave in the mountains of Siberia has produced a string of remarkable archaeological discoveries. In 2008, scientists there found a 41,000-year-old pinky bone, whose DNA matched neither humans nor Neanderthals. Instead, it belonged to a previously unknown group of hominins they named Denisovans. Three Denisovan teeth also turned up in the cave. Since then, traces of Denisovan DNA have bee

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Ancient fossil turtle had no shell

Scientists have found new evidence confirming that turtles once lived without shells.

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Cave girl was half Neanderthal, half Denisovan

Genetic detective work gives a rare insight into the liaisons of early humans living 50,000 years ago.

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Matter: A Blended Family: Her Mother Was Neanderthal, Her Father Something Else Entirely

Genetic analysis of bones discovered in a Siberian cave hints that the prehistoric world may have been filled with “hybrid” humans.

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In Photos: A Bone from a Denisovan-Neanderthal Hybrid

A long bone unearthed in Denisova Cave in Siberia is providing new proof that Denisovans and Neanderthals mated.

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Neanderthals and Denisovans Mated, New Hybrid Bone Reveals

Finally, there's proof that Neanderthals and Denisovans interbred.

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168 super-lasere forvandler gas til et skinnende metal

Et forskerhold har med verdens kraftigste laser skabt samme materiale, som findes i kernen af store stjerner.

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Rensdyrejere råber på hjælp mod klimaskabt hungersnød

Klimaændringer har gjort livet svært for de svenske sameres 250.000 rensdyr, og de beder derfor nu desperat om hjælp

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Meet the first known child of a Neandertal and a Denisovan

DNA analysis of a bone fragment reveals Neandertal movements between Siberia and western Europe.

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Excited atoms throw light on anti-hydrogen research

Swansea University scientists working at CERN have published a study detailing a breakthrough in antihydrogen research.

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Epigenetic patterns determine if honeybee larvae become queens or workers

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London and Australian National University have unravelled how changes in nutrition in the early development of honeybees can result in vastly different adult characteristics.

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Ant-y social: Study of ants reveals the evolutionary benefits of group living

Common wisdom suggests that two heads are better than one. Yet, two heads can also butt—and when resources are scarce, competition may seem more attractive than collaboration. With that in mind, biologists have long wondered how civil societies evolve.

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Fossil turtle didn't have a shell yet, but had the first toothless turtle beak

There are a couple of key features that make a turtle a turtle: its shell, for one, but also its toothless beak. A newly-discovered fossil turtle that lived 228 million years ago is shedding light on how modern turtles developed these traits. It had a beak, but while its body was Frisbee-shaped, its wide ribs hadn't grown to form a shell like we see in turtles today.

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Facebook, Twitter takedowns show quandary in curbing manipulation

Facebook and Twitter unveiled fresh crackdowns on misinformation campaigns from Russia and Iran as analysts warned of more efforts to manipulate public debate ahead of the November US elections.

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Plant virus alters competition between aphid species

In the world of plant-feeding insects, who shows up first to the party determines the overall success of the gathering; yet viruses can disrupt these intricate relationships, according to researchers at Penn State.

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Air pollution reduces global life expectancy by more than one year, study finds

Air pollution shortens human lives by more than a year, according to a new study from a team of leading environmental engineers and public health researchers. Better air quality could lead to a significant extension of lifespans around the world.

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Steady as she goes: Scientists tame damaging plasma instabilities in fusion facilities

In a set of recent experiments, scientists have tamed a damaging plasma instability in a way that could lead to the efficient and steady-state operation of ITER, the international tokamak experiment under construction in France to demonstrate the practicality of fusion power.

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When a Neandertal Met a Denisovan, What Happened Was Only Human

Scientists describe the hybrid child of two starkly different human groups — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Parrots' economics

An economic decision-making involves weighing up differently beneficial alternatives to maximise profits. This sometimes requires foregoing one's desire for immediate rewards. Not only does one have to control one's own impulses, but also to assess the expected outcomes in order to decide whether waiting is worthwhile.

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Undergraduate student spots a low surface brightness object in the Leo I galaxy group

Last summer, Case Western Reserve University undergraduate student Chris Carr spotted what looked like a "smudge" on deep sky images taken from the university's Burrell Schmidt telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in southwest Arizona.

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Germany’s Foreign Minister Just Proposed a Way to Skirt U.S. Sanctions

German officials agree something must be done about America; they just can’t seem to agree on what. Consider Foreign Minister Heiko Maas’s op-ed in Handensblatt , the German business newspaper, in which he said Europe and the U.S. “ have been drifting apart for years” and urged Europe to “assume our equal share of responsibility” in order to “form a counterweight when the U.S. crosses the line,”

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How Does This Bull Market End?

Welcome to what is poised to be—by most counts—the longest bull market on record in the United States. For roughly 3,453 days the S&P 500 has been on a mostly steady upward trajectory . To many, these prolonged gains are unambiguously good news, particularly when combined with an economy that is strong and stable—which this one is. The market rally has resulted in gains of more than 300 percent a

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Risk of heart attacks is double for daily e-cigarette users

Use of e-cigarettes every day can nearly double the odds of a heart attack, according to a new analysis of a survey of nearly 70,000 people, led by researchers at UC San Francisco. The research also found that dual use of e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes — the most common use pattern among e-cigarette users — appears to be more dangerous than using either product alone.

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Parrots' economics

An economic decision-making involves weighing up differently beneficial alternatives to maximise profits. This sometimes requires foregoing one's desire for immediate rewards. Not only does one have to control one's own impulses, but also to assess the expected outcomes in order to decide whether waiting is worthwhile.

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Evolution and the concrete jungle

New research conducted by evolutionary biologists worldwide paints cities as evolutionary 'change agents', says a trio of biologists from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) who selected and edited the studies.

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The 'Gloo' behind James Webb Space Telescopes Spider technology

It takes a team of talented individuals working in unison to brainstorm, build and deliver what will become the world's most powerful space telescope. Marcelino Sansebastian is a Senior Instrument Technician at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland who has been deeply involved with NASA's James Webb Space Telescope since the project began. Known for his passion, skillset and un

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New material could improve efficiency of computer processing and memory

A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has developed a new material that could potentially improve the efficiency of computer processing and memory. The researchers have filed a patent on the material with support from the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and people in the semiconductor industry have already requested samples of the material.

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Ekspert: Kokosolie er 'ren gift'

Kokosolie er én af de værste ting at spise, lyder det fra Harvard-professor. Hun bakkes op af hjerteforening.

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Air pollution leads to cardiovascular diseases

Scientists reviewed the mechanisms responsible for vascular damage from air pollution.

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Scientists create a mineral in the lab that captures carbon dioxide

Magnesite takes a long time to form in nature. Now, a team has found a way to speed up the making of the mineral, which can store carbon dioxide.

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When confronted, a single neuron helps a fruit fly change course

In the fruit fly, a single pair of brain neurons command backward locomotion in both larvae and adults, researchers report. The methodology behind the discovery provides a way for scientists to link other direct connections between individual brain neurons and nervous system neurons.

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Mixed report card for low-cost indoor air quality home monitors

Indoor air researchers recently tested seven consumer-grade air quality monitors to see if they could detect fine particles emitted by common household activities, including cooking, burning candles, and smoking. All of the monitors tested by researchers were found to have either underreported or missed the presence of very small particles that can penetrate deeply into the lungs.

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Neuroscientists restore significant bladder control to 5 men with spinal cord injuries

Magnetic stimulation of the lower spinal cord through the skin enabled five men with spinal-cord injuries to recover significant urination control for up to two weeks. The new approach could enhance patients' quality of life by increasing independence and reducing reliance on a catheter to empty the bladder.

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Collusion Isn’t Trump’s Biggest Problem Anymore

What has been the worst day of the Trump administration? It could have been January 21, 2017, when Press Secretary Sean Spicer started the presidency off with a pointless and futile fight over inauguration attendance . Or May 17, 2017, when Special Counsel Robert Mueller was appointed. Perhaps July 16, 2018, the day of President Donald Trump’s disastrous meeting in Helsinki with Vladimir Putin .

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Why are young adults wasting so much food? Study looks at perceptions and food behaviors

Researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to get a better idea why 18- to 24-year-olds, especially college students, have a higher tendency to waste food, and how their residence type–on or off campus–plays a role. Findings from a study, published in the journal Appetite, show that during the transitionary time of young adulthood, many of the food management behaviors that might prevent f

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When confronted, a single neuron helps a fruit fly change course

In the fruit fly, a single pair of brain neurons command backward locomotion in both larvae and adults, researchers report. The methodology behind the discovery provides a way for scientists to link other direct connections between individual brain neurons and nervous system neurons.

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New galaxy found?

A student spotted what looked like a 'smudge' last summer on deep sky images. Astronomers have now announced that it was very likely a new galaxy about 37 million lightyears away — a part of the Leo I galaxy group that is 'lowest surface brightness object ever detected via integrated light.'

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As Climate Scientists Speak Out, Sexist Attacks Are on the Rise

Female researchers have faced everything from personal insults to death and rape threats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Revolutionary Power of Pies in Queen Sugar

“I’m almost 60 years old,” Violet Bordelon tells her much younger beau, Hollywood, in a pivotal episode of OWN ’s Queen Sugar . “And I will not be sidelined, sidetracked, or sidestepped, or put in a damn corner and told to wait my turn, not another day. It’s my time.” Violet (played by Tina Lifford) makes this bold declaration—all because of pies. Namely because of her own brand of “Vi’s Prized P

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How The Pronghorn Crossed The Road

How The Pronghorn Crossed The Road Officials in Wyoming are building bridges in the hopes of restoring the migratory path of the pronghorn. How The Pronghorn Crossed The Road Video of How The Pronghorn Crossed The Road Creature Wednesday, August 22, 2018 – 11:30 Annie Roth, Contributor Video By: Annie Roth Twice a year, thousands of pronghorn antelope make 170-mile-long migrations across Wyoming’

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Asteroids get spun so fast by the force of sunlight they fall apart

Sunlight can transfer energy to asteroids and make them spin so fast they break up. Understanding how they break could help us protect Earth from asteroid impacts

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Parrots make wise investment decisions to get what they want: walnuts

Macaws and African grey parrots can learn the value of tokens and choose to make investments that will earn them a better snack in the long-run

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More than 350 people in Kerala have died as a result of flooding

Since India’s monsoon season began in June, more than 200,000 people in the southern state of Kerala have had to abandon their homes and move to relief camps

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The long-term financial toll of breast cancer

The financial fallout from breast cancer can last years after diagnosis, particularly for those with lymphedema, a common side effect from treatment, causing cumulative and cascading economic consequences for survivors, their families, and society, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.

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Physical therapy after a fall may help reduce emergency department revisits

In a new study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers explored whether older adults who received physical therapy (PT) services while in the ED for a fall experienced fewer fall-related repeat visits to the ED.

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New galaxy found?

Case Western Reserve University undergraduate student Chris Carr spotted what looked like a 'smudge' last summer on deep sky images taken from the university's telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in southwest Arizona. This month, Carr and Astronomy Professor Chris Mihos, announced that it was very likely a new galaxy about 37 million lightyears away — a part of the Leo I galaxy group that

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Engineers develop A.I. System to detect often-missed cancer tumors

Engineers at the University of Central Florida Center for Research in Computer Vision have taught a computer how to detect tiny specks of lung cancer in CT scans, which radiologists often have a difficult time identifying. The artificial intelligence system is about 95 percent accurate, compared to 65 percent when done by human eyes, the team said.

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Researchers find a neural 'auto-correct' feature we use to process ambiguous sounds

Our brains have an 'auto-correct' feature that we deploy when re-interpreting ambiguous sounds, a team of scientists has discovered. Its findings point to new ways we use information and context to aid in speech comprehension.

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Novel technology may enable more efficient atrial fibrillation monitoring and detection

A study found that a mobile heart monitor, paired with a smart device and an app, and supported by an automated algorithm can effectively and accurately detect AF, especially when supported by physician overread.

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Research finds naps plus sleep may enhance emotional memory in early childhood

Neuroscientists report for the first time evidence that naps and overnight sleep may work together to benefit memory in early childhood.

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Collagen could spare diabetic dogs and people daily shots

A collagen formulation mixed with pancreatic cells is the first minimally invasive therapy to successfully reverse type 1 diabetes within 24 hours and maintain insulin independence for at least 90 days, a pre-clinical animal study shows. The findings suggest that people and dogs with type 1 diabetes could eventually replace daily insulin injections or wearable pumps with a shot every few months.

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Air pollution reduces global life expectancy by more than one year, study finds

Air pollution shortens human lives by more than a year, according to researchers from UT Austin.

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New material could improve efficiency of computer processing and memory

A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has developed a new material that could potentially improve the efficiency of computer processing and memory.

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People pick gifts that will 'wow' rather than satisfy recipients

Gift givers tend to focus on the 'big reveal,' leading them to choose whichever gift is more likely to surprise and delight the recipient in the moment — even when other options are more likely to bring recipients the greatest satisfaction, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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Plant virus alters competition between aphid species

In the world of plant-feeding insects, who shows up first to the party determines the overall success of the gathering; yet viruses can disrupt these intricate relationships, according to researchers at Penn State.

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Ending a 40-year quest, scientists reveal the identity of 'hearing' protein

Scientists have identified the sensor protein responsible for hearing and balance. The findings put an end to a 40-year quest for the protein that converts sound and head movement into electrical signals that travel to the brain.

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New genetic variants predict outcome in dilated cardiomyopathy patients of African descent

Genetic testing is increasingly being used for the diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. African-Americans are at especially high risk for cardiomyopathy but have been underrepresented in genetic studies.Now, Temple researchers have identified four variations in a gene known as BAG3 that are linked to a poor outcome. The JAMA Cardiology study is the first to describe genetic variants that are almos

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Policy intended to curb opioid prescribing associated with increase in filled opioid prescriptions after surgery

The US Drug Enforcement Administration in 2014 moved to limit prescribing of pain medications containing the opioid hydrocodone from schedule III (a class of controlled substances) to the more restrictive schedule II. As a result, commonly prescribed formulations of hydrocodone were limited to a 90-day supply and could no longer be prescribed by telephone or fax. This analysis examined opioid pres

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The spotlight of attention is more like a strobe

Despite the 'illusion' of continuity, human perception pulses in and out four times per second, say researchers, a rate that is identical in human and monkey brains.

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Evolution might favor 'survival of the laziest'

A new large-data study of bivalves and gastropods in the Atlantic Ocean suggests laziness might be a fruitful strategy for survival of individuals, species and even communities of species.

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Stressed, toxic, zombie cells seen for 1st time in Alzheimer's

Tau protein accumulation is common across 20 human brain diseases. Researchers have found stressed, senescent cells in Alzheimer's disease, and established a link between tau tangles and this cell stress. The scientists used a senolytic therapy to clear the senescent cells and tau tangles in Alzheimer's mice, which improved both brain function and structure.

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Improved understanding of industrial electrode processes

In the industrial production of chlorine, recently special electrodes have been introduced, which consume much less current than conventional systems. The method requires oxygen which is introduced into hot, highly concentrated sodium hydroxide solution, in which it is poorly soluble. It is still unclear how industrial current densities can be achieved under these conditions. Researchers from Boch

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How brains of doers differ from those of procrastinators

Researchers have analyzed why certain people tend to put tasks off rather than tackling them directly. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), they identified two brain areas whose volume and functional connectivity are linked to an individual's ability to control their actions.

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Species-rich forests better compensate environmental impacts

To offset CO2 emissions, China is reforesting. If a mixture of tree species instead of monocultures were planted, much more carbon could be stored. An international team has shown that species-rich forest ecosystems take up more CO2 from the atmosphere and store more carbon in biomass and soil, making them more effective against climate change.

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Austria allows shooting wolves with rubber bullets

Austria has authorised shooting wolves with rubber bullets to deter attacks on livestock, a regional authority said Wednesday.

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Trump's New Power Plan Comes With a Deadly Price

The Environmental Protection Agency says the new plan will result in more air pollution deaths.

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ASMR videos are just beginning to whisper their anti-anxiety secrets to scientists

Health The calming sensation these videos induce might help Internet users calm down. The popularity of ASMR videos may be due to their potential health benefits. Aside from being a pleasant sensation, many people who watch ASMR videos say it helps reduce…

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1 protein keeps bacteria’s DNA ‘recipes’ safe

New research describes how unique characteristics of a protein called Dps helps bacteria survive starvation and other stressful conditions. “Bacteria is different from what we’ve seen in higher organisms because their ‘recipes’ can still be read, even when they are in the recipe box.” The findings, which appear in Cell , may lead to more targeted antibiotics and other drug therapies. Bacteria cau

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Call off the grizzly bear trophy hunt, it’s immoral and unscientific

The first grizzly bear hunt in Wyoming for over 40 years ignores the questionable conservation status and emotional capacities of these iconic animals, says Marc Bekoff

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Militant groups influence local policies during conflict

The five-decades-long Colombian conflict weakened government institutions and left millions displaced. With a new president at the helm, many wonder about the future of the country.

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Six Big Questions After the Cohen and Manafort Bombshells

Two close advisers to the president are now convicted felons. Here are six big questions about where this all goes next.

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Why Trump Supporters Believe He Is Not Corrupt

On Wednesday morning, the lead story on FoxNews.com was not Michael Cohen’s admission that Donald Trump had instructed him to violate campaign-finance laws by paying hush money to two of Trump’s mistresses. It was the alleged murder of a white Iowa woman, Mollie Tibbetts, by an undocumented Latino immigrant, Cristhian Rivera. On their face, the two stories have little in common. Fox is simply cov

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These lithium-ion batteries can't catch fire because they harden on impact

Lithium-ion batteries used in consumer electronics are notorious for bursting into flame when damaged. These incidents occasionally have grave consequences, ranging from burns to house fires to the crash of an airplane. Inspired by the weird behavior of some liquids that solidify on impact, researchers have developed a practical and inexpensive method to prevent these fires. They will present thei

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Study: Many teens – and parents – feel tethered to phones

Parents lament their teenagers' noses constantly in their phones, but they might benefit from taking stock of their own screen time habits.

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Irony is the new black

A giddy tween wearing a Justin Bieber t-shirt at a Justin Bieber concert—not too surprising. But what about your hard rock friend showing up to a death metal party wearing a Justin Bieber t-shirt?

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Strategic indulgence key to maximizing the college experience

Want to maximize the college experience? It's not just about grades. High performing students, as measured by their grade point average (GPA), are also good at making decisions so that they can enjoy college game days without hurting their academic performance. These students make good strategic decisions in their time use, according to new research recently published in the journal Social Psychol

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Epic genetic: the hidden story of wheat

Globally, wheat, together with maize and rice, provides the most human nutrition. It can thrive in a whole range of different environments, even within a similar geographical region.

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Pointy eggs more likely to stay put in birds' cliffside nests, study finds

Natural selection—that merciless weeder-outer of biological designs that are out of step with the times—also is a wily shaper of traits. Exhibit A is the pointy murre egg, according to new research published in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

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Militant groups influence local policies during conflict

Through intimidation and political influence, illegal militant groups influenced local taxes and property rights during the Colombian Conflict, according to a study led by Princeton University.

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One of the most popular ADHD drugs may cause hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms

One of the most popular ADHD drugs may cause hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms. Research published in the SJCAPP says that possible adverse symptoms may affect 1.1 percent — 2.5 percent of ADHD patients treated with methylphenidate.

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QR code ‘clouds’ protect 3D printing from piracy

Researchers have developed a way to prove the authenticity of a 3D-printed part by employing QR codes for unique device identification. The worldwide market for 3D-printed parts is a $5 billion business with a global supply chain involving the internet, email, and the cloud—creating a number of opportunities for counterfeiting and intellectual property theft. Flawed parts printed from stolen desi

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Research identifies all the different ways the sea supports human wellbeing

A study led by the University of Liverpool that catalogued all of the links between marine biodiversity and the different ways we rely on the sea found more than 30 ways it supports well-being including providing a source of nutrition, supplying raw materials and supporting recreational activities.

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Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo caused in part by Indonesian volcanic eruption

Electrically charged volcanic ash short-circuited Earth's atmosphere in 1815, causing global poor weather and Napoleon's defeat, says new research.

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Some trees can't survive sea level rise

Sea level rise is killing bald cypress trees, according to an FIU study.

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Structural fluctuation evaluation in substances from measurement data

Microstructure analysis of materials is a key technology for new material research. Using an information extraction technique called sparse modeling, a collaboration of researchers led by Professor Ichiro Akai of Kumamoto University, Japan, has developed the world's first method of analyzing the atomic structure and structural fluctuation in materials using only measured data. This method needs no

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New methods developed for designing dynamic object controllers

The words "uncertainty" and "multiple criteria" characterize the relevance and complexity of modern problems related to the control of dynamic objects and processes. In fact, any mathematical model describing complex controlled processes inevitably includes inaccuracies in the description of the perturbations and parameters of the control object. Ignoring such "uncertainty" often leads to fatal er

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Woodpeckers and development coexist in Seattle

A new study tracked birds in suburban Seattle and found that as long as tree cover remains above a certain threshold, pileated woodpeckers and housing developments can coexist.

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In soil carbon measurements, tools tell the tale

Soil organic carbon stocks are the amount of organic carbon found in soil. There are several common ways of measuring these stocks. Until now they were all believed to give pretty much the same results. New research shows not all tools give the same results.

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Addressing South Africa's cancer reporting delay with machine learning

Cancer registries hold vital data sets, kept tightly encrypted, containing demographic information, medical history, diagnostics and therapy. Oncologists and health officials access the data to understand the diagnosed cancer cases and incidence rates nationally. The ultimate goal is to use this data to inform public health planning and intervention programs. While real time updates are not practi

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Mixed report card for low-cost indoor air quality home monitors

Affordable indoor air quality monitors for the home can be worth the purchase, a recent product evaluation revealed, but all of the monitors tested by researchers were found to have either underreported or missed the presence of very small particles that can penetrate deeply into the lungs.

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Bagmænd tjente mindst 3,2 millioner kroner på falsk sextortion-kampagne

Bagmændene bag svindel-mail-kampagnen, der også har været brugt til at afpresse danskere, har tjent mindst 3,2 millioner kroner.

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Black Hole Firewalls Could Be Too Tepid to Burn

Despite its ability to bend both minds and space, an Einsteinian black hole looks so simple a child could draw it. There’s a point in the center, a perfectly spherical boundary a bit farther out, and that’s it. The point is the singularity, an infinitely dense, unimaginably small dot contorting space so radically that anything nearby falls straight in, leaving behind a vacuum. The spherical bound

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LSU Health study documents limited access to orthopaedic care for Louisiana Medicaid patients

A study led by Christopher Marrero, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reports that despite Medicaid expansion, access to outpatient orthopaedic care in Louisiana remains significantly limited for patients with Medicaid insurance.

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Brazilian D'Or Institute and L'Oréal R&I develop functional human sensory neurons

Scientists were able to generate, in the laboratory, human neurons responsive to sensorial stimuli. After 5 years of collaboration between the D'Or Institute for Research & Education and L'Oreal R&I, in partnership with UFRJ, Unicamp and Embrapa, the discoveries were published in Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience.

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How to get serious about diversity and inclusion in the workplace | Janet Stovall

Imagine a workplace where people of all colors and races are able to climb every rung of the corporate ladder — and where the lessons we learn about diversity at work actually transform the things we do, think and say outside the office. How do we get there? In this candid talk, inclusion advocate Janet Stovall shares a three-part action plan for creating workplaces where people feel safe and exp

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Energy controls platform available in open source

VOLTTRON is an innovative open source software platform that helps users rapidly develop and deploy new control solutions for a myriad of applications in buildings, renewable energy systems and electricity grid systems. Developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from the Department of Energy, VOLTTRON can be downloaded from the not-for-profit Eclipse Foundation that will stewa

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Will fake social media followers derail the booming influencer marketing business?

Celebrities, social media stars, and other online personalities have taken a hit to their credibility in recent months, as millions of their followers have been exposed as fake or bought. This has created a bigger problem for advertisers and consumers, who no longer can trust in high follower numbers as a measure of influence and credibility.

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Study finds loss of biodiversity exacerbates pressures on social bees

Scientists have assumed that habitats with intensive agricultural use are generally bad for bees, because of the exposure to pesticides and the very limited choice of food resources and nesting places. The worldwide extinction of bees was to some extent attributed to this factor. But bees are well able to thrive in agricultural areas, as long as they have access to so-called "habitat islands" with

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Analysis shows no change in US crime from medical marijuana legalisation

Victoria University of Wellington research shows there has been almost no change to the level of crime in the United States since the legalisation of medical marijuana.

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Graphene laminated pipes could reduce corrosion in the oil and gas industry

Researchers at The University of Manchester and TWI have discovered ways of using graphene to prolong the lifetime of pipes used in the oil and gas industry.

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High-throughput fluorescence assay for monitoring Cas9 activity

Gene editing technology could one day eliminate diseases currently considered incurable. Thanks to a new test developed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists, that day is closer to dawning.

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Another way to search for biosignatures of alien life—the material blasted out of asteroid impacts

In recent years, the number of confirmed extra-solar planets has risen exponentially. As of the penning of the article, a total of 3,777 exoplanets have been confirmed in 2,817 star systems, with an additional 2,737 candidates awaiting confirmation. What's more, the number of terrestrial (i.e. rocky) planets has increased steadily, increasing the likelihood that astronomers will find evidence of l

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Mouser Electronics

Technology Generation Robot: Human 2.0 Grant Imahara visits Cyberdyne, a robotics company located near Tokyo, to see HAL in action. No, not that HAL—it stands for Hybrid Assistive Limb and works with the…

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Opinion: A Modest Proposal to Address NIH Insanity

Silicon Valley's early-stage funding model could address a dearth of opportunities for young investigators just launching new projects.

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Precise records of baby stars' growth caught at millimeter wavelengths

Babies grow up fast, in the blink of an eye, and thus their parents wish to record their growth without missing any moment. This is true not only for human babies but also for baby stars, called protostars, although the recorders are not parents but astronomers. Protostar ages, or evolutionary stages, have been determined from observations at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths. The youngest stage,

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Putting the Living Wage Calculator into action

If you type the phrase "living wage" into Google's search engine, the first result that appears—even before the Wikipedia entry—is MIT's Living Wage Calculator (LWC). Created by Amy Glasmeier, a professor of economic geography and regional planning at the School of Architecture and Planning, the LWC calculates the baseline wage employees need to earn to support themselves in any county in the Unit

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What makes some species more likely to go extinct?

Though they say "'tis impossible to be sure of anything but death and taxes," a bit of financial chicanery may get you out of paying the taxman. But no amount of trickery will stop the inevitability of death. Death is the inescapable endpoint of life.

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Could you identify a criminal by their voice? It's far harder than it sounds

Over five years in the late 1970s, the Yorkshire Ripper was murdering women and the hunt for one of the UK's worst serial killers was on. During this time, the police were sent three letters and an audio communication, purportedly from the killer – clues that led the investigation to be moved from West Yorkshire, where the Ripper (later to be named as Peter Sutcliffe) was indeed operating, to the

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Oral vaccination protects Africa's most endangered carnivore

Over the past month, a team from Oxford's Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Programme (EWCP) has implemented the first oral vaccination campaign to pre-empt outbreaks of rabies among Ethiopian wolves, the world's most endangered canid, in their stronghold in the Bale Mountains of southern Ethiopia.

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The Most Damaging Thing That’s Happened to Trump

It is the morning after a devastating defeat. Smoke is still rising from the field. The rubble has not yet been cleared. And the commanders are having trouble facing just how hopeless their position has become. They no longer know on how many fronts they are fighting, how many separate enemies they face, or to what extent those enemies are cooperating—one might say “colluding”—with one another. T

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Even Trump’s Own Adviser Is Warning About ‘Politicizing’ the Threat From Russia

On Tuesday—hours after Donald Trump yet again questioned whether Russia intervened in the 2016 U.S. election and denounced the investigation into that interference by “disgraced and discredited Bob Mueller and his … Angry Democrat Thugs” as a “Rigged Witch Hunt”—a top official in the Trump administration issued a stark warning about the peril of politicizing the threat from Vladimir Putin. Nothin

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Up close with the largest animal on Earth

It's certainly sad when to learn of a whale's death, given they are some of the ocean's most majestic mammals. While no doubt tragic, researchers on Dalhousie's Agricultural Campus are looking for the silver lining.

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Coffee farmers struggle to adapt to Colombia's changing climate

In Colombia's coffee-producing region of Risaralda, small trees run along the sharp incline of the Andes Mountains, carefully tended in tidy rows. Thousands of green coffee berries turn brilliant red as they ripen, ready to be harvested by hand. The steep hills here prevent mechanized techniques.

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Forensic linguistics gives victims and the wrongfully convicted the voices they deserve

"Most people take language for granted, but not you … You and I both appreciate the power and specificity of words." This quote, taken from the recent Netflix series Manhunt: Unabomber, sums up nicely the notion that language is more powerful than many of us are aware of. Words impact how events and those who participate in them are perceived, which may explain why criminal cases can sometimes res

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Call for citizen scientists to help unravel the mysteries of South Sudan's forests

Conservationists from Fauna & Flora International (FFI) and Bucknell University biology researchers have teamed up with government and conservation authorities to capture more than 425,000 images through a camera wildlife survey in South Sudan. The Bucknell team has launched a website where volunteers can view the images to identify and verify animal species.

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How climate change will affect dairy cows and milk production in the UK – new study

The unusually hot summer of 2018 has proved challenging for farmers across the UK. Among other things, the scorching weather and lack of rain has damaged crops, and the grass used to feed farm animals too.

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Four tips on how to get served more quickly at the pub—new research

As you are reading this, in bars all over the world customers are ordering drinks and bartenders are serving them. Some are getting their drinks without too much fuss, while others are getting disgruntled at being made to wait – and it is even worse when the bartender serves someone who has not been waiting as long as you have. But this common interaction has seldom been explored in any depth.

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This boosts quality of life for people with depression

People who receive vagus nerve stimulation for depression experience significant improvements in quality of life, even when their symptoms don’t completely subside, researchers report. A new study involved nearly 600 patients with depression that taking four or more antidepressants, taken either separately or in combination could not be alleviate. Researchers evaluated vagus nerve stimulators, wh

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Epic genetic: the hidden story of wheat

Published in Genome Research, based on a novel method developed by Earlham Institute, UK, an international research team have uncovered the hidden genetic secrets that give wheat its remarkable ability for local adaptation — revealing a previously untapped resource for breeding better, more resilient wheat.

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Media alert: New articles in The CRISPR Journal

The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, announces the publication of its third issue.

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Pointy eggs more likely to stay put in birds' cliffside nests, study finds

Natural selection — that merciless weeder-outer of biological designs that are out of step with the times — also is a wily shaper of traits. Exhibit A is the pointy murre egg, according to new research published in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

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Mentors play critical role in quality of college experience, new poll suggests

In order to have a rewarding college experience, students should build a constellation of mentors.

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Tårn af 35 ton tunge betonblokke skal lagre energi

Schweizisk opstartsvirksomhed vil lagre overskydende strøm fra elnettet i 35 ton tunge betonblokke ved at lade en kran stable dem højt op og udnytte tyngdekraften, når elnettet igen mangler energi.

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Biomaterial could keep tooth alive after root canal

A root canal ranks high on most people's list of dreaded dental procedures, and it results in a dead tooth susceptible to further decay. Now scientists have developed a peptide hydrogel designed to regenerate dental pulp after a root canal, preserving the tooth.

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Through the glass ceiling

Over the last thirty years or so the term "glass ceiling" has come to symbolise the barriers faced by women in attempting to make upward progress in their careers.

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A Cross-Country Road Trip, Courtesy of Google Street View

Matthew Muspratt traveled from coast to coast without ever filling up his gas tank.

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Even Teens Worry That Teens Are Addicted to Their Phones

A Pew Research study finds that that 54 percent of US teens ages 13 to 17 worry they spend too much time on their phones, and 52 percent have taken steps to cut back.

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How Netflix Snagged Black-ish Creator Kenya Barris

The star Hollywood writer Kenya Barris climbed the Hollywood ladder for years and had supposedly reached its apex. Beginning with brief writing stints on shows like Girlfriends, Are We There Yet? and I Hate My Teenage Daughter , Barris then served as a writer and producer on the sitcom The Game , before creating his own show, Black-ish , on ABC. It was a critical and commercial hit, and with that

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Phones Are Changing the Texture of Family Life

Phones have saturated teenage life: Ninety-five percent of Americans ages 13 to 17 have a smartphone or access to one , and nearly half report using the internet “almost constantly.” But as recent survey data and interviews have suggested, many teens find much of that time to be unsatisfyingly spent. Constant usage shouldn’t be mistaken for constant enjoyment, as any citizen of the internet can a

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Letters: ‘Textbooks Are Just the Tip of the Iceberg’

How History Classes Helped Create a 'Post-Truth' America In a recent interview for TheAtlantic.com, Alia Wong spoke with James W. Loewen, the author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, about how schools’ flawed approach to teaching the country’s past affects its civic health. As a history teacher, I agree with James W. Loewen’s indictment of history textbooks. But Loewen is old school. Many of today’s hi

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Why bigger planes mean cramped quarters

Aviation The incredible shrinking airplane. Jets are getting bigger, yet, inch by inch, our personal space dwindles. How does the heck does that work?

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New method grows brain cells from stem cells quickly and efficiently

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a faster method to generate functional brain cells, called astrocytes, from embryonic stem cells. Astrocytes play a significant role in neurodegenerative diseases. The new method reduces the time required to produce the cells from months to two weeks, and the study has been published in Nature Methods.

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Strategic indulgence key to maximizing the college experience

Students who are focused on long term goals maximize their college experience by engaging in 'strategic indulgence,' according to new research being published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

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Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo caused in part by Indonesian volcanic eruption

Electrically charged volcanic ash short-circuited Earth's atmosphere in 1815, causing global poor weather and Napoleon's defeat, says new research.

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Is 'chocapocalypse' looming? Why we need to understand what's at stake

No more chocolate by 2050? Several articles have pointed recently that we are heading to a major chocolate crisis.

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Medicinalindustrien om Spinraza-afgørelse: Situationen er grænsende til grotesk

Patienterstatningens afvisning af syv Spinraza-sager er ifølge Lægemiddelindustriforeningen et bevis på, at Medicinrådet har overskredet sine politisk udstukne rammer og begrænser den enkelte læges ordinationsret.

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Irony is the new black

Consuming brands ironically is a way to secretly signal our identity or beliefs to people who know us, according to new research.

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Crystalline silica in meteorite brings scientists closer to understanding solar evolution

Scientists discovered silica mineral quartz in a primitive meteorite, becoming the first in the world to present direct evidence of silica condensation within the solar protoplanetary disk. They also found ultrarefractory scandium- and zirconium-bearing minerals in the meteorite, which implies that the minerals condensed from nebular gas over a wide temperature range.

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Research shows 'merit' is highly subjective and changes with our values

Who is meritorious, what constitutes merit, and how merit and gender targets can operate together are widely misunderstood questions, as our new research shows.

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How do you prolong the useful life of lubricants?

Wind turbines towering hundreds of feet over many landscapes herald a future of endless, clean energy.

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Newly identified structure in lymph nodes was 'hiding in plain sight'

For the first time in decades, researchers have identified a new 'micro-organ' within the immune system — and they say it's an important step towards understanding how to make better vaccines.

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Bees need it colorful

Stopping bee extinction is a goal of scientists. Researches under the leadership of the University of Würzburg have discovered that a diversified plant environment helps bees in maintaining stable populations.

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Research identifies all the different ways the sea supports human wellbeing

A study led by the University of Liverpool that catalogued all of the links between marine biodiversity and the different ways we rely on the sea found more than 30 ways it supports well-being including providing a source of nutrition, supplying raw materials and supporting recreational activities.

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Fast visible-UV light nanobelt photodetector

Here, we report a fast-response CdSCdSxTe1-x-CdTe core-shell nanobelt photodetector with a rise time of 11 μs, which is the fastest among CdS based photodetectors reported previously. The improved response speed is ascribed to the suppressed possibilities of surface reaction resulting from the core-shell structure and heterojunction among the CdS, CdSxTe1-x and CdTe. The high performance in respon

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A simpler approach to black hole description developed by RUDN astrophysicists

RUDN astrophysicists have suggested an approach to simplify calculations of observable effects in the vicinity of black holes to which the mathematical apparatus of Einstein's classic relativity theory does not apply. The results of the work were published in Physical Review D. According to the theory of general relativity, the movement of any massive body causes the occurrence of space-time rippl

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Chemists completely change the direction of Diels-Alder reaction

RUDN-based researchers, together with Russian colleagues, have studied the Diels-Alder reaction in the derivatives of furan (a heterocyclic organic substance) and managed to reach 100 percent control over the composition of its products. The described patterns may be useful for creating new methods of agricultural waste processing. Moreover, the reaction may be used for the manufacture of graphene

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The President Is a Crook

So now it’s confirmed, as a matter of legal record, that President Donald Trump organized a scheme to violate federal election laws. He directed his longtime personal attorney to pay at least one woman for silence. That attorney got the money by lying to a bank to get a home-equity line of credit. It’s a matter of legal record, too, that Trump’s campaign chair was a huge-scale crook. Despite his

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Mary Suh Joins The Atlantic’s Events Team, AtlanticLIVE

Journalist Mary Suh is joining the editorial team at AtlanticLIVE, The Atlantic’s events division, following more than 20 years as a top editor at The New York Times, AtlanticLIVE president Margaret Low announced today. She will be a senior editor working with executive producer Rob Hendin and a team responsible for shaping the content for The Atlantic’s live events journalism, which comes to lif

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What Makes the Human Brain Special

Parts of the brain involved in language and cognition have enlarged greatly over an evolutionary timescale — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pine cones inspire self-adjusting shades for houses

Researchers have created a new shading system that adjusts independently over the course of the day, without any sensors or motors. This largely maintenance-free system also runs without electricity, making it an alternative to motor-driven shades. It gets hot in the city in summer, and buildings in direct sunlight get particularly warm. At night, it can then be difficult to get rid of that accum

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Study of bird migration tricky due to hybridization

Hybridization, the inter-breeding of bird species, is a widespread phenomenon, which is best illustrated in Estonia by the lesser spotted eagle and the greater spotted eagle. However, due to the fact that the migration strategies of both bird species are completely different, studying their offspring, or hybrids, helps ornithologists discover a lot about their migration secrets.

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Improved understanding of industrial electrode processes

In the industrial production of chlorine, recently special electrodes have been introduced, which consume much less current than conventional systems. The method requires oxygen which is introduced into hot, highly concentrated sodium hydroxide solution, in which it is poorly soluble. It is still unclear how industrial current densities can be achieved under these conditions. Researchers from Boch

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How brains of doers differ from those of procrastinators

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analysed why certain people tend to put tasks off rather than tackling them directly. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), they identified two brain areas whose volume and functional connectivity are linked to an individual's ability to control their actions.

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Woodpeckers and development coexist in Seattle

The two largest woodpeckers in North America, the imperial woodpecker and ivory-billed woodpecker, are believed to have gone extinct during the twentieth century. Can their surviving cousin, the pileated woodpecker, persist when standing dead trees and other crucial resources are lost to urbanization? A new study tracked birds in suburban Seattle and found that as long as tree cover remains above

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Stressed, toxic, zombie cells seen for 1st time in Alzheimer's

Tau protein accumulation is common across 20 human brain diseases. UT Health San Antonio researchers have found stressed, senescent cells in Alzheimer's disease, and established a link between tau tangles and this cell stress. The scientists used a senolytic therapy to clear the senescent cells and tau tangles in Alzheimer's mice, which improved both brain function and structure.

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Irony is the new black

New research from the University of Arizona finds that consuming brands ironically is a way to secretly signal our identity or beliefs to people who know us.

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Norsk datacenter skal genanvende overskudsvarme

Norske DigiPlex har forpligtet sig til genanvende overskudsvarme i samarbejde med fjernvarmeselskabet Fortum Oslo Varme. Det er del af en net-zero-strategi.

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An underwater glider for measuring turbulence in Lake Geneva

Huge systems of rotating water masses—called gyres—form in oceans and large lakes. Two EPFL laboratories, working with the University of California, Davis, are using an underwater glider to explore one such gyre in Lake Geneva and learn more about how it affects the three-dimensional structure of the aquatic ecosystem.

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Predicting chemical processes to help agribusinesses, cosmetic, fuel and food industries

A Purdue University-affiliated company is developing a method to accurately and efficiently predict chemical reactions in liquid solutions, which would help agribusinesses, fuel companies, food makers, cosmetic industry and many other businesses.

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Species-rich forests better compensate environmental impacts

To offset CO2 emissions, China is reforesting. If a mixture of tree species instead of monocultures were planted, much more carbon could be stored. An international team including UZH researchers has shown that species-rich forest ecosystems take up more CO2 from the atmosphere and store more carbon in biomass and soil, making them more effective against climate change.

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Talking to an android: Meet ERICA

We've all tried talking with devices, and in some cases they talk back. But, it's a far cry from having a conversation with a real person. Now, a research team from Kyoto University, Osaka University, and the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute, or ATR, has significantly upgraded the interaction system for conversational android ERICA, giving her even greater dialog skills.

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Future information technologies: Nanoscale heat transport under the microscope

A team of researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Potsdam has investigated heat transport in a model system comprising nanometre-thin metallic and magnetic layers. Similar systems are candidates for future high-efficiency data storage devices that can be locally heated and rewritten by laser pulses (heat-assisted magnetic recording). Measurements taken with extrem

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CasPER—a new method for diversification of enzymes

A new study published in the Metabolic Engineering Journal describes a method based on CRISPR/Cas9, which enables flexible engineering of essential and nonessential enzymes without additional engineering. This has multiple applications, including the development of bio-based production of pharmaceuticals, food additives, fuels and cosmetics.

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Uncovering sand mining's impacts on the world's rivers

It is extraordinary how few people know anything about sand mining.

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Do private shuttles affect the reliability of public transit?

While many Puget Sound residents have to choose between taking public transit or personal vehicles to work, Microsoft and Seattle Children's Hospital employees have an additional option: private commuter buses.

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Glaring racial disparities in out-of-school suspensions, a warning about the role of on-site law enforcement

A new University of Pittsburgh study of Allegheny County schools shows severe racial disparities in out-of-school suspensions with a rate that is double for African-American students compared to their non-Black classmates.

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Lead is poisoning children on U.S. military bases, says report

An extensive investigation by the Reuters news agency has found that many children living on U.S. military bases may be exposed to hazardous levels of lead in decaying family housing. The investigation included tests done at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory on samples of water, soil, and paint, from homes on seven bases. As a result of the report, a bipartisan group of four U

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Keurig K-Café Review: Why I Love This Latte and Cappuccino Machine

The original pod coffee company has created an ace latte and cappuccino machine.

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Air Pollution Is Shortening Your Life. Here’s How Much.

Air pollution from coal plants, wood stoves, tailpipes and other sources shortens life spans by a few months, and sometimes years.

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Medical device managers rely on physicians to screen out defects rather than issue recalls

Results of a new behavioral study into what influences the decision to recall a defective product found that medical device firm managers may rely on their physician-customers to screen out detectable defects, in lieu of issuing a recall.

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Specially prepared paper can bend, fold or flatten on command

One of the oldest, most versatile and inexpensive of materials — paper — seemingly springs to life, bending, folding or flattening itself, by means of a low-cost actuation technology.

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Wireless communication breaks through water-air barrier

In a novel system, underwater sonar signals cause vibrations that can be decoded by an airborne receiver.

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'It's all in the eyes': The role of the amygdala in the experience and perception of fear

An investigator reviews the evolving understanding of the role of the brain structure called the amygdala.

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Laughing gas may have helped warm early Earth and given breath to life

Laughing gas and the mystery of Carl Sagan's Faint Young Sun Paradox: When the sun shone dimmer an eon ago, Earth remained warm in spite of it likely thanks to a mix of greenhouse gases. Biogeochemists have now shown how N20, known today for its use as a dental anesthetic, may have made it into the mix.

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Facebook Use Linked to Gender Equality

Social network activity may reduce the male-female power imbalance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Woodpeckers and development coexist in Seattle

The two largest woodpeckers in North America, the Imperial Woodpecker and Ivory-billed Woodpecker, are believed to have gone extinct during the twentieth century. Can their surviving cousin, the Pileated Woodpecker, persist when standing dead trees and other crucial resources are lost to urbanization? A new study published by The Condor: Ornithological Applications tracked birds in suburban Seattl

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Mechanisms of hair follicle-specific fibroblast formation unraveled

Hair growth is regulated by a small cluster of hair-specific fibroblasts, the dermal papilla. But exactly how dermal papilla forms has remained elusive until now. In a recent study professor Marja Mikkola's research group at the University of Helsinki used confocal microscopy of live skin to show that the dermal condensate forms via cell migration.

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Mixed report card for low-cost indoor air quality home monitors

Indoor air researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) recently tested seven consumer-grade air quality monitors to see if they could detect fine particles emitted by common household activities, including cooking, burning candles, and smoking. All of the monitors tested by researchers were found to have either underreported or missed the presence of very small particles th

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Crystalline silica in meteorite brings scientists closer to understanding solar evolution

Scientists discovered silica mineral quartz in a primitive meteorite, becoming the first in the world to present direct evidence of silica condensation within the solar protoplanetary disk. They also found ultrarefractory scandium- and zirconium-bearing minerals in the meteorite, which implies that the minerals condensed from nebular gas over a wide temperature range.

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Standard hypothyroidism treatment falling short

A research team headed by Elizabeth McAninch, MD, a assistant professor in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, found higher cholesterol levels in the blood of hypothyroid patients treated with appropriate doses of levothyroxine (LT4) — a synthetic version of the human thyroid hormone that is the standard treatment for hypothyroidism — than in healthy control subjects.

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Nope, Vikings didn’t teach Inuit ancestors to weave

The Dorset and Thule people—ancestors of today’s Inuit—created spun yarn some 500 to 1,000 years before Vikings arrived in North America, according to a new study. The finding, made possible in part by a new method for dating fiber artifacts contaminated with oil, is evidence of independent, homegrown indigenous fiber technology rather than a transfer of knowledge from Viking settlers. Study lead

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Ny influenzavaccine skal sikre bedre dækning overfor influenza B

Den nye influenzavaccine skal tilbydes særligt udsatte grupper i forbindelse med den kommende influenzasæson.

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Amsterdam's Schiphol airport faces September strike

Dutch unions said Wednesday they have called for a strike by security staff next month at Amsterdam's Schiphol airport, one of the world's busiest.

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Edmunds rounds up today's top hybrids

The Toyota Prius may be synonymous with hybrids, but shopping for a gas-electric car is no longer a choice between that and a handful of also-rans. Today, more than a half-dozen hybrids return 45 mpg or more while offering impressive space, cutting-edge tech and more conventional shapes that don't flaunt their eco credentials quite so blatantly.

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Depression marks on seafloor suggest whales might be visiting prospective mining sites

A trio of researchers with the National Oceanography Centre in the U.K. has found depression marks on the sea floor in a very deep part of the ocean—they suggest the marks may have been made by deep-diving whales. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Leigh Marsh, Veerle Huvenne and Daniel Jones describe how they found the marks, and why they believe they might have b

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Is Santa real? A version of Alexa skirts some kid questions

A version of Alexa won't tell kids where babies come from or spill the beans about Santa. It also won't explain some things kids might have heard on the news—like what Stormy Daniels does for a living.

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Spanish police smash Europe's 'biggest' illegal turtle farm

Spanish police said Wednesday they had dismantled Europe's biggest illegal turtle and tortoise farm, seizing over 1,100 of the animals, including several highly endangered species.

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Coconut oil is 'pure poison', says Harvard professor

It is feted as a healthy choice but the oil, which is high in saturated fat, is ‘one of the worst things you can eat’ says expert In depth: Why we fell for clean eating For certain health food shops and wellbeing sites it is the panacea that helps everything from bad hair and mental grogginess to obesity and haemorrhoids. But the carefully-crafted image of coconut oil as a cure for many ills has

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Aeolus: Wind mapping satellite lifts off

The Aeolus spacecraft launches into orbit to make the first truly global maps of wind behaviour.

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Hurricane Lane, a Monster Category 4 Storm, Barrels Toward Hawaii

Damaging winds could hit the Big Island as early as this afternoon.

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Study of Chinese pangolins shows their natural habitat has been cut in half

A team of researchers from China and the U.K. has found that the natural habitat available for the Chinese pangolin has been cut in half over the past half-century. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the mammal, its habitat and its chances for survival.

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Rethinking Drinking: Do the Benefits of Alcohol Outweigh the Risks?

New research questions the benefits of even moderate drinking. What’s the right amount for you? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ny professor skal undersøge langtidskonsekvenser ved urinvejssygdomme

Overlæge Mette Nørgaard er ny professor i urologisk epidemiologi. Hun skal bruge sit professorat til at forske i de langsigtede konsekvenser ved god- og ondartede urologiske sygdomme.

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Kirurgisk afdeling uddanner kliniske byggere til Sundheds­platformen for egne penge

Skal Sundhedsplatformen bestå og leve op til sin forpligtelse med lokal tilpasning, er den eneste mulighed for Gastroenheden på Hvidovre Hospital selv at betale for og uddanne 'kliniske byggere', siger overlæge fra afdelingen.

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Mind over matter: You really can think yourself healthier and happier

A positive mindset isn't just mental – it can trigger physical changes making you fitter, slimmer, more energetic and less stressed. It will even help you live longer

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Facebook bans hundreds of accounts linked to Russia and Iran

Ahead of the US mid-term elections in November, Facebook has taken down accounts linked with Russia and Iran for engaging in misleading political behaviour

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Researchers find a neural 'auto-correct' feature we use to process ambiguous sounds

Our brains have an 'auto-correct' feature that we deploy when re-interpreting ambiguous sounds, a team of scientists has discovered. Its findings point to new ways we use information and context to aid in speech comprehension.

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Vaccines Still Don’t Cause Autism

Update: The evidence continues to show no link between vaccines and autism.

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HPV tests can replace most Pap smears, according to new recommendations

Health If you are in possession of a cervix, here's what you should do. An update to the official recommendations for cervical cancer screening now includes the option to get an HPV test instead of a pap smear—in some circumstances.

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Cell and Gene Therapy Tracker: Global CAR T-Cell Trials

Investigators have launched numerous clinical trials that test the efficacy of the immunotherapy. Here is a global accounting of these experiments.

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Anova Precision Cooker Nano Review: Sous Vide on a Budget

The new Anova Precision Cooker Nano cuts some corners, but is fine for the price.

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Singer's Latest Creation Brings Formula 1 Know-How to the Porsche 911

The famed Porsche restoration house has produced what it calls the most advanced air-cooled 911 on the planet.

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Gender Equality Could Push Men’s and Women’s Personalities Apart

The question of whether or not there are fundamental differences between men’s and women’s personalities has long been debated by psychologists. A number of studies show that certain personality traits are more consistent with one gender over another. At the same time, other research contends that these differences between the genders are still negligible, and that more broadly the brains of both

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Letters: Is It Ethical to Use Artificial Intelligence to Predict Human Outcomes?

Artificial Intelligence Shows Why Atheism Is Unpopular In July, Sigal Samuel wrote about new artificial-intelligence modeling projects that may help predict policy outcomes—particularly around issues of religious pluralism. In his book Sapiens , Yuval Noah Harari defines two classes of chaotic systems. In level-one chaotic systems, the rules can be complex, but they operate deterministically and

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Image of the Day: A Case of Mistaken Identity

By reevaluating a fossil species, researchers have developed a new theory for the lemur colonization of Madagascar.

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Ligestillingsminister: Danmark har for få kvindelige forskere

Der er alt for få kvinder ansat som forskere på universiteterne. Det går udover dansk forskning, som misser en stor talentmasse, mener ligestillingsminister Eva Kjer Hansen.

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As Spring Arrives Earlier, Arctic Geese Speed Up Their Migration

The birds are arriving in the Arctic up to 13 days earlier than they used to. But at a cost: hunger. Annie Sneed reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nordjyder vil betale 600 mio. kr. til ny Limfjordsforbindelse

Aalborg Kommune melder sig nu parat til at betale, hvad der svarer til en tiendedel af en ny Limfjordsforbindelse for at få gang i projektet. Transportministeren vil stadig ikke fremrykke projektet.

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Posting Instagram Sponsored Content Is the New Summer Job

While some teens spent the summer of 2018 babysitting, bagging groceries, or scooping ice cream, thousands of others made hundreds of dollars—and in some cases, much more—the new-fashioned way: by doing sponsored content on Instagram. With “jobs you need to do a lot of training,” says Lucy, a 13-year-old in Pennsylvania who asked to be referred to by a pseudonym. “Then you have to, like, physical

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Amber unveils evolution of ancient antlions

Myrmeleontiformia, consisting of antlions and their relatives, are an ancient group of lacewing insects characterized by predatory larvae with unusual morphologies and behaviors. An international team led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) and two Italian researchers found fossil Myrmeleontiformia fauna from the mid-Cretaceous (approximately 100 million years ago) prese

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Doctors Must Speak Up for a Free Press

We need an effective connection between medicine and journalism to bring legitimate research findings to the public — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Norsk praksislæge: Almen praksis drukner i kliniske guidelines

Myndighedernes store fokus på forebyggelse og tidlig opsporing betyder, at borgerne bliver udsat for overflødige test og undersøgelser, mener Gisle Roksund, der er tidligere formand for Norsk forening for allmennmedisin

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Researchers manipulate individual graphene dislocations on the atomic scale

Materials can deform plastically along atomic-scale line defects called dislocations. Many technical applications such as forging are based on this fundamental process, but the power of dislocations is also exploited in the crumple zones of cars, for instance, where dislocations protect lives by transforming energy into plastic deformation. FAU researchers have now found a way of manipulating indi

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Stars memorize rebirth of our home galaxy

The Milky Way galaxy has died once before, and we are now in what is considered its second life. Calculations by Masafumi Noguchi (Tohoku University) have revealed previously unknown details about the Milky Way. These were published in the July 26 edition of Nature.

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Why Universities Need ‘Public Interest Technology’ Courses

Decades ago, schools and foundations created professional pathways to practice public interest law. Now the same should be done for public interest technology.

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GM's Use of 3-D Printing Predicts Cheaper, Better Cars

Additive manufacturing is finally reaching the auto industry in earnest, and it could change how cars get built.

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At Y Combinator, Startups Manage Molecules Rather Than Code

Demo Day at the famed incubator showed strong interest in all things bio, from healthcare to food.

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'ENHANCE.COMPUTER' Is the Perfect Workplace Distraction

Finally, you can live out your procedural crime drama fantasies—thanks to Nicole He.

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Prepare to Be Hypnotized By These Delicate Paper Robots

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University use conductive 3-D-printed material and paper to build actuators for use in delicate little robots.

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Growing Up Undocumented When Your Siblings Are Citizens

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reported by master's students at the University of California at Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. The stories explore the impact of the vast racial and economic inequality in Fresno, the poorest major city in California. A ndy Magdaleno should have been born in California . And he would have been born there, just like his sister Beatriz was

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Kenya’s technology evolved. Its political problems stayed the same.

Long before the internet, hate speech flourished in echo chambers of a different kind.

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Future elections may be swayed by intelligent, weaponized chatbots

The AI advances that brought you Alexa are teaching propaganda how to talk.

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How to tell if you’re arguing with a bot

MIT Technology Review helps you figure out who is on the other side of your debate.

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Technologists are trying to fix the “filter bubble” problem that tech helped create

But research shows online polarization isn’t as clear-cut as people think.

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US election campaign technology from 2008 to 2018, and beyond

The first Obama campaign kicked off a technological revolution in electioneering. Where is it going next?

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China’s use of big data might actually make it less Big Brother-ish

Why the country’s adoption of ever-more-intrusive technology could, paradoxically, lead to stronger civil liberties.

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This is what filter bubbles actually look like

Maps of Twitter activity show how political polarization manifests online and why divides are so hard to bridge.

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The four ways that ex-internet idealists explain where it all went wrong

21st-century digital evangelists had a lot in common with early Christians and Russian revolutionaries.

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Massive, Ancient Stone Monument in Kenya Held More Than 500 Bodies, 400 Gerbil Teeth

You've probably never heard of this site, but it was the largest monumental cemetery in Africa at the time.

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The Arctic's Most Stable, Solid Patch of Ice Is Melting

There's a chunk of hard ice north of Greenland that isn't there anymore.

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Ancient Quasars Provide Incredible Evidence for Quantum Entanglement

Using two ancient galactic cores called quasars, researchers have taken a massive step forward toward confirming quantum entanglement — a concept that says particles can be linked no matter how far apart in the universe they may be.

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Lost Worlds wrapping up: dead birds, island hopping and the value of museum collections

With the Science Blog Network closing, Hanneke Meijer reflects on her contributions to the Guardian’s Lost Worlds Revisited Despite all the splendid fossils we have covered here on Lost Worlds Revisited, nothing lasts forever (apart from the cold November rain here in Norway). In my time on here, I have covered a range of topics, from Darwin’s finches , the peculiar nature of island faunas , and

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Why the pessimists are winning, for now

The editor’s letter in the 2018 politics issue of MIT Technology Review.

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Gennembrud: Forskere knækker genom-koden bag den vigtigste kornsort

Hvedens arvemasse er omsider blevet kortlagt i en hidtil uhørt detaljeringsgrad, hvilket allerede har ført til 20 procent større kerner dyrket i laboratorier.

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Rice Genes Could Be Key to Stemming Nitrogen Pollution

A genetically engineered strain of rice maintains high yields with less fertilizer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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