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Cardio exercise and strength training affect hormones differently

Strength training and cardio exercise affect the body differently with regard to the types of hormones they release into the blood, new research conducted at the University of Copenhagen shows. One of the conclusions of the study is that cardio exercise produces a far greater amount of the metabolic hormone FGF21 than strength training.

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No safe level of alcohol, new study concludes

There is no safe level of drinking alcohol, concludes a new study. It shows that in 2016, nearly 3 million deaths globally were attributed to alcohol use, including 12 percent of deaths in males between the ages of 15 and 49.

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Kalashnikov lancerer elbil: Vil være Teslas store konkurrent

Den russiske våbenproducent Kalashnikov vil konkurrere med Teslas superbiler og lægger ud med en retro-futuristisk prototype inspireret af en sovjetisk hatchback fra 1970'erne.

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Our moon has 'minimoons', named after the Austin Powers character

These fast-moving and transient objects are difficult to detect, even though there may be loads of them floating around the planet. Read More

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Unhealthy gut bacteria tells you to eat when you're not hungry

What makes you want to eat even when you're not hungry? Scientists at UCLA now know exactly why. Read More

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How drunk were the Founding Fathers? Revolutionary-era Americans could drink you under the table

A historical look into the tipple that toppled the British Empire and kick-started America. Read More

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Strong earthquake rattles remote Alaska region

A strong earthquake shook a remote part of Alaska but no damage was reported.

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Functioning Apple computer built in 1970s up for auction

A piece of computer history that helped launch a trillion dollar company is hitting the auction block.

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Audi's PB 18 e-tron Concept Puts the Driver in the Center

In the new electric concept, the driver's seat slides left and right, so when you're not suffering a passenger, you can sit in the middle, just like the pros.

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The Late(?), Great Fissure 8

Kilauea's gone quiet, but is this really the end of the Lower East Rift Zone eruption? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Many young adults lack financial literacy, economic stability, study finds

Many young people lack financial literacy and money-management skills, indicating an urgent need for educational programs to help them enter adulthood better equipped to handle their financial affairs, a new study finds.

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Taking aim at the dreaded tropical disease leishmaniasis

Leishmania is a microorganism threatening the health of over 500 million people at risk of crossing its path. Although leishmaniasis, the disease caused by the parasite, has been on the radar of scientists for a long time, the quest for affordable and effective treatment continues. Researchers have now developed a new, cost-effective strategy to rapidly identify molecules capable of eliminating Le

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Rare drone video of uncontacted Amazonians

Recently released video and still images offer a rare view of uncontested indigenous residents of the Amazonian rainforest, including the solitary last member of his tribe. Read More

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Genetic analysis of Florida's invasive pythons reveals a tangled family tree

A new genetic analysis of invasive pythons captured across South Florida finds the big constrictors are closely related to one another. In fact, most of them are genetically related as first or second cousins, according to a new study.

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Eksperter råber op: Byggebranchen er en kæmpe klimasynder

Der skal radikale metoder til at ændre byggeindustrien. Og det skal gå stærkt, mener internationale eksperter.

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Buildings made from fungi? Meet London’s pop-up bio-lab innovators

A shipping container complex in a Shepherd’s Bush market is the unlikely home to a community of startup research projects If there’s one place you wouldn’t expect a new biotech research lab to be built, it’s slap bang in the middle of a busy London market. Yet navigate through stalls selling fish, fabric and phone cases in west London’s Shepherd’s Bush market and you’ll find a brightly painted cou

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Why the effects of a boozy binge could last longer than you think

A new study suggests that the effects of alcohol on our mental processing could extend to the day after a session of heavy drinking.

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Unnecessary heart procedures can be avoided with non-invasive test

Unnecessary heart procedures can be avoided with a non-invasive test, according to late breaking research.

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Single pill with two drugs could transform blood pressure treatment

A single pill with two drugs could transform blood pressure treatment.

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Forcefully Unplugged

Temporary reminders of the invisible technology in our daily lives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Don’t miss: Video game-making, circus science and unusual brains

Tap into the tools of game creation, uncover the scientific know-how behind the thrills of the big top, and read a masterful summary of neurology and psychiatry

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Rygning er udbredt blandt yngre patienter med akutte blodpropper

Blandt yngre kvinder, der indlægges med akutte blodpropper, er otte ud af ti rygere, viser dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på ESC-kongressen.

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Hjertestop-overlevere har en god prognose

Hjertestoppatienter, der overlever den første måned, har en god prognose – og langt de fleste kommer tilbage på arbejdsmarkedet, viser en dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på ESC-kongressen.

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Gravide med hjertesygdomme bør ikke føde efter 40. uge

Nye ESC-retningslinjer anbefaler normal fødsel eller kejsersnit ved 40. graviditetsuge.

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To-i-en-piller kan forbedre behandling af forhøjet blodtryk

Hovedparten af patienter med forhøjet blodtryk bør behandles med to former for blodtryksmedicin i én enkelt pille, lyder nye ESC-retningslinjer.

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FFR-ct er effektiv til at identificere patienter med koronararteriesygdom

Dansk undersøgelse understøtter, at brug af FFR-ct kan reducere behovet for yderligere diagnostiske undersøgelser af patienter med stabil angina pectoris.

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Høje niveauer af godt kolesterol kan være skadeligt

Ny forskning præsenteret på ESC-kongressen viser, at høje niveauer af HDL-kolesterol øger risiko for dødsfald og hjerteanfald

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Patienter bør inddrages i valg mellem hjerteoperation eller stent

Nye retningslinjer fra European Society of Cardiology lægger vægt på, at patienterne bør altid inddrages i valget ellem en hjerteoperation eller indsætning af en stent.

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England to Allow Women to Take Early Abortion Pill at Home

The British government said the second of two early medical termination pills need no longer be taken at a clinic, echoing moves in Scotland and Wales.

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A Pop Star, a Protest, and a Likely Case of Torture in Uganda

Editor’s Note: The author, a researcher whose work focuses on a range of politically sensitive topics in contemporary Uganda, is remaining anonymous to protect the safety of sources in the country. It has been over 10 days since the Twitter account of the Ugandan member of Parliament commonly known as Bobi Wine went silent. The last time the wildly popular Afropop singer-turned-legislator (whose

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Reality Winner, Insider Trading, and More Security News This Week

In security news this week, Apple and Facebook beef, Reality Winner gets sentenced, facial recognition at the airport, and more.

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Meet the virtual pooch that could help prevent dog bites

A virtual dog could soon be used as an educational tool to help prevent dog bites, thanks to an innovative project led by the University of Liverpool's Virtual Engineering Centre (VEC).

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A smartphone application can help in screening for atrial fibrillation

A smartphone application (app) can help in screening for atrial fibrillation, according to late breaking results from the DIGITAL-AF study presented today at ESC Congress.

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Skim reading is the new normal. The effect on society is profound | Maryanne Wolf

When the reading brain skims texts, we don’t have time to grasp complexity, to understand another’s feelings or to perceive beauty. We need a new literacy for the digital age Look around on your next plane trip. The iPad is the new pacifier for babies and toddlers. Younger school-aged children read stories on smartphones; older boys don’t read at all, but hunch over video games. Parents and other

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The Paradox of Karl Popper

The great philosopher, renowned for his ferocious attacks on scientific and political dogmatism, could be quite dogmatic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to recycle shoes, crayons, toothbrushes, and other random stuff

DIY Give new life to your leftovers. Companies boil down used crayons, grind up faded tennis balls, and shred worn toothbrushes to give these old objects, once destined for the landfill, new life.

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Flere kræftpatienter får tilbudt offentlig DNA-test

DNA-test kan fortælle dig næsten alt. Men vil du egentlig vide det?

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The Speedy Rise and Fall of Robot Babysitters

During the winter of 2017, an 18-year old college student named Canon Reeves spent much of his time trailing a knee-high robot around Fayetteville, Arkansas, as it delivered Amazon packages to students. The robot, created by a start-up called Starship Technologies in 2014, is basically a cooler on wheels; it uses radars, ultrasonic sensors, and nine cameras to make deliveries. Reeves’s job was to

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Colourful clownfish carry an unusual health warning for predators

Many animals use bright colours to advertise their toxicity – but clownfish are colourful because their sea anemone hosts are venomous

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'Sorry to Bother You' Is Great Science Fiction, People

The film has been widely praised by critics, but is it getting the credit it deserves as a visionary work of sci-fi?

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Should I Flush It? Most Often, the Answer Is No

We asked wastewater management experts about what’s safe to dispose of down your toilet or sink. Their answer: Not much.

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No longer a hurricane, Lane continues to threaten Hawaii

Environment The fires and rains of Hurricane Lane rage on. Hurricane Lane fell apart in spectacular fashion as it meandered south of the Hawaiian Islands on Friday, but flooding remains a serious concern.

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Why Pre-Workout Static Stretching Is Actually Dangerous

While it is true that we should definitely warm up before exercise, holding a static stretch is definitely not the way to go about it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Talkin' Birds: The Damage Of Plastics

Single-use plastics like bags and straws are doing damage to the world's oceans and marine life. Ray Brown from Talkin' Birds tells NPR's Scott Simon that such plastics pose danger to birds as well.

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Fresno’s Ugly Divide

Fresno is the largest city in California’s Central Valley. It’s also the poorest major city in the entire state. Over the past year, graduate students at U.C. Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism have reported deeply into Fresno’s past and present, investigating the vast inequalities that exist within the city and its surrounding areas. The Atlantic is partnering with the school to publish wh

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Why Married Women Are Using Two Last Names on Facebook

Among her friends, 30-year-old Molly Weissman is known as Molly Weissman. Her colleagues at her office in New York refer to her in conversation as Molly Weissman, and when you ask her how she’d like to be named on second reference in a news story, she opts for “Weissman” there too. But on Facebook, ever since she got married in 2015, Weissman is Molly Lister Weissman—a nod to the fact that before

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Ugens debat: Gik der trold i træpilledebatten?

Er det et problem, at produktionen af træpiller til de danske kraftværker og fyr i 2016 krævede et skovareal på størrelse med Sjælland og Fyn tilsammen?

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We Need Software to Help Us Slow Down, Not Speed Up

Speed often improves life. But the recent techlash has been driven in a fundamental way by the grim side effects of this acceleration.

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending August 25, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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A Singular Species: The Science of Being Human

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A smartphone application can help in screening for atrial fibrillation

A smartphone application (app) can help in screening for atrial fibrillation, according to late breaking results from the DIGITAL-AF study presented today at ESC Congress.

11h

Unnecessary heart procedures can be avoided with non-invasive test

Unnecessary heart procedures can be avoided with a non-invasive test, according to late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 20181 and published in Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Scans cut heart attack rates and save lives, major study finds

Heart scans for patients with chest pains could save thousands of lives, research led by the University of Edinburgh suggests. The life-saving scans — called CT angiograms — helped to spot those with heart disease so they could be given treatments to prevent heart attacks. Researchers say current guidelines should be updated to incorporate the scans into routine care.

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Nose breathing in yoga may calm the mind by slowing brainwaves

When meditators take deep breaths through their nose it causes nerves in their nasal passages to fire more slowly, and brainwaves follow suit [we can’t say the brain fires more slowly

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The Family Weekly: The Case for Not Saying “Hey Guys”

This Week in Family “Guys” has become part of everyday vernacular to address groups of people, but the Atlantic staff writer Joe Pinsker talked to a motley crew of individuals—teachers, ice-cream scoopers, debate coaches, urban planners—about their attempts to move away from the word . Often, “guys” is seen as a symbol of exclusion—a word with an originally male meaning used to refer to people wh

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Cher’s Glorious Cyborgification of ABBA

As is the case for all great acts that rewrite the definition of “pop music,” ABBA hacked the machinery of human emotion. They took the eternal tick-tock of disco and latched it to the glorious confinement of the 3-minute verse-chorus workout. They found a universal mean between four individualized singers. And they deduced the equation that specifies a certain amount of emotional down needs to e

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Watch 1,400 Tarantula Babies Emerge from Their Mother's Egg Sac

Ever wonder what it looks like when 1,400 tarantulas are born all at once? Wonder no more.

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Phone Numbers Were Never Meant as ID. Now We’re All At Risk

Your phone number was never meant to be your identity. Now that it effectively is, we're all at risk.

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28 Best Tech and Gaming Deals: LG G6, Roomba, Vizio, Apple

It's last call on Amazon Echo and Fire deals, along with big discounts on game preorders.

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You Are Getting Sleepy—Tagged Proteins May Point to Why

The identification of SNIPPs, a set of proteins found primarily at the brain’s synapses, brings science closer to understanding why we need to sleep.

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'Lost Squadron' WWII Warplane Discovered Deep Beneath a Greenland Glacier

The lost squadron crash-landed in Greenland more than 70 years ago and was found only last month.

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We can train ourselves to be better at knowing when we are wrong

Humans have an awareness of the limitations of our knowledge – and we can get better at judging when we might be making a mistake

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Improvising A Super Explosive | Treasure Quest

Jack and Jeremy's rock removal device should generate an explosion equivalent to 60 sticks of dynamite. Stream Full Episodes of Treasure Quest: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/treasure-quest-snake-island/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TreasureQuestTV/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitte

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Even Scott Walker Says He’s ‘At Risk’ in Wisconsin

It might seem odd to assess the Wisconsin gubernatorial race by channeling Herman Melville, but consider Ahab’s outburst as he prepared one last time to confront his elusive prey: “Towards thee I roll, thou all destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell’s heart I stab at thee; for hate’s sake I spit my last breath at thee.” That’s basically the Democratic lament

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Crazy Rich Identities

The movie Crazy Rich Asians , adapted from Kevin Kwan’s bestselling novel, has been widely celebrated in the United States as a big step toward diversity: It’s a Hollywood movie with an Asian cast. But in Singapore, some people are complaining that the film doesn’t capture their country’s actual diversity. That’s even granting the film’s focus on people who are crazy rich (not—to avoid confusion—

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Diller-ø, skraldeyacht og svævende vakuum-tog: Her er 4 vilde rigmandsbyggerier

Nogle af verdens rigeste mænd er i gang med deres eget rumkapløb. Og det er langt fra de eneste skøre idéer, der kommer fra milliardærerne.

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Study investigates major cause of heart attacks in women

Munich, Germany — Aug. 25, 2018: The initial findings of a study on spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a major cause of heart attacks in women, are reported today in a late breaking science session at ESC Congress 2018.

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The Tao of John McCain

He is one of the last remaining larger than life figures in American politics, but it’s the small, human moments with John McCain that linger indelibly in memory now. In his prime, before the compromises of his last presidential campaign shrunk him into a defensive crouch, his preferred method of controlling his image was to abandon all the modern methods of self-presentation, whether conducting

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It’s Time to Stop Talking About Terrorists As If They’re Diabolical Geniuses

The video, shot from a respectful distance, shows the two brothers embracing one last time, somewhere on the Yemeni side of the border. They had crossed this same border three years earlier, fleeing from Saudi authorities and looking for a jihad to join. Now the younger brother was heading back to Saudi Arabia on a suicide mission, carrying a bomb his brother had built for him. At the time the vi

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Det kølige overblik fra en varm sommer

Ingeniøren er på gaden igen med avisen. Her er et overblik over en række af sommerens begivenheder i teknologiens og naturvidenskabens verden, som de har været dækket på ing.dk.

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Debat i Ingeniørforeningen: Er krumme eller lige gader smukkest?

En historisk gennemgang om byplanlægningen igennem tiderne udartede i 1919 til en diskussion, hvor flere ingeniører gik i rette med oplægsholderen, når han mente, at ingeniører var »for optagne af den rette linjes anvendelse til at have øje for hverken det kunstneriske eller landskabelige moment«.

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Why was Hurricane Lane so unpredictable?

Hawaii's Big Island is experiencing severe flooding as of Friday morning, leaving many surprised or unprepared, as the path of Hurricane Lane was looking unpredictable earlier in the week. Why can these storms be so hard to predict?

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Too much of a good thing? Very high levels of 'good' cholesterol may be harmful

Very high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL or 'good') cholesterol may be associated with an increased risk of heart attack and death, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2018.

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Airbnb sues New York over 'government overreach'

Airbnb sued the city of New York on Friday, denouncing as "an extraordinary act of government overreach" a new law forcing home-sharing platforms to disclose data about hosts.

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Powerful Hawaii hurricane downgraded to tropical storm

Hurricane Lane weakened to a tropical storm on Friday as it headed toward the Hawaiian islands. But it still brought torrential rains that immersed a city in waist-deep water and forced people to flee flooding homes, while others jumped off seawalls with boogie boards into the turbulent ocean.

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Automaker Tesla to remain a public company, CEO Musk saysElon Musk Tesla Public

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said Friday that the company would continue to be publicly traded, weeks after suggesting that he would take the pioneering electric carmaker private.

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I have had a heart attack. Do I need open heart surgery or a stent?

New advice on the choice between open heart surgery and inserting a stent via a catheter after a heart attack is launched today. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Guidelines on myocardial revascularization are published online in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.

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Do doctors really know how to diagnose a heart attack?

Confusion over how to diagnose a heart attack is set to be cleared up with new guidance launched today. The 2018 Fourth Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction is published online in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.

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Single pill with two drugs could transform blood pressure treatment

A single pill with two drugs could transform blood pressure treatment, according to the 2018 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Society of Hypertension (ESH) Guidelines on arterial hypertension published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.

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Pregnant women with heart disease should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation

Pregnant women with heart disease should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation. That is one of the recommendations in the 2018 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines for the management of cardiovascular diseases during pregnancy published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.

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Verdens største fly skal skyde raketter ud i rummet

Microsoft-milliardær Paul Allen satser på at have sit enorme raket-fly på vingerne inden 2020, hvor han både vil sende mennesker og satellitter i rummet.

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Photos: Perfectly Preserved Baby Horse Unearthed in Siberian Permafrost

The foal died more than 30,000 years ago, yet everything from its hooves to the fine hairs in its nose remained intact.

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Why the effects of a boozy binge could last longer than you think

A new study suggests that the effects of alcohol on our mental processing could extend to the day after a session of heavy drinking.

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Facts About Yttrium

Properties, sources and uses of the element yttrium.

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Survival Of The Sluggish: Scientists Find An Upside To A Low Metabolism

A study of 5 million years of mollusks suggests that laziness could be a good survival strategy: species that have gone extinct had higher metabolic rates than the ones that exist today. (Image credit: Neogene Atlas of Ancient Life / University of Kansas)

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Mercedes' EQ Silver Arrow Mixes Tech With Old Timey Racing

Inspired by the racing cars of the 1930s, this single seat concept uses a big battery and augmented reality to mix modern luxury with an old-school aesthetic.

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Women in England to be allowed to have abortions at home

Women who are less than 10 weeks pregnant will soon be able to have abortions at home, bringing England in line with Scotland and Wales

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This Asteroid Poses No Risk — Again, No Risk — to Us Earthlings

Within the past couple of days, some media outlets have reported that a "potentially dangerous" asteroid will come "dangerously close" to Earth on Tuesday (Aug. 28) — but unfortunately for sensationalists, this is not true.

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Method to cancel noise without ear-blocking headphones

Disruptive noise is almost everywhere, from people talking in the office corridor to road construction down the street to the neighbor's lawn mower. Researchers are looking to improve this noisy frustration.

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NASA's OSIRIS-REx begins asteroid operations campaign

OSIRIS-REx caught its first glimpse of asteroid Bennu last week and began the final approach toward its target.

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Epigenetic reason for drug resistance discovered in a deadly melanoma

Researchers have discovered a previously unknown reason for drug resistance in a common subtype of melanoma, one of the deadliest forms of cancer, and in turn, have found a new therapy that could prevent or reverse drug resistance for melanoma patients with a particular gene mutation, according to a new study.

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Nanotubes change the shape of water

Nanotubes of the right diameter can prompt water inside to solidify into a square tube, transitioning into a kind of ice. The discovery could lead to new types of nanochannels devices, like nanoscale capacitors or syringes.

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The Atlantic Daily: What Can Be Wrought

What We’re Following Legal Developments: New York prosecutors have granted immunity to the chief financial officer of the Trump Organization as part of their investigation of Michael Cohen—which could now be t he biggest legal threat Donald Trump faces. Congressional Democrats have formed an unlikely alliance with Attorney General Jeff Sessions in order to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller f

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How low is too low? Study highlights serious risks for intensive blood pressure control

Researchers found if patients with hypertension taking prescribed medications experience unusually low blood pressures — systolic blood pressure under 110mmHg — they are twice as likely to experience a fall or faint as patients whose treated blood pressure remains 110mmHg and above.

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What's Causing Hurricane Lane's Massive Rainfall?

Hawaii got a lot of rain today. It will get more this weekend. Here's why.

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Siberian Permafrost Reveals Perfectly Preserved Ice-Age Baby Horse

Melting permafrost in Siberia revealed a preserved foal that is 30,000 to 40,000 years old.

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Inside America’s largest collection of stuffed endangered animals

Nexus Media News A warehouse in Denver became a repository of contraband to raise awareness against illegal poaching. The National Wildlife Property Repository in Denver, CO is trying to raise awareness of, and stop, the black market endangered animal trade.

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Can a turtle live without its shell?

Scientists have found evidence that confirms turtles once lived without shells.

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Australia’s Ban on Huawei Is Just More Bad News for China

The move reflects US influence, and Australia's tense, complicated relationship with China.

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Nikon's long-awaited Z7 mirrorless camera is here, and it's spectacular

Technology Check out the first shots from Nikon’s new mirrorless full-frame camera. Our initial thoughts on Nikon’s Z camera line.

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A CRISPR cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy is closer after a trial in dogs

Treating a fatal muscle disease could be the next major advance for gene editing.

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OSIRIS-REx snaps first images of asteroid Bennu

OSIRIS-REx got its first glimpse of near-Earth asteroid Bennu. The probe will collect a sample from the asteroid and return it to Earth.

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Paris Dispatch: Paris Bees at Work From Notre-Dame to the Luxembourg Gardens

Paris has seen a marked rise in urban beekeeping, with more than 1,000 hives atop landmark buildings as well as in community gardens across the city.

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What We Now Know About Iran's Global Propaganda Campaign

For years, Iran has run its own secret infowar—running a remarkably similar playbook as Russia.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Tip of the Weisselberg

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Allen Weisselberg, the longtime CFO of the Trump Organization, was reportedly granted immunity by federal prosecutors in exchange for providing information about Michael Cohen, Trump’s former lawyer. President Trump announced that he’s canceled Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s upcoming visit to North Korea because “we are not making s

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The Latest Scientific Advice On Drinking Alcohol: Don't.

A new study published in The Lancet finds alcohol is associated with 2.8 million deaths each year worldwide. Researchers conclude that there is no safe level of alcohol and say the risks outweigh the potential benefits.

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Arthritic condition in teens: Scientists find malfunctioning gene

A new study has found that a malfunctioning gene associated with a common arthritic disease that often starts in teenagers is now directly linked to the loss of vital immune cells that may prevent it.

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Bugatti One-Ups Itself With Its New Divo Supercar

The Divo is lighter, stiffer, and faster than the (already extreme) Bugatti Chiron.

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A Daily Drink Is Almost Certainly Not Going to Hurt You

The headline to this story is an alternative interpretation of a study that’s going around this week in the news under headlines like “ No Amount of Alcohol Is Safe, Experts Warn ,” “ No Healthy Level of Alcohol Consumption, Says Major Study ,” and “If You’ve Ever Tasted Alcohol, Get Your Affairs in Order.” The last headline is not real, but you get the idea. I’m not saying the headlines are sens

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Producing hydrogen from splitting water without splitting hairs

In our energy-hungry society, finding cheaper ways of producing and storing energy is a constant battle. Scientists have now devised a method of using copper as a catalyst in the reaction designed to split water and produce hydrogen in gaseous form.

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Sweeter dreams in a peaceful mind

A new study shows that people with more peace of mind in the waking state have more positive dreams, whereas those with more anxiety in the waking state have more negative dreams. This means that dream experiences, as revealed in recalled and reported dreams, may reflect a person's mental health.

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Being the market leader is not everything

Building customer relationships and strengthening the brand are key to a company's financial success — more so than being the market leader, a recent study shows.

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Tree species richness in Amazonian wetlands is three times greater than expected

Compilation of data from forest inventories and botanical collections generates a list of 3,615 tree species in wetland areas of the Amazon Basin.

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Chronic malnutrition in children: A new gut microbial signature

The Afribiota project was set up to advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of chronic malnutrition. A first study recently demonstrated microbiota disorders in malnourished children, revealing the existence of a surprising microbial signature in the gut.

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Cardio exercise and strength training affect hormones differently

Strength training and cardio exercise affect the body differently with regard to the types of hormones they release into the blood, new research shows. One of the conclusions of the study is that cardio exercise produces a far greater amount of the metabolic hormone FGF21 than strength training.

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Flirting flies: More than just winging it

Studies of the song of the fruit flies reveal new findings of how the neurons in the brain function. These results can be used to uncover new knowledge on how brains in general function which in the longer term may have medical significance.

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Nanotubes change the shape of water

First, according to Rice University engineers, get a nanotube hole. Then insert water. If the nanotube is just the right width, the water molecules will align into a square rod.

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Illinois researchers develop method to cancel noise without ear-blocking headphones

Disruptive noise is almost everywhere, from people talking in the office corridor to road construction down the street to the neighbor's lawn mower. Research being conducted at the University of Illinois' Coordinated Science Laboratory is looking to improve this noisy frustration.

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Bowtie-funnel combo best for conducting light; team found answer in simple equation

Running computers on virtually invisible beams of light would make them faster, lighter and more energy efficient. A Vanderbilt team found the answer in a familiar formula.

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One step closer to bioengineered replacements for vessels and ducts

Researchers bioprint complex tubular tissues to replace dysfunctional vessels and ducts in the body.

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Signaling cascade that repairs damaged nerve cells characterized

Through a study of roundworm nerve cells with severed axons, researchers showed that a signaling cascade that normally functions in promoting the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells also acts in inducing axon regeneration. The findings shed light on a fundamental feature of nerve repair, which is limited in the central nervous system in humans, and thus could pave the way towards treatments for brain

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Smoked out: Researchers develop a new wildfire smoke emissions model

Scientists have developed an advanced model that can help predict pollution caused by wildfire smoke. The research provides a physical model that can more reliably predict soot and smoke emissions from wildfires over a range of conditions.

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Carbon emissions in African savannas triple previous estimates

Widespread tree felling in African savannas is producing at least three times as many carbon emissions as was previously thought, research suggests.

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FEMA misses hurricane damage reported on Twitter

Social media sites can help with assessing the impact of natural disasters like Hurricane Harvey, but federal authorities overlook much of the critical information those sites convey, according to new research. The report shows almost half of the Hurricane Harvey damage reports people provided using social media were not captured by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimates. Initial Ha

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Nanotubes change the shape of water

Nanotubes of the right diameter can prompt water inside to solidify into a square tube, transitioning into a kind of ice. The discovery could lead to new types of nanochannels devices, like nanoscale capacitors or syringes.

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Study reveals potential biomarkers of cerebral aneurysm risk

The study reveals specific molecular biological responses involved in flow-induced expansive remodeling of cerebral arteries that may influence differential expression of flowdependent cerebrovascular pathology.

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Protecting your health data — healthcare leaders share their experience with cybersecurity strategy

Like other data-driven organizations, healthcare networks are vulnerable to potentially crippling cyberattacks — but may lag behind other sectors in preparing for and avoiding data breaches, according to a series of articles and commentaries in the Fall issue of Frontiers of Health Services Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). This journal i

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How low is too low? Study highlights serious risks for intensive blood pressure control

Kaiser Permanente research published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found if patients with hypertension taking prescribed medications experience unusually low blood pressures — systolic blood pressure under 110mmHg — they are twice as likely to experience a fall or faint as patients whose treated blood pressure remains 110mmHg and above.

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Mount Etna volcano roars into action with ash and lava

Mount Etna in Sicily has roared back into spectacular volcanic action, sending up plumes of ash and spewing lava.

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No Amount Of Alcohol Is Good For Your Health, Global Study Says

While the study's authors acknowledge moderate drinking may protect some people against heart disease, these potential benefits do not outweigh the risks of cancer and other diseases. (Image credit: Peter Forest/Getty Images for Starz)

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College tours for Chinese teens a rapidly growing market for tourist industry

Growing numbers of families in China are sending their teens on college tours in other countries, creating a potentially lucrative market sector for universities, college towns and tourism-related businesses, a new study suggests.

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Lægeforeningen er ikke gift med regionerne

Det er afgørende for Lægeforeningen at holde fokus på at sikre sundhedsvæsenet tilstrækkeligt med ressourcer og ikke lade sig distrahere af mere eller mindre velgennemtænkte strukturforslag. Svar til Jesper Brandt Andersen.

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Friends' influence helps telecom firms retain customers

Retaining customers is a central concern in many industries, including IT markets, where churn rates—the rate at which subscribers to a service discontinue their subscriptions—are high. For example, cell phone companies report churn rates of as much as 2% per month, which affects companies' value and profitability. A new study tested a strategy to help a telecommunications firm manage churn. Conta

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Shape-shifting material can morph, reverse itself using heat, light

A new material developed by University of Colorado Boulder engineers can transform into complex, pre-programmed shapes via light and temperature stimuli, allowing a literal square peg to morph and fit into a round hole before fully reverting to its original form.

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Google tells Toomey hackers tried to infiltrate staff email

Google has alerted U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey's office that hackers with ties to a "nation-state" sent phishing emails to old campaign email accounts, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Republican said Friday.

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32 kids' medicines are getting recalled. Here's what you need to know

Health Homeopathic drug company King Bio spotted potential bacterial contamination. On Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration issued a statement that the homeopathic drug company King Bio is recalling 32 of its children’s pain-relievers. According…

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The Greatest Disappointment of the Trump Presidency

I n late January 2018 , 12 months into the Donald Trump era, the military scholar Eliot Cohen looked back at an assessment he had written for The Atlantic in late January 2017, soon after Trump was sworn in. In his second piece, Cohen pointed out that for most writers, most of the time, the prospect of revisiting old works of journalistic analysis is uninviting. Journalism is the process of offer

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Donald Trump Sorrowfully Cancels Another North Korea Meeting

It was almost like the last time. Preparations were underway for another high-stakes meeting between old adversaries desperately seeking a way out of their nuclear standoff. And then, suddenly, they weren’t. A day after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo sunnily announced that he would travel to Pyongyang next week alongside a new U.S. special representative for North Korea to make progress on removi

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US taps ex-prosecutor as watchdog over China's ZTE

A former US federal prosecutor will serve as the legal watchdog over Chinese telecoms giant ZTE, which narrowly avoided collapse after being hit with US sanctions, the Commerce Department announced Friday.

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NAFTA talks with US 'very far' along: Mexico's Guajardo

US and Mexican negotiators are "very far" along in efforts to revamp the North American Free Trade Agreement but some issues will have to wait until Canada rejoins the talks, Mexico's Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo said Friday.

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NASA's OSIRIS-REx begins asteroid operations campaign

After an almost two-year journey, NASA's asteroid sampling spacecraft, the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx), caught its first glimpse of asteroid Bennu last week and began the final approach toward its target. Kicking off the mission's asteroid operations campaign on Aug. 17, the spacecraft's PolyCam camera obtained the image from a

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Effective fisheries management can reduce extinction risk of marine fish stocks

Numerous studies have highlighted that climate change impacts will put vulnerable marine species at risk of local and even global extinction; however, local actions through effective fisheries management can reduce the probability of those species' extinction risk by as much as 63 per cent, says a new UBC study.

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Self-healing reverse filter opens the door for many novel applications

A self-healing membrane that acts as a reverse filter, blocking small particles and letting large ones through, is the 'straight out of science fiction' say mechanical engineers.

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Shape-shifting material can morph, reverse itself using heat, light

A new material can transform into complex, pre-programmed shapes via light and temperature stimuli.

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Why polluted air may be a threat to your kidneys

Of the many well-documented risks of dirty air, one potential danger is lesser known: chronic kidney disease.

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Effective fisheries management can reduce extinction risk of marine fish stocks

Effective fisheries management plans, coupled with actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions, both separately, but especially in tandem, would have an immediate effect on the number of marine species that face extinction.

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Mutations in this molecule may have helped mammoths tolerate the cold

Biomedical researchers have captured close-up views of TRPV3, a skin-cell ion channel that plays important roles in sensing temperature, itch, and pain.

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Thomas Frieden, Former CDC Chief, Arrested on Sexual Abuse Charges

A woman told police in July that Frieden groped her in his Brooklyn apartment in October 2017.

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Bowtie-funnel combo best for conducting light; team found answer in simple equation

Running computers on virtually invisible beams of light rather than microelectronics would make them faster, lighter and more energy efficient. A version of that technology already exists in fiber optic cables, but they're much too large to be practical inside a computer.

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Why polluted air may be a threat to your kidneys

Of the many well-documented risks of dirty air, one potential danger is lesser known: chronic kidney disease. Learn about new research and how to protect yourself.

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Acute leukemia: Drug trials show 50 percent cure rate in lab mice

Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most aggressive cancers. Now, scientists have developed a new biological drug with a cure rate of 50 percent for lab mice with acute leukemia.

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New insights on sperm production lay groundwork for solving male infertility

Using advanced techniques, researchers have created the most complete catalog of cells in the male gonads. The aim: to create sperm in a dish.

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One step closer to bioengineered replacements for vessels and ducts

A team of Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers have developed a way to bioprint tubular structures that better mimic native vessels and ducts in the body. The 3-D bioprinting technique allows fine-tuning of the printed tissues' properties, such as number of layers and ability to transport nutrients. These more complex tissues offer potentially viable replacements for damaged tissue. The team d

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Self-healing reverse filter opens the door for many novel applications

A self-healing membrane that acts as a reverse filter, blocking small particles and letting large ones through, is the "straight out of science fiction" work of a team of Penn State mechanical engineers.

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ASA's Aqua satellite finds an Extra-Tropical Cyclone Cimaron

Cimaron has crossed the big island of Japan and became an extra-tropical cyclone. NASA's Aqua satellite looked at Cimaron in infrared light and saw cloud tops were warming as the elongated storm weakened.

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Pic of metal cracking may shed light on bridge collapses

The first 3D image of a microscopic crack propagating through a metal that hydrogen damaged could help prevent the failure of all sorts of things, like bridges and dental implants, researchers say. “For the first time we were able to catch the crack red-handed,” says Michael J. Demkowicz, associate professor of materials science and engineering at Texas A&M University. “It’s much better than arri

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A Leader in the War on Poverty Opens a New Front: Pollution

A pastor is resurrecting the Poor People’s Campaign, a movement started by Martin Luther King Jr. He sees the climate and environment as issues on par with poverty and racism.

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An Undiscovered Facebook Bug Made Me Think I Was Hacked

The social network erroneously turned extra security protections off—after I had *strengthened* my privacy settings.

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New York Prosecutors May Pose a Bigger Threat to Trump Than Mueller

The man who knows “ where all the financial bodies are buried ” in President Donald Trump’s namesake organization may now lead prosecutors in the Southern District of New York directly to them. Allen Weisselberg, the Trump Organization’s chief financial officer who also serves as the treasurer of the Trump Foundation, has been granted immunity by prosecutors in their ongoing investigation of Trum

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Shelters often mislabel dog breeds. But should we be labeling them at all?

Animals Labels impact how likely a pup is to get adopted, even when the label isn’t very accurate. Labels can have devastating consequences for dogs in shelters, who are perceived as less adoptable because of their purported heritage.

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Researchers stop cell suicide that worsens sepsis, arthritis

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered a way to stop immune cell death associated with multiple diseases, including sepsis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and arthritis.The findings, published in Science Immunology , identify a chemical that potently inhibits inflammatory cell death.

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College tours for Chinese teens a rapidly growing market for tourist industry

Middle-class teens in China are embarking on study tours of university campuses in the U.S., a market sector that could be lucrative for public colleges and tourism-related businesses in the Midwest, according to a new study led by Joy Huang, a professor of recreation, sport and tourism at the University of Illinois.

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NASA's OSIRIS-REx begins asteroid operations campaign

OSIRIS-REx caught its first glimpse of asteroid Bennu last week and began the final approach toward its target.

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Russian trolls are weaponizing the vaccine "debate" to divide Americans

A new study shows how bots and Russian trolls have been spreading misinformation and confusion on Twitter about vaccination in an apparent attempt to sow discord among Americans. Read More

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One logical fallacy unites creationists and conspiracy theorists

Creationists think that every aspect of reality was planned. Conspiracy theorists think that major socio-political events were planned. We now know why there is an overlap between the two groups. Read More

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No amount of alcohol is safe, warns new global study

A new study on global alcohol consumption, said to be the largest and most detailed of its kind, says the “safest level of drinking is none.” Read More

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Photos of the Week: Silent Sam, Turbine Down, Mutton Bustin’

A dance on the beach in England, international competition at the 2018 Asian Games, ink on display at the Shanghai Tattoo Extreme & Body Art Expo, the MTV Video Music Awards in New York City, the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, camels in Inner Mongolia, night patrol in El Salvador, Hurricane Lane seen from orbit, agricultural drones in Japan, lightning over Mexico, and much more

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The Democratic Effort to Keep Jeff Sessions in Office

In the long history of strange bedfellows in politics, there may be no more awkward alliance than the one that’s developed over the past year between congressional Democrats and Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Senate Democrats were aghast when Donald Trump, then the president-elect, named one of his staunchest campaign supporters to lead the Justice Department a few weeks after his surprise elect

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New nusinersen drug delivery method identified for spinal muscular atrophy patients

A new report has identified an alternative method to deliver nusinersen to patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) using a subcutaneous intrathecal catheter system (SIC) configured by connecting an intrathecal catheter to an implantable infusion port. SMA is a devastating genetic disease that leads to progressive degeneration of motor neurons that control movement, swallowing, and breathing. I

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Uninsured major cardiac-related hospitalizations declined in first year after ACA

States that expanded eligibility for their Medicaid program in 2014 when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was implemented, saw fewer uninsured patients among major cardiac-related hospitalizations in the first year compared with states that did not expand the program, according to a study released today by the Journal of the American Medical Association Network.

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Friends' influence helps telecom firms retain customers

A new study tested a strategy to help a telecommunications firm manage churn. Contacting not only customers but also their friends helped reduce the customers' propensity to discontinue their ties to the company.

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Mutations in this molecule may have helped mammoths tolerate the cold

Columbia University biomedical researchers have captured close-up views of TRPV3, a skin-cell ion channel that plays important roles in sensing temperature, itch, and pain.

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Shape-shifting material can morph, reverse itself using heat, light

A new material developed by University of Colorado Boulder engineers can transform into complex, pre-programmed shapes via light and temperature stimuli.

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Bowtie-funnel combo best for conducting light; team found answer in simple equation

Running computers on virtually invisible beams of light would make them faster, lighter and more energy efficient. A Vanderbilt team found the answer in a familiar formula.

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Self-healing reverse filter opens the door for many novel applications

A self-healing membrane that acts as a reverse filter, blocking small particles and letting large ones through, is the 'straight out of science fiction' work of a team of Penn State mechanical engineers.

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Advanced microscope technology reveals novel side to cell signaling complex

Advanced microscopes have helped researchers determine at atomic resolution the structure of a molecular complex implicated in birth defects and several cancers.

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Viral outbreaks could be predicted two years in advance by mathematical model

Scientists have identified the cause of outbreaks of enterovirus, one of the most prevalent types of virus in the world.

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New channel-gating mechanism discovered

Computational biophysicists have cracked the secret of how cells regulate Big Potassium (BK) channels.

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Former CDC Director Tom Frieden Arrested on Sexual Misconduct Charge

The alleged incident occurred in October — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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India's devastating rains match climate change forecasts

Once-a-century rains that have pounded the Indian state of Kerala and displaced 1.3 million people are in line with the predictions of climate scientists, who warn that worse is to come if global warming continues unabated.

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NASA looks at heavy rainmaker in Hurricane Lane

Cloud top temperatures provide scientists with an understanding of the power of a tropical cyclone. NASA's Aqua satellite observed Hurricane Lane in infrared light to those temperatures.

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Glowing NASA Map Shows Huge Dust Clouds Swirling Across Earth

We live our whole lives wandering from one cloud of dust to the next. A new NASA image lets you see that for yourself.

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Effective fisheries management can reduce extinction risk of marine fish stocks

Effective fisheries management plans, coupled with actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions, both separately, but especially in tandem, would have an immediate effect on the number of marine species that face extinction.

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NASA's Aqua satellite finds an Extra-Tropical Cyclone Cimaron

Cimaron has crossed the big island of Japan and became an extra-tropical cyclone. NASA's Aqua satellite looked at Cimaron in infrared light and saw cloud tops were warming as the elongated storm weakened.

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One step closer to bioengineered replacements for vessels and ducts

Researchers bioprint complex tubular tissues to replace dysfunctional vessels and ducts in the body.

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Simple eye exam may detect Alzheimer’s disease early

It may be possible in the future to screen patients for Alzheimer’s disease using a simple eye exam, according to new research. Using technology similar to what is found in eye doctors’ offices, researchers have detected evidence indicating Alzheimer’s disease in older patients who had no symptoms. “This technique has great potential to become a screening tool that helps decide who should undergo

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NASA tracks tropical storm Soulik into the Sea of Japan

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm Soulik after it moved into the Sea of Japan and saw that wind shear was adversely affecting the storm.

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Strange gamma rays from the sun may help decipher its magnetic fields

The sun spits out more and weirder gamma rays than anyone expected, which could give a new view of the sun’s magnetic fields.

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Yes, Antarctica has a fire department

Yes, Antarctica has (and needs) a fire department. Megan Branson spent three seasons there as a fire-fighter/paramedic.

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Texas Man Survived a Shark Bite. Now the Wound Has Flesh-Eating Bacteria.

As if a painful shark bite wasn't enough, this man's wound was infected with ocean-dwelling flesh-eating bacteria.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Quantum Computing Explained

On this episode, WIRED writer Tom Simonite explains quantum computing to us. Kinda.

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New immunotherapy inhibits tumor growth and protects against metastases

Scientists have taken important steps forward in the development of a cancer-targeting immunotherapy. Researchers developed a treatment in mice that destroys part of the tumor and stimulates the immune system to attack persistent surviving cancer cells.

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From guts to glory: The evolution of gut defense

A newly discovered gut 'missing link' shows how mammals evolved to live with their microbes.

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The youngest smoke more

An increasing number of children under 15 years old have started to smoke during the last 40 years in Europe.

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Teens' screen addiction might be contagious, and parents are patient zero

Technology New research shows they learned it by watching you. New research shows that both parents and children suffer the effects of too much screen time.

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How Climate Change Is Creating A New Breed Of Hurricane

How Climate Change Is Creating A New Breed Of Hurricane Climate change is warming our oceans, and that thermal energy is fueling stronger hurricanes. How Climate Change Is Creating A New Breed Of Hurricane Video of How Climate Change Is Creating A New Breed Of Hurricane Earth Friday, August 24, 2018 – 13:15 Annie Roth, Contributor A Category 3 hurricane is currently barrelling across the Pacific

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5 Reasons LeBron James's School Really Is Unique

Headlines touting the Next Big Idea in education have become so common in recent years that it’s tempting to dismiss every new K-12 initiative as a fad or fantasy doomed to either flatline or fail. A skeptical observer might be inclined to sweep LeBron James’s I Promise School into that pile. But teachers and executives who’ve worked closely with James on this endeavor insist that he won’t let th

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Natural sugar cuts diabetes risk in mice

A natural sugar called trehalose blocks glucose from the liver and activates a gene that boosts insulin sensitivity, which reduces the chance of developing diabetes, according to new research in mice. Activating the gene also triggers an increase in burned calories, reduces fat accumulation and weight gain, and lessens measures of fats and cholesterol in the blood. The findings suggest new possib

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California bill restricting plastic straws goes to governor

California is poised to become the first state to restrict the distribution of plastic straws at restaurants under a bill approved Thursday by lawmakers, capturing the attention of environmentalists nationwide who hope the idea, like many with origins in the Golden State, will spread across the nation.

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Bitcoin sluger strøm som aldrig før

Hele Danmarks strømforbug er lavere end kryptovalutaens mindst mulige strømforbrug.

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Fires, floods and other calamities fuel this app's popularity

On the morning a fire forced the evacuation of her daughter's school, Ruth Kobayashi found out about it when her smartphone bleated out the distinctive tone she knows she can't ignore: the Orange County high school's app-based emergency communications system.

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Here’s What Happens When a Few Dozen People Take Small Doses of Psychedelics

In high school, my rebellious friends used to tell me I was way too neurotic to handle hallucinogens such as mushrooms and acid. But science is beginning to show that some forms of psychedelics may be able to calm anxieties and lift people out of depression. Prominent thinkers such as Michael Pollan and Ayelet Waldman have begun exploring the therapeutic benefits of psychedelics in certain contex

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Thomas Frieden, Former Head of C.D.C., Arrested on Groping Charge

Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, who headed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for eight years, was also charged with forcible touching and harassment of a Brooklyn woman, the police said.

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Francis Collins Pranked by Sacha Baron Cohen

Duped into an interview with the comedian, the NIH director caught on to the joke and seized it as a teaching opportunity.

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Trump's Pick for Science Advisor Dodges Climate Change Question

In a hearing with Senators, meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier avoided climate change questions by saying it wasn’t his expertise.

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Trial in lawsuit over police surveillance of protesters ends

A federal judge will decide whether the police department in Memphis, Tennessee, violated free speech rights of protesters by watching them and monitoring their social media accounts.

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NASA Astronauts Could Fly to Moon-Orbiting Station by 2024, Pence Says

The Vice President’s remarks offered new details on the Trump administration’s space-policy plans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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French tomato grower takes on Monsanto over weedkiller

Weaving through the aisles of his greenhouse in northern France, Jean-Claude Terlet, a retired farmer who grows tomatoes for local markets, seems to be brimming with energy.

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Remember Windows 95? Now you can download it on most OS systems, for free.

Microsoft Windows 95 was launched exactly 23 years ago today, selling for the tidy sum of $209.95. Now you can download it for free on almost any device. Go ahead. You know you want to. Read More

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DMT makes your brain think it's dying—and it's completely wonderful

A new study compares the psychedelic DMT with near-death experiences. Read More

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NASA tracks Tropical Storm Soulik into the Sea of Japan

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm Soulik after it moved into the Sea of Japan and saw that wind shear was adversely affecting the storm.

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NASA looks at heavy rainmaker in Hurricane Lane

Cloud top temperatures provide scientists with an understanding of the power of a tropical cyclone. NASA's Aqua satellite observed Hurricane Lane in infrared light to those temperatures.

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French winemakers cheer vintage year

2018 is shaping up to be a vintage year for French wine—the best for almost a decade.

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Tourists complain French cicadas are 'too loud'

It is the quintessential sound of the Mediterranean in summer, but for some French tourists the cicadas of Provence are just too noisy.

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Tech giants aim to coordinate fight on misinformation: report

Major technology firms including Facebook, Google and Twitter were set to meet Friday as part of an effort to coordinate the battle against misinformation campaigns by foreign agents, a media report said.

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What Sea Lice Taught Me About Life

“Um, so, I’m really itchy?” I say, as my instructor, Randy, pushes me out to sea to catch another wave. I am 52-years-old, taking my first surfing lesson . We are in Ocean City, Maryland, where 36th Street meets the Atlantic. It’s early enough that the sun is still quite low on the horizon, silhouetting Randy who, at 21, is the same age as my middle child. I know I should keep this in mind and no

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Verizon: No internet speed restrictions for first responders

A nationwide telecommunications company that slowed internet service to firefighters as they battled the largest wildfire in California history says it has removed all speed cap restrictions for first responders on the West Coast.

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7.1-magnitude quake hits Peru-Brazil border: USGS

A powerful 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck Peru's border with Brazil on Friday, the US Geological Survey said, but national authorities said there were no initial reports of casualties or damage in the sparsely populated region.

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Raging forest fire bears down on German villages

A large forest fire raging 50 kilometres (30 miles) southwest of Berlin continued to spread early Friday after hundreds of people were evacuated from their homes.

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Disappearing into thin air

In a major advance towards targeting cancer without harming healthy tissue, researchers have found a way to exploit hypoxia (reduced oxygen levels) — a condition which occurs during the development of many common cancers and drives their progression and spread.

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An avatar uses your gait to predict how many calories you will burn

New avatar-based software looks at how people walk in order to predict their energy expenditure. The software, originally intended for roboticists and for researchers who develop prosthetics and exoskeletons, could have many uses in both medicine and sports.

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Movement control: how our brain responds to unexpected situations

Scientists have demonstrated that the motor cortex is necessary for the execution of corrective movements in response to unexpected changes of sensory input but not when the same movements are executed spontaneously. Signatures of differential neuronal usage in the cortex accompany these two phenomena.

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3-D cell environment key for divvying up chromosomes

Epithelial cells grown on a plastic dish are worse at segregating their chromosomes than epithelial cells growing in mice, a new study shows. The results may help explain why chromosomes go awry in cancer.

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Bioinspired enzyme model with a redox switch

Coupled oxygen transfer and electron transfer reactions that use cofactors are enzymatic reactions of crucial significance to all lifeforms from bacteria to vertebrates. In the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, scientists have introduced a model for the enzyme sulfite oxidase. It is based on a molybdenum complex whose special ligands can be oxidized to allow coupling of oxygen transfer to a

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Hurricane Lane lumbers toward Hawaii with 120 mph winds

Hurricane Lane spun in a dangerously unpredictable path Friday as it lumbered toward Hawaii, dumping rain on the mostly rural Big Island and forcing more than 1,000 people to flee to emergency shelters.

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Why Social Media Shouldn’t Censor Hate Speech

Nadine Strossen, the former president of the ACLU, argues that censorship does more harm than good—especially when it comes to social media platforms. In an interview filmed at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival in June, Strossen explains that hate speech is not a recognized legal concept in the United States. “That said,” she continues, “speech that conveys a hateful message—along with speech that co

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Keeping cancer out of breath blocks drug resistance

Chemists have demonstrated a new approach to blocking cancer-drug resistance that they believe could be applied to any type of cancer. In a dramatic result, the approach — which involves chemically combining two existing drugs in a new way — produced 50 percent smaller tumors in mice compared with a traditional treatment with the same drugs given separately.

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The birth and death of proteins in a single cell

A new method developed by bioengineers has disentangled the 'see-saw' balance of protein synthesis and degradation in single cells.

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How RNA regulates genes in embryo that affect seizure susceptibility

Scientists have discovered how a type of RNA, called Evf2 enhancer RNA, regulates key genes during a critical stage in embryonic brain development.

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What the grieving mother orca tells us about how animals experience death

For many weeks, news of a mother orca carrying her dead infant through the icy waters of the Salish Sea captured the attention of many around the world. Keeping the infant afloat as best she could, the orca, named Tahlequah, also known as J35 by scientists, persisted for 17 days, before finally dropping the dead calf.

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New insights on sperm production lay groundwork for solving male infertility

Nearly one in eight couples in the U.S. face infertility, and about half of those cases can be attributed to semen abnormalities in the male partner.

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EU fjerner straftold på kinesiske solcellepaneler

Fjernelsen betyder lavere priser på solcelleanlæg i Danmark og i resten af Europa, vurderer en glad solcellebranche. Beslutningen får effekt fra 3. september.

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Researchers achieve multifunctional solid-state quantum memory

The team of Li Chengfeng, Zhou Zongquan and others from the CAS Key Lab of Quantum Information developed a multi-degree-of-freedom (DOF) multiplexed solid-state quantum memory, and demonstrated photon pulse operation functions with time and frequency DOFs. The results were published in Nature Communications recently.

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From guts to glory: The evolution of gut defense

A new Nature Communications paper has journeyed to the inside of our insides, as a team from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University has mapped the evolutionary journey of how animal guts have evolved to defend themselves from microbial attack.

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To Highlight Gender Gaps, Scientists Decline Opportunities

Activists are protesting imbalanced conferences, editorial boards, and other professional activities by refusing to join.

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Many young adults lack financial literacy, economic stability, study finds

Many young people lack financial literacy and money-management skills, indicating an urgent need for educational programs to help them enter adulthood better equipped to handle their financial affairs, University of Illinois graduate student Gaurav Sinha found in a new study. Social work professors Min Zhan and Kevin Tan co-wrote the paper, published recently in the journal Children and Youth Serv

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Scientists Are Starting to Test Claims About "Microdosing"

Could psychedelics lead to improved antidepressant or anti-anxiety therapies? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Alzheimer's one day may be predicted during eye exam

Using technology similar to what is found in many eye doctors' offices, researchers have detected evidence suggesting Alzheimer's in older patients who had no symptoms of the disease.

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The unexpected upside of E. coli

The often maligned bacterium E. coli plays an instrumental role in helping its host absorb iron, according to new research that could lead to novel therapies for iron-deficiency anemia.

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Algal blooms a threat to small lakes and ponds, too

Harmful algae isn't just a problem for high-profile bodies of water — it poses serious, toxic threats in small ponds and lakes as well, new research has found.

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On-again, off-again relationships might be toxic for mental health

The pattern of breaking up and getting back together can impact an individual's mental health and not for the better, new research shows. The study suggests people in these kinds of relationships should make informed decisions about stabilizing or safely terminating their relationships.

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Safe' UV light may prevent infections in catheters, cardiac drivelines

Optical fibers that emit a type of UV light that's safe for skin — but deadly for drug-resistant bacteria — may be able to prevent infections around skin-penetrating medical devices, new research shows.

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How This Will End

Michael Gerson, one of the most eloquent and principled critics of Donald Trump, insists that we are at June 1973, the moment when John Dean’s testimony broke the dam that a year later swept Richard Nixon off into disgrace. Others agree: This is an inflection point. And yet an equally well-informed friend insists, “I no longer believe in political inflection points and neither should you.” Who kn

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A new permafrost gas mysterium

Permafrost thaw allows biological activity in previously frozen ground, leading to a potential release of climate-relevant gases. We have heard about carbon dioxide and the potential 'methane bomb', but what about other gases? A new study from University of Copenhagen shows that soil microorganisms play an important role.

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Journey to the fantastical microbe realm hidden right on your face

Science Your body means the world to the microbes that live on it. To millions of minuscule microbes, your body is like a great expanse of open prairie. And snowy mountains. And stinky swamps.

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Quantum Fluctuations Near Absolute Zero Visualized for the First Time

Quantum Fluctuations Near Absolute Zero Visualized for the First Time The technique could help scientists better understand why certain materials have the properties they do. Quantum.jpg Pictured: Quantum fluctuations imaged for the first time. Image credits: Beena Kalisky Physics Friday, August 24, 2018 – 11:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — It looks like static on a TV screen. But t

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How Disease and Conquest Carved a New Planetary Landscape

Many people think that in the thousands of years following the rise of agriculture, human societies were static. They were not. Empires rose—some flourished, then perished, while others persisted. Most people remained subsistence farmers who kept themselves, or themselves and the ruling elites, alive. Foraging as a way of life was pushed to agriculturally marginal lands. Populations grew rapidly,

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LBJ’s Wild Ex-President Hair (And the Story Behind It)

Long before Donald Trump’s wisps of cotton candy brushed the door frames of the Oval Office, many American presidents had memorable hairstyles: George Washington’s powdered tresses, Andrew Jackson’s unruly mane, Abraham Lincoln’s stolid chinstrap. Yet the follicular legacies of some retired presidents remain woefully underappreciated. This week though, thanks to a photo that made the rounds onlin

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Searching Is a Fiendishly Clever Online Thriller

Twenty minutes into Searching , after David Kim (John Cho) goes to bed, the screen goes dark. Then, suddenly, there’s a burst of color, as ribbons of light dance across the frame. It’s a screen saver , one anyone who’s ever used a Mac might be quite familiar with, and it’s a perfect model of tranquility until a notification starts flashing in the corner. David is getting a FaceTime call from his

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'The Most Simple Constitutional Arguments Become Complicated Once Guns Are Involved'

In 1971, a slim volume filled with instructions detailing how to create explosives and other weapons proliferated across bookshelves. The Anarchist Cookbook was one ideological young American’s attempt to make a political statement; in this case , the author was registering his opposition to the Vietnam War and the draft letter he had received. The book set off an urgent and fearful debate. In a

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Study questions the role of lead poisoning in Franklin Expedition deaths

A team of investigators from across Canada, including a trio of Western researchers, have raised serious doubt about the popular belief that lead poisoning played a role in the death of members of the famed Franklin Expedition. The study, Franklin expedition lead exposure: New insights from high resolution confocal X-ray fluorescence imaging of skeletal microstructure, was published today in PLOS

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Do dogs have feelings?

If you live with a dog you just know when it's happy or miserable, don't you? Of course you do. Even the scientific community, now admits that dogs have emotions – even if scientists can't directly measure what they are experiencing.

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Shell Oil Quietly Urges Lawmakers to Support Carbon Tax

The company sees carbon pricing as an essential policy tool to tackle climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Scientists Created the Purest Drop of Water on Earth

If cleanliness is next to godliness, then this is one divine droplet.

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Kerala floods—why it's so hard to detect the fingerprints of global warming

The devastating floods in the Indian state of Kerala are a stark reminder of the vulnerability of the world's most densely populated regions to weather and climate phenomena. In addition to the tragic loss of several hundred lives, widespread floods driven by unusually high and persistent monsoon rains have severely impacted the region's fragile infrastructure and displaced more than a million peo

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Decline in uninsured hospitalizations for cardiovascular events after ACA Medicaid expansion

Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was associated with a decline in the proportion of uninsured hospitalizations for major cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

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Meth-Addicted Mothers and Child Abuse

In the United States, methamphetamine is making a comeback. Following the legalization of medical marijuana in California, Mexican cartels pivoted to the production of pure liquid meth, which is brought across the border and crystallized in conversion labs. There is more meth on the streets than ever before, according to William Ruzzamenti, a 30-year Drug Enforcement Administration veteran and th

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A molecular pit crew responsible for refuelling in signaling cells

During IndyCar races, pit stop crews will often refuel a car, replace wheels and complete minor repairs on a race car within 10 seconds. In this short time, a dozen or so people work rapidly and in a highly coordinated manner to complete a number of tasks with extraordinary efficiency.

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Genetically engineered virus spins gold into beads

Engineers have altered a virus to arrange gold atoms into spheroids measuring a few nanometers in diameter. The finding could make production of some electronic components cheaper, easier, and faster.

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New study highlights shark protections, vulnerability to fishing

A new analysis shows that the habitats of three shark species (great hammerhead, tiger, and bull sharks) are relatively well protected from longline fishing in federal waters off the southeastern United States, but that that some prime locations are still vulnerable to fishing.

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NASA Will Launch a Laser Into Space Next Month to Track Earth's Melting Ice

NASA is preparing to launch a cutting-edge, laser-armed satellite that will spend three years studying Earth's changing ice sheets.

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Eyewire Brain Zoo: Anaconda Evil Cubes

Let’s round the corner to our next animal habitat, where we’ll see some ssssslithering ssssssnakes. Anaconda Evil Cubes Aug 25 @12 AM – Aug 30 @12 PM US ET Boas and pythons, including the anaconda, utilize their infrared vision to zero in on their prey. Humans don’t have this ability, but we have invented cameras that allow us to turn thermal signals into colors we can see within the human visibl

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Farvel til halogen: 1. september bliver halogenpæren forbudt

60 år med halogenpærer slutter lørdag den 1. september: Pæren bliver nemlig forbudt at sælge. Det vil stadig være muligt at købe halogenpærerne, så længe de er på restlager i butikkerne. Men efter det tager LED over.

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Effect of peer feedback on academic writing

Feedback from fellow students on academic writing is as informative as that of teachers. That is one of the findings in Bart Huisman's (ICLON) dissertation. Defence on 12 September.

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Scientists unravel history of lost harbour of Pisa

New insights into the evolution and eventual disappearance of Portus Pisanus, the lost harbour of Pisa, have been revealed.

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Will Baby Poop Bacteria Become the New Probiotic?

Could the key to better gut health reside in a probiotic cocktail from baby poop?

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Image: Hurricane Lane

The Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite took the temperature at the top of Hurricane Lane as it headed towards Hawaii's Big Island on 22 August 2018. Lane weakened to a Category 3 storm on 23 August, just before it hit Hawaii. Still a powerful storm, it has brought torrential rain to the Big Island. The island is still reeling from months of devastating lava flows from the Kilauea volcano and is now

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Scientists have developed an effective marker for cancer diagnosis and therapy

A research group consisting of scientists from NUST MISIS, the Technical University of Munich, Helmholtz Zentrum München, the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the University of Oldenburg have developed a system that allows doctors to both improve the accuracy of diagnosing malignant cells and to provide additional opportunities for cancer treatment. The magnetoferritin compound is the main elemen

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How we can use light to see deep inside our bodies and brains | Mary Lou Jepsen

In a series of mind-bending demos, inventor Mary Lou Jepsen shows how we can use red light to see and potentially stimulate what's inside our bodies and brains. Taking us to the edge of optical physics, Jepsen unveils new technologies that utilize light and sound to track tumors, measure neural activity and could possibly replace the MRI machine with a cheaper, more efficient and wearable system.

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How To Survive A 10,000-Foot Fall

Sometimes people who fall great distances survive. How do they get so lucky? Scientists share the secrets of an implausible safe landing. (Image credit: Cloudytronics/Getty Images)

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Research reveals dangerous midlife switch of ditching activity to sit still

People are falling into a trap of greater inactivity during middle age, according to new research.

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Mandarin language learners get a boost from AI

IBM Research and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) are collaborating on a new approach to help students learn Mandarin. The strategy pairs an AI-powered assistant with an immersive classroom environment that has not been used previously for language instruction. The classroom, called the Cognitive Immersive Room (CIR), makes students feel as though they are in restaurant in China, a garden, o

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Fog Is Full of Microbes

The Namib desert is one of the driest places on Earth. Its coast, however, is one of the foggiest. Some days, the fog—the result of a bone-chillingly cold ocean current that runs along the coast and condenses any water in the air above it—rolls inland to shroud the Namib’s famous sand dunes in white. “It’s such a dramatic landscape already,” says Sarah Evans. “Then you have this fog that’s there

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Emissions in savannas triple previous estimates

Widespread tree felling in African savannas is producing at least three times as many carbon emissions as was previously thought, research suggests.

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The dimension of a space can be inferred from the abstract network structure

Networks describe relations between objects. They show how objects relate to one another and which ones are mutually influential. In this context, how does space impact structure? Geoinformatics scientist Dr. Franz-Benjamin Mocnik was particularly interested in answering this question. In his study, the Heidelberg University researcher demonstrated that the spatial reference can be identified in a

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Hawaii Braces for 'Catastrophic Flooding' and Landslides from Hurricane Lane

Waves as high as 25 feet (7.6 meters) could smash into the Hawaiian coastline today (Aug. 24) as Hurricane Lane approaches.

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Risk adjusting for race and poverty bolsters rankings of some hospitals

Sociodemographic risk adjustment of emergency care-sensitive mortality improves apparent performance of some hospitals treating a large number of nonwhite, Hispanic, or poor patients.

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MSU scientists closer to solving arthritic condition in teens

A new Michigan State University study has found that a malfunctioning gene associated with a common arthritic disease that often starts in teenagers is now directly linked to the loss of vital immune cells that may prevent it.

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INRS takes aim at the dreaded tropical disease leishmaniasis

Leishmania is a microorganism threatening the health of over 500 million people at risk of crossing its path. Although leishmaniasis, the disease caused by the parasite, has been on the radar of scientists for a long time, the quest for affordable and effective treatment continues. INRS professors Albert Descoteaux and Steven LaPlante have developed a new, cost-effective strategy to rapidly identi

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New equal Earth 2-D map offers better perspective of the world

Three mapmakers with the Environmental Systems Research Institute, Monash University and the North American Cartographic Information Society have created a new map of the world that more accurately displays both the size and shape of the continents. In their paper published on the International Journal of Geographical Information Science website, Bojan Šavrič , Tom Patterson and Bernhard Jenny exp

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Don't blame women for leaving fields like engineering—blame bad attitudes

There are reasons why feminists use the slogan "the personal is political", especially when men make arguments using the age old idea that "biology is destiny".

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Why queues for women's toilets are longer than men's

If you're a woman, then you've definitely experienced the frustration of standing in a long, slow-moving queue for the toilets while watching men quickly go in and out of theirs. And you've likely had the same conversation with others in that queue—Jeez, why does it always take so long!"

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Hollywood Can’t Ignore the Success of Crazy Rich Asians

Just three weeks ago , Crazy Rich Asians had been pegged by box-office experts as a minor hit at best, tracked to open at around $18 million over five days—a respectable number given its $30 million budget, but hardly a bonanza. Last weekend, the romantic comedy nearly doubled that early prediction, making $35.2 million in its opening weekend and showing impressive staying power over the followin

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Experts voice safety concerns about new pebble-bed nuclear reactors

Researchers advise caution as a commercial-scale nuclear reactor known as HTR-PM prepares to become operational in China. The reactor is a pebble-bed, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), a design that is ostensibly safer but that researchers in the US and Germany warn does not eliminate the possibility of a serious accident.

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Majority of current and former cancer patients age 50-plus are happy with their life

Two-thirds of current cancer patients, and more than three-quarters of former cancer patients aged 50 and over, are mentally flourishing despite their illness, according to a new study.

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New research presents alternative methods, like robo-advisors, to manage retirement income

The need to help retirees make prudent spending decisions has led to the growth of a large industry of financial advisors, but a new article suggests that improved policy approaches may be more effective. A new study reviews the psychology behind rapid spending decisions and presents five policy options that lead to the smarter self-management of assets.

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New research proposes using local data in resolving malnutrition

Kwashiorkor, one of the most extreme forms of malnutrition, is estimated to affect more than a hundred thousand children annually. However, it has largely been overlooked by the scientific community. Researchers have recently attempted to increase its recognition by conducting a global study of more than 1.7 million children, but a new study reveals that kwashiorkor may be a local phenomenon that

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Using artificial intelligence to locate risky dams

In the U.S., 15,498 of the more than 88,000 dams in the country are categorized as having high hazard potential—meaning that if they fail, they could kill people. As of 2015, some 2,000 of these high hazard dams are in need of repair. With a hefty price tag estimated at around $20 billion, those repairs aren't going to happen overnight.

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Novel X-ray optics boost imaging capabilities at NSLS-II

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new approach to 3-D x-ray imaging that can visualize bulky materials in great detail—an impossible task with conventional imaging methods. The novel technique could help scientists unlock clues about the structural information of countless materials, from batteries to biological systems.

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Tree species richness in Amazonian wetlands is three times greater than expected

Compilation of data from forest inventories and botanical collections generates a list of 3,615 tree species in wetland areas of the Amazon Basin.

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Being the market leader is not everything

Building customer relationships and strengthening the brand are key to a company's financial success — more so than being the market leader, a recent study shows.

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Sweeter dreams in a peaceful mind

A new study by researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, and the University of Skövde, Sweden, shows that people with more peace of mind in the waking state have more positive dreams, whereas those with more anxiety in the waking state have more negative dreams. This means that dream experiences, as revealed in recalled and reported dreams, may reflect a person's mental health.

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Producing hydrogen from splitting water without splitting hairs

Summary In our energy-hungry society, finding cheaper ways of producing and storing energy is a constant battle. Now, in a new study published in EPJ D, Austrian scientists and their US colleagues have devised a method of using copper as a catalyst in the reaction designed to split water and produce hydrogen in gaseous form.

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A molecular pit crew responsible for refuelling in signaling cells

Raghu Padinjat's group from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, has identified a molecular pit crew that helps to refuel signaling cells efficiently. Researchers from the group have shown that three proteins–the enzyme PI4KIIIα (phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα), and two other proteins, Efr3 and TTC7– are crucial for maintaining levels of the lipid molecule PIP2 (pho

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New insights on sperm production lay groundwork for solving male infertility

Using advanced techniques, Michigan Medicine researchers have created the most complete catalog of cells in the male gonads. The aim: to create sperm in a dish.

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Uhyggelig familiesygdom fik læger til at undre sig: Kan gener smitte?

Gravid kvinde blev måske smittet med en dødelig hjernesygdom af sit foster, der havde en anden livsfarlig, arvelig sygdom.

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How Africa can up its game on water management for agriculture

Global agriculture is facing unprecedented challenges. It's estimated that the world's population will reach 9.1 billion by 2050 with an ever expanding middle class. Current food production levels will have to be increased by 70% to meet future nutrition requirements.

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Nanotechnology vs. viruses—researchers introduce innovative and cost-effective antiviral compound

An international interdisciplinary team of virologists and biochemists that includes scientists at Freie Universität has developed low-cost and "cell-friendly" nanogels that can efficiently prevent viral infections. The flexible nanogels mimic cell surface receptors where several viral families bind. Pathogens adhere to the nanogel molecules, so the likelihood of an infection of cells decreases si

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Infrared beams show cell types in a different light

By shining highly focused infrared light on living cells, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) hope to unmask individual cell identities, and to diagnose whether the cells are diseased or healthy.

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Sneak Peak: New Season of Treasure Quest

Watch this sneak peak of the new season of Treasure Quest. Tune in Friday, August 24 at 9p to catch the premiere! Stream Full Episodes of Treasure Quest: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/treasure-quest-snake-island/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TreasureQuestTV/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: http

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Calcium-catalyzed reactions of element-H bonds

Calcium-catalyzed reactions of element-H bonds provide precise and efficient tools for hydrofunctionalization. Owning to the great abundance, non-toxicity, and biocompatible features of Ca element, Ca-catalyzed reactions attract a broad academic interesting and are of great industrial application values.

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Scientists elaborated upon carbon sink/source patterns of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea

The sinks/sources of carbon in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea exert great influences on coastal ecosystem dynamics and regional climate change process. Scientist from IOCAS have elaborated upon the variation and key controlling factors of carbon sink/source in the YS and ECS from aspects of air-sea CO2 exchange, dissolved and particulate carbon in seawaters, and carbon burial in sediments, whic

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Researcher helps crack decades-old math problem

Spiros Michalakis, manager of outreach and staff researcher at Caltech's Institute for Quantum Information and Matter (IQIM), and Matthew Hastings, a researcher at Microsoft, have solved one of the world's most challenging open problems in the field of mathematical physics. The problem, related to the "quantum Hall effect," was first proposed in 1999 as one of 13 significant unsolved problems to b

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Facebook to tell 4 million users their data may have been misused

Facebook will notify 4 million users of potential data misuse because of the myPersonality project. A New Scientist investigation revealed the scandal earlier this year

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Moving is hard. Let these apps do the heavy lifting.

DIY Make your phone carry that stress. Moving to a new house is rarely a simple process. To make life easier, these apps help you do everything from finding a new place to organizing your checklist.

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Specialeråd blåstempler sammenlægninger på hjerteområdet

Centralisering af visse former for hjerteundersøgelser vil styrke behandling af af hjertepatienter og reducere antallet af dobbeltundersøgelser i Region Midtjylland, vurderer professor.

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Control system simulator helps operators learn to fight hackers

A simulator that comes complete with a virtual explosion could help the operators of chemical processing plants – and other industrial facilities – learn to detect attacks by hackers bent on causing mayhem. The simulator will also help students and researchers understand better the security issues of industrial control systems.

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Why do weever fish make beach visits a painful experience?

Scientists from the University of Plymouth are carrying out research into one of the more painful features of the South West's beaches – weever fish.

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For first time in 40 years, cure for acute leukemia within reach

Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most aggressive cancers. While other cancers have benefitted from new treatments, there has been no encouraging news for most leukemia patients for the past 40 years. Until now. As published today in the scientific journal Cell, Professor Yinon Ben-Neriah and his research team at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU)'s Faculty of Medicine have developed a new

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In ancient Rome, insults in politics knew hardly any boundaries

According to historians, political debates in ancient Rome were conducted with great harshness and personal attacks, which were in no way inferior to some of the hate speech on the Internet.

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Flirting flies: More than just winging it

Studies of the song of the fruit flies reveal new findings of how the neurons in the brain function. These results can be used to uncover new knowledge on how brains in general function which in the longer term may have medical significance.

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Signaling cascade that repairs damaged nerve cells characterized

Through a study of roundworm nerve cells with severed axons, researchers at Nagoya University showed that a signaling cascade that normally functions in promoting the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells also acts in inducing axon regeneration. The findings shed light on a fundamental feature of nerve repair, which is limited in the central nervous system in humans, and thus could pave the way towards

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Letbanen Odder – Aarhus er klar til afgang

Efter to år er Letbanen mellem Odder og Aarhus er klar til at køre med passagerer. Den sidste godkendelse er netop gået igennem.

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New study finds zoning ineffective for deer winter habitat conservation

Protection of only narrowly defined zones of winter habitat is not an effective means of regional habitat conservation for white-tailed deer, according to a new University of Maine study.

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Researchers develop a new wildfire smoke emissions model

A BYU chemical engineering professor and his Ph.D. student have developed an advanced model that can help predict pollution caused by wildfire smoke.

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Pushing the plasma density limit

For decades, researchers have been exploring ways to replicate on Earth the physical process of fusion that occurs naturally in the sun and other stars. Confined by its own strong gravitational field, the sun's burning plasma is a sphere of fusing particles, producing the heat and light that makes life possible on earth. But the path to a creating a commercially viable fusion reactor, which would

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Low muscle strength linked to earlier death

People with low muscle strength don’t typically live as long as their stronger peers, according to a new study. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, chronic health conditions, and smoking history, researchers found that people with low muscle strength are 50 percent more likely to die earlier. …muscle strength may be an even more important predictor of overall health and longevity than m

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Chronic malnutrition in children: A new gut microbial signature

The Afribiota project, led by the Institut Pasteur in Paris, in Madagascar and in Bangui, in collaboration with the University of British Colombia, Inserm and Collège de France, was set up to advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of chronic malnutrition. A first study recently demonstrated microbiota disorders in malnourished children, revealing the existence of a surprising micro

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Carbon emissions in African savannas triple previous estimates

Widespread tree felling in African savannas is producing at least three times as many carbon emissions as was previously thought, research suggests.

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Smoked out: Researchers develop a new wildfire smoke emissions model

A Brigham Young University chemical engineering professor and his Ph.D. student have developed an advanced model that can help predict pollution caused by wildfire smoke.The research, sponsored by the USDA Forest Service and the Department of Energy, provides a physical model that can more reliably predict soot and smoke emissions from wildfires over a range of conditions.

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Researchers identify link between gut bacteria and eating for pleasure, as opposed to hunger

A study of 63 healthy people showed that those with elevated microbiome levels of the metabolite indole — produced when gut bacteria break down the amino acid tryptophan — had stronger function and connectivity in specific areas of the brain's reward network. Such activity in the brain indicates that a person is more prone to 'hedonic eating,' or eating for pleasure rather than for hunger. Those

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Viral outbreaks could be predicted two years in advance by mathematical model

Scientists have identified the cause of outbreaks of enterovirus, one of the most prevalent types of virus in the world.

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'Reigns' Is Coming to 'Game of Thrones,' and the Rest of This Week in Games

This week, we've got Xbox rentals, Steam's ongoing problem with sexy games, and some upcoming swipe-based fun in the *Game of Thrones* universe.

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The Spiky Simulator That Will Help Find Oceans in Space

The Hybrid European Radio Frequency and Antenna Test Zone, or HERTZ, can mimic signals hurtling at light speed through 500 million miles of space.

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The youngest smoke more

An increasing number of children under 15 years old have started to smoke during the last 40 years in Europe.

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Genetically engineered virus spins gold into beads

Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have altered a virus to arrange gold atoms into spheroids measuring a few nanometers in diameter. The finding could make production of some electronic components cheaper, easier, and faster.

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Advanced microscope technology reveals novel side to cell signaling complex

In a study published today in Science, UT Southwestern and Rockefeller University researchers used advanced microscopes to determine at atomic resolution the structure of a molecular complex implicated in birth defects and several cancers.

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Video: Why measure wind?

Learn how Earth's wind is generated and why we need to measure it.

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Video: Aeolus launch highlights

Lifted into orbit on a Vega rocket from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana on 22 August 2018, ESA's Aeolus satellite will measure winds around the globe and play a key role in our quest to better understand the workings of our atmosphere. Importantly, this novel mission will also improve weather forecasting. The Aeolus carries one of the most sophisticated instruments ever to be put into orbit. T

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Killer love vine leaves mummified wasps in its wake

Researchers have discovered a new example of a parasitic plant attacking a parasitic insect on their shared host plant. Love vine, a parasitic plant, attaches itself to oak trees, but it doesn’t feed off the oak trees themselves. Instead, the vine feeds off of nurseries that parasitic wasps make for their eggs and larvae by hijacking those same trees’ tissue. Love vine finds and feeds on these nu

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Genetically engineered virus spins gold into beads

The race is on to find manufacturing techniques capable of arranging molecular and nanoscale objects with precision.

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Tværsektorielle teams skal mindske brugen af tvang i psykiatrien

For at bringe brugen af tvang i psykiatrien ned, skal der nu afprøves en model med tværsektorielle teams. Regioner og kommuner kan nu sammen søge pulje for at afprøve modellen.

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High performance graphene-based catalysts

NUS scientists have developed design guidelines that increase the catalytic effectiveness of graphene-based solid state catalysts for potential industry applications.

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Missing Tape Discovery Solves 40-Year Lunar Mystery

Traces of the Apollo astronauts’ presence lingered long after they left — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Turning agriculture waste into new industries

Increasing the value of agriculture waste and turning it into new products will be the outcome of a new $10.9 million research consortium led by the University of Adelaide.

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Researchers discover mechanism underlying activity of proteins associated with cancer and autism

An international team of researchers has determined the function of a new family of proteins associated with cancer and autism. The results have been published in Molecular Cell.

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Researchers claim water irrigation efficiency efforts actually cause more water use

An international team of researchers has found that efforts to make irrigation systems more efficient are actually prompting more water use. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group explains the basis for their argument and offers suggestions about better ways to manage water use.

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Natural human enzyme can biodegrade graphene, scientists report

Degradation of pristine graphene occurs in the human body when interacting with a naturally occurring enzyme found in the lung, announced Graphene Flagship partners; the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), University of Strasbourg, Karolinska Institute and University of Castilla–La Mancha (UCLM).

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Please stop freaking out about ‘flesh-eating’ sexually transmitted infections

Health Here are the facts. Recent headlines may have you wondering if your genitals are at risk of rotting off. Before you flip out, read up on the facts.

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How a janitor wowed Darwin by solving the ice age mystery

Self-educated ice sage James Croll cracked the conundrum of why Earth periodically freezes over. He was feted in his time, so why did the world forget him?

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Mind-reading video game helps children with ADHD concentrate better

A video game that players control with their minds appears to improve concentration skills in children with ADHD may have fewer side effects than medication

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Endangered bees and climate nightmares find a new voice in poetry

A world in environmental crisis needs all the help it can get from the arts. Poetry may be the ideal medium for expressing our unease at an endangered world

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Feedback: More jobs lost to AI (that’s Avian Intelligence)

Corvids join the rat race in France, Dutch judges turn up the heat on Pastafarian, cows granted access to nudist beach, the sea that's not a sea, and more

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Researchers develop cryopreservation method for ladybird beetle ovaries

A new study has found an effective way to cryopreserve and subsequently transplant ovaries of the multicolored Asian ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis. In mammals (including humans), long-term cryopreservation of fertilized eggs, sperm and ovaries is possible. However, in insects, cryopreservation of fertilized eggs has not been successful, and cryopreservation of sperm and ovaries has been put t

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On the genesis of shape: There is no magic in remote synchronization

In some physical systems, even elements quite distant from one another are able to synchronize their actions. At a first glance, the phenomenon appears mysterious. Using a network of simple electronic oscillators interconnected as a ring, researchers from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow have shown that remote synchronization can, at least in certain cas

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CityLab Summit of Global Mayors, City Innovators, and Urban Leaders to be Held in Detroit October 28-30

Washington, D.C. and New York, NY (August 24, 2018)—CityLab, the preeminent global summit organized by The Atlantic, the Aspen Institute, and Bloomberg Philanthropies to address the most urgent urban issues of our time, has selected Detroit for its sixth-annual convening. The event will gather the world’s leading mayors, city innovators, urban experts, artists, and activists for two-and-a-half da

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How Logitech Made the MX Vertical Ergonomic Mouse Look Great

Logitech's new mouse, which went on sale this week, looks like a wave and feels like a handshake. Here’s the story of how it was designed.

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The Gear That Could Solve the Next Big Wildfire Whodunit

Wildfire investigators retrace a fire's path, sifting through the ashes—sometimes literally—in search of its cause. Here's how.

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AAAS Insiders Petition to Revoke Honors of Sexual Harassers

The organization says it's working on a policy.

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Image of the Day: Fire Alarm

Bats use both echolocation and vision to avoid eating unpleasant fireflies.

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2 Mental Abilities Separate Humans from Animals

Two key features created the human mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Uncovering atomic movements in crystal

Scientists can spend a long time in heated debates over tiny details – for example, how and whether atoms in a crystal move when heated, thereby altering the symmetry. Using computer simulations for the mineral lead telluride on the CSCS supercomputer Piz Daint, ETH researchers have resolved a long-standing controversy.

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Large scale preparation method of high quality SWNT sponges

In a paper published in Nano, a group of researchers report developing a simple flame-burning method to prepare single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) sponges on a large scale. The SWNT sponge has multifunctional properties and has applications in waste cleaning, sensing and energy storage.

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Frede Olesen: Vi skal genopfinde den moderne generalist

Der er fantastiske muligheder for at udbygge det nære sundhedsvæsen, hvis man vil det. Det fordrer kort sagt, at vi genopfinder ’den moderne generalist’ og ’det moderne lokalsamfund’. Jeg tror, at begge sider af Folketinget har erkendt behovet. Det her er for vigtigt til partipolitik. Held og lykke til hele Folketinget.

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Overlæge er ny adjungeret professor i kardiologi

Rasmus Møgelvang er tiltrådt som adjungeret professor i kardiologi hos Kardiologisk Forskningsenhed.

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Priserne dykker, og effektiviteten stiger: Solcellerne kommer i 2025

Der er enighed om, at solceller kan opføres uden støtte allerede i 2025. Men ikke om, hvor mange, hvor, og hvad det vil betyde …

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Sometimes Mosquitoes Are Just Thirsty

Mosquitoes want your blood for its proteins…or simply to hydrate on a hot, dry day. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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There's No 'Safe' Level of Alcohol Consumption, Global Study Finds

Drinking alcohol in moderation is more harmful than previously thought, according to a new study that concludes there's no "safe" level of alcohol consumption.

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Blue-Eyed Immigrants Transformed Ancient Israel 6,500 Years Ago

Ancient skeletons from a cave in Israel show genetic links to people from what is now Turkey and Iran.

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Scientists Blasted Mirrors with Lasers to Listen to Light

Light has momentum, and scientists can hear it.

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Efficient eddies carry warmer waters across the Atlantic

Eddies formed off South Africa can trap and transport water across the vast expanse of the Atlantic to Brazil, and, in doing so, make an important contribution to the global climate.

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The Powerful Practice of Writing by Hand

Doug McLean In Laura van den Berg’s new novel The Third Hotel , the protagonist keeps running into her husband on the streets of Havana—which is strange because her husband is dead, killed by an oncoming car just a few weeks earlier. In the journey that follows, Clare begins to question everything she knows—her past, her present, the very distance between life and death—though the novel isn’t con

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There’s method in a firefly’s flashes

Fireflies use their flashing lights for mating and maybe even to ward away predators.

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Øsamfund tager teten med morgendagens energiløsninger

Dyr diesel med mange miljøomkostninger har fået øsamfund verden over til at gå forrest med at finde nye løsninger. Høj andel af vedvarende energi kræver energilagring.

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Medie: Regeringen vil overvåge data om lediges elforbrug

Udbetaling Danmark skal have adgang til at tjekke om opvaskemaskine og fjernsyn kører for at kunne afsløre socialt bedrageri, mener regeringen.

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267 kommunale solcelleanlæg stemplet som ulovlige

Solcelleanlæggene er ulovlige, fordi de ikke er selskabsmæssigt adskilt fra kommunen. Kommunen kan enten rette ind eller pille anlægget ned. Men en ny bekendtgørelse giver lidt håb.

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Ten Years at Burning Man, In Photographs

Art cars, crazy costumes, wild bonfires—it's all here.

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'Ask the StoryBots': The Very Online History of the Best Kids' Show on Netflix

It doesn't get much better than the lighthearted show—which should come as no surprise, given its lineage.

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The Best Gear on Sale at REI and Backcountry This Labor Day

Shop these end-of-summer deals on Arc’teryx, Jetboil, Burley, and other outdoor brands.

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The Serious Security Problem Looming Over Robotics

Herb2 the robot is not in its right mind, because clear across the country at Brown University, researchers have compromised it. Robotics, in other words, has itself a security issue.

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Science-Based Satire: Integrative Baby Monitor Combines the Best of Conventional and Alternative Features

Are there really baby monitors on the market that can alert a parent to stagnant chi as well as dangerously low oxygen levels? No, that's ridiculous! Will a company sell one at some point in the future? Probably. But for now, it's satire.

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How a Science Fair Empowers Teens from Underrepresented Groups

A new documentary shows how a well-known international competition gives kids a way to fight the lack of diversity in science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pregnant and Addicted to Heroin

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reported by master's students at the University of California at Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. The stories explore the impact of the vast racial and economic inequality in Fresno, the poorest major city in California. F or two hours every Saturday , a 1960s-era bus parks on a dead-end street in a dusty part of Fresno, California. Volunte

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The Bias in Fresno’s Justice System

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reported by master's students at the University of California at Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. The stories explore the impact of the vast racial and economic inequality in Fresno, the poorest major city in California. A jacket with a police badge sewn onto its shoulder hangs in the the office of Fresno City Councilman Oliver Baines III.

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Forget "Manned" Missions–Females May Be More Mentally Resilient in Deep Space

A controversial new study in lab mice hints at sex-based differences in cosmic ray–induced cognitive decline — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Disappearing into thin air

A major advance towards targeting cancer without harming healthy tissue has been discovered by University of Bristol researchers. The team has found a way to exploit hypoxia (reduced oxygen levels) — a condition which occurs during the development of many common cancers and drives their progression and spread. The findings, which have implications for targeted oncology, are published today in the

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Europa står ikke længere i skyggen af USA

ESC-kongressen viser, at europæisk kardiologi er kommet op i gear og ikke længere står ikke i skyggen af USA, mener professor Henning Bundgaard.

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Kongres byder på vigtige studier om revaskularisering

Thomas Engstrøm ser især frem til at skulle præsentere resultaterne af det såkaldte VERDICT-studie påESC-kongressen.

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Håbet om et gennembrud i forebyggelsen af reperfusionsskader lever fortsat

Hans Erik Bøtker skal på ESC-kongressen holde møder i relation til KONDI-studiet, hjerteafdelingen på Aarhus Universitetshospital står i spidsen for.

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Højkvalitetsforskning giver Danmark en plads på verdenskortet

Henrik Steen Hansen er som formand for det nationale, videnskabelige selskab selvskreven til at deltage i flere møder for de nationale selskabers formænd.

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ESC bruges til at pleje internationale kontakter

Bjarne Linde Nørgaard bruger ESC-kongressen til holde møder i de mange styregrupper, som han er involveret i.

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Trump’s Peculiar Sympathy for White South Africans

Donald Trump, who generally admires dictators and ignores their victims, has finally found a human-rights issue he cares about: the plight of white South Africans. On Wednesday, he tweeted a demand that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo “closely study” the South African government’s “seizing [of] land from white farmers.” Despite the many graver human-rights problems plaguing Africa, Trump has someh

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The Farm Bill and the ‘Assault’ on Poor Families

Before the current farm bill expires on September 30, House and Senate conferees will sit down and try to put the finishing touches on a new, thousand-page bill that speaks to all aspects of the nation’s agriculture policy, from farm subsidies to crop insurance to conservation programs. But the legislation, now nearly four years in the making, could be derailed by work requirements in the Supplem

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Paul Manafort and Trump’s Pardon Pattern

In each of three pardons President Donald Trump has issued since taking office, his justification for doing so has been virtually the same: The convictions were not “fair.” “He was treated very unfairly by our government!” the president said in May after pardoning the far-right commentator Dinesh D’Souza, who was convicted in 2014 for campaign-finance violations. “I have heard that he has been tr

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The Innocents Is the Most Netflixy Drama Yet

If The Innocents isn’t the most Netflixy dramatic series ever made, it’s at least a contender. It’s the kind of show where every element feels directly lifted from another Netflix hit and mashed up into a slightly awkward creation. There’s the doomed but touchingly pure teenage romance ( 13 Reasons Why ). The young couple running away together with minimal planning and for reasons that are lightl

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How a Lawsuit Could Check Trump's Power Over Security Clearances

There is little dispute that President Donald Trump has the basic authority to revoke security clearances for current and former federal officials, as he did last week in the case of former CIA Director John Brennan and has threatened to do for several others who have criticized him. The rules for security clearances are governed by executive order, not law, and the president is the head of the e

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Danmark får ikke adgang til kildekoder for F-35

Danmarks suverænitet bliver ikke kompromitteret af, at USA får fuld kontrol over softwaren i Danmarks kommende kampfly, vurderer forsvarsminister Claus Hjort Frederiksen.

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Overlæge ser frem til vigtige danske præsentationer

Præsentationerne af to væsentlige danske studier er blandt Lene Holmvangs højdepunkter på ESC-kongressen.

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Professor følger ph.d.-studerendes præsentationer

På årets ESC-kongres vil Jens Cosedis Nielsen overvære de sessioner, hvor hans ph.d.-studerende præsenterer deres resultater.

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From guts to glory: The evolution of gut defense

Gut 'missing link' shows how mammals evolved to live with their microbes.

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New immunotherapy inhibits tumor growth and protects against metastases

Scientists at the VIB-UGent Center for Medical Biotechnology have taken important steps forward in the development of a cancer-targeting immunotherapy. The research team developed a treatment in mice that destroys part of the tumor and stimulates the immune system to attack persistent surviving cancer cells. In addition, the researchers demonstrated that the treatment provides protection against t

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Researchers discover epigenetic reason for drug resistance in a deadly melanoma

Mount Sinai researchers have discovered a previously unknown reason for drug resistance in a common subtype of melanoma, one of the deadliest forms of cancer, and in turn, have found a new therapy that could prevent or reverse drug resistance for melanoma patients with a particular gene mutation, according to a study published in Nature Communications in August.

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Researchers achieve multifunctional solid-state quantum memory

Research team from CAS Key Lab of Quantum Information developed multi-degree-of-freedom multiplexed solid-state quantum memory and demonstrate photon pulse operation functions with time and frequency degree-of-freedoms.

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UMass Amherst research discovers new channel-gating mechanism

Computational biophysicists are not used to making discoveries, says Jianhan Chen at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, so when he and colleagues cracked the secret of how cells regulate Big Potassium (BK) channels, they thought it must be a computational artifact. But after many simulations and tests, they convinced themselves that they have identified the BK gating mechanism that had elude

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Kickstartet i gang af crowdfunding: Her er de populære gadgets i dag

På hjemmesiden Kickstarter kan man investere i gadgets, der endnu ikke findes. Men hvordan ser det ud med dem flere år efter?

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Putin Makes a Move for Peace Through Force

With the U.S. president skeptical of overseas engagements and withdrawing from a series of diplomatic commitments, his “America First” doctrine often looks like disengagement from the world. But then there is Russia, which this week showcased its own brand of global engagement—the Taliban said it would attend talks in Moscow where the U.S. and Afghan governments have declined to participate; Russ

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Experience: I can't picture things in my mind

I have a condition called aphantasia where I can’t visualise things. When I try to picture my daughter when she’s not there, I see nothing I was seven when, in hindsight, I first questioned my imagination. I remember watching the first Harry Potter film and my friend, who was a huge fan, was complaining that the characters weren’t how she imagined them to be. I couldn’t understand what she meant

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Mærsk støtter dyr plastoprydning i Stillehavet: Forkert løsning, mener ekspert

Et system af flydesystemer skal fjerne 50 pct. af plasten i verdens største plasticsuppe. Men tilgangen er forkert, mener ekspert.

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Trilobites: The Mysterious Green Orbs That Float by Day and Sink at Night

Known in Japan as marimo, the unusual balls of algae seem to follow a biological clock that helps them pursue sunlight while underwater.

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Mangel på operationssygeplejersker øger ventetid for kræftpatienter

På Rigshospitalet venter patienter typisk seks uger på at blive opereret for bugspytkirtelkræft. I Odense, Aarhus og Aalborg, som udfører den samme operation, er ventetiden mellem to og fire uger. Lægerne er klar til at operere flere patienter, men stor mangel på operationssygeplejersker på Abdominalcentret gør det umuligt at skrue op for kapaciteten.

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Mangel på operationssygeplejersker er et københavner-problem

Abdominalcentret på Rigshospitalet kæmper med rekrutteringsvanskeligheder af operationssygeplejersker. Det problem har de ikke i Odense, Aarhus eller Aalborg. Oversygeplejersker kalder rekrutteringsvanskelighederne for »et københavner-problem«.

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Kelp forests function differently in warmer oceans

The dynamics of kelp forests in the North-East Atlantic will experience a marked change as ocean warming continues and warm-water kelp species become more abundant, according to new research.

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