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Nyheder2018august27

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Long-sought decay of Higgs boson observed

Six years after its discovery, the Higgs boson has at last been observed decaying to fundamental particles known as bottom quarks. The finding, presented today at CERN1 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), is consistent with the hypothesis that the all-pervading quantum field behind the Higgs boson also gives mass to the bottom quark. Both teams have submitted th

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Efter FM-sluk: Norsk radiolytning i frit fald

Nordmændene er fortsat utilfredse med at have mistet FM-båndet, og det smitter af på radioens lyttertal. Det får et norsk parti til at foreslå at genindføre den udfasede FM-teknologi.

12h

 

Scientists find a new way to attack herpesviruses

A team of scientists led by Leor S. Weinberger, PhD, the William and Ute Bowes Distinguished Professor and director of the Gladstone-UCSF Center for Cell Circuitry, uncovered the mechanism that allows cytomegalovirus to replicate. Their study, published in the scientific journal PNAS, could open new therapeutic avenues to treat several herpesviruses.

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Scientist develops database for stellar-exoplanet 'exploration'

A Southwest Research Institute scientist is using big data to help the scientific community characterize exoplanets, particularly alien worlds orbiting nearby stars. Of particular interest are exoplanets that could harbor life.

9min

 

Archaeologists dig Native American fort found in Connecticut

Archaeologists are marveling at the site of a 1600s Native American fort in Connecticut that was uncovered as part of a rail bridge replacement project.

9min

 

Explainer: How Google search results work

Political leanings don't factor into Google's search algorithm. But the authoritativeness of page links that the algorithm spits out and the perception of thousands of human raters do.

9min

 

Higgs particle's favorite 'daughter' comes home

In a finding that caps years of exploration into the tiny particle known as the Higgs boson, researchers have traced the fifth and most prominent way that the particle decays into other particles. The discovery gives researchers a new pathway by which to study the physical laws that govern the universe.

10min

 

The Bait: Hook Toss Titans | Deadliest Catch

Nick McGlashan takes on Freddy Maugatai in a freestyle hook toss competition! Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.co

12min

 

Tree swallow study: Stressful events have long-term health impacts

Little is known about how brief yet acute stressors—such as war, natural disasters and terror attacks—affect those exposed to them, though human experience suggests they have long-term impacts.

15min

 

Migrating monarchs facing increased parasite risks

During their annual migration to wintering sites in Mexico, monarch butterflies encounter dangers ranging from cars and trucks to storms, droughts and predators. A study led by ecologists at the University of Georgia has found evidence that these iconic insects might be facing a new challenge.

15min

 

New cancer treatment uses enzymes to boost immune system and fight back

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a new approach to treating cancer using enzyme therapy.

21min

 

Ironing out the difficulties of moving fluids in space

Fluid flows downhill—at least it does on Earth. Fluid movement becomes much more complicated in space, and that creates challenges for systems that rely on pumping fluids around for thermal control, engine propellants and other functions.

21min

 

Need To Track A Submarine? A Harbor Seal Can Show You How

Harbor seals use sensors in their whiskers to help discern predator from prey. It's all about the way the water whirls, say scientists who are now training computers to be better trackers, too. (Image credit: Douglas Klug/Images)

26min

 

The link between obesity, the brain, and genetics

Clinicians should consider how the way we think can make us vulnerable to obesity, and how obesity is genetically intertwined with brain structure and mental performance, according to new research.

31min

 

Research brief: Researchers 3D print prototype for 'bionic eye'

A team of researchers at the University of Minnesota have, for the first time, fully 3D printed an array of light receptors on a hemispherical surface. This discovery marks a significant step toward creating a 'bionic eye' that could someday help blind people see or sighted people see better.

31min

 

What Does ‘Redemption’ Actually Mean?

On Sunday night, Louis C.K. performed an unexpected set at the Comedy Cellar, a famed club in New York’s Greenwich Village. The appearance was the comedian’s first since he admitted last year to sexual misconduct—most notably, exposing himself to (and masturbating in front of) multiple women in the comedy world. “I have spent my long and lucky career talking and saying anything I want,” C.K. said

33min

 

Air Pollution Linked to Decline in Cognitive Performance

A study compares verbal and math test scores to air quality measurements in China and finds a correlation.

40min

 

Wild Horses Can Handle Hurricanes. What About Climate Change?

Strong winds and heavy rain can sometimes wash the animals out to sea, but shortages of fresh drinking water and food are more worrisome as sea levels rise.

40min

 

Teenagers have a hard time reading one another's tones of voice

New research shows that the ability to understand what someone is feeling based on their tone of voice can be challenging in mid-adolescence (between 13-15 year olds), particularly when it comes to tones of voice which express anger, meanness, disgust, or happiness.

41min

 

In warming Arctic, major rivers show surprising changes in carbon chemistry

New research suggests that the same factors driving the Arctic's changing climate are fueling a geological response that could play a small part in counteracting those changes' malign effects.

41min

 

Scientists alter membrane proteins to make them easier to study

By making hydrophobic sections water-soluble, researchers hope to learn more about protein structures.

41min

 

Record High Number Of STD Infections In U.S., As Prevention Funding Declines

The U.S. has the highest rates of sexually transmitted disease cases in the industrialized world, say health trackers, with chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis reaching 2.3 million cases in 2017. (Image credit: Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source)

47min

 

Three previously unknown ancient primates identified

Biological anthropologists have described three new species of fossil primates that were previously unknown to science.

55min

 

Interventions really do reduce lead dust. But not enough?

Fixing peeling paint and removing other household sources of lead during a mother’s pregnancy can reduce levels of dust lead in homes to levels significantly lower than previously deemed achievable, research shows. “There is no safe level of lead,” says Joseph Braun, associate professor of epidemiology at Brown University’s School of Public Health and lead author of the study. “We were able to ac

56min

 

New Cell Type Discovered in Human Brains

Rosehip neurons are not found in rodents. Perhaps they offer clues about what separates our brains from those of other animals.

1h

 

A rare galaxy that's challenging our understanding of the universe | Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil

What's it like to discover a galaxy — and have it named after you? Astrophysicist and TED Fellow Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil lets us know in this quick talk about her team's surprising discovery of a mysterious new galaxy type.

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This beautiful map of Earth's atmosphere shows a world on fire

Space Salt, smoke, and dust. This map is more than just pretty. It’s a visualization created by NASA researchers of the particulates present in our atmosphere on a single day—August 23, 2018.

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New Scientist Live: step into many quantum worlds

Sean Carroll will be helping New Scientist Live attendees understand what quantum mechanics means for the many worlds hypothesis – and poor Schrödinger’s cat

1h

 

Artificial muscles and prosthetics could be made of gel-infused wood

When wood is stripped down to its grain and infused with gel, it becomes a strong yet flexible material that could be used in muscle implants and prosthetics

1h

 

Writing a 'thank you' note is more powerful than we realize, study shows

New research from the University of Texas at Austin proves writing letters of gratitude, like Jimmy Fallon's 'Thank You Notes,' is a pro-social experience people should commit to more often. The gesture improves well-being for not only letter writers but recipients as well.

1h

 

CU researchers identify potential target for treating pain during surgery

A research team lead by faculty of the University of Colorado School of Medicine have published a study that improves the understanding of the pain-sensing neurons that respond to tissue injury during surgery.

1h

 

126 patient and provider groups to CMS: Proposed E/M service cuts will hurt sickest patients

A broad coalition of 126 patient and provider groups — led by leading national organizations including the American College of Rheumatology — today sent a letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) urging the agency not to move forward with a proposal that would significantly reduce Medicare reimbursements for evaluation and management (E/M) services provided by specialist.

1h

 

Teenagers have a hard time reading one another's tones of voice

Newly published research in the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior shows that the ability to understand what someone is feeling based on their tone of voice can be challenging in mid-adolescence (between 13-15 year olds), particularly when it comes to tones of voice which express anger, meanness, disgust, or happiness.

1h

 

New cancer treatment uses enzymes to boost immune system and fight back

UT Engineers developed an enzyme therapy that stimulates a human immune system abnormally suppressed by cancer cells, unleashing the body's power to fight back against the disease.

1h

 

1h

 

The United States and Brazil top the list of nations with the most gun deaths

Globally, the estimated number of gun deaths due to homicides, suicides and unintentional injuries went up from 1990 to 2016.

1h

 

Opinion: Poor Science Contributes to Delhi's Air Pollution Crisis

The sources of pollution are not known yet because of incomplete data collection.

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1h

 

Leaf molecules as markers for mycorrhizal associations

Researchers have discovered that certain leaf metabolites can be used as markers for mycorrhizal associations. Mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the plants' nutrient uptake and help them thrive under extreme conditions. The discovery of foliar markers enables scientists to screen large amounts of plants for mycorrhizal associations without having to destroy them. This new tool could contribute to breed

1h

 

Jeremy Corbyn’s Ironically Ahistorical Anti-Semitism

The past two years have brought a seemingly unending stream of revelations about disparaging comments made by the British Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, about Jews, Zionists, and Israel. But in recent days has come the lowest blow, with the emergence of a video from 2013. Corbyn, in speaking of people who approached the Palestine Liberation Organization representative to the United Kingdom t

1h

 

An elusive Higgs boson decay has finally been spotted

Two experiments at the Large Hadron Collider confirm that the Higgs boson decays into bottom quark pairs.

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Why Google Is a Perfect Target for TrumpTrump Google Conservative

A sentence-by-sentence breakdown of Trump's recent tweets about the search giant reveal why Google is his most convenient target.

1h

 

Novel biomedical imaging system

Researchers are developing a novel biomedical imaging system that combines optical and ultrasound technology to improve diagnosis of life-threatening diseases. Photoacoustic tomography is a noninvasive technique that converts absorbed optical energy into acoustic signal. Pulsed light is sent into body tissue, creating a small increase in temperature that causes tissue to expand and create an acous

1h

 

Anxiety, depression, other mental distress may increase heart attack, stroke risk in adults over 45

A new study links anxiety, depression and other mental distress to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke among adults ages 45 or older, even after factoring for lifestyle behaviors and disease history. The associations were slightly stronger for stroke among women than men.

1h

 

Tree swallow study: Stressful events have long-term health impacts

Little is known about how brief yet acute stressors — such as war, natural disasters and terror attacks — affect those exposed to them, though human experience suggests they have long-term impacts. Two recent studies of tree swallows uncover long-term consequences of such passing but major stressful events. Both studies provide information on how major stressful events have lasting effects and w

1h

 

Crowdsourcing campaigns increase HIV testing among at-risk men in China

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found that crowdsourced campaigns can motivated men at-risk of HIV infection in China to get tested.

1h

 

Migrating monarchs facing increased parasite risks

During their annual migration to wintering sites in Mexico, monarch butterflies encounter dangers ranging from cars and trucks to storms, droughts and predators. A study led by ecologists at the University of Georgia has found evidence that these iconic insects might be facing a new challenge.

1h

 

The Global Rightward Shift on Climate Change

Last Thursday, Malcolm Turnbull was the prime minister of Australia. By the end of this week, he’ll be just another guy in Sydney. Turnbull was felled by climate-change policy. His attempt at a moderate, even milquetoast energy bill—which included some mild cuts in greenhouse-gas emissions—proved too aggressive for his co-partisans. On Friday, members of Australia’s center-right Liberal Party vot

1h

 

Making a Living Before Making it Big on YouTube

When it comes to the subtle hierarchies of the world of online video stars, YouTubers are the cream of the crop. The site, with its nearly 2 billion monthly active users , is the largest online video platform in the world. Its top names generate tens of millions of dollars in revenue and wield enormous cultural capital. “ YouTubers are today’s celebrities,” said Justin Cadelago, Senior Vice Presi

1h

 

Before Jupiter got huge, it had a pretty messed up childhood

Space Pebbles and planetesimals pummeled the planet's early surface Jupiter is by far the biggest planet around the sun. However, scientists now find repeated pummeling Jupiter experienced when it was young may have stunted its growth…

2h

 

Does chemotherapy harm ability to function for older women with breast cancer?

This study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, investigates the effects of breast cancer and its treatments on older women's abilities to function.

2h

 

Katherine Johnson, Trailblazing NASA Mathematician, Celebrates 100 Trips around the Sun

The pioneering mathematician overcame barriers of racism and misogyny to help develop U.S. human spaceflight — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

 

Sinkholes: When the Earth Opens Up

The ground beneath our feet, our highways, and our cities appears to be very sturdy. But, on rare occasions, that solid ground can simply open up without warning, dropping whatever it was supporting into an unpredictably deep hole. An undiscovered cavern or abandoned mine might collapse, or a broken water main or heavy storm might cause erosion, until the surface becomes a thin shell that drops a

2h

 

Single People Aren’t to Blame for the Loneliness Epidemic

Americans have long worried that their countrymen are lonely, but recently, mild concern has given way to outright panic. In 2017, the former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy warned that loneliness in the U.S. had reached epidemic proportions. And it’s not just Americans who are anxious—in January, British Prime Minister Theresa May appointed the country’s first “minister for loneliness.” While appre

2h

 

Comparing the limits of 'unlimited' smartphone data plans

Technology You get access to lots of data, but it may not be very fast. Explore the subtleties of unlimited data plans from Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon, and AT&T…

2h

 

New phase proposed in the relationship between figs and wasps

A Brazilian researcher describes 129 species of fig tree parasites which compete and even prey upon the fig wasps during the many phases of the fig-wasp mutualism that helped to shape both plant and its pollinator.

2h

 

Machine learning improves searches in world's largest biomedical literature database

Results sorted by relevance, instead of date, provide an improved experience for users of PubMed, the world's largest biomedical literature database, according to a study publishing Aug. 28 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Zhiyong Lu and colleagues at the National Library of Medicine (NLM)/National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which develops and maintains PubMed.

2h

 

Misfolded proteins serve as 'inherited memory' of toxic insults

Protein aggregates have a bad reputation in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but in bacteria, inheritance of aggregates by daughter cells may help protect against the same toxic stresses that triggered them in parental cells, according to a new study publishing in PLOS Biology, by Sander Govers, Abram Aertsen, and colleagues at KU Leuven, Belgium.

2h

 

Crowdsourced multimedia campaign to boost HIV testing in China

A crowdsourced intervention led to an increase in the number of gay men who got tested for HIV in eight cities in China, researchers led by Joseph Tucker from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, USA, report this week in PLOS Medicine.

2h

 

Rights groups urge Google not to bend to China censors

Human rights groups and other advocacy organizations Tuesday urged Google to abandon any plans to craft a censored version of its search engine that could pass muster with regulators in China.

2h

 

Nikki Haley Warns That Iran Could Become ‘the Next North Korea’

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said on Tuesday that she “never thought the Iran deal could be fixed.” Even so, the Trump administration spent months consulting with other countries on ways to improve the agreement, before the United States withdrew from it entirely in May and reimposed sanctions on Iran. “You could change it to be a better deal, but you couldn’t change it to be

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Starbucks’ Pumpkin Spice Latte Is Back to Mess With Your Brain

The real reasons why these frothy, fatty drinks are so devilishly addictive.

2h

 

Too Frail To Retire? Humans Ponder The Fate Of Research Chimps

Lab chimps used in medical studies are being retired to a forested sanctuary. But scientists and workers who care for the animals say some older chimps aren't healthy enough to make the transition. (Image credit: Janet McConnaughey/AP)

2h

 

New treatment can halve hospital stays for some patients with heart infection

A new treatment can halve hospital stays for some patients with a heart infection (endocarditis), according to late breaking results of the POET trial.

2h

 

Low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided, study suggests

A large study suggests that low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided, say researchers who found that people who consumed a low carbohydrate diet were at greater risk of premature death.

2h

 

Yellowstone Rebounded from an Epic 1988 Fire–That May Be Harder in Future

As bigger wildfires occur more frequently, even ecosystems adapted to fire may have difficulty recovering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

 

Tesla wins green rebate lawsuit against Canada's Ontario province

US electric automaker Tesla has won a lawsuit against Canada's most populous province of Ontario after its new government scrapped a rebate initiative for electric car purchases.

2h

 

Telegram says to cooperate in terror probes, except in Russia

The Telegram encrypted messenger app said Tuesday said it would cooperate with investigators in terror probes when ordered by courts, except in Russia where it is locked in an ongoing battle with authorities.

2h

 

Differences between combined, isolated use of cannabis, nicotine on brain networks

Researchers have investigated the effects on the brain of concurrent cannabis and nicotine use, versus the use of solely cannabis and solely nicotine.

2h

 

Wilder wildfires ahead?

At roughly 415,000 acres, Northern California's Mendocino Complex Fire is now the state's largest recorded wildfire, surpassing the record held by Santa Barbara and Ventura counties' Thomas Fire, which occurred less than a year before. Roughly 10 other large-scale conflagrations are threatening the state. And California is not yet even at the height of its wildfire season.

2h

 

Your Low Carb Diet Won't Kill You, But It's Probably Not a Good Idea

A new study suggests low-carb diets could be deadly, but a nutrition expert said people should be skeptical.

2h

 

‘Twitter for aircraft’ keeps drones from getting lost

Drones use GPS to find their way without a pilot. But when GPS signals get blocked, drones can get lost. A new method that uses an antenna on the ground offers a backup. “…Without [GPS], tiny drones all the way up to commercial aircraft can’t do their jobs.” “Right now GPS is the one ring to rule them all: Without it, tiny drones all the way up to commercial aircraft can’t do their jobs. It’s a h

2h

 

Astronaut quits halfway through training, 1st in 50 years

For the first time in 50 years, an astronaut-in-training is quitting NASA.

2h

 

Three previously unknown ancient primates identified

Biological anthropologists from The University of Texas at Austin have described three new species of fossil primates that were previously unknown to science. All of the new primates were residents of San Diego County at a time when southern California was filled with lush tropical forests.

2h

 

Research reveals the connection between climate change, El Niño and the possibility for more extreme wildfires

At roughly 415,000 acres, Northern California's Mendocino Complex Fire is now the state's largest recorded wildfire, surpassing the record held by Santa Barbara and Ventura counties' Thomas Fire, which occurred less than a year before. Roughly 10 other large-scale conflagrations are threatening the state. And California is not yet even at the height of its wildfire season.

2h

 

Machine learning improves searches in world's largest biomedical literature database

Results sorted by relevance, instead of date, provide an improved experience for users of PubMed, the world's largest biomedical literature database, according to a study publishing August 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Zhiyong Lu and colleagues at the National Library of Medicine (NLM)/National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which develops and maintains PubMed.

2h

 

Misfolded proteins serve as 'inherited memory' of toxic insults

Protein aggregates have a bad reputation in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but in bacteria, inheritance of aggregates by daughter cells may help protect against the same toxic stresses that triggered them in parental cells, according to a new study publishing 28 August in the open access journal PLOS Biology, by Sander Govers, Abram Aertsen, and colleagues at KU Le

2h

 

Three previously unknown ancient primates identified

Biological anthropologists from The University of Texas at Austin have described three new species of fossil primates that were previously unknown to science.

2h

 

Clinical trials needed to study cannabinoid use in Canadian children

Canadian parents use unregulated cannabinoids for seizure control in children with neurologic conditions like epilepsy, and clinical trials are needed to inform doctors and parents on prescribing, according to a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

2h

 

Researchers developing novel biomedical imaging system

Purdue University researchers are developing a novel biomedical imaging system that combines optical and ultrasound technology to improve diagnosis of life-threatening diseases.

2h

 

NASA sees formation of Eastern Pacific Tropical Depression 16E

NASA's Aqua satellite saw the sixteenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean come together on Aug. 28.

2h

 

Counting on NASA's ICESat-2

NASA is about to launch the agency's most advanced laser instrument of its kind into space. The Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, will provide critical observations of how ice sheets, glaciers and sea ice are changing, leading to insights into how those changes impact people where they live.

2h

 

Hurricane's death toll in Puerto Rico put at nearly 3,000

Puerto Rico's governor raised the island's official death toll from Hurricane Maria from 64 to 2,975 on Tuesday after an independent study found that the number of people who succumbed in the desperate, sweltering months after the storm had been severely undercounted.

3h

 

Sidste omgang: Er det usundt at drikke alkohol hver dag?

Små mængder alkohol kan have betydning for din sundhed. Men du skal ikke være bekymret for en enkel genstand, vurderer ekspert.

3h

 

NASA sees formation of Eastern Pacific Tropical Depression 16E

NASA's Aqua satellite saw the sixteenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean come together on Aug. 28, 2018.

3h

 

Purdue researchers developing novel biomedical imaging system

Purdue University researchers are developing a novel biomedical imaging system that combines optical and ultrasound technology to improve diagnosis of life-threatening diseases.Photoacoustic tomography is a noninvasive technique that converts absorbed optical energy into acoustic signal. Pulsed light is sent into body tissue, creating a small increase in temperature that causes tissue to expand an

3h

 

Wilder wildfires ahead?

Research at UCSB and NCAR reveals the connection between climate change, El Niño and the possibility for more extreme wildfires.

3h

 

Counting on NASA's ICESat-2

NASA is about to launch the agency's most advanced laser instrument of its kind into space. The Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, will provide critical observations of how ice sheets, glaciers and sea ice are changing, leading to insights into how those changes impact people where they live.Launch is scheduled for Sept. 15, and as we count down the days, we're counting up 10

3h

 

New approach makes sprayed droplets hit and stick to their targets

When spraying paint or coatings onto a surface, or fertilizers or pesticides onto crops, the size of the droplets makes a big difference. Bigger drops will drift less in the wind, allowing them to strike their intended targets more accurately, but smaller droplets are more likely to stick when they land instead of bouncing off.

3h

 

Think the ‘invisible hand’ controls markets? Maybe not

While many economists assume the “invisible hand” theory influences markets, new research finds a disruptor has turned this long-held concept—which Adam Smith introduced in 1759—on its head. The disruptor does not have anything to do with technological advancements or innovation like one might expect—in fact, it’s much simpler. It’s a third party who interrupts a trading relationship. Contrary to

3h

 

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Genome editing improves yield of spider silk Golden orb-web spider. Image courtesy of iStock/hakoar. The high strength and elasticity of spider silk render it a desirable raw material for construction, defense, and biomedical applications. However, spiders are difficult to rear due to their territorial and cannibalistic nature. Previous efforts to…

3h

 

People can recognize, learn, and apply default effects in social influence [Social Sciences]

Defaults influence decisions, but Zlatev et al. (1) argue that people are unaware of those influences and unlikely to learn them. The claim is important and surprising, and it comes as a conclusion to their very thorough piece of scholarship. Nevertheless, the appearance of default neglect may instead reflect the…

3h

 

Reply to Jung et al.: Default neglect persists over time and across contexts [Social Sciences]

We appreciate the comments and studies by Jung et al. (1). They test for default neglect in three new default games, finding that “Choice Architects” (CAs) are better than chance at correctly predicting the default effect in these new contexts. That said, we believe that Jung et al.’s claim that…

3h

 

Benefits of antibiotics burden in low-income countries [Biological Sciences]

Klein et al. (1) report that global antibiotic consumption increased by 65% over the 2000–2015 period, with a 114% increase in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The authors conclude that global antibiotic consumption must be decreased to reduce the threat of antibiotic resistance, although reduction efforts must take into account…

3h

 

Reply to Abat et al.: Improved policies necessary to ensure an effective future for antibiotics [Biological Sciences]

Antibiotics, particularly penicillins, have been instrumental in lowering mortality associated with pneumococcal pneumonia since they were introduced in the 1950s (1). As we recently reported (2), since 2000, global antibiotic use has increased significantly, driven largely by increases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Given this association, we read with…

3h

 

Do the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic graphs warrant additional explanation? [Biological Sciences]

We read with great interest the article by Kudalkar et al. (1), in which the authors identify and conduct substantial work for a promising novel long-acting nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) molecule. We commend the authors for addressing an urgent, unmet global need. Such studies are particularly relevant for developing…

3h

 

Reply to Pandey et al.: Understanding the efficacy of a potential antiretroviral drug candidate in humanized mouse model of HIV infection [Biological Sciences]

We appreciate Pandey et al.’s (1) interest in further understanding our published work (2). Our responses are given below the excerpts from the Letter.Our first and foremost concern is the data presented in their figure 6C. We fail to understand why there was a fall in the plasma viral loads…

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Sticking and stacking: Persistent ordering of fragmented DNA analogs [Applied Physical Sciences]

In a PNAS paper, Smith et al. (1) demonstrate spontaneous self-assembly of a DNA analog from a solution of mononucleotide triphosphates, exhibiting concurrently a high degree of Watson–Crick base pair selectivity with complementarity-dependent partitioning of nucleotides, a stacking order corresponding very closely to B-DNA geometry and a mesophase ordering similar…

3h

 

Dynamics of hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Importance of Membrane Fusion in Biology Membrane fusion is ubiquitous in biology, both in natural cellular functions such as neurotransmission and in pathological processes such as viral infection. The fusion of lipid bilayer membranes involves membrane contact, merger, and formation of an aqueous fusion pore, allowing the merging of separate…

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Economic inequality drives female sexualization [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Sexual selection plays a crucial role in understanding the diversity of both physiological and behavioral traits of animals and in recent years has made significant contributions to explaining the patterning of inter- and intrasexual competition in humans (1). With increasing interest in the active role of females as competitors (2),…

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Generating carbon schwarzites via zeolite-templating [Chemistry]

Zeolite-templated carbons (ZTCs) comprise a relatively recent material class synthesized via the chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor on a zeolite template, followed by the removal of the template. We have developed a theoretical framework to generate a ZTC model from any given zeolite structure, which we show can…

3h

 

General methodology for inferring failure-spreading dynamics in networks [Engineering]

A generic modeling framework to infer the failure-spreading process based on failure times of individual nodes is proposed and tested in four simulation studies: one for cascading failures in interdependent power and transportation networks, one for influenza epidemics, one benchmark test case for congestion cascade in a transportation network, and…

3h

 

Self-organized criticality and pattern emergence through the lens of tropical geometry [Mathematics]

Tropical geometry, an established field in pure mathematics, is a place where string theory, mirror symmetry, computational algebra, auction theory, and so forth meet and influence one another. In this paper, we report on our discovery of a tropical model with self-organized criticality (SOC) behavior. Our model is continuous, in…

3h

 

Deciphering the super relaxed state of human {beta}-cardiac myosin and the mode of action of mavacamten from myosin molecules to muscle fibers [Biochemistry]

Mutations in β-cardiac myosin, the predominant motor protein for human heart contraction, can alter power output and cause cardiomyopathy. However, measurements of the intrinsic force, velocity, and ATPase activity of myosin have not provided a consistent mechanism to link mutations to muscle pathology. An alternative model posits that mutations in…

3h

 

The consequences of cavity creation on the folding landscape of a repeat protein depend upon context [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The effect of introducing internal cavities on protein native structure and global stability has been well documented, but the consequences of these packing defects on folding free-energy landscapes have received less attention. We investigated the effects of cavity creation on the folding landscape of the leucine-rich repeat protein pp32 by…

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Altered conformational landscape and dimerization dependency underpins the activation of EGFR by {alpha}C-{beta}4 loop insertion mutations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Mutational activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human cancers involves both point mutations and complex mutations (insertions and deletions). In particular, short in-frame insertion mutations within a conserved αC–β4 loop in the EGFR kinase domain are frequently observed in tumor samples and patients harboring these mutations are insensitive…

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Proteomic analysis of monolayer-integrated proteins on lipid droplets identifies amphipathic interfacial {alpha}-helical membrane anchors [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Despite not spanning phospholipid bilayers, monotopic integral proteins (MIPs) play critical roles in organizing biochemical reactions on membrane surfaces. Defining the structural basis by which these proteins are anchored to membranes has been hampered by the paucity of unambiguously identified MIPs and a lack of computational tools that accurately distinguish…

3h

 

JUM is a computational method for comprehensive annotation-free analysis of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) greatly diversifies metazoan transcriptomes and proteomes and is crucial for gene regulation. Current computational analysis methods of AS from Illumina RNA-sequencing data rely on preannotated libraries of known spliced transcripts, which hinders AS analysis with poorly annotated genomes and can further mask unknown AS patterns. To…

3h

 

Rev7 dimerization is important for assembly and function of the Rev1/Pol{zeta} translesion synthesis complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases Polζ and Rev1 form a complex that enables replication of damaged DNA. The Rev7 subunit of Polζ, which is a multifaceted HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, Mad2) protein with roles in TLS, DNA repair, and cell-cycle control, facilitates assembly of this complex by binding Rev1 and the…

3h

 

Structure of the mammalian TRPM7, a magnesium channel required during embryonic development [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The transient receptor potential ion channel subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is required for mouse embryonic development. TRPM7 contains both an ion channel and an α-kinase. The channel domain comprises a nonselective cation channel with notable permeability to Mg2+ and Zn2+. Here, we report…

3h

 

Cellular function given parametric variation in the Hodgkin and Huxley model of excitability [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

How is reliable physiological function maintained in cells despite considerable variability in the values of key parameters of multiple interacting processes that govern that function? Here, we use the classic Hodgkin–Huxley formulation of the squid giant axon action potential to propose a possible approach to this problem. Although the full…

3h

 

Control of the Restriction Point by Rb and p21 [Cell Biology]

The Restriction Point was originally defined as the moment that cells commit to the cell cycle and was later suggested to coincide with hyperphosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Current cell cycle models posit that cells exit mitosis into a pre-Restriction Point state, where they have low cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)…

3h

 

Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase stimulates thrombopoietin-independent hematopoiesis accelerating recovery from thrombocytopenia [Cell Biology]

New mechanisms behind blood cell formation continue to be uncovered, with therapeutic approaches for hematological diseases being of great interest. Here we report an enzyme in protein synthesis, known for cell-based activities beyond translation, is a factor inducing megakaryocyte-biased hematopoiesis, most likely under stress conditions. We show an activated form…

3h

 

Regulation of axon repulsion by MAX-1 SUMOylation and AP-3 [Developmental Biology]

During neural development, growing axons express specific surface receptors in response to various environmental guidance cues. These axon guidance receptors are regulated through intracellular trafficking and degradation to enable navigating axons to reach their targets. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the UNC-5 receptor is necessary for dorsal migration of developing motor axons….

3h

 

Oligodendrocyte precursor survival and differentiation requires chromatin remodeling by Chd7 and Chd8 [Developmental Biology]

Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) constitute the main proliferative cells in the adult brain, and deregulation of OPC proliferation-differentiation balance results in either glioma formation or defective adaptive (re)myelination. OPC differentiation requires significant genetic reprogramming, implicating chromatin remodeling. Mounting evidence indicates that chromatin remodelers play importan

3h

 

Differences in neural stem cell identity and differentiation capacity drive divergent regenerative outcomes in lizards and salamanders [Developmental Biology]

While lizards and salamanders both exhibit the ability to regenerate amputated tails, the outcomes achieved by each are markedly different. Salamanders, such as Ambystoma mexicanum, regenerate nearly identical copies of original tails. Regenerated lizard tails, however, exhibit important morphological differences compared with originals. Some of these differences concern dorsoventral patterning…

3h

 

Oceanographic boundaries constrain microbial diversity gradients in the South Pacific Ocean [Ecology]

Marine microbes along with microeukaryotes are key regulators of oceanic biogeochemical pathways. Here we present a high-resolution (every 0.5° of latitude) dataset describing microbial pro- and eukaryotic richness in the surface and just below the thermocline along a 7,000-km transect from 66°S at the Antarctic ice edge to the equator…

3h

 

Deep mutational scanning of hemagglutinin helps predict evolutionary fates of human H3N2 influenza variants [Evolution]

Human influenza virus rapidly accumulates mutations in its major surface protein hemagglutinin (HA). The evolutionary success of influenza virus lineages depends on how these mutations affect HA’s functionality and antigenicity. Here we experimentally measure the effects on viral growth in cell culture of all single amino acid mutations to the…

3h

 

RNF169 limits 53BP1 deposition at DSBs to stimulate single-strand annealing repair [Genetics]

Unrestrained 53BP1 activity at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) hampers DNA end resection and upsets DSB repair pathway choice. RNF169 acts as a molecular rheostat to limit 53BP1 deposition at DSBs, but how this fine balance translates to DSB repair control remains undefined. In striking contrast to 53BP1, ChIP analyses of…

3h

 

Thioredoxin-like2/2-Cys peroxiredoxin redox cascade supports oxidative thiol modulation in chloroplasts [Plant Biology]

Thiol-based redox regulation is central to adjusting chloroplast functions under varying light conditions. A redox cascade via the ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)/thioredoxin (Trx) pathway has been well recognized to mediate the light-responsive reductive control of target proteins; however, the molecular basis for reoxidizing its targets in the dark remains unidentified. Here,…

3h

 

Phosphoinositides control the localization of HOPS subunit VPS41, which together with VPS33 mediates vacuole fusion in plants [Plant Biology]

The vacuole is an essential organelle in plant cells, and its dynamic nature is important for plant growth and development. Homotypic membrane fusion is required for vacuole biogenesis, pollen germination, stomata opening, and gravity perception. Known components of the vacuole fusion machinery in eukaryotes include SNARE proteins, Rab GTPases, phosphoinositides,…

3h

 

Seed genome hypomethylated regions are enriched in transcription factor genes [Plant Biology]

The precise mechanisms that control gene activity during seed development remain largely unknown. Previously, we showed that several genes essential for seed development, including those encoding storage proteins, fatty acid biosynthesis enzymes, and transcriptional regulators (e.g., ABI3, FUS3) are located within hypomethylated regions of the soybean genome. These hypomethylated regions…

3h

 

Evidence for the impact of the 8.2-kyBP climate event on Near Eastern early farmers [Anthropology]

The 8.2-thousand years B.P. event is evident in multiple proxy records across the globe, showing generally dry and cold conditions for ca. 160 years. Environmental changes around the event are mainly detected using geochemical or palynological analyses of ice cores, lacustrine, marine, and other sediments often distant from human settlements….

3h

 

Archaeogenomic evidence from the southwestern US points to a pre-Hispanic scarlet macaw breeding colony [Anthropology]

Hundreds of scarlet macaw (Ara macao cyanoptera) skeletons have been recovered from archaeological contexts in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico (SW/NW). The location of these skeletons, >1,000 km outside their Neotropical endemic range, has suggested a far-reaching pre-Hispanic acquisition network. Clear evidence for scarlet macaw breeding within this…

3h

 

Evolution and function of the hominin forefoot [Anthropology]

The primate foot functions as a grasping organ. As such, its bones, soft tissues, and joints evolved to maximize power and stability in a variety of grasping configurations. Humans are the obvious exception to this primate pattern, with feet that evolved to support the unique biomechanical demands of bipedal locomotion….

3h

 

Silkworm genetic sexing through W chromosome-linked, targeted gene integration [Applied Biological Sciences]

Sex separation methods are critical for genetic sexing systems in commercial insect production and sterile insect techniques. Integration of selectable marker genes into a sex chromosome is particularly useful in insects with a heterogametic sex determination system. Here, we describe targeted gene integration of fluorescent marker expression cassettes into a…

3h

 

Mass spider silk production through targeted gene replacement in Bombyx mori [Applied Biological Sciences]

Spider silk is one of the best natural fibers and has superior mechanical properties. However, the large-scale harvesting of spider silk by rearing spiders is not feasible, due to their territorial and cannibalistic behaviors. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, has been the most well known silk producer for thousands of years…

3h

 

Controlling fracture cascades through twisting and quenching [Applied Physical Sciences]

Fracture fundamentally limits the structural stability of macroscopic and microscopic matter, from beams and bones to microtubules and nanotubes. Despite substantial recent experimental and theoretical progress, fracture control continues to present profound practical and theoretical challenges. While bending-induced fracture of elongated rod-like objects has been intensely studied, the effects of

3h

 

Crystal Structure of a ligand-bound LacY-Nanobody Complex [Biochemistry]

The lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY), a dynamic polytopic membrane transport protein, catalyzes galactoside/H+ symport and operates by an alternating access mechanism that exhibits multiple conformations, the distribution of which is altered by sugar-binding. Camelid nanobodies were made against a double-mutant Gly46 → Trp/Gly262 → Trp (LacYWW) that produces…

3h

 

Chromatin structure and its chemical modifications regulate the ubiquitin ligase substrate selectivity of UHRF1 [Biochemistry]

Mitotic inheritance of DNA methylation patterns is facilitated by UHRF1, a DNA- and histone-binding E3 ubiquitin ligase that helps recruit the maintenance DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 to replicating chromatin. The DNA methylation maintenance function of UHRF1 is dependent on its ability to bind chromatin, where it facilitates monoubiquitination of histone H3…

3h

 

Interleukin 4 is inactivated via selective disulfide-bond reduction by extracellular thioredoxin [Biochemistry]

Thioredoxin 1 (TRX), an essential intracellular redox regulator, is also secreted by mammalian cells. Recently, we showed that TRX activates extracellular transglutaminase 2 via reduction of an allosteric disulfide bond. In an effort to identify other extracellular substrates of TRX, macrophages derived from THP-1 cells were treated with NP161, a…

3h

 

Spectroscopic ruler for measuring active-site distortions based on Raman optical activity of a hydrogen out-of-plane vibration [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Photoactive yellow protein (PYP), from the phototrophic bacterium Halorhodospira halophila, is a small water-soluble photoreceptor protein and contains p-coumaric acid (pCA) as a chromophore. PYP has been an attractive model for studying the physical chemistry of protein active sites. Here, we explore how Raman optical activity (ROA) can be used…

3h

 

Biophysical and functional characterization of Norrin signaling through Frizzled4 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Wnt signaling is initiated by Wnt ligand binding to the extracellular ligand binding domain, called the cysteine-rich domain (CRD), of a Frizzled (Fzd) receptor. Norrin, an atypical Fzd ligand, specifically interacts with Fzd4 to activate β-catenin–dependent canonical Wnt signaling. Much of the molecular basis that confers Norrin selectivity in binding…

3h

 

Mre11 complex links sister chromatids to promote repair of a collapsed replication fork [Cell Biology]

Collapsed replication forks, which are a major source of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), are repaired by sister chromatid recombination (SCR). The Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN) protein complex, assisted by CtIP/Sae2/Ctp1, initiates SCR by nucleolytically resecting the single-ended DSB (seDSB) at the collapsed fork. The molecular architecture of the MRN intercomplex, in which…

3h

 

N-glycan microheterogeneity regulates interactions of plasma proteins [Chemistry]

Altered glycosylation patterns of plasma proteins are associated with autoimmune disorders and pathogenesis of various cancers. Elucidating glycoprotein microheterogeneity and relating subtle changes in the glycan structural repertoire to changes in protein–protein, or protein–small molecule interactions, remains a significant challenge in glycobiology. Here, we apply mass spectrometry-based appro

3h

 

Foxp2 regulates anatomical features that may be relevant for vocal behaviors and bipedal locomotion [Developmental Biology]

Fundamental human traits, such as language and bipedalism, are associated with a range of anatomical adaptations in craniofacial shaping and skeletal remodeling. However, it is unclear how such morphological features arose during hominin evolution. FOXP2 is a brain-expressed transcription factor implicated in a rare disorder involving speech apraxia and language…

3h

 

Vegfaa instructs cardiac muscle hyperplasia in adult zebrafish [Developmental Biology]

During heart development and regeneration, coronary vascularization is tightly coupled with cardiac growth. Although inhibiting vascularization causes defects in the innate regenerative response of zebrafish to heart injury, angiogenic signals are not known to be sufficient for triggering regeneration events. Here, by using a transgenic reporter strain, we found that…

3h

 

Discovery of fissionogenic Cs and Ba capture five years after Oklo reactor shutdown [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Understanding the release and sequestration of specific radioactive signatures into the environment is of extreme importance for long-term nuclear waste storage and reactor accident mitigation. Recent accidents at the Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear reactors released radioactive 137Cs and 134Cs into the environment, the former of which is still live today….

3h

 

Recycled ancient ghost carbonate in the Pitcairn mantle plume [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The extreme Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb isotopic compositions found in Pitcairn Island basalts have been labeled enriched mantle 1 (EM1), characterizing them as one of the isotopic mantle end members. The EM1 origin has been vigorously debated for over 25 years, with interpretations ranging from delaminated subcontinental lithosphere, to…

3h

 

Uranium isotope fractionation by abiotic reductive precipitation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Significant uranium (U) isotope fractionation has been observed during abiotic reduction of aqueous U, counter to the expectation that uranium isotopes are only fractionated by bioassociated enzymatic reduction. In our experiments, aqueous U is removed from solution by reductive precipitation onto the surfaces of synthetic iron monosulfide. The magnitude of…

3h

 

Opinion: Expansion fever and soft money plague the biomedical research enterprise [Economic Sciences]

Academic biomedical science has had both a long boom in its funding and a subsequent scary bust. From 1970 to 1999, NIH budgets increased 9% per year (1); from 2000 to 2004, they doubled (2, 3). In 2005 came the unmistakable bust: flat-lined NIH budgets converted the doubling into a…

3h

 

Electron tomography reveals details of the internal microstructure of desalination membranes [Environmental Sciences]

As water availability becomes a growing challenge in various regions throughout the world, desalination and wastewater reclamation through technologies such as reverse osmosis (RO) are becoming more important. Nevertheless, many open questions remain regarding the internal structure of thin-film composite RO membranes. In this work, fully aromatic polyamide films that…

3h

 

Human exonization through differential nucleosome occupancy [Evolution]

Nucleosomal modifications have been implicated in fundamental epigenetic regulation, but the roles of nucleosome occupancy in shaping changes through evolution remain to be addressed. Here we present high-resolution nucleosome occupancy profiles for multiple tissues derived from human, macaque, tree shrew, mouse, and pig. Genome-wide comparison reveals conserved nucleosome occupancy profiles…

3h

 

Endoribonuclease ENDU-2 regulates multiple traits including cold tolerance via cell autonomous and nonautonomous controls in Caenorhabditis elegans [Genetics]

Environmental temperature acclimation is essential to animal survival, yet thermoregulation mechanisms remain poorly understood. We demonstrate cold tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans as regulated by paired ADL chemosensory neurons via Ca2+-dependent endoribonuclease (EndoU) ENDU-2. Loss of ENDU-2 function results in life span, brood size, and synaptic remodeling abnormalities in addition to…

3h

 

N6-methyladenosine modification of hepatitis B virus RNA differentially regulates the viral life cycle [Microbiology]

N6-methyladenosine (m6A) RNA methylation is the most abundant epitranscriptomic modification of eukaryotic messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Previous reports have found m6A on both cellular and viral transcripts and defined its role in regulating numerous biological processes, including viral infection. Here, we show that m6A and its associated machinery regulate the life…

3h

 

Probing the non-Debye low-frequency excitations in glasses through random pinning [Physics]

We investigate the properties of the low-frequency spectrum in the density of states D(ω) of a 3D model glass former. To magnify the non-Debye sector of the spectrum, we introduce a random pinning field that freezes a finite particle fraction to break the translational invariance and shifts all of the…

3h

 

Linguistic effect on speech perception observed at the brainstem [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Linguistic experience affects speech perception from early infancy, as previously evidenced by behavioral and brain measures. Current research focuses on whether linguistic effects on speech perception can be observed at an earlier stage in the neural processing of speech (i.e., auditory brainstem). Brainstem responses reflect rapid, automatic, and preattentive encoding…

3h

 

Income inequality not gender inequality positively covaries with female sexualization on social media [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Publicly displayed, sexualized depictions of women have proliferated, enabled by new communication technologies, including the internet and mobile devices. These depictions are often claimed to be outcomes of a culture of gender inequality and female oppression, but, paradoxically, recent rises in sexualization are most notable in societies that have made…

3h

 

Maintaining trust when agents can engage in self-deception [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The coexistence of cooperation and selfish instincts is a remarkable characteristic of humans. Psychological research has unveiled the cognitive mechanisms behind self-deception. Two important findings are that a higher ambiguity about others’ social preferences leads to a higher likelihood of acting selfishly and that agents acting selfishly will increase their…

3h

 

Recurrent computations for visual pattern completion [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Making inferences from partial information constitutes a critical aspect of cognition. During visual perception, pattern completion enables recognition of poorly visible or occluded objects. We combined psychophysics, physiology, and computational models to test the hypothesis that pattern completion is implemented by recurrent computations and present three pieces of evidence that…

3h

 

How intermittent breaks in interaction improve collective intelligence [Social Sciences]

People influence each other when they interact to solve problems. Such social influence introduces both benefits (higher average solution quality due to exploitation of existing answers through social learning) and costs (lower maximum solution quality due to a reduction in individual exploration for novel answers) relative to independent problem solving….

3h

 

Effects of environmental stressors on daily governance [Sustainability Science]

Human workers ensure the functioning of governments around the world. The efficacy of human workers, in turn, is linked to the climatic conditions they face. Here we show that the same weather that amplifies human health hazards also reduces street-level government workers’ oversight of these hazards. To do so, we…

3h

 

Small room for compromise between oil palm cultivation and primate conservation in Africa [Sustainability Science]

Despite growing awareness about its detrimental effects on tropical biodiversity, land conversion to oil palm continues to increase rapidly as a consequence of global demand, profitability, and the income opportunity it offers to producing countries. Although most industrial oil palm plantations are located in Southeast Asia, it is argued that…

3h

 

Correction for Koehler et al., Transient surface ocean oxygenation recorded in the ~2.66-Ga Jeerinah Formation, Australia [Correction]

EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for “Transient surface ocean oxygenation recorded in the ∼2.66-Ga Jeerinah Formation, Australia,” by Matthew C. Koehler, Roger Buick, Michael A. Kipp, Eva E. Stüeken, and Jonathan Zaloumis, which was first published July 9, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1720820115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:7711–7716). The authors note…

3h

 

Correction for de Jonge et al., Gene cluster conservation provides insight into cercosporin biosynthesis and extends production to the genus Colletotrichum [Correction]

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES Correction for “Gene cluster conservation provides insight into cercosporin biosynthesis and extends production to the genus Colletotrichum,” by Ronnie de Jonge, Malaika K. Ebert, Callie R. Huitt-Roehl, Paramita Pal, Jeffrey C. Suttle, Rebecca E. Spanner, Jonathan D. Neubauer, Wayne M. Jurick II, Karina A. Stott, Gary A. Secor,…

3h

 

Correction for Caranto and Lancaster, Nitric oxide is an obligate bacterial nitrification intermediate produced by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase [Correction]

BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “Nitric oxide is an obligate bacterial nitrification intermediate produced by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase,” by Jonathan D. Caranto and Kyle M. Lancaster, which was first published July 17, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1704504114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:8217–8222). The authors note that on page 8221, left column, expression [3] should instead…

3h

 

Correction to Supporting Information for Weinberg et al., Bioinformatic analysis of riboswitch structures uncovers variant classes with altered ligand specificity [SI Correction]

BIOCHEMISTRY, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for “Bioinformatic analysis of riboswitch structures uncovers variant classes with altered ligand specificity,” by Zasha Weinberg, James W. Nelson, Christina E. Lünse, Madeline E. Sherlock, and Ronald R. Breaker, which was first published March 6, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1619581114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci…

3h

 

Men and women process motion at different speeds

On average, men pick up on visual motion significantly faster than women do, according to a new study. Humans’ ability to notice moving objects has always been a useful skill, good for avoiding an animal predator in ancient times and crossing a busy street in the modern world. That evolutionary success attests to the importance of visual motion processing, and why there may be specialized regions

3h

 

What are the physics of blowing bubbles?

New research gets at the science behind the simple act of blowing bubbles. In a series of experiments replicating bubble blowing, researchers have discovered two methods that make bubbles: one, pushing with a steady but strong wind on a soap film through a circular wand, which causes it to grow into a bubble, and two, pushing with a gentle wind on an already-inflated film in order to drive its fu

3h

 

Moms who toke: Is marijuana use safe when you're pregnant?

Is marijuana healthy for the baby while the mother is pregnant? Read More

3h

 

We can run out of land to grow food, warns study

Dietary rules need to consider the land needed to grow the food, cautions new study. Read More

3h

 

What Is CBD Oil, and Does It Really Work?

Cannabis oil may not be the cure-all people think it is.

3h

 

Ethan Hawke Reckons With Poptimism in Hollywood

Ethan Hawke made his feature debut as an actor in 1985, playing a teenage boy in the Joe Dante film Explorers . That year , the top 10 movies at the U.S. box office were a varied bunch. There were sequels, like the Sylvester Stallone–starring Rambo: First Blood Part II and Rocky IV . There was a sci-fi classic ( Back to the Future ), family favorites ( Cocoon, The Goonies ), a goofy comedy ( Spie

3h

 

Differences between combined, isolated use of cannabis, nicotine on brain networks

Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth® at the University of Texas at Dallas investigated the effects on the brain of concurrent cannabis and nicotine use, versus the use of solely cannabis and solely nicotine.

3h

 

Take a vacation — it could prolong your life

A 40-year Finnish study of middle-aged male executives finds that taking vacations could prolong life.

3h

 

Ny metode kan halvere indlæggelsestid for mange patienter med betændelse i hjertet

Resultaterne af det danske POET-studie, som i dag er præsenteret på ESC, kan få stor betydning for den fremtidige kliniske praksis for behandlingen af stabile endokarditispatienter, mener professor Henning Bundgaard, der har stået i spidsen for studiet.

3h

 

Risikopatienter kan have gavn hurtig invasiv behandling

Tidlig revaskularisering kan være gavnlig for patienter med ikke-akutte blodpropper, der har høj risikoprofil, viser resultaterne af det danske VERDICT-studie, som i dag blev præsenteret på ESC-kongressen.

3h

 

Flere end ét myokardieinfarkt tredobler risikoen for død eller indlæggelse for hjertesvigt

Patienter med akutte blodpropper i hjertet har markant øget risiko for død eller indlæggelse for hjertesvigt, hvis de har andre infarkter uanset størrelsen på disse, viser dansk undersøgelse.

3h

 

Blodfortyndende medicin gavner ikke efter hjertesvigt

Thrombin er næppe hovedårsagen til kardiovaskulære hændelser blandt hjertesvigt-patienter, konkluderer forskergruppe, der afprøvet forebyggende behandling blodfortyndende medicin efter hjertesvigt.

3h

 

Instagram Adds 2FA, Account Verification in Security UpdateInstagram 2FA Verification

The Facebook-owned platform launches robust two-factor authentication and now has a more transparent user verification system.

3h

 

Eyewire Brain Zoo: Honeybee Marathon

Next up on our zoo tour, let’s visit the beehive! Aug 29 @8 am US ET During this marathon, act like a bee and work together to get our cell built before the clock runs out! We’ll be naming any cells that are worked on during this marathon, so better start practicing that waggle! Swag (generously sponsored by @susi) : 1 shirt, 1 mug, 1 poster, and 3 sticker sheets will be raffled among the top 25%

3h

 

Carbon in color: First-ever colored thin films of nanotubes created

A method can produce large quantities of pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes in select shades of the rainbow. The secret is a fine-tuned fabrication process — and a small dose of carbon dioxide. The films could find applications in touch screen technologies or as coating agents for new types of solar cells.

3h

 

Current advice to limit dairy intake should be reconsidered, research suggests

New research finds that with the exception of milk, dairy products have been found to protect against both total mortality and mortality from cerebrovascular causes.

3h

 

E. coli strain from retail poultry may cause urinary tract infections in people

A strain of Escherichia coli (E. coli) found in retail chicken and turkey products may cause a wide range of infections in people, according to a new study.

3h

 

Should Fatal Opioid-Related Drug Overdoses Be Classified as Suicides?

New research suggests it is time for a categorization change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

 

Close ties with fathers help daughters overcome loneliness

Fathers play a key role in helping their young daughters overcome loneliness, a new study has found.

4h

 

Scientists sweep cellular neighborhoods where Zika hides out

Researchers report a comprehensive analysis of interactions between Zika virus proteins and native human proteins. One of their findings gives insight into how Zika escapes immune signaling and where the virus proliferates inside the cell.

4h

 

Novel gene mutation found in lymphatic disorder

Pediatric researchers have identified a gene mutation that causes a serious lymphatic condition, and used that knowledge to restore normal lymphatic vessels in model animals. The laboratory findings may lead to a new therapy for patients with this type of abnormal lymphatic circulation. Abnormal lymphatic flow may sometimes cause severe symptoms, including respiratory distress, fluid accumulation

4h

 

Effects of deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease

Researchers have studied motor and cognitive effects of deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease. Their results show that the adverse cognitive effects of deep brain stimulation are linked to a different neural pathway than that responsible for the treatment's desired motor effects. This finding will help optimize treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease.

4h

 

Prognose efter myokardieinfarkt viser konstante forbedringer

Danske myokardiepatienters prognose er blevet støt bedre i perioden 2000-2014, viser undersøgelse præsenteret på ESC-kongressen.

4h

 

Ny forskning kortlægger dødsfald efter operation

Skader på hjertemusklen er blandt de mest almindelige dødsårsager hos patienter efter operation.

4h

 

Kulhydratfattig kost øger risiko for dødsfald

Kulhydratfattige diæter kan være forbundet med en øget risiko for at dø tidligt, viser ny forskning.

4h

 

Forskere frikender mejeriprodukter for skadelige virkninger

Indtag af mejeriprodukter beskytter mod dødsfald, mener forskere, der dog påpeger, at drikkemælk øger risiko for hjerte-kar-sygdomme.

4h

 

Facebook bans Myanmar’s military leader in unprecedented move

Facebook has banned top military accounts in Myanmar, including the commander-in-chief's. This is the first time it has banned a country's military or political leaders

4h

 

Two CAR T-Cell Therapies Greenlighted in Europe

Cancer treatments from Novartis and Gilead earn approval from EU regulators, but a first pass by the UK's state-funded health service finds CAR T is too expensive.

4h

 

Study provides new insights for ways to use cell metabolism to treat cancer

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have discovered that cell metabolism plays an important role in the ability of cells to start a survival program called autophagy, an unwanted side effect of some anti-cancer drugs that helps some tumor cells dodge treatment and eventually regrow into new tumors.

4h

 

Training for parents referred to CPS improves toddler's physiological regulation

A parental training program for families referred to Child Protective Services improved toddlers' unconscious reactions to mildly stressful situations, as well as improving parents' behavior, according to a new study by researchers at UC Davis and the University of Washington.

4h

 

Diagnosis is not best predictor of avoidable hospitalizations of nursing home residents

Care of long-term nursing home patients can be fragmented by hospitalizations and re-hospitalizations, which are especially burdensome for frail older adults. A new study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Center for Aging Research reports that a patient's diagnosis is not the best predictor of whether that individual will be transferred to a hospital or remain in place.

4h

 

Close ties with fathers help daughters overcome loneliness

Fathers play a key role in helping their young daughters overcome loneliness, a new study has found.

4h

 

The Populist’s Guide to Scandal, Jeremy Corbyn Edition

LONDON—It’s the scandal that keeps going—and so, somehow, does the man at its center. When allegations of anti-Semitism within Britain’s Labour Party burst into full-on political crisis in March, the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters insisted anti-Semitism was not tolerated in the party and vowed to root it out. But the hits kept coming. There were revelations that Corbyn had likened

4h

 

The 22-Year-Old Who Wrote Barack Obama’s Letters

In a small office on the top floor of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, a young woman sat at a desk covered with letters to the president of the United States. There were hundreds, each stamped with Back from the OVAL and crowned at the top with “Reply” in Barack Obama’s handwriting. Most White House staff members didn’t even know of this tiny office, accessible primarily by staircase and

4h

 

The Education of Bill Oliver

W ord came that President Barack Obama wanted to see some of the mail just the day after he took office. Mike Kelleher was the director of the Office of Presidential Correspondence (OPC). He got the call from the Oval saying the president wanted to see five letters. Then they called back with a correction. The president wanted to see 15 letters. They called back one more time. He wanted to see 10

4h

 

The Flood Is Coming

Keeping citizens safe is an essential responsibility of government, but when it comes to the dangers of climate change, the Trump administration just doesn’t care — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Rethinking a healthy diet from a global perspective

Scientists of the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences are using research from several large global studies to develop an updated, international approach of identifying a healthy diet.

4h

 

GW report delivers recommendations aimed at preparing Puerto Rico for hurricane season

In an independent report published today, researchers at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health estimated there were 2,975 excess deaths in Puerto Rico due to Hurricane Maria from September 2017 through the end of February 2018. The researchers also identified gaps in the death certification and public communication processes and went on to make recommendations t

4h

 

More patients survive sudden cardiac arrest with new EMS technique that uses a breathing tube

A new study showed that a change in the type of breathing tube paramedics use to resuscitate patients with sudden cardiac arrest can significantly improve the odds of survival and save thousands of lives. More than 90 percent of Americans who experience sudden cardiac arrest die before, or soon after, reaching a hospital.

4h

 

1,000 Human Teeth Uncovered in Excavation for Australian Subway

A long-dead Australian dentist's gruesome legacy recently resurfaced.

4h

 

Louis C.K. and the Men Who Keep Getting What They Want

“Like, classic Louis, really really good.” That was the comic Mo Amer, one of the performers who happened to be present at the Comedy Cellar in New York City for an event that took place—and took many by surprise—on Sunday evening : a set performed by Louis C.K. A show that marks, according to The New York Times , his return to comedy and to its various spotlights: a performance made “for apparen

4h

 

How Women’s Suffrage Improved Education for a Whole Generation of Children

When the United States ratified the Nineteenth Amendment nearly a century ago, the law’s immediate impact extended far beyond giving women the right to vote. Women’s suffrage—widely viewed as one of the 20th century’s most important events—coincided with a growing (if gradual) embrace of gender equality, increased social spending , and a greater tendency among politicians to take a progressive st

4h

 

When Conservation Backfires

On New Year’s Day 2015, as celebratory fireworks erupted around the world, a quieter but no less explosive change was happening in Kiribati. After years of planning, the central-Pacific nation finally instigated a complete ban on all fishing within a 157,000-square-mile area of ocean, equivalent in size to California. This area—the Phoenix Islands Protected Area ( PIPA )—had enjoyed limited (and

4h

 

Meet Thousands of Twins in Twinsburg

“We’re not exactly the same person,” says a teenage boy, glancing at his brother—who, dressed identically, and exhibiting the same physical features, appears to be the boy’s mirror image—“even though we’re going to the same college, majoring in the same thing, and taking all the same classes.” Welcome to Twins Days, the largest annual festival for biological twins in the world. Every summer since

4h

 

Remote islands harbor higher numbers of non-native species

The effects of island remoteness from the mainland on the number of species found on islands differs strongly for non-native compared to native species. Numbers of native species on islands decrease with greater remoteness, while numbers of non-native species increase. An international research team has uncovered this surprising finding. These findings have important implications for our understan

4h

 

Study helps children hit the right note in supporting autistic peers

Collaborative music lessons in schools improve the attitudes of pupils towards their peers with autism.

4h

 

A novel nanoactuator system has been developed

Researchers have developed a novel nanoactuator system, where conformation of biomolecule can be tuned by electric field and probed using optical properties of gold nanoparticle.

4h

 

Breakthrough sensor to help people with bipolar disorder monitor lithium levels

Patients living with bipolar disorder and depression will soon be able to use a unique wearable sensor to safely monitor their lithium drug levels.

4h

 

Artificial intelligence can deliver specialty-level diagnosis in primary care setting, study shows

A system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to detect diabetic retinopathy without a person interpreting the results earned Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorization in April, following a clinical trial in primary care offices. The study was the first to prospectively assess the safety of an autonomous AI system in patient care settings.

4h

 

Novel brain network linked to chronic pain in Parkinson's disease

Scientists have revealed a novel brain network that links pain in Parkinson's disease to a specific region of the brain.

5h

 

New approach makes sprayed droplets hit and stick to their targets

MIT engineers led by Kripa Varanasi have devised a new way to make sprayed droplets hit and stick to their targets.

5h

 

Temperature model predicts regional and seasonal virus transmission by mosquitoes

Scientists have built a model that predicts how temperature affects the spread of Ross River virus, a common mosquito-borne virus in Australia.

5h

 

Multiple facets of biodiversity reduce variability of grassland biomass production

A new study shows that plant evolutionary history plays a critical role in regulating year-to-year variation of biomass production in grasslands. In the face of climate change, understanding causes of variability in key ecosystem services such as biomass production is essential. A team of researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), University of Göttingen and

5h

 

If military robot falls, it can get itself up

Scientists have developed software to ensure that if a robot falls, it can get itself back up, meaning future military robots will be less reliant on their soldier handlers.

5h

 

Protein modifications pointing to cancer

Researchers can, for the first time, precisely characterize the protein modification ADP-ribosylation for all proteins in a tissue sample. The changes, which are a typical reaction to stress, provide information about the condition of a cell. They are now testing the new method to diagnose and treat cancer.

5h

 

Post-workout muscle building and repair blunted in obese adults

Obesity is associated with a host of health problems, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. According to a new study, obesity also diminishes a person's ability to build muscle after engaging in resistance exercise.

5h

 

How eggplants became Asian: Genomes and elephants tell the story

The evolutionary context of the eggplant was until recently very poorly known. Historical documents and genetic data have shown that the eggplant was first domesticated in Asia, but most of its wild relatives are from Africa. Researchers managed to obtain the first well-supported hypothesis on the origin of the eggplant and its direct relatives.

5h

 

The science behind blowing bubbles

What exactly happens when you blow on a soap film to make a bubble? Behind this simple question about a favorite childhood activity is some real science, researchers have found.

5h

 

Combination approach shows promise for beating advanced melanoma

A new study has found that a treatment that uses a bacteria-like agent in combination with an immunotherapy drug could help some people with advanced melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer, live longer.

5h

 

Potential drugs developed to help curb smoking

Researchers have created more than a dozen candidate drugs with the potential to curb smokers' desire for nicotine by slowing how it is broken down in the body. The researchers hope the substances can help people reduce their consumption of tobacco, if not quit altogether.

5h

 

Traffic noise may make birds age faster

Traffic noise may be associated with an increased rate of telomere loss in Zebra finches that have left the nest, according to a new study. Telomeres are caps on the ends of chromosomes that protect genes from damage. Shortening of telomeres indicates accelerated biological aging.

5h

 

All wired up: New molecular wires for single-molecule electronic devices

Scientists have designed a new type of molecular wire doped with organometallic ruthenium to achieve unprecedentedly higher conductance than earlier molecular wires. The origin of high conductance in these wires suggests a potential strategy for developing of novel molecular components, which could be the building blocks of future minuscule electronic devices.

5h

 

Can 'microswimmers' swim through jelly?

Researchers have studied how microswimmers, like bacteria or sperm, swim through fluids with both solid and liquid-like properties e.g. gels. They found that subtle changes in swimmer features, its structure and how it moves, invoke a dramatically different response from the fluid. They also discovered that the similarity in size between the structure of the fluid and the swimmer led to a wide ran

5h

 

Preemptive overfishing: Promising to solve environmental problem may initially worsen it, study suggests

As ocean conservation efforts kick into high gear amid concerns over climate change, food insecurity and habitat degradation, a disturbing phenomenon may also be on the rise: preemptive overfishing in a given area in anticipation of impending conservation policies.

5h

 

Mechanisms behind focused-ultrasound-assisted treatment of brain tumors

A study has analyzed, for the first time, the mechanisms underlying the use of focused ultrasound to improve the delivery of anti-cancer drugs across the blood brain barrier into brain tumors.

5h

 

Connectivity explains ecosystem responses to rainfall, drought

Researchers reveal techniques — inspired by the study of information theory — to track how changes in precipitation alter interactions between the atmosphere, vegetation and soil at two National Science Foundation Critical Zone Observatory sites in the western United States.

5h

 

Trump says Google is 'rigged' with bad news about himTrump Google Conservative

President Donald Trump took aim Tuesday at Google, claiming that news search results were "rigged" against him, which prompted a White House aide to suggest the administration may look at regulating the huge internet platform.

5h

 

Temperature model predicts regional and seasonal virus transmission by mosquitoes

Scientists have built a model that predicts how temperature affects the spread of Ross River virus, a common mosquito-borne virus in Australia, according to a report in the journal eLife.

5h

 

NASA finds little improvement in Miriam's structure

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Miriam Aug. 27 and infrared data showed slight improvement from the day before. On Aug. 28, wind shear was still affecting the storm.

5h

 

New compact hyperspectral system captures 5-D images

Researchers have developed a compact imaging system that can measure the shape and light-reflection properties of objects with high speed and accuracy. This 5D hyperspectral imaging system—so-called because it captures multiple wavelengths of light plus spatial coordinates as a function of time —could benefit a variety of applications including optical-based sorting of products and identifying peo

5h

 

Trilobites: Before These Parasitic Wasps Finished Devouring Live Flies, They Became Fossils

In fly pupae that turned to stone, scientists found evidence that wasps have been infesting other insects for tens of millions of years.

5h

 

The math of malaria: Drug resistance 'a numbers game' of competing parasites

A new mathematical model for malaria shows how competition between parasite strains within a human host reduces the odds of drug resistance developing in a high-transmission setting. But if a drug-resistant strain does become established, that same competition drives the spread of resistance faster, under strong selection from antimalarial drug use.

5h

 

Stellar 'swarms' help astronomers understand the evolution of stars

New work from Carnegie's Jonathan Gagné and the American Museum of Natural History's Jacqueline Faherty identified nearly a thousand potential members and 31 confirmed members of stellar associations—stars of similar ages and compositions that are drifting together through space—in our own corner of the Milky Way. Their work, published in the Astrophysical Journal, could help astronomers understan

5h

 

Stats reveal when cops give out the most speeding tickets

With Fort Lauderdale serving as an example, Avvo crunches the numbers to find the days of the month and week, and the times, you’re most likely to get a traffic ticket. Read More

5h

 

U.S. Is Woefully Unprepared for Nuclear Strike

Its health system lacks the capacity to respond to attacks that use high-powered modern weapons — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

The 'invisible hand' doesn't control markets

Traditionally, many economists presume markets are influenced by the "invisible hand" theory. New research from Michigan State University found a disruptor has turned this long-held concept—perpetuated by Adam Smith since 1759—on its head.

5h

 

Twitter useful for stock picks, could boost market efficiency, shows studyTwitter Suspends Accounts

Despite concerns to the contrary, it turns out that Twitter is not uninformative when it comes to its reliability as an investor information source.

5h

 

New sensor could help doctors monitor patient progress from a distance

A self-powered sensor developed at the University of Waterloo could allow doctors to remotely monitor the recovery of surgical patients.

5h

 

NASA looks at fluctuating strength of Tropical Storm Lane

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over tropical cyclone Lane on Aug. 27 it had just regained tropical storm status and showed powerful thunderstorms around east of its center of circulation. However, wind shear kicked back up and by 11 p.m. EDT that day, Lane had again weakened back to tropical depression status.

5h

 

New compact hyperspectral system captures 5-D images

Researchers have developed a compact imaging system that can measure the shape and light-reflection properties of objects with high speed and accuracy.

5h

 

Electric polarization in the macroscopic world and electrons moving at atomic scales

Femtosecond x-ray experiments in combination with a new theoretical approach establish a direct connection between electric properties in the macroscopic world and electron motions on the time and length scale of atoms. The results open a new route for understanding and tailoring the properties of ferroelectric materials.

5h

 

The 'invisible hand' doesn't control markets

New socioeconomic research from Michigan State University found a market disruptor has turned the 'invisible hand' theory on its head.

5h

 

Parasites discovered in fossil fly pupae

Parasitic wasps existed as early as several million years ago. Within a project coordinated by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), researchers of various disciplines for the first time definitively discovered fossil parasites inside their hosts. The scientists studied fly pupae from old collections using ultrafast X-ray imaging. They found 55 cases of parasitization and described four extinct

5h

 

Six countries in the Americas account for half of all firearm deaths

A new study reveals more than a quarter-million people died from firearm-related injuries in 2016, with half of those deaths occurring in only six countries in the Americas: Brazil, the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, and Guatemala.

5h

 

A non-canonical strategy may improve cancer radiotherapy

Interactions between radiation therapy and the immune system can improve cancer treatment. The cellular carnage caused by radiation attracts scavengers, such as dendritic cells, that present cancer cell fragments to T cells. This study suggests novel ways to improve treatment by using radiation to boost immunotherapy.

5h

 

Come together: New laser technique binds aluminum with plastic in injection molding

Designing lightweight materials — a goal in the automotive and airline industries — requires carefully joining together different types of materials like metals and polymers, and these additional steps drive up manufacturing costs. New work in laser technology recently increased the adhesion strength of metal-plastic hybrid materials; engineers demonstrated a technique for binding plastic to alu

5h

 

Mapping out cancer's movements

Cancer researchers struggle to identify tumor cells that are interspersed within nonmalignant tissues because tumor cells exploit the tissue environment and monopolize available resources to continue growing. Researchers attribute cancer cell's ability to use cell signaling and metabolic pathways that override normal cell growth restrictions to complicated chemical exchanges between tissue and tum

5h

 

Better understanding of potential regeneration after brain/spinal cord injury

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have uncovered new information on the pathways involved in neuronal regeneration, hopefully bringing the medical community one step closer to managing brain and spinal cord injuries.

5h

 

Immune system prioritizes distinct immune responses in infants with flu

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists detail how the immune system strives to protect the lungs of the youngest flu patients. Researchers reported evidence that unconventional T cells play a pivotal role in protecting infants from serious, possibly fatal, flu complications. Rather than fueling inflammation, the unconventional T cells triggered a biochemical cascade that increased levels

5h

 

Researchers find elusive source of most abundant immune cell

Discovery of human neutrophil progenitor opens the door for new therapeutic targets and could serve as an important biomarker for early cancer detection.

5h

 

INSiGHT identifies unique retinal regulatory genes

A new platform called INSiGHT enables researchers to uncover new retinal regulatory genes.

5h

 

Genes that regulate how much we dream

Sleep is known to allow animals to re-energize themselves and consolidate memories. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is known to play an important role in maintaining a healthy mental and physical life, but the molecular mechanisms behind this state are barely understood. Now, an international research team led by researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan has id

5h

 

We can all help to improve communication for people with disabilities

Around 5% of the population, or 1.2 million Australians have a communication disability. Communication disability can arise if a person has a health condition affecting their speech, language, listening, understanding, reading, writing, or social skills.

5h

 

In warming Arctic, major rivers show surprising changes in carbon chemistry

Over the past several decades, the Arctic has begun to show signs of significant ecological upheaval. The rate of warming in the Arctic is nearly twice the global average, and those changes are triggering a cascade of destabilizing environmental effects. Ice is melting, permafrost is thawing, and experts say fires in Arctic forests are as damaging as they've been in 10,000 years.

5h

 

Researchers develop 'cytological ruler' to build 3D map of human genome

It has been almost 20 years since the human genome was first sequenced, but researchers still know little about how the genome is folded up and organized within cells. Researchers describe a new technique that can measure the position of every single gene in the nucleus to build a 3D picture of the genome's organization.

5h

 

Smallest medical robot for the Guinness World Records

It can't be seen with a human eye. It doesn't look anything like C-3PO or R2-D2, or even BB-8. But, nevertheless, it is a robot (all 120nm of it) and its now been deemed the Smallest Medical Robot.

5h

 

For carbon storage, biodiversity can help — or hurt

Biodiversity plays a significant role in forest carbon storage, but surprisingly less than previously thought, new research suggests.

5h

 

Algae a threat to walleye vision, study finds

Walleye and the fish they eat struggle to see in water clouded by algae, and that could potentially jeopardize the species' future if harmful algal blooms persist, according to a new study.

5h

 

Corals in deeper waters under stress, too, scientists find

Researchers have used a novel approach to assess temperature stress on deep coral reefs in Palau, combining sea level and temperature data sets from continuous recorders serviced by divers.

5h

 

Ebola species found in bats ahead of any potential outbreak

For the first time, scientists have discovered a new ebolavirus species in a host prior to detection in an infected human or sick animal.

5h

 

Heart-brain connection could be predictive biomarker for epilepsy

Heartbeat irregularities connected to brain activity abnormalities may lead to the ability to predict eventual epileptic seizures in subjects who suffered physical or infectious brain insults, according to Penn State researchers who studied mouse models of cerebral malaria, which often causes epilepsy in those who survive.

5h

 

Study raises the standard for measuring nerve cell death

Researchers have developed a new and improved method to judge the effectiveness of experimental therapies for neurodegeneration–the progressive loss of neurons.

5h

 

People who don't read the news better at predicting which articles will go viral

Using fMRI data, researchers found that the brain activity of people who don't frequently read the news better predicted the popularity of New York Times Health articles. Frequent readers, by contrast, responded positively to all articles. When seeking to have content go viral, say the authors, look beyond the most committed readers or advocates.

5h

 

As summers get hotter, death tolls will rise

Health Unless we do something, as heatwaves become more common, death rates will skyrocket. Seventeen of the hottest years on record occurred this century. This year is no exception, with the past three months once again breaking temperature records in the…

5h

 

To Understand Volcanoes on Other Worlds, Stand On Our Own

In 1979, Sicily’s Mount Etna lurched to life, sending a plume of ash and several chunks of molten rock skyrocketing into the air. The outburst was unexpected. And for Rosaly Lopes , a 22-year-old graduate student in planetary science at the time, it was a close call. She and her colleagues had left the summit that morning to work roughly a mile downhill. But others were caught in the terrifying b

5h

 

Which Is Rarer: Gold or Diamonds?

Diamonds are forever, and gold is precious, but which is rarer? And does that rarity have anything to do with the price we see at a jewelry store?

5h

 

Unearthing the secrets of cellular energy

Everything the body does—your brain thinking, your heart beating, your cells growing—requires energy. Consequently, it comes as no surprise that disruptions in energy production can contribute to a wide range of diseases. To address this common denominator, a team of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco (UCSF) led by Ken Nakamura, MD, Ph.D., turned to the molecular power-pla

5h

 

Leaf molecules as markers for mycorrhizal associations

In nature, most plants establish mutual relationships with root fungi, so-called mycorrhiza. Mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the plants' nutrient uptake and help them thrive under extreme conditions. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, discovered that certain leaf metabolites can be used as markers for mycorrhizal associations. The discovery of foliar marker

5h

 

Facebook has introduced a user trustworthiness score – here's why it should go further

Facebook has reportedly started giving users a secret trustworthiness score in its attempt to tackle fake news. According to the Washington Post, the score is partly based on users' ability to correctly flag and report inaccurate news items on the site. Facebook then takes this score into account when working out how a user's content should be spread around the network (although it doesn't tell us

5h

 

Come together: New laser technique binds aluminum with plastic in injection molding

As developers in the automotive and airline industries push to make more efficient vehicles, they are turning their attention to designing sturdy, lightweight machines. Designing lightweight materials, however, requires carefully joining together different types of materials like metals and polymers, and these additional steps drive up manufacturing costs. New work in laser technology recently inc

5h

 

Lombok quakes not necessarily leading to a big bang

In recent weeks, the volcanic island of Lombok, in Indonesia, has been battered by a series of powerful earthquakes, each greater than M6 and each located deep beneath Lombok's volcanic complex. The very presence of the volcano naturally leads to public concerns that these earthquakes are in some way related and we could expect an eruption to follow.

5h

 

Mapping out cancer's movements

Cancer researchers struggle to identify tumor cells that are interspersed within nonmalignant tissues because tumor cells exploit the tissue environment and monopolize available resources to continue growing. Researchers attribute cancer cell's ability to use cell signaling and metabolic pathways that override normal cell growth restrictions to complicated chemical exchanges between tissue and tum

5h

 

Scientists cast new light on molecular behaviour

Scientists at Heriot-Watt University have developed a new experiment that has revealed never-before-seen molecular behaviour.

5h

 

ESA's role in easing water scarcity

Water is crucial to life on Earth. But today, its overexploitation and pollution present challenges for the environment, economies and global living standards. These issues are addressed by the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the annual World Water Week, which runs from 26–31 August 2018 in Stockholm.

5h

 

First published results from new X-ray laser

With the publication of the first experimental measurements performed at the facility, the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (EuXFEL) has passed another critical milestone since its launch in September 2017. It is the first of a "next generation" of XFELs that offer much more rapid data collection than was possible before. As the EuXFEL delivers X-ray pulses at the almost unbelievable rate of one

5h

 

New sensor could help doctors monitor patient progress from a distance

A self-powered sensor developed at the University of Waterloo could allow doctors to remotely monitor the recovery of surgical patients.The small, tube-like device is designed to be fitted to braces after joint surgery to wirelessly send information to computers, smartphones or smartwatches to track range of motion and other indicators of improvement.

5h

 

The math of malaria

A new mathematical model for malaria shows how competition between parasite strains within a human host reduces the odds of drug resistance developing in a high-transmission setting. But if a drug-resistant strain does become established, that same competition drives the spread of resistance faster, under strong selection from antimalarial drug use.

5h

 

Chest pain drug falls short in preventing first episode of ventricular arrhythmia or death

A trial of more than 1,000 patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators found that the drug ranolazine (used to treat chest pain; brand name Ranexa®) was safe but didn't decrease the likelihood of the first occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias or death in this high-risk population. The drug did lower the risk for recurrent ventricular tachycardia by 30 percent, suggesting it could be a t

5h

 

NASA looks at fluctuating strength of Tropical Storm Lane

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over tropical cyclone Lane on Aug. 27 it had just regained tropical storm status and showed powerful thunderstorms around east of its center of circulation. However, wind shear kicked back up and by 11 p.m. EDT that day, Lane had again weakened back to tropical depression status.

5h

 

NASA finds little improvement in Miriam's structure

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Miriam Aug. 27 and infrared data showed slight improvement from the day before. On Aug. 28, wind shear was still affecting the storm.

5h

 

In warming Arctic, major rivers show surprising changes in carbon chemistry

New research suggests that the same factors driving the Arctic's changing climate are fueling a geological response that could play a small part in counteracting those changes' malign effects.

5h

 

Stellar 'swarms' help astronomers understand the evolution of stars

New work from Carnegie's Jonathan Gagné and the American Museum of Natural History's Jacqueline Faherty identified nearly a thousand potential members and 31 confirmed members of stellar associations–stars of similar ages and compositions that are drifting together through space–in our own corner of the Milky Way. Their research could help astronomers understand the evolution of stars and the pr

5h

 

Three factors that predict life-threatening respiratory disease in burn patients

For the first time, researchers have devised a model to predict burn patients who are most likely to develop life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).The prediction model includes three factors: the extent of the patient's inhalation injury, the percentage of the patient's body that was burned and whether the patient had high levels of a blood clotting protein called von Willebr

5h

 

Study finds how NF-2 gene mutations make cells hyper-responsive to growth factor signaling

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center researchers has determined one way that mutations in a gene involved in a rare, hereditary cancer syndrome lead to out-of-control cellular proliferation.

5h

 

Cancer linked to poor prognosis in patients with broken heart syndrome

Cancer is linked to an increased risk of death and rehospitalization in patients with broken heart syndrome, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2018.

5h

 

Panel: Doctors Should Focus On Preventing Depression In Pregnant Women, New Moms

Physicians are urged to identify which pregnant women and new mothers are at high risk of depression and refer them to talk therapy before they show worsening symptoms. (Image credit: Veronica Grech/Getty Images)

5h

 

Toddlers know when they’re being judged

Even before toddlers can form a complete sentence, they’re attuned to how others may be judging them, according to a new study. The findings, which appear in Developmental Psychology , show that toddlers are sensitive to the opinions of others, and will modify their behavior accordingly when others are watching. “We’ve shown that by the age of 24 months, children are not only aware that other peo

5h

 

Nu laver Jaguar sin klassiske E-type om til elbil

En elektrificeret koncept-udgave af Jaguar E-type fra sidste år var ekstremt populær. Er du den heldige ejer af en E-type, tilbyder Jaguar nu at ombygge den til eldrift.

5h

 

Quantum computer simulates two types of bizarre materials

In calculations involving about 2,000 quantum bits, a D-Wave machine reproduced the behavior of exotic substances.

5h

 

Renewable energy sources can take up to 1000 times more space than fossil fuels

To generate renewable energy takes more space than one might think. New research by environmental scientist Paul Behrens and master's student John van Zalk shows how much space is needed for nine specific types of energy. Biomass, hydro and wind, while vital, take up the most space. Natural gas and nuclear take least. Publication in Energy Policy.

5h

 

Cracking the sugar code—why the 'glycome' is the next big thing in health and medicine

When you think of sugar, you probably think of the sweet, white, crystalline table sugar that you use to make cookies or sweeten your coffee. But did you know that within our body, simple sugar molecules can be connected together to create powerful structures that have recently been found to be linked to health problems, including cancer, aging and autoimmune diseases.

5h

 

A novel nanoactuator system has been developed

Researchers at University of Jyväskylä (Finland) and University of Tampere (Finland) together with BioNavis Ltd (Finland) have developed a novel nanoactuator system, where conformation of biomolecule can be tuned by electric field and probed using optical properties of gold nanoparticle.

6h

 

How Eggplants became Asian – genomes and elephants tell the story

The evolutionary context of the eggplant was, until recently, very poorly known. Historical documents and genetic data have shown that the eggplant was first domesticated in Asia, but most of its wild relatives are from Africa. Researchers from the Natural History Museums of London (NHM) and Finland (University of Helsinki) managed to obtain the first well-supported hypothesis on the origin of the

6h

 

The terrifying power of stereotypes – and how to deal with them

From "girls suck at maths" and "men are so insensitive" to "he is getting a bit senile with age" or "black people struggle at university", there's no shortage of common cultural stereotypes about social groups. Chances are you have heard most of these examples at some point. In fact, stereotypes are a bit like air: invisible but always present.

6h

 

Carbon in colour: First-ever coloured thin films of nanotubes created

A method developed at Aalto University, Finland, can produce large quantities of pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes in select shades of the rainbow. The secret is a fine-tuned fabrication process—and a small dose of carbon dioxide. The films could find applications in touch screen technologies or as coating agents for new types of solar cells.

6h

 

Researchers uncover the science behind blowing bubbles

What exactly happens when you blow on a soap film to make a bubble? Behind this simple question about a favorite childhood activity is some real science, researchers at New York University have found.

6h

 

Why art thrives at Burning Man | Nora Atkinson

Craft curator Nora Atkinson takes us on a trip to Nevada's Black Rock Desert to see the beautifully designed and participatory art of Burning Man, revealing how she discovered there what's often missing from museums: curiosity and engagement. "What is art for in our contemporary world if not this?" she asks.

6h

 

All that is gold is not biochemically stable

Environmental nanoparticle researchers discover that gold isn't always the shining example of a biologically stable material that it's assumed to be. In a nanoparticle form, the normally very stable, inert, noble metal actually gets dismantled by a microbe found on a Brazilian aquatic weed.

6h

 

Up to 8 million deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries yearly due to poor-quality health care

Recent gains against the burden of illness, injury, and disability and commitment to universal health coverage (UHC) are insufficient to close the enormous gaps that remain between what is achievable in human health and where global health stands today, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

6h

 

Breakthrough sensor to help people with bipolar disorder monitor lithium levels

Patients living with bipolar disorder and depression will soon be able to use a unique wearable sensor to safely monitor their lithium drug levels.

6h

 

Why studying Latino health as a whole doesn’t make sense

Despite the substantial diversity among Latinos, national and state surveillance health surveys often treat the group as a monolithic entity. Researchers are calling for better, disaggregated data. Latinos are the largest racial/ethnic minority group in the United States, representing 16.3 percent of the population and growing—coming from more than 25 countries in the Caribbean, Central America,

6h

 

Can a woman have a penis? How to understand disagreements about gender recognition

Members of a small women's rights group, Liverpool ReSisters, have declared that "women don't have penises." They seem to be very confident of this point, having gone as far as to paste stickers claiming as much onto the genital areas of some of the statues that make up Anthony Gormley's artwork Another Place on Crosby Beach near Liverpool. It's an attention-grabbing stunt. But are they right? Wel

6h

 

Remote islands harbour higher numbers of non-native species

The effects of island remoteness from the mainland on the number of species found on islands differs strongly for non-native compared to native species. Numbers of native species on islands decrease with greater remoteness, while numbers of non-native species increase. This surprising finding has been uncovered by an international research team led by Dietmar Moser, Bernd Lenzner and Franz Essl fr

6h

 

If military robot falls, it can get itself up

Scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory have developed software to ensure that if a robot falls, it can get itself back up, meaning future military robots will be less reliant on their Soldier handlers.

6h

 

Paris, Tokyo, New York and others pledge to slash waste

By slashing food waste and improving waste management and recycling, 23 global cities and regions representing 150 million people pledged Tuesday to significantly cut the pollution-causing garbage they generate by 2030.

6h

 

Cochrane review looks at accuracy of Xpert for the diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB

In one-fifth of people with active tuberculosis (TB), the site of disease is outside the lungs (extrapulmonary TB). Some forms of extrapulmonary TB, such as TB meningitis, are extremely dangerous, where a rapid diagnosis can make all the difference to a patient. In a new Cochrane Review, a team of authors reviewed the evidence and assessed the accuracy of the widely-used rapid diagnostic test, mai

6h

 

Protein modifications pointing to cancer

Researchers from the University of Zurich can, for the first time, precisely characterize the protein modification ADP-ribosylation for all proteins in a tissue sample. The changes, which are a typical reaction to stress, provide information about the condition of a cell. Together with the University Hospital Zurich, they are now testing the new method to diagnose and treat cancer.

6h

 

Post-workout muscle building and repair blunted in obese adults, study finds

Obesity is associated with a host of health problems, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. According to a new study reported in the Journal of Physiology, obesity also diminishes a person's ability to build muscle after engaging in resistance exercise.

6h

 

If military robot falls, it can get itself up

Scientists at the US Army Research Laboratory and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory have developed software to ensure that if a robot falls, it can get itself back up, meaning future military robots will be less reliant on their soldier handlers.

6h

 

Leaf molecules as markers for mycorrhizal associations

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, discovered that certain leaf metabolites can be used as markers for mycorrhizal associations. Mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the plants' nutrient uptake and help them thrive under extreme conditions. The discovery of foliar markers enables scientists to screen large amounts of plants for mycorrhizal associations without h

6h

 

Novel technique to treat endometrial cysts is safe and effective

A technique called catheter-based sclerotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for endometrial cysts and could help preserve fertility in patients, according to a new study.

6h

 

Slightly More Than 100 Fantastic Articles

Each year, I keep a running list of nonfiction that I encounter as I publish The Best of Journalism , a weekly email newsletter that I curate. This is my annual attempt to bring roughly 100 of those stories to a wider audience. I could not read or note every worthy article published last year (and I’ve disqualified paywalled articles and everything published at The Atlantic–– though don’t miss la

6h

 

The World Isn’t Prepared to Deal With Possible Genocide In Myanmar

A United Nations report recommended Monday that Myanmar’s top generals be investigated for genocide at the International Criminal Court for their role in the violence perpetrated against the Rohingya. “There is sufficient information to warrant the investigation and prosecution of senior officials in the Tatmadaw chain of command, so that a competent court can determine their liability for genoci

6h

 

Sprint, T-Mobile merger means 28,000 jobs lost, including 4,500 at HQs, union claims

Organized labor officially opposed the merger between Sprint and T-Mobile on Monday, saying it would cost more than 28,000 jobs, including 4,500 at the two headquarters.

6h

 

Why do we think tiny things are cute?

Science There are a few reasons, but we're hard-wired to find small things adorable. From viral videos to toys, there's something about miniatures that we just can't get enough of.

6h

 

Advertising just got micro-personal – why we don't care

With all the buzz and hysteria about how consumers are being cunningly "micro-targeted" in a bid for mind control, not only by advertisers of products but also by political parties, researchers at UniSA's Ehrenberg-Bass Institute for Marketing Science have discovered there is probably no reason to panic.

6h

 

Breakthrough sensor to help people with bipolar disorder monitor lithium levels

Patients living with bipolar disorder and depression will soon be able to use a unique wearable sensor to safely monitor their lithium drug levels.

6h

 

Novel gene mutation found in lymphatic disorder

Pediatric researchers have identified a gene mutation that causes a serious lymphatic condition, and used that knowledge to restore normal lymphatic vessels in model animals. The laboratory findings may lead to a new therapy for patients with this type of abnormal lymphatic circulation. Abnormal lymphatic flow may sometimes cause severe symptoms, including respiratory distress, fluid accumulation

6h

 

Invisible needles

An international research group of scientists from Politecnico di Torino (Italy) and NUST MISIS (Russia) has developed a model of a new metamaterial, which will improve the accuracy of nano-sensors in optics and biomedicine by cloaking them from external radiation. The article reporting the results has been recently published in Scientific Reports, a high rank, prestigious interdisciplinary journa

6h

 

Qual­ity re­gisters for sur­gery ex­clude many treat­ment-re­lated ad­verse events

According to a recent study, many extensive national registries are primarily based on data collected for administrative purposes, and often feature selective and incomplete reporting of treatment outcomes.

6h

 

FeCo-selenide — Next-generation material in energy storage devices?

In a paper in the forthcoming issue of NANO, a team of researchers have fabricated an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) based on FeCo-selenide nanosheet arrays as positive electrode and Fe 2 O 3 nanorod arrays as negative electrode. There is evidence that FeCo-selenide could be the next-generation promising electrode materials in energy storage devices.

6h

 

Discovery on East Asian monsoon dynamics

Dr. Richard Cheung and Dr. Moriaki Yasuhara from the University of Hong Kong and their collaborators identified four pervasive East Asian summer monsoon strengthening events at 1250, 1450, 1550, and 1900 CE and found that oceanic and continental settings could partially explain spatial differences in Asian summer monsoon trends at decadal to centennial scale.

6h

 

Shining X-ray light on perovskites for better solar cells

Named after a mineral discovered in the Ural Mountains of Russia, perovskites have taken center stage as a class of materials with properties that could be applied to future electronics and energy devices.

6h

 

Would an eruption in Melbourne really match Hawaii's volcanoes? Here's the evidence

Spectacular images of recent volcanic eruptions in Hawaii are a little disheartening – especially given news reports suggesting there is a sleeping volcano under Melbourne that could awaken and erupt at any moment.

6h

 

Tongues provide clues to identifying the breed of new-born calves

Identifying the breed of a new-born calf is not always easy, but Massey University research suggests their tongues may hold a clue.

6h

 

Levitating 2-D semiconductors for better performance

Atomically thin 2-D semiconductors have been drawing attention for their superior physical properties over silicon semiconductors; nevertheless, they are not the most appealing materials due to their structural instability and costly manufacturing process. To shed some light on these limitations, a KAIST research team suspended a 2-D semiconductor on a dome-shaped nanostructure to produce a highly

6h

 

This body clock trick makes us more patient

Seeing time tick down quickly on a countdown clock may give people more patience than seeing time pass slowly would. In a series of experiments, the speed of a countdown clock affected the patience and decision-making of video game players, both during and after the game, according to David Reitter, associate professor of information sciences and technology at Penn State. “‘What can we do about i

6h

 

Infrared sensor serves as a new tool for drug discovery

Scientists have found a new method for analysing how active agents affect a specific protein essential for cell survival. Their research could help to quickly develop drugs with fewer side effects.

7h

 

Researchers study midge fly infestation in Ohio wastewater treatment plants

Ever wonder what happens to the water when it goes down the drain or toilet? Eventually, it ends up at a water reclamation facility, where it is filtered, cleansed and converted back into water that can be used for other purposes, such as agricultural irrigation, replenishing surface and ground water, and sometimes conversion back into drinking water.

7h

 

Tiny crystals pave the way for new design of digital devices

Curtin researchers have developed a tiny electrical circuit that may enable an entirely new design of digital devices.

7h

 

The same but different—what passengers like about Uber

Uber's dramatic rise has been accompanied by criticism, including allegations of predatory pricing and flouting of safety and employment laws.

7h

 

Underwater robot tracks toxic algae in Lake Erie

Microcystin is a nasty toxin that can cause skin reactions, stomach problems, and even liver damage. It's produced by a tiny blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) called Microcystis, which multiplies like crazy in warm, nutrient-rich water. Unfortunately, Microcystis blooms are becoming increasingly common in the Great Lakes, which provide drinking water for millions of people. This month researchers fr

7h

 

Semantic cache for AI-enabled image analysis

The availability of high-resolution, inexpensive sensors has exponentially increased the amount of data being produced, which could overwhelm the existing Internet. This has led to the need for computing capacity to process the data close to where it is generated, at the edges of the network, in lieu of sending it to cloud datacenters. Edge computing, as this is known, not only reduces the strain

7h

 

Judge tosses suit against Southwest Airlines on fingerprints

A Chicago federal judge has tossed a proposed class-action lawsuit alleging Southwest Airlines violated the law by requiring that certain employees use fingerprints to sign into and out of work.

7h

 

Italian pilots approve deal with Ryanair

Italian pilots have approved an agreement over working conditions with Ryanair in the first such deal the strike-hit low-cost aviation giant has fully concluded.

7h

 

As Tesla deals with internal woes, rivals make their move

While Tesla grapples with internal issues like production delays, a sometimes-erratic CEO and a recent about-face on whether to go private, its rivals are moving aggressively into the luxury electric vehicle space.

7h

 

A novel nanoactuator system has been developed

Researchers at University of Jyväskylä (Finland) and University of Tampere (Finland) together with BioNavis Ltd (Finland) have developed a novel nanoactuator system, where conformation of biomolecule can be tuned by electric field and probed using optical properties of gold nanoparticle.

7h

 

Amazonian rainfall increases in wet season

Amazonian precipitation in wet season is foun to have largely increased during the past three decades (1979-2015). The results based on model simulation suggest that the tropical sea surface temperature variability may control this process, particularly in Atlantic and Pacific.

7h

 

Study helps children hit the right note in supporting autistic peers

Collaborative music lessons in schools improve the attitudes of pupils towards their peers with autism, a new study in the journal Autism reports.

7h

 

Remote islands harbor higher numbers of non-native species

The effects of island remoteness from the mainland on the number of species found on islands differs strongly for non-native compared to native species. Numbers of native species on islands decrease with greater remoteness, while numbers of non-native species increase. An international research team has uncovered this surprising finding. The study has been published in the prestigious scientific j

7h

 

Treating inflammatory bowel disorder by delivering microRNAs

Osaka University researchers efficiently delivered miRNAs to immune response cells in inflamed intestinal tracts using a super carbonate apatite (sCA), which had been shown to be highly effective in the delivery of nucleic acids to solid tumors, demonstrating the efficacy of sCA in the prevention and treatment of colitis in mice.

7h

 

Scientists sweep cellular neighborhoods where Zika hides out

Researchers report a comprehensive analysis of interactions between Zika virus proteins and native human proteins. One of their findings gives insight into how Zika escapes immune signaling and where the virus proliferates inside the cell.

7h

 

Carbon in color: First-ever colored thin films of nanotubes created

A method developed at Aalto University, Finland, can produce large quantities of pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes in select shades of the rainbow. The secret is a fine-tuned fabrication process — and a small dose of carbon dioxide. The films could find applications in touch screen technologies or as coating agents for new types of solar cells.

7h

 

Scientists pinpoint the key mechanism foe amplification of global warming

Over the past century, the Earth has experienced a steady rise in the global-mean surface temperature, which is thought to be driven by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. It is well known by climate scientists that the surface warming in response to anthropogenic radiative forcing is much stronger than that associated with the forcing itself. A new study pinpoints the thermal-radiative coupli

7h

 

How eggplants became Asian — genomes and elephants tell the story

The evolutionary context of the eggplant was until recently very poorly known. Historical documents and genetic data have shown that the eggplant was first domesticated in Asia, but most of its wild relatives are from Africa. Researchers from the Natural History Museums of London and Finland managed to obtain the first well-supported hypothesis on the origin of the eggplant and its direct relative

7h

 

Effects of deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease

Researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have studied motor and cognitive effects of deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease. Their results show that the adverse cognitive effects of deep brain stimulation are linked to a different neural pathway than that responsible for the treatment's desired motor effects. This finding will help optimize treatments for patient

7h

 

Novel imaging biomarker to help predict coronary inflammation

Researchers at Cleveland Clinic, University of Oxford and University of Erlangen have identified a novel imaging biomarker, which has been found to be able to predict all-cause and cardiac mortality by measuring inflammation of fatty tissue surrounding the coronary arteries.

7h

 

Scientists alter membrane proteins to make them easier to study

By making hydrophobic sections water-soluble, MIT researchers hope to learn more about protein structures.

7h

 

Harvard professor claims coconut oil is "pure poison"

Karen Michels video on the dangers of coconut oil has gone viral, leaving the nutritional blogosphere scratching its head. Read More

7h

 

Praktiserende læger får ny vejledning i hjertesygdomme

Ny vejledning for behandling af iskæmisk hjerte-kar-sygdom anbefaler prakitserende læger at bruge SCORE. Vejledning tager spørgsmålet om forebyggende behandling med blodtryksmedicin op.

7h

 

Antallet af kvindelige læger i lederstillinger på sygehuse stiger

Der er kommet flere kvindelige læger i lederstillinger stiger, viser opgørelse fra Overlægeforeningen. En positiv og nødvendig udvikling mener overlægernes formand Lisbeth Lintz.

7h

 

Aarhus Universitetshospital planlægger færre operationer grundet flytning til Skejby

Tre kirurgiske afdelinger på Aarhus Universitetshospital planlægger med nedsat operationskapacitet over en periode i forbindelse med flytningen til det nye hospital i Skejby.

7h

 

Ny professor skal forske i sygdomme i skjoldbruskkirtlen

Overlæge Steen Bonnema er udnævnt til professor ved Klinisk Institut, Syddansk Universitet, hvor han skal forske i skjoldbruskkirtlens sygdomme.

7h

 

John McCain’s Death Brought Out the Worst in the Trump Administration

You can tell a lot about a person, and a presidential administration, by the way they handle small, symbolic things. The White House’s handling of the American flag in the aftermath of Senator John McCain’s death is providing a good test of the Trump team. The episode has managed to combine most of the worst aspects of Donald Trump’s presidency: pettiness as a major motivating force for administr

7h

 

A New 'Brown Tide' Could Make Florida's Dangerous Red Tide Worse

Florida's got more than one problem bloom in its waters, and they're threatening to mix.

7h

 

Machine learning-algoritme udnytter differentiel privacy i undervisningen

Differentiel privacy kan sikre privatlivsbeskyttelsen i den såkaldte Rasch-model, uden at datakvaliteten lider stor skade, viser ny forskning fra DTU Compute.

7h

 

Letbanetog er kollideret med personbil

En personbil er kørt ind på skinnerne og frontalt sammen med et letbanetog ved Dokk1 i Aarhus.

7h

 

VIDEO: Er dette verdens bedste papirfly?

I weekenden holder Danmarks Tekniske Museum DM i papirflyvning. Vi tester en favorit. Lad os teste din.

7h

 

Discovery on past deep-water dynamics in the western tropical Pacific

Researchers from The University of Hong Kong discovered the effects of deep-sea water contribution in the western tropical Pacific.

7h

 

Researchers develop 'cytological ruler' to build 3D map of human genome

It has been almost 20 years since the human genome was first sequenced, but researchers still know little about how the genome is folded up and organized within cells. In a paper to be published Aug. 28 in the Journal of Cell Biology, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign describe a new technique that can measure the position of every single gene in the nucleus to build a

7h

 

Metabolic engineering of E. coli for the secretory production of free haem

Researchers of KAIST have defined a novel strategy for the secretory production of free haem using engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains. They utilized the C5 pathway, the optimized downstream pathways, and the haem exporter to construct a recombinant micro-organism producing extracellular haem using fed-batch fermentation. This is the first report to extracellularly produce haem using eng

7h

 

Researchers reveal the growth of graphene near polycrystalline substrate grain boundaries

In a paper published in NANO, a team of researchers from the Laboratory of Graphene Mechanics (LogM), Zhejiang University has shown how the morphological structure of a catalytic substrate influences the growth of graphene on it. This provides more guidance on the synthesis of high-quality graphene with less domain boundaries.

7h

 

Unearthing the secrets of cellular energy

In a new study published in PLOS Biology, a team of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco (UCSF) led by Ken Nakamura, MD, PhD, used innovative technologies to generate the first large-scale list of genes that control the production of cellular energy. Their findings provide a better understanding of the pathways that are critical for making cellular energy and could lead to t

7h

 

Devin Nunes’s Curious Trip to London

Earlier this month, as all eyes were on the courtroom dramas unfolding in Virginia—where President Donald Trump’s campaign chairman was just convicted on bank- and tax-fraud charges—and in New York—where the president’s longtime personal lawyer pleaded guilty to campaign-finance violations and implicated Trump in a crime—the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee was in London, seeking out

7h

 

What John McCain’s Death Means for Republican Control of the Senate

John McCain’s death will deprive the Senate of one of its longest-serving members, its leading military hawk and champion of interventionist U.S. foreign policy, and a Republican who regularly sought—and often struck—significant accords with Democrats. But in the short term, the loss of the Arizona senator and elder statesman is likely to bolster the GOP’s majority in the chamber, as well as its

7h

 

The Choice Facing a Declining United States

In Nairobi National Park, a succession of concrete piers rises over the heads of rhinos and giraffes, part of a $13.8 billion rail project that will link Kenya’s capital with the Indian Ocean. It’s a project with the ambition and scale of global leadership, and the site safety posters are in the language of its engineers and builders: Chinese. Four hundred miles further north, in one of Kenya’s c

7h

 

Research shows carbon dioxide levels influenced by earthquakes

The findings are the result of a research collaboration between Victoria University of Wellington, Durham University in the United Kingdom, the University of Otago and GNS Science.

7h

 

Scientists advance technique for developing novel light beams from synchrotron radiation

Structured light, created by generating and applying light to a surface, is important in such applications as 3-D scanners, dual photography and microscopic technology. A new study has demonstrated a method that produces novel light beams from synchrotron light sources, opening up a new way to generate X-ray beams.

7h

 

Particles collected by Hayabusa give absolute age of asteroid Itokawa

Understanding the origin and time evolution of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is an issue of scientific interest and practical importance because they are potentially hazardous to the Earth. However, when and how these NEAs were formed and what they experienced during their lifetime remain enigmas.

7h

 

Water vapor annealing technique on diamond surfaces for next-generation power devices

Diamonds are often displayed in exquisite jewelry. But this solid form of carbon is also renowned for its outstanding physical and electronic properties. In Japan, a collaboration between researchers at Kanazawa University's Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology and AIST in Tsukuba, led by Ryo Yoshida, has used water vapor annealing to form hydroxyl-terminated diamond surfaces that are

7h

 

Geologists discover the most complete skull of Wetlugasaurus

In June, the staff of the Geology and Geophysics Department of Samara Polytech took part in a scientific expedition of the Triassic and Jurassic deposits in the southeast of the Samara region.

7h

 

Efficient removal of radionuclides U(VI) by rod-like metal organic framework (MOF-5) nanomaterials

As the radionuclide 235U(VI) is inevitably released into the natural environment, its potential toxicity and irreversibility have made it a major pollution problem in nuclear energy production. A recent study revealed that a rod-like metal-organic framework (MOF-5) nanomaterial was used as a high-efficiency adsorbent for sorption of U(VI), indicating that MOF-5 can be used for rapid and efficient

7h

 

Upper Cretaceous trench deposits of the Neo-Tethyan subduction zone

The Jiachala Formation, which was fed largely from the Gangdese arc, has long been considered to comprise syn-collisional foreland-basin deposits based on the reported occurrence of Paleocene-early Eocene dinoflagellate cysts and pollen assemblages. Because magmatic activity in the Gangdese arc continued through the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene, this scenario is incompatible with U-Pb ages of det

7h

 

Study reveals the mechanism that helps malaria parasites take over human red blood cells

Researchers from UCLA and Washington University in St. Louis have discovered the previously unknown mechanism of how proteins from Plasmodium parasites—which cause malaria—are exported into human red blood cells, a process that is vital for parasites to survive in humans. The finding could pave the way for new treatments for malaria.

7h

 

Artwork unveiled on exoplanet satellite

Two plaques etched with thousands of miniaturised drawings made by children have been unveiled in a dedicated ceremony held today in Switzerland.

7h

 

Transferring sorghum's weed-killing power to rice

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have transferred a biochemical pathway found in sorghum, which produces a weed-killing compound, into rice plants.

7h

 

How will humans adapt to climate change? Ask a Viking

Popular culture portrays Vikings as violent marauders who raided the coasts of Europe with impunity, but new research indicates the Vikings were vulnerable to at least one threat: a changing climate.

7h

 

Scientists alter membrane proteins to make them easier to study

About 30 percent of the proteins encoded by the human genome are membrane proteins—proteins that span the cell membrane so they can facilitate communication between cells and their environment. These molecules are critical for learning, seeing, and sensing odors, among many other functions.

7h

 

Climate change predicted to bring more extremes to inland Southern California

Hot, dry weather in Southern California's inland desert region is projected to become more extreme over the 21st century, according to a report written by researchers at UC Riverside and the U.S. Department of Agriculture that was released today as part of California's Fourth Climate Change Assessment.

7h

 

Image: Time-lapse sequence of Jupiter's north

Striking atmospheric features in Jupiter's northern hemisphere are captured in this series of color-enhanced images from NASA's Juno spacecraft.

7h

 

AI speeds effort to protect endangered elephants

Cornell's Elephant Listening Project tracks African forest elephants with acoustic sensors, but the forests are so remote and the sound files so huge it takes months to collect and analyze the data – too long to rescue the animals from poachers or other threats.

7h

 

As algae blooms increase, scientists seek better ways to predict these toxic tides

Scientists around the United States are developing programs that can predict harmful algal blooms in advance.

7h

 

Best Fitness Trackers (2018): Fitbit, Suunto, Garmin, Nokia, Apple Watch

Do you need a wearable for skiing, or for counting your dance steps at a wedding? We've found the best for every body.

7h

 

All wired up: New molecular wires for single-molecule electronic devices

Scientists at Tokyo Tech designed a new type of molecular wire doped with organometallic ruthenium to achieve unprecedentedly higher conductance than earlier molecular wires. The origin of high conductance in these wires suggests a potential strategy for developing of novel molecular components, which could be the building blocks of future minuscule electronic devices.

7h

 

Rejseplanen vil inkludere delebiler, bycykler og taxa

En ny app, Minrejseplan, samler det meste fra tog til cykeludlejning i ruteplanlægningen. Billetterne skal dog stadig købes hver for sig.

7h

 

The Jordan Peterson All-Meat Diet

“I know how ridiculous it sounds,” Mikhaila Peterson told me recently by phone, after a whirlwind of attention gathered around the 26-year-old, who is now offering dietary advice to people suffering with conditions like hers. Or not so much dietary advice as guiding people in eating only beef. At first glance, Peterson, who is based in Toronto, could seem to be one of the many emerging semi-celeb

8h

 

New treatment can halve hospital stays for some patients with heart infection

A new treatment can halve hospital stays for some patients with a heart infection (endocarditis), according to late breaking results of the POET trial presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018 and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

8h

 

Oral anticoagulants plus antiplatelets associated with poor outcome in atrial fibrillation

Combined oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy is associated with a worse prognosis than anticoagulation alone in newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation patients without a clear indication for antiplatelets, according to late breaking results from the GARFIELD-AF registry presented today at ESC Congress 2018.

8h

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