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Nyheder2018august28

 

 

 

Is it safe for women with heart disease to become pregnant?

Munich, Germany – 28 Aug 2018: Is it safe for women with heart disease to become pregnant? Usually, according to ten-year results from the ROPAC registry reported in a late breaking science session today at ESC Congress 2018.

8h

 

Blood pressure drug slows aortic dilatation in Marfan syndrome

Munich, Germany — Aug. 28, 2018: Treatment with a drug to lower blood pressure slows enlargement (dilatation) of the aorta in children and young adults with Marfan syndrome, according to late breaking results from the AIMS trial presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018.

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First randomised trial tests criteria used to diagnose heart attack

Munich, Germany — Aug. 28, 2018: Results of the first randomised trial testing the criteria used to diagnose heart attack are presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018 and published in The Lancet.

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The Lancet: Papers at European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress

The following papers will be presented at the ESC congress in Munich, and published simultaneously in The Lancet journal. All papers are under embargo until the stated time.Contact details for corresponding authors are provided in the Articles and linked Comments. Funding information is listed on the first page of each Article.

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Midtjylland ansætter ny ledende overlæge i Børne- og Ungdomspsykiatrisk Afdeling

Jakob Paludan er ansat som ny ledende overlæge på Børne- og Ungdomspsykiatrisk Afdeling i Region Midtjylland.

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Evidence found of worker naked mole rats who eat queen feces becoming more attentive to young

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found evidence suggesting that female worker naked mole rats become more maternal after consuming their queen's feces. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of the unique mammals and what they found.

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Researchers uncover the science behind blowing bubbles

What exactly happens when you blow on a soap film to make a bubble? Behind this simple question about a favorite childhood activity is some real science, researchers at NYU have found.

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Few people at risk for heart disease understand food labels

An Irish survey of 200 men and women examines awareness, understanding, and use of food labels in preventing lifestyle-related disease in a primary care setting. Participants responded to a questionnaire devised by the lead author. The study identifies gaps in consumers' use and interpretation of food labels, especially among men and people at risk of cardiovascular disease. The authors conclude t

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Elizabeth Warren’s Theory of Capitalism

While so much of the action on the American left in recent months has come in the form of revived enthusiasm for socialism, Senator Elizabeth Warren has positioned herself quite differently. During the past two weeks, she has expounded about the prospects for capitalism in a much-covered speech and in a Wall Street Journal op-ed. Instead of championing the system’s demise, she presents herself as

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How Sanders and Warren Will Decide Which One Runs for President

I t was April 2014 and Bernie Sanders was seriously pondering the notion of diving into the 2016 presidential race. But as the senator from Vermont huddled with his advisers inside a Capitol Hill townhouse one balmy Wednesday evening, he wondered if he could compete against a political heavyweight on the ascent. The woman he dreaded running against was being recruited by liberals across the count

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Low-carb diets lose their benefits when you go hard on animal products

Health Eliminating carbs isn't necessarily a bad thing, you just have to be smart about it. Carbs are undeniably delicious, but for some people they’re the enemy. Should they be, though? Recent studies suggest that eating a diet very low in carbohydrates might…

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Image of the Day: Bear Bones

Modern brown bears carry DNA from extinct cave bears that lived during the Ice Age.

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Your Next Weather Apocalypse: The Smokestorm

Atmospheric scientist Cliff Mass coined the word "smokestorm" to describe city-choking air conditions. Here's what he says we need to do to prevent another one.

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Don’t Pretend Facebook and Twitter’s CEOs Can’t Fix This Mess

CEO naiveté is not a credible excuse for letting fake news and harassment flourish on your platform.

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Avenatti 2020 Was Probably Inevitable

Michael Avenatti made the scene earlier this month at the MTV Video Music Awards, as attention-seeking celebrities are wont to do. Sleek as a panther on the prowl, like Steve McQueen of ’60s cinema, he oozed ambition onto whatever mics hovered beneath his chiseled chin. Yes, he told the nodding inquisitor from Variety , he is indeed “seriously looking” at running for president: “I’ve been traveli

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The Murders That Sparked China’s Rideshare Boycott

Users of China’s top rideshare app, Didi Chuxing, are deleting it en masse after one of its drivers raped and murdered a young female passenger. The hashtag #BoycottDidi on Weibo has garnered more than 1 million views as public furor grows over the latest in Didi’s crises. Over the weekend, the driver confessed to local police to raping and stabbing his 20-year-old passenger on her way to a frien

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Why I Just Can't Quit Watching Reality Dating Shows

Social experiments like 'Are You the One?' meld fact and fantasy into something that's more like the real thing than you might expect.

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How to Get the Most Out of Gmail’s New Features

Master the new UI faster than you can say “automatic migration.”

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How Technology Is Changing the Way We Love: A WIRED Investigation

Throughout the week, we'll be reckoning with the state of romance in an on-demand world.

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Has Tech Ushered in a Golden Age of Long-Distance Dating?

Communicating has never been easier, but there are still limits to the intimacy we can experience with conventional technology.

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Want Flying Cars? SkyRyse Says Start With Smarter Helicopters

The Silicon Valley startup believes in the promise of personal air transport, but it's not waiting for advanced tech to materialize to put its tech into the air.

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China Won't Share Its Samples of a Deadly Flu Virus. Here's Why That's a Problem.

The Chinese government appears to be withholding samples of the dangerous bird flu virus H7N9 from the United States, according to news reports.

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Researchers find a way to mimic clinical trials using genetics

A technique called Mendelian randomization could be the revolutionary tool drug companies have been waiting for.

9h

 

White dwarf-main sequence binary identified in the open cluster NGC 752

Using data provided by Gaia satellite, two American astronomers have discovered a white dwarf-main sequence binary in the open cluster NGC 752. It is the first white dwarf found in this cluster. The finding was detailed by researchers in a paper published August 17 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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How Does a Black Hole Form?

They start with a bang and end up gobbling up everything near them.

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If You Have Heart Disease, Too Much 'Good' Cholesterol May Be Harmful

When it comes to so-called good cholesterol, a new study suggests there could be truth to the phrase "too much of a good thing."

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The Power of Anomalies

Progress in science is sometimes propelled by the discovery of experimental oddities that inspire a fresh perspective on nature — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Jupiter had growth disorders

Researchers of the Universities of Bern and Zürich and of ETH Zürich show how Jupiter was formed. Data collected from meteorites had indicated that the growth of the giant planet was delayed for 2 million years. Now, the researchers have found an explanation: Collisions with kilometer-sized rocks generated high energy, which meant that in this phase, hardly any accretion of gas could take place, a

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How Whale Poop Could Counter Calls to Resume Commercial Hunting

Whales’ fecal matter feeds the ocean, giving conservationists another argument for saving them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

 

Diabetespatienter har ingen gavn af forebyggende behandling med aspirin

Hverken fiskeolie eller aspiriner kan forhindre kardiovaskulære hændelser blandt patienter med diabetes, viser nyt studie præsenteret ESC-kongressen.

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As discussed: it’s time to break the hateful passive-aggressive email chain | André Spicer

Phrases like ‘sorry for the double email’ or ‘please advise’ only serve to enrage – why use them? Remember the last time you were scrolling through an email and saw phrases like “Reattached for your convenience”, “sorry for the double email” or “please advise”? You’re not alone if you felt enraged by reading them. According to a recent survey by the software company Adobe , 25% of us loathe the ph

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A no-deal Brexit will betray British science

With more than £500m a year at stake, the scale of losses to UK research from a no-deal Brexit are becoming clear On 14 June 2016, just over a week before the EU referendum, Vote Leave were keen to calm the fears of British scientists, farmers and others who relied on European funds. The thirteen Vote Leave ministers signed a pledge , still standing on Vote Leave’s website, that “If the public vo

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5 decades after his death, George Gamow’s contributions to science survive

George Gamow, irreverent physicist and prolific popularizer, died half a century ago.

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Bølge af phishing-angreb binder danske forbrugere til abonnementer

'Abonnementsfælder' på sms, e-mail, Instagram og Facebook har snydt en række danskere med tilbud om gavekort og gratis flybilletter, skriver Forbrugerombudsmanden i pressemeddelelse.

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Britisk datatilsyn oversvømmet med anmeldelser om sikkerhedsbrud

Anmeldelser af sikkerhedsbrud hos britiske virksomheder er vokset med 160 procent, efter GDPR er indført i Storbritannien

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E. coli strain from retail poultry may cause urinary tract infections in people

A strain of Escherichia coli (E. coli) found in retail chicken and turkey products may cause a wide range of infections in people, according to a study published today in the American Society for Microbiology's open access journal mBio.

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Environmentalists’ Unlikely Republican Ally in Florida

When early voting started in Florida two weeks ago, voters in many parts of the state walked into polling stations seeing green sludge and smelling dead fish. A state of emergency has been declared statewide as Florida experiences a months-long algae bloom that has killed thousands of fish, shut down beaches, and sickened locals. It’s not the first algae bloom to hit the state, but its proximity

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Keeping Tesla Public Won't Save Elon Musk From the SEC—or Angry Investors

The decision not to take his automaker private doesn't do much to shield the CEO from a reported SEC investigation, and shareholders who say his unexpected tweet cost them money.

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Smart strømstyring reducerede eludgifterne med 60 procent

En norsk familie udvidede hjemmet med 119 kvadratmeter og fik alligevel store besparelser på elregningen. Med ombygningen fulgte nemlig også et skift fra radiatoropvarmning til gulvvarme og smart styring af opvarmningen, der sker med el.

10h

 

Væltet træ tog strømmen på hele Bornholm

OPDATERET Et ø-dækkende strømsvigt ramte Bornholm mandag aften, da et træ faldt ned over en højspændingsledning mellem Hasle og Åkirkeby. Et beskyttelsesrelæ i den nærmeste transformer svigtede og satte en kædereaktion i gang.

10h

 

Can microswimmers swim through gel?

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have studied how microswimmers, like bacteria or sperm, swim through fluids with both solid and liquid-like properties, e.g., gels. They found that subtle changes in a swimmer's features, its structure, and how it moves invoke a dramatically different response from the fluid. They also discovered that the similarity in size between the structure of th

11h

 

Nano-imaging of intersubband transitions in few-layer 2-D materials

Semiconducting heterostructures are key to the development of electronics and opto-electronics. Many applications in the infrared and terahertz frequency range exploit transitions, called intersubband transitions, between quantized states in semiconductor quantum wells. These intraband transitions exhibit very large oscillator strengths, close to unity. Their discovery in III-V semiconductor heter

11h

 

Genoan bridge collapse shows the importance of structural redundancy

Signs Genoa’s Morandi motorway bridge needed repair were ignored or missed, but its initial structure didn’t have enough built-in fail-safes anyway

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China Is Treating Islam Like a Mental Illness

One million Muslims are being held right now in Chinese internment camps, according to estimates cited by the UN and U.S. officials. Former inmates—most of whom are Uighurs, a largely Muslim ethnic minority—have told reporters that over the course of an indoctrination process lasting several months, they were forced to renounce Islam, criticize their own Islamic beliefs and those of fellow inmate

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Components of heart healthy diet may differ from what was previously thought

Munich, Germany — Aug. 28, 2018: The foods that make up a heart healthy diet for people worldwide may differ from what was previously thought, according to late breaking results from the observational Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018 and simultaneously published in the Lancet.

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Gout drug reduces adverse events in patients with hyperuricaemia

Munich, Germany — Aug. 28, 2018: Uric acid reduction with the gout treatment febuxostat reduces adverse events in elderly patients with hyperuricaemia, according to late breaking research presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018.

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Optimal timing of invasive evaluation after heart attack examined in randomized trial

The optimal timing of invasive evaluation after a heart attack has been examined in a randomised trial. The late breaking results from the VERDICT trial are presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018.

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Removable balloon is as good as permanent stent implant for opening small blocked arteries

Munich, Germany — Aug. 28, 2018: A removable balloon is as good as a permanent stent implant for opening small blocked arteries, according to late breaking results from the BASKET-SMALL 2 trial presented in a Hot Line Session today at ESC Congress 2018 and simultaneously published in The Lancet.

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Study shows AI can deliver specialty-level diagnosis in primary care setting

A system designed by a University of Iowa ophthalmologist that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to detect diabetic retinopathy without a person interpreting the results earned Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorization in April, following a clinical trial in primary care offices. The study was the first to prospectively assess the safety of an autonomous AI system in patient care settings.

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Anxiety, depression, other mental distress may increase heart attack, stroke risk in adults over 45

Anxiety, depression and other mental distress was associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke among adults ages 45 or older, even after factoring for lifestyle behaviors and disease history. The associations were slightly stronger for stroke among women than men.

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The New Health Care: Study Causes Splash, but Here’s Why You Should Stay Calm on Alcohol’s Risks

Harms increase with each additional drink per day, yet they are much smaller than many other risks in our lives.

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Dansk Energi: Solcelleanlæg til private bliver en god forretning i 2025

Beregninger viser, at private solcelle-batterianlæg er en god forretning i 2025, men ikke for samfundet. Derfor foreslår man at reducere elafgifterne. Ikke noget problem for os, siger solcellebranchen.

11h

 

Stress øger studietiden for næsten hver femte ingeniørstuderende

Problemer med søvn, koncentration og kost er flyttet ind hos de unge.

12h

 

Take a vacation — it could prolong your life

Taking vacations could prolong life. That's the finding of a 40-year study presented today at ESC Congress and accepted for publication in The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging.

12h

 

We dream even when under general anaesthetic

When we're under general anaesthesia, we are still internally conscious and we even have dreams, but we don't remember them because anaesthesia gives us amnesia

12h

 

The largest of Madagascar’s endemic lemurs needs a helping hand

Most of the 107 lemur species are at risk and the child-sized indri is no exception, being a victim of hunting and habitat loss to slash-and-burn agriculture

12h

 

ScienceTake: What Do Ducks Hear? And Why Do We Care?

To develop acoustic warning devices that might save sea ducks from getting caught in fishing nets scientists are studying their underwater hearing.

12h

 

What Ducks Hear Underwater

Scientists from the University of Delaware have created a hearing test for ducks. Here’s what they found.

12h

 

These Cultural Treasures Are Made of Plastic. Now They’re Falling Apart.

Museum conservators are racing to figure out how to preserve modern artworks and historical objects that are disintegrating.

12h

 

The case against Mars colonisation

Plans are being made to colonise Mars. Zahaan Bharmal unpicks the arguments against the idea Earlier this month, a group of 60 prominent scientists and engineers met behind closed doors at the University of Boulder Colorado. Their agenda: Mars colonisation. Organised by Elon Musk’s SpaceX and attended by members of Nasa’s Mars exploration programme, the goal of this inaugural “Mars workshop” was

13h

 

Enzymkanaler i bugspytkirtlen dannes ligesom floder

Med metoder til at analysere vejsystemer og floder har forskere fra Københavns Universitet undersøgt,…

13h

 

Smoking Cessation

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death. There are effective pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods to help people stop smoking.

13h

 

Current advice to limit dairy intake should be reconsidered

The consumption of dairy products has long been thought to increase the risk of death, because of dairy's relatively high levels of saturated fat. With the exception of milk, which appears to increase the risk of CHD, dairy products have been found to protect against both total mortality and mortality from cerebrovascular causes, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2018, the annu

14h

 

Current advice to limit dairy intake should be reconsidered

The consumption of dairy products has long been thought to increase the risk of death, particularly from coronary heart disease (CHD), cerebrovascular disease, and cancer, because of dairy's relatively high levels of saturated fat. Yet evidence for any such link, especially among US adults, is inconsistent.

14h

 

Low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided

Low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided, according to a large study presented today at ESC Congress 2018.

14h

 

Facebook move on Myanmar raises thorny political questions

Facebook's ban of Myanmar's military leaders marks a new step for the leading social network against state "actors"—and raises thorny questions on how the company deals with repressive regimes using the platform.

14h

 

Startup delivers groceries in self-driving cars

Startup AutoX on Monday announced the Silicon Valley debut of a service that will turn self-driving cars into mobile grocery shops summoned with a touch of a smartphone application.

14h

 

Google's search tool to help job-seeking veterans

A new Google search tool will allow service members transitioning to civilian life to include their military occupational specialty code to find jobs that match their skills.

14h

 

Brussels gripped by lobbying war over copyright law

It has been dubbed one of the most brutal lobbying wars in Brussels history, pitting media firms and Paul McCartney on one side against Big Tech and internet freedom denizens on the other.

14h

 

Crippling costs of war reporting and investigative journalism

The cost of war reporting and investigative journalism is becoming prohibitive for media outlets, campaigners have warned.

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Leading journalists join call for EU copyright reform

Leading journalists from more than 20 countries joined a call Tuesday for European MPs to approve a controversial media reform aimed at forcing internet giants to pay for news content.

14h

 

China's swine fever outbreak may spread in Asia: FAO

An outbreak of African swine fever in China may spread to other parts of Asia, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization warned Tuesday, as the world's largest pork producer scrambled to contain the disease.

14h

 

Hundreds of fish die in lagoon in tony Malibu, California

California officials were trying Monday to solve a stinky mystery: A die-off has left hundreds of fish floating in a recently restored lagoon on the tony Malibu coast.

14h

 

HIV/AIDS research yields dividends across medical fields

Since the first cases of AIDS were reported in the United States 37 years ago, the National Institutes of Health has invested more than $69 billion in the understanding, treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. Beyond the development of life-saving medications and innovative prevention modalities, such research has led to numerous advances outside the HIV field, according to a new commentary from exp

15h

 

How to be human: the man who was raised by wolves

Abandoned as a child, Marcos Rodríguez Pantoja survived alone in the wild for 15 years. But living with people proved to be even more difficult. By Matthew Bremner The first time Marcos Rodríguez Pantoja ever heard voices on the radio, he panicked. “Fuck,” he remembers thinking, “those people have been inside there a long time!” It was 1966, and Rodríguez woke from a nap to the sound of voices. T

15h

 

Politiet: Predictive policing er interessant – men datagrundlaget er for småt

Dansk politi har brugt analysesoftwaren Palantir siden 2016. I USA bruges den til at udpege interessante personer, inden de har gjort noget, men herhjemme er der indtil videre ikke tilstrækkelige datasæt, siger politiet.

15h

 

40.000 år gammel hest fundet i Sibirien

Det er første gang, at et så velbevaret og gammelt føl er fundet.

16h

 

WSU Spokane researchers develop potential drugs to help curb smoking

Washington State University researchers have created more than a dozen candidate drugs with the potential to curb smokers' desire for nicotine by slowing how it is broken down in the body. The researchers hope the substances can help people reduce their consumption of tobacco, if not quit altogether.

16h

 

Combination approach shows promise for beating advanced melanoma

A UCLA-led study has found that a treatment that uses a bacteria-like agent in combination with an immunotherapy drug could help some people with advanced melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer, live longer.

16h

 

Critics Trying To Stop A Big Study Of Sepsis Say The Research Puts Patients At Risk

The consumer advocacy group Public Citizen also says the multicenter study of life-threatening sepsis will at best produce confusing results. A Harvard doctor and designer of the research disagrees. (Image credit: Portra Images/Getty Images)

16h

 

3D liver tissue implants made from human stem cells support liver function in mice

Stem cells transformed into 3D human liver tissue show promising support of liver function when implanted into mice with a liver disease. The scientists say that in addition to being early-stage progress towards developing human liver tissue implants, it could also reduce the need for animals in research by providing a better platform to study human liver disease and test drugs in the lab.

17h

 

To tog var 177 meter fra at støde sammen under test af det nye signalsystem

Under en test af det nye ERTMS-signalsystem sendte Banedanmark ved en fejl to tog i retning mod hinanden. En fejl, som det gamle signalsystem ville have forhindret. Banedanmark holder kortene tæt til kroppen – Ingeniøren afdækker forløbet, som lokomotivførerne kalder »en fadæse«.

17h

 

Obesity: Causes, Complications & Treatments

Daily exercise, calorie control key to achieving healthy weight

17h

 

Traffic noise may make birds age faster

Traffic noise may be associated with an increased rate of telomere loss in Zebra finches that have left the nest, according to a study published in Frontiers in Zoology. Telomeres are caps on the ends of chromosomes that protect genes from damage. Shortening of telomeres indicates accelerated biological aging.

20h

 

Predicting the response to immunotherapy using artificial intelligence

A new study establishes for the first time that artificial intelligence can process medical images to extract biological and clinical information. By designing an algorithm and developing it to analyse CT scan images, medical researchers specializing in artificial intelligence in oncology-radiotherapy and precision medicine) have created a so-called radiomic signature.

21h

 

More accurate measure of body fat developed

Researchers have developed a simpler and more accurate method of estimating body fat than the widely used body mass index, or BMI, with the goal of better understanding obesity.

21h

 

Call for a unified approach to preventing suicides and other self-injury deaths

Self-injury mortality (SIM) has surpassed diabetes as the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, prompting researchers to call for a new unified approach to SIM prevention.

22h

 

Deaths from drug overdose and suicide outstrip those from diabetes in US

Combined deaths from drug overdose and suicide ('self-injury') now outstrip those from diabetes in the US, reveals a brief report published online in the journal Injury Prevention.

22h

 

The Atlantic Daily: In the Face of Strife

What We’re Following Trade Deal: Donald Trump announced he is “terminating” NAFTA after reaching a trade agreement with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto. Yet the details of the deal—in keeping with Trump’s recurrent strategy of bluffs and tweaks—look more like a rebranding. Here’s what the agreement means in practice. Mass Shootings: A man opened fire on competitors at a video-game tournament

22h

 

Breast-Feeding Mothers Should Avoid Marijuana, Pediatricians Say

A new study showed that chemical traces of marijuana can be detected in breast milk up to six days after use, highlighting the need for research into the effect of pot on babies.

22h

 

Skin Deep: Keep Your Gut Healthy and Your Skin May Follow

A wave of designer probiotic pills and powders — stylishly packaged, with names like Glow and Inner Beauty — is based on the idea that perfect skin may be linked to your tummy.

22h

 

As CO2 levels climb, millions at risk of nutritional deficiencies

Rising levels of carbon dioxide from human activity are making staple crops such as rice and wheat less nutritious and could result in 175 million people becoming zinc deficient and 122 million people becoming protein deficient by 2050, according to new research.

22h

 

Secret tunnels discovered between the skull and the brain

Bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside most of our bones, produces red blood cells as well as immune cells that help fight off infections and heal injuries. According to a new study of mice and humans, tiny tunnels run from skull bone marrow to the lining of the brain and may provide a direct route for immune cells responding to injuries caused by stroke and other brain disorders.

22h

 

In sync: How cells make connections could impact circadian rhythm

Researchers have developed a unified, data-driven computational approach to infer and reveal connections among cells in biological and chemical oscillatory networks.

22h

 

Many Arctic pollutants decrease after market removal and regulation

Levels of some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention are decreasing in the Arctic, according to an international team of researchers who have been actively monitoring the northern regions of the globe.

22h

 

Environmentally friendly farming practices used by nearly one third of world's farms

Nearly one-third of the world's farms have adopted more environmentally friendly practices while continuing to be productive, according to a global assessment by 17 scientists in five countries. Researchers analyzed various practices, including organic farming, that use land, water, biodiversity, labor, knowledge and technology to both grow crops and reduce environmental impacts like pesticide pol

22h

 

Stabilizing dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane improves muscle function

In a head-to-head trial between the conventional glucocorticoid, prednisolone, and a modified glucocorticoid, vamorolone, in experimental models of LGMD2B, vamorolone improved dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane stability and repair. This correlated with increased muscle strength and decreased muscle degeneration, according to a new study.

22h

 

Study finds 1 in 12 children taking multiple medications at risk

About one in five children regularly use prescription medications, and nearly one in 12 of those children are at risk for experiencing a harmful drug-drug interaction. Adolescent girls are at highest risk.

22h

 

Can 'microswimmers' swim through jelly?

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have studied how microswimmers, like bacteria or sperm, swim through fluids with both solid and liquid-like properties e.g. gels. They found that subtle changes in swimmer features, its structure and how it moves, invoke a dramatically different response from the fluid. They also discovered that the similarity in size between the structure of the flui

22h

 

Scientists identify a new kind of human brain cell

Scientists have uncovered a new type of human brain cell that has never been seen in mice and other well-studied laboratory animals.

22h

 

Your regular reminder that humans still waste way too much food

Environment It's bad to waste food. Like, really bad. A new study suggests that young people may waste food, at least in part, because they don't know they shouldn't. Here's why food waste is bad.

22h

 

Preschoolers learn math skills with blocks and patterns

Patterning and spatial activities like playing with blocks are simple yet powerful activities through which preschoolers develop early math skills, according to new research. A 4-year-old lines up colorful blocks in a row: red-red-green-red-red-green. Her teacher encourages her to replicate the pattern using soft toys: bear-bear-monkey-bear-bear-monkey. Another child uses blocks to build a doorwa

23h

 

This fix for nerve ‘insulation’ could prevent MS progress

Researchers have found a way to rebuild damaged nerve coverings that cause multiple sclerosis. Finding ways to restore the myelin sheath is recognized as important to preventing the progression of disability in MS patients. “Your brain runs on electricity. And, like electrical wires, your nervous system needs insulation.” “Your brain runs on electricity. And, like electrical wires, your nervous s

23h

 

Ideas about personality skew how we judge faces

We make snap judgments of others based not only on their facial appearance, but also on our pre-existing beliefs about how others’ personalities work, according to a new study. The research, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , underscores how we interpret others’ facial features to form impressions of their personalities. “Although these impressions are

23h

 

How our fat ‘rheostats’ make it tough to lose weight

Scientists have identified the function of a protein that has been confounding metabolism researchers for more than two decades. It may have implications both for treating obesity and for understanding weight gain during pregnancy and menopause. The protein, called the melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) maintains what Roger Cone, director of the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute, has ter

23h

 

Do single moms escape workplace bias against mothers?

The workplace biases facing parents may differ for single moms and dads, experiments suggest. Single moms don’t face penalties at work in the same way married mothers do, according to the findings. And at the same time, single dads don’t benefit in the workplace the way that married fathers do. Past studies in sociology have established the “motherhood penalty” and the “fatherhood premium.” Resea

23h

 

Having a parent with cancer hampers grades and future income

Children with a parent who either had or died from cancer don’t do as well as their peers in school and may not earn as much later in life, according to new research. Researchers looked at data on every child born in Denmark between 1978 and 1999 and their parents—around 1 million Danes in total—and discovered that parental cancer during childhood not only affects the child’s final examinations i

23h

 

FEMA misses hurricane damage reported on Twitter

Social media sites can help with assessing the impact of natural disasters like Hurricane Harvey, but federal authorities overlook much of the critical information those sites convey, according to new research. The report shows almost half of the Hurricane Harvey damage reports people provided using social media were not captured by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimates. Initial Ha

23h

 

Pic of metal cracking may shed light on bridge collapses

The first 3D image of a microscopic crack propagating through a metal that hydrogen damaged could help prevent the failure of all sorts of things, like bridges and dental implants, researchers say. “For the first time we were able to catch the crack red-handed,” says Michael J. Demkowicz, associate professor of materials science and engineering at Texas A&M University. “It’s much better than arri

23h

 

Natural sugar cuts diabetes risk in mice

A natural sugar called trehalose blocks glucose from the liver and activates a gene that boosts insulin sensitivity, which reduces the chance of developing diabetes, according to new research in mice. Activating the gene also triggers an increase in burned calories, reduces fat accumulation and weight gain, and lessens measures of fats and cholesterol in the blood. The findings suggest new possib

23h

 

Simple eye exam may detect Alzheimer’s disease early

It may be possible in the future to screen patients for Alzheimer’s disease using a simple eye exam, according to new research. Using technology similar to what is found in eye doctors’ offices, researchers have detected evidence indicating Alzheimer’s disease in older patients who had no symptoms. “This technique has great potential to become a screening tool that helps decide who should undergo

23h

 

Scientists find corals in deeper waters under stress too

Coral reefs around the world are threatened by warming ocean temperatures, a major driver of coral bleaching. Scientists routinely use sea-surface temperature data collected by satellites to predict the temperature-driven stress on reef communities, but new research shows that surface measurements alone may not accurately predict the full extent of thermal stress on deeper corals.

23h

 

Environmentally friendly farming practices used by nearly 1/3 of world's farms

Nearly one-third of the world's farms have adopted more environmentally friendly practices while continuing to be productive, according to a global assessment by 17 scientists in five countries.

23h

 

Algae a threat to walleye vision, study finds

Walleye and the fish they eat struggle to see in water clouded by algae, and that could potentially jeopardize the species' future if harmful algal blooms persist, according to a new study.

23h

 

Yemen cholera epidemic 'controlled' by computer predictions

Cases are slashed thanks to a new system that predicts where outbreaks will occur.

23h

 

Bugatti made its Divo supercar faster by slowing it down

Cars The supercar is capped at just 236 miles per hour. The curves are where this monster shines.

23h

 

Physicians deserve answers as public service loan forgiveness program hangs in the balance

With medical school loan debt averaging $200,000, many physicians pursue the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program that eliminates federal student loans after 10 years of service in the public sector. But the fate of the program hangs in the balance, as government officials signal a desire to end it, leaving physicians in a lingering uncertainty that's unnecessary and unfair, health policy exper

23h

 

Elizabeth Warren’s ‘Accountable Capitalism Act’ aims to restore what we once had in this country

An interesting take on "fixing" the rampant corporate supremacy of the last 40 years. Read More

23h

 

We live in a zombie galaxy that died and came back to life, claims new study

A Japanese astronomer shows that the Milky Way galaxy was formed in two stages, "dying" in between. Read More

23h

 

Zafar the Sexually-Frustrated Dolphin Shuts Down Beach in France

The bottlenose dolphin became overly friendly.

23h

 

How a Hangover Affects Your Brain the Next Day

A new study finds that a night of heavy drinking may affect people's cognition the next day, including their memory, attention, coordination and even driving skills.

23h

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Half Staff

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines In a posthumous letter, Senator John McCain urged Americans to unite and asked Americans to tear down walls: “We weaken our greatness when we confuse our patriotism with tribal rivalries that have sown resentment and hatred and violence in all the corners

23h

 

Take a Number: How Much Alcohol Is Safe to Drink? None, Say These Researchers

A large study of drinking habits in 195 countries contradicts widely shared advice on healthy drinking.

23h

 

US Senate Passes Spending Bill Granting NIH $39.1 Billion

Alzheimer’s disease will receive $2.3 billion, the biggest chunk of change devoted to one of the NIH’s various interests.

23h

 

Scientists find corals in deeper waters under stress too

A new study led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Coral Reef Research Foundation (CRRF) in Palau describes a novel approach for predicting warm temperature-induced stress on corals from the sea surface through a deeper expanse ranging from 30-150 meters (100-500 feet) known as the mesophotic zone.

23h

 

Trump’s NAFTA Strategy: Bluff, Rebrand, Declare Victory

President Trump said Monday he’s “terminating” NAFTA , the free-trade deal with Canada and Mexico he’s called a “disaster” and blamed for job losses in the United States. It looked like a potentially massive development, as if Trump were signaling the end of a $1 trillion trade deal that’s defined trade in North America for more than two decades. But what he went on to describe seemed like more o

23h

 

Environmentally friendly farming practices used by nearly 1/3 of world's farms

Nearly one-third of the world's farms have adopted more environmentally friendly practices while continuing to be productive, according to a global assessment by 17 scientists in five countries.The researchers analyzed various practices, including organic farming, that use land, water, biodiversity, labor, knowledge and technology to both grow crops and reduce environmental impacts like pesticide

1d

 

Algae a threat to walleye vision, study finds

Walleye and the fish they eat struggle to see in water clouded by algae, and that could potentially jeopardize the species' future if harmful algal blooms persist, according to a new study.

1d

 

All aboard the neutron train—mapping residual stresses for more robust rails

Railway rails are designed to endure years of heavy loads and different operating conditions. However, over time, contact forces between the rails and the wheels of trains can cause significant wear and tear on the rails, which then must be replaced to ensure safety and reliability.

1d

 

Cold, dry climate shifts linked to Neanderthal disappearance

Ancient periods of cold and dry climate helped our species replace Neanderthals in Europe, a study suggests.

1d

 

'We are totally happy,' says paid Amazon workers on Twitter

Amazon is taking an out-of-the box approach to answering its critics—paying workers to be "ambassadors" and tweet full-time about how satisfied they were at their jobs.

1d

 

Toyota pours $500 mn into driverless car tie-up with Uber (Update)

Toyota will pump about $500 million into ride-share firm Uber as part of a deal to work together on mass-producing self-driving vehicles, the Japanese car giant said on Tuesday.

1d

 

For carbon storage, biodiversity can help—or hurt

Biodiversity plays a significant role in forest carbon storage, but surprisingly less than previously thought, new research in Ecology Letters suggests.

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1d

 

Many Arctic pollutants decrease after market removal and regulation

Levels of some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention are decreasing in the Arctic, according to an international team of researchers who have been actively monitoring the northern regions of the globe.

1d

 

In sync: How cells make connections could impact circadian rhythm

If you've ever experienced jet lag, you are familiar with your circadian rhythm, which manages nearly all aspects of metabolism, from sleep-wake cycles to body temperature to digestion. Every cell in the body has a circadian clock, but researchers were unclear about how networks of cells connect with each other over time and how those time-varying connections impact network functions.

1d

 

For carbon storage, biodiversity can help — or hurt

Biodiversity plays a significant role in forest carbon storage, but surprisingly less than previously thought, new research in Ecology Letters suggests.

1d

 

A blue paradox

Promising to solve an environmental problem may initially worsen it, according to new research at the Bren School.

1d

 

Cause of aggressive skin cancer in patients with butterfly syndrome

The insights could open the door to a more effective treatment approach for patients with rare disorder.

1d

 

New urine dipstick test detects cause of disease that blinds millions

Scientists have developed a urine diagnostic to detect the parasitic worms that cause river blindness, also called onchocerciasis, a tropical disease that afflicts 18 to 120 million people worldwide.

1d

 

Diseased heart muscle cells have abnormally shortened telomeres

People with a form of heart disease called cardiomyopathy have abnormally short telomeres in heart muscle cells responsible for contraction, according to a new study.

1d

 

Here’s how to bend spaghetti to your will

Researchers have discovered how to snap spaghetti sticks without sending bits of pasta flying.

1d

 

Breathing polluted air may make you worse at maths and language

Air pollutants can creep into your brain as you breathe, deteriorating your brain tissue and damaging your cognitive function – and it’s worse for men

1d

 

Naked mole rats may become good parents by eating their queen’s faeces

It’s common for naked mole rats to eat faeces, and the hormones within their pregnant queen’s waste could trigger them to become more attentive to her pups

1d

 

Corals in a Hurricane: Deep Reefs under Threat

More than 30 meters below the surface of the ocean lies the 'twilight zone'. The coral reefs that grow here are complex ecosystems but they may be under threat from extreme weather events. Rather… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Many Arctic pollutants decrease after market removal and regulation

Levels of some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention are decreasing in the Arctic, according to an international team of researchers who have been actively monitoring the northern regions of the globe.

1d

 

In sync: How cells make connections could impact circadian rhythm

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and collaborating institutions developed a unified, data-driven computational approach to infer and reveal connections among cells in biological and chemical oscillatory networks.

1d

 

Ant-y social: Successful ant colonies hint at how societies evolve

How did civilization begin? Where did the division of labor come from? Do successful societies need strong leaders? Princeton and Rockefeller University researchers tackled those giant questions with some very small research subjects: genetically identical ants (Ooceraea biroi) that can live independently or in groups — and have no queens. They found that simply increasing group size, even if it

1d

 

NASA is preparing for future space missions by exploring underwater volcanoes off Hawaii

Space Deep Sea Meets Deep Space Nearly two and a half miles under the surface of the water, the volcanic seafloor of Hawaii will soon host a new NASA mission called SUBSEA (Systematic Underwater…

1d

 

Eyewire Brain Zoo: Giraffe vs Ostrich

Battle of the long necks! Humans may have both these guys beat when it comes to brain:body ratio, but we don’t quite have the charming quirkiness of these odd misfits of the animal kingdom. Giraffe neurons have to send signals down a 13 foot spinal column! And an ostrich’s brain makes up just .03% of its body weight! Pick your animal favorite and let’s see who comes out on top. Aug 28 @11 AM – Au

1d

 

Eyewire Brain Zoo: Primate Trivia

Let’s round the corner to the Primate Sanctuary, where our closest cousins in the animal world will greet us! Primate Trivia Aug 26 @11 AM – Aug 28 @11 AM US ET with Tamarin Trivia Power Hour on Aug 28 @11 AM ET With only a 2% genetic difference from humans, and 8-9 billion neurons, Gorillas are extremely intelligent great apes. Check out this video about Koko the Gorilla, who learned over 1000 s

1d

 

Q&A: How a Plant Ages

The genetic mechanisms that seem to influence human life span may also be at work in plants.

1d

 

China Has Withheld Samples of a Dangerous Flu Virus

Despite an international agreement, U.S. health authorities still have not received H7N9 avian flu specimens from their Chinese counterparts.

1d

 

What Makes A Human Brain Unique? A Newly Discovered Neuron May Be A Clue

The human brain isn't just bigger than a mouse brain. It contains at least one kind of brain cell that isn't found in rodents. (Image credit: Tamas Lab/University of Szeged)

1d

 

U.N. says Myanmar leaders should be tried in court for genocide against Rohingya

After conducting a year-long investigation into a campaign against Rohingya Muslims, a United Nations panel found evidence that Myanmar security forces committed “the gravest crimes under international law.” Read More

1d

 

What Nietzsche really meant: The Apollonian and Dionysian

One God stands for order, logic, and reason. The other stands for chaos, madness, and drunkenness. Nietzsche thinks you need both. Read More

1d

 

Latest Effort to Replicate Psych Studies Yields 62 Percent Success

Among the experiments that came to the same result as the original, the effect size was smaller on average.

1d

 

1d

 

Old Stone Drought Warning Resurfaces in Europe: 'When You See Me, Cry'

Old stones bearing ominous messages about dry years have resurfaced from within a river in Central Europe, according to an Associated Press report.

1d

 

Analysis: Commonly used drugs are rarely studied in primary care patients

Drugs most commonly prescribed to patients seen by primary care physicians are not often tested in the patients who go to these clinics, where most people receive their care.

1d

 

Fishing activity skyrocketed ahead of ban in South Pacific area

Ahead of a full ban, fishing increased 130 percent in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area in the South Pacific, setting back projected efforts to let nature rebuild fish stocks by 18 months, researchers say.

1d

 

Diseased heart muscle cells have abnormally shortened telomeres, Stanford researchers find

People with a form of heart disease called cardiomyopathy have abnormally short telomeres in heart muscle cells responsible for contraction, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

1d

 

Study defines mechanisms behind focused-ultrasound-assisted treatment of brain tumors

A study led by a team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has analyzed, for the first time, the mechanisms underlying the use of focused ultrasound to improve the delivery of anti-cancer drugs across the blood brain barrier into brain tumors.

1d

 

Connectivity explains ecosystem responses to rainfall, drought

In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers reveal techniques — inspired by the study of information theory — to track how changes in precipitation alter interactions between the atmosphere, vegetation and soil at two National Science Foundation Critical Zone Observatory sites in the western United States.

1d

 

Naked-Mole-Rat Queens Control Their Subjects by Having Them Eat Poop

Naked mole rats are intensely social creatures, and poop is a central part of their social lives. For one, they like to roll around in the designated toilet chambers of their large underground colonies, picking up the distinctive odor that marks them as a colony member. As wee little pups, they “beg” for poop to eat—literally chirping and scratching at adults’ butts. It’s a way, scientists think,

1d

 

Sucralose produces previously unidentified metabolites

Sucralose, a widely used artificial sweetener sold under the trade name Splenda®, is metabolized in the gut, producing at least two fat-soluble compounds, according to a recent study using rats. The finding differs from the studies used to garner regulatory approval for sucralose, which reported that the substance was not broken down in the body.

1d

 

Nano-imaging of intersubband transitions in few-layer 2-D materials

A study reports on the first observation of intersubband transitions in 2-D materials via scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy.

1d

 

This bright blue dye is found in fabric: Could it also power batteries?

Methylene blue is a common ingredient in wastewater from textile mills. But scientists think it may be possible to give this industrial pollutant a second life. In a study, they show that the dye, dissolved in water, is good at storing and releasing energy on cue. This makes the compound a promising material for redox flow batteries, which could store energy for wind farms and solar homes.

1d

 

NASA observes Tropical Storm Miriam's formation

Tropical cyclones continue to regularly develop in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. As Tropical Storm Miriam was developing, the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite observed the rainfall happening within the storm.

1d

 

What's Facebook Watch and will you like it?

What is "Facebook Watch?" If you said, "another ingenious/devious way for Facebook to consume every last second of my life," you wouldn't be wrong. If you said, "haven't a clue," you wouldn't be alone.

1d

 

Naked mole rats eat the poop of their queen for parenting cues

Hormones in the naked mole rat queen’s poop turn subordinate nest-mates into surrogate parents.

1d

 

85 Miles of Atlantic Coral Reef Stayed Hidden Until Now

A marine expedition recently discovered a previously unknown coral reef in the Atlantic Ocean.

1d

 

Connectivity explains ecosystem responses to rainfall, drought

In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers reveal techniques—inspired by the study of information theory—to track how changes in precipitation alter interactions between the atmosphere, vegetation and soil at two National Science Foundation Critical Zone Observatory sites in the western United States.

1d

 

Fishing activity skyrocketed ahead of ban in South Pacific area

Ahead of a full ban, fishing increased 130 percent in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area in the South Pacific, setting back projected efforts to let nature rebuild fish stocks by 18 months, researchers say.

1d

 

NASA observes Tropical Storm Miriam's formation

Tropical cyclones continue to regularly develop in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. As Tropical Storm Miriam was developing, the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite observed the rainfall happening within the storm.

1d

 

Daily Life in Maine, as Photographed by Robert F. Bukaty

Robert F. Bukaty has been working as a photographer for the Associated Press since 1993, and was a member of the AP team that won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of President Clinton’s impeachment. However, Bukaty’s many photographs of everyday life in the state of Maine, where he is based, are a constant source of joy and wonder. The images are beautifully made portraits of Maine’s peop

1d

 

The Developing Norms for Reopening Schools After Shootings

When students from Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas—where eight students and two teachers were killed in a mass shooting on May 18—went back to school last week, their school looked different from the last time they saw it. Metal detectors and a security vestibule made of bulletproof glass greeted them at the front doors, and every classroom now also contained a “panic button” to trigger a

1d

 

If You Watch Nothing Else of Who Is America?, Watch the Segment With O.J. Simpson

The thing that gets you is the laughter. On Sunday night’s finale of Who Is America? —a segment that aired after the credits had made it seem that the end of the show had come and gone—Showtime offered one more instance of Sacha Baron Cohen fooling, and in that way revealing, a selected representative of the American identity. This time, the stunt-happy satirist was playing “Gio,” an Italian play

1d

 

Spinosaurus Was a Terrible Swimmer

This famous dinosaur wasn't very skilled in the water, after all — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

NASA looks at water vapor concentration in Tropical Depression 25W

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Aug. 27 it analyzed water vapor within newly formed Tropical Depression 25W and revealed three areas of strong concentrations.

1d

 

Discovering trailing components of a coronal mass ejection

Using Green Bank Observatory in West Virginia, PSI Associate Research Scientist Elizabeth A. Jensen's team observed radio signals from the MESSENGER spacecraft and discovered that solar eruptions known to cause communication disruptions and electrical grid failures as they hit Earth have secondary trailing impacts. Jensen is lead author of "Plasma Interactions with the Space Environment in the Acc

1d

 

Food insecurity leads to higher mortality risk, a new study finds

A wide array of negative health outcomes have been associated with food insecurity including diabetes, depression, and cardiovascular disease. But could food insecurity lead to an increased risk of mortality? According to University of Illinois agricultural economist Craig Gundersen, no one has researched this relationship until now.

1d

 

New urine dipstick test detects cause of disease that blinds millions

Scientists at Scripps Research have developed a urine diagnostic to detect the parasitic worms that cause river blindness, also called onchocerciasis, a tropical disease that afflicts 18 to 120 million people worldwide.

1d

 

NASA looks at water vapor concentration in Tropical Depression 25W

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Aug. 27 it analyzed water vapor within newly formed Tropical Depression 25W and revealed three areas of strong concentrations.

1d

 

Coconut oil is the latest reminder that there's no such thing as a 'superfood'

Health But it's far from 'pure poison.' Categorizing foods as either good or bad—the way marketers do when they crown new “superfoods”—is not necessarily the best way to approach nutrition.

1d

 

The Irony of the Jacksonville Mass Shooting

On Sunday afternoon, a man shot and killed three people, including himself, and injured at least 11 others at a Madden NFL video-game tournament in Jacksonville, Florida. The Jacksonville police impounded the shooter’s car, suggesting that he drove down from his home in Baltimore (which the FBI has since raided ). It’s not yet known whether he planned to commit the violence at the tournament, or

1d

 

How scientists predicted Corona's appearance during Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse

It was Aug. 14, 2017, just one week before the Moon would cross paths with the Sun and Earth, casting its shadow across the United States. The entire country buzzed with anticipation for the fleeting chance to see the corona, the Sun's tenuous outer atmosphere.

1d

 

INTEGRA simplifies pipetting for GLP environments

Which brand of pipette to use may not be your first consideration when designing your laboratory workflows and SOPs to follow good laboratory practice (GLP), but choosing the right pipette can make it much easier to achieve consistent results. INTEGRA’s electronic pipettes – including the VIAFLO, VOYAGER and VIAFLO 96/384 ranges – are designed to meet the demands of the modern laboratory environme

1d

 

Qrypt licenses ORNL's quantum random number generator to fortify encryption methods

Qrypt, Inc., has exclusively licensed a novel cyber security technology from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, promising a stronger defense against cyberattacks including those posed by quantum computing.

1d

 

Researchers reveal cause of aggressive skin cancer in patients with butterfly syndrome

The insights could open the door to a more effective treatment approach for patients with rare disorder.

1d

 

How scientists predicted corona's appearance during Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse

A week before the Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse that was visible across the US, the country buzzed with anticipation. But the wait was uniquely nerve-wracking for a group of scientists at Predictive Science Inc. in San Diego. How would their predicted view of the corona, the result of a complex numerical model, compare to the real thing?

1d

 

Drug could aid recovery after a heart attack

Drugs currently undergoing development to treat anaemia could be repurposed to help prevent people with Type 2 diabetes from developing heart failure, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and Diabetes UK.

1d

 

Drug could aid recovery after a heart attack

Drugs currently undergoing development to treat anaemia could be repurposed to help prevent people with Type 2 diabetes from developing heart failure, according to new research.

1d

 

Rare discovery of new fatty acids

Decades after scientists discovered hundreds of different fatty acids in vegetable oils, two that had managed to elude detection have finally revealed themselves. The discovery may be the first of its kind since the 1960s and 1970s, the researchers said, when biochemists identified troves of new fatty acids in various vegetable oils.

1d

 

How gene variant is linked to chronic pain after traumatic injury

In 2013, researchers found an association between genetic variants in FKBP5 and posttraumatic chronic pain. Now a new study by the same research group has confirmed this association in a cohort of more than 1,500 people of both European-American and African-American descent who experienced motor vehicle collision trauma.

1d

 

John McCain’s Final Letter to America

On Monday morning in Arizona, Senator John McCain’s former campaign manager Rick Davis, acting as a spokesperson for the McCain family, read aloud the text of the late senator’s final letter to the public. “These are John’s words,” he said. What follows is a transcription of what Davis read: My fellow Americans, whom I have gratefully served for 60 years, and especially my fellow Arizonians, than

1d

 

Anaemia drugs could also aid recovery after heart attack, says study

Findings suggest trial drugs may reduce chance of heart failure for diabetic patients Hopes have been raised that drugs being trialled to treat anaemia could also be used to aid recovery after a heart attack and help decrease the chance of future heart failure. Initial results suggest the drugs could be given to people with Type 2 diabetes immediately after a heart attack, according to research f

1d

 

Wildfire risk doesn't douse housing demand

Demand for real estate rebounds in high-risk areas within one to two years of a wildfire, a new study finds. Here's what the research may mean for homeowners in California and beyond.

1d

 

International team makes rare discovery of new fatty acids

Decades after scientists discovered hundreds of different fatty acids in vegetable oils, two that had managed to elude detection have finally revealed themselves to a team led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Huazhong Agricultural University in China. The discovery may be the first of its kind since the 1960s and 1970s, the researchers said, when biochemists identified troves of new fatty

1d

 

James Bond’s Murky Future

The James Bond series is one of Hollywood’s oldest and most enduring franchises. Over the course of 50-plus years, the character has starred in 24 official films (plus a few unauthorized spin-offs) and been played by six actors, basically inventing the concept of the “reboot” through multiple recastings. Since 2006, the role has belonged to Daniel Craig, whose four outings as the secret agent hav

1d

 

New clues unearthed about mammals' rapid evolution after dinosaur extinction

It was a life-altering event. Around 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, an asteroid struck the Earth, triggering a mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs and some 75% of all species. Somehow mammals survived, thrived, and became dominant across the planet. Now we have new clues about how that happened.

1d

 

Judge blocks online plans for printing untraceable 3-D guns

A U.S. judge in Seattle blocked the Trump administration Monday from allowing a Texas company to post online plans for making untraceable 3D guns, agreeing with 19 states and the District of Columbia that such access to the plastic guns would pose a security risk.

1d

 

Hungary: Opposition party seeks Microsoft graft case probe

A Hungarian opposition party is formally asking authorities to investigate an alleged corruption scheme involving the sale of Microsoft products to state clients.

1d

 

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Last week in tech: Bad smartphone habits, new DJI drones, and Facebook bans

Technology Read this and then put the phone down. Check out the latest episode of our podcast.

1d

 

Hyppigt anvendte medicinske stents er jævnbyrdige

Danske langtidsresultater for patienter, der har fået indsat tidligere hyppigt anvendte medicinske stents, viser ingen forskel mellem disse i forhold til risikoen for død eller myokardieinfarkt.

1d

 

UTSA enters Guinness World Records with smallest medical robot

It can't be seen with a human eye. It doesn't look anything like C-3PO or R2-D2, or even BB-8. But, nevertheless, it is a robot (all 120nm of it) and its creators from The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are now world record holders in the Guinness World Records for creating the Smallest Medical Robot.

1d

 

Heart-brain connection could be predictive biomarker for epilepsy

Heartbeat irregularities connected to brain activity abnormalities may lead to the ability to predict eventual epileptic seizures in subjects who suffered physical or infectious brain insults, according to Penn State researchers who studied mouse models of cerebral malaria, which often causes epilepsy in those who survive.

1d

 

Researchers reveal how gene variant is linked to chronic pain after traumatic injury

In 2013, UNC School of Medicine researchers were first to show an association between genetic variants in FKBP5 and posttraumatic chronic pain. Now a new study by the same research group has confirmed this association in a cohort of more than 1,500 people of both European-American and African-American descent who experienced motor vehicle collision trauma.

1d

 

Stress gene influences chronic pain after car crash

A study of more than 1,000 motor vehicle accident survivors published in JNeurosci reveals a common variant in a gene involved in the stress response that increases vulnerability to developing chronic pain. Addressing the interaction between this genetic variant and post-traumatic stress may represent a supplemental or alternative to treatment with addictive opioids.

1d

 

Brain-heart activity predicts post-malaria epilepsy in mice

Animals that develop epilepsy after an infection can be identified as early as three months prior to their first seizure by measuring interactions between the brain and the heart, according to new research using a mouse model of post-cerebral malaria epilepsy. Published in JNeurosci, this finding could inform efforts to diagnose and treat acquired epilepsy.

1d

 

NASA finds wind shear slamming Tropical Cyclone Lane

Infrared satellite imagery shows scientists where the coldest cloud tops are located in a tropical cyclone and can give a clear picture of wind shear's effects. NASA's Aqua satellite data showed wind shear was pushing Tropical Depression Lane's strongest storms east of its center. Despite the wind shear, Lane strengthened back into a tropical storm on Aug. 27.

1d

 

Toddlers Like Winners, But How They Win Matters

Unlike other primates, human toddlers watching a competition don't appreciate victors who shove rivals out of the way. Even little kids prefer high-status characters who aren't bullies. (Image credit: Rick Lowe/Getty Images)

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1d

 

Motion reducerer dødeligheden blandt patienter med højt blodtryk

Direkte dosis-respons association mellem graden af fysisk aktivitet og dødelighed blandt patienter med højt blodtryk, viser undersøgelse præsenteret på ESC-kongressen.

1d

 

Hjertelæger behandler de rette brystsmertepatienter med magnyl

Behandling med hjertemagnyl efter CT-scanning af kranspulsårerne blandt patienter med angina pectoris gives til de rigtige patienter, viser undersøgelse som afdelingslæge Erik L. Grove har præsenteret på ESC-kongressen.

1d

 

Hjerteforeningens formand: Vi må ikke lade os forblænde af teknologien og glemme det hele menneske

Begejstring over teknologiske landvindinger må ikke få kardiologerne til at glemme det hele menneske bag hjertesygdommen, mener Hjerteforeningens formand Christian Hassager, der glæder sig over, at også ESC med nye guidelines fremhæver, at patienterne i større grad skal involveres i beslutningerne om deres behandling.

1d

 

Cedars-Sinai investigators develop more accurate measure of body fat

Cedars-Sinai investigators have developed a simpler and more accurate method of estimating body fat than the widely used body mass index, or BMI, with the goal of better understanding obesity.

1d

 

Commentary: More malaria nets likely needed between campaigns

A new study published in the Lancet journal EClinicalMedicine suggests that more mosquito nets are likely needed between mass campaigns to keep malaria cases in check.

1d

 

Nano-imaging of intersubband transitions in few-layer 2D materials

A study in Nature Nanotechnology reports on the first observation of intersubband transitions in 2D materials via scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy.

1d

 

NASA finds wind shear slamming Tropical Cyclone Lane

Infrared satellite imagery shows scientists where the coldest cloud tops are located in a tropical cyclone and can give a clear picture of wind shear's effects. NASA's Aqua satellite data showed wind shear was pushing Tropical Depression Lane's strongest storms east of its center. Despite the wind shear, Lane strengthened back into a tropical storm on Aug. 27.

1d

 

Marijuana Found in Breast Milk 6 Days after Use

Recent findings suggest use of the drug during pregnancy, although rare, is on the rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

The Complicated Female Genius of Lauryn Hill

Lauryn Hill defines herself. Twenty years ago, the one-time lead of the Fugees stepped out from the shadow of her male bandmates to release a solo debut. In the time since its August 1998 release, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill , her sole full-length album, has become the stuff of lore. It’s inspired records , documentaries , and books . The woman at its core remains at once celebrated and vilif

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This bright blue dye is found in fabric. Could it also power batteries?

Methylene blue is a common ingredient in wastewater from textile mills. But University at Buffalo scientists think it may be possible to give this industrial pollutant a second life. In a study, they show that the dye, dissolved in water, is good at storing and releasing energy on cue. This makes the compound a promising material for redox flow batteries, which could store energy for wind farms an

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Why Jupiter's Rapid Growth Spurt Was Delayed for Millions of Years

New research suggests why Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system, waited about two million years for its early-formation growth spurt.

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Trilobites: Extinct Cave Bear DNA Lives On in Brown Bears

Modern brown bears are carrying a bit of genetic material passed down from the cave bear, in a study that suggests extinction does not always vanquish a species’ genes.

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Testing the reproducibility of social science research

Today, in Nature Human Behavior, a collaborative team of five laboratories published the results of 21 high-powered replications of social science experiments originally published in Science and Nature, two of the most prestigious journals in science. They failed to replicate the results of more than a third of the studies and turned up significantly weaker evidence for the remainder compared to t

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Artificial intelligence project to help bring the power of the sun to Earth is picked for first U.S. exascale system

To capture and control the process of fusion that powers the sun and stars in facilities on Earth called tokamaks, scientists must confront disruptions that can halt the reactions and damage the doughnut-shaped devices. Now an artificial intelligence system under development at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University to predict and

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Wildfire risk doesn't douse housing demand

Out of sight, out of mind.

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Serendipitous discovery may lead to eco-friendly lubricant

Seed oil components of an ornamental flower could provide a direct pathway for designing a new class of environmentally friendly lubricants. Researchers at the School of Science at IUPUI identified the compound in the seed oil that is produced in a manner unlike any other fatty acid. The study was published today online in the journal Nature Plants.

1d

 

Geologists uncover new clues about largest mass extinction ever

A new study could help explain the driving force behind the largest mass extinction in the history of earth, known as the End-Permian Extinction.

1d

 

Massive effort yields image-based cell sorting technology

Invented over 50 years ago, flow cytometry-based cell sorting has become a widely used tool in biology labs for physically isolating cells based on their global surface marker expression profiles. But now researchers have unveiled the next evolution in this critical process, 'Image-Activated Cell Sorting,' or IACS for short.

1d

 

Testing the reproducibility of social science research

A team co-led by Gideon Nave of Penn's Wharton School replicated 21 high-profile social science studies and found discrepancies with the original research, including eight studies that failed to find significant evidence for the original finding. Researchers betting in prediction markets, however, were quite accurate at predicting which findings would replicate and which would not.

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From farm to fridge: Milk carton 'sell-by' dates may become more precise

The 'sell-by' and 'best-by' dates on milk cartons may soon become more meaningful and accurate. Food scientists have created a new predictive model that examines spore-forming bacteria and when they emerge.

1d

 

Serendipitous discovery may lead to eco-friendly lubricant

Seed oil components of an ornamental flower could provide a direct pathway for designing a new class of environmentally friendly lubricants. Researchers identified the compound in the seed oil that is produced in a manner unlike any other fatty acid.

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Om at være magtfuld

Min og de øvrige hospitalsdirektørers placering på Dagens Medicins Magtliste afspejler meget fint vores indflydelse i det danske sundhedsvæsen. Som embedsmænd skal vi spille vores politikere gode, ikke overskygge dem.

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New platform by NYU Tandon, Frick, brings art history research into the digital age

Can 21st century data science and visualization revolutionize the impact of art created millennia ago?

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Foxconn giving $100 million to UW-Madison for partnership

Foxconn Technology Group announced Monday that it will invest $100 million in engineering and innovation research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, making it one of the largest gifts in the school's history that comes as the Taiwan-based electronics giant builds a factory in southeastern Wisconsin that would be the company's first of its kind in North America.

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The End of Theoretical Physics As We Know It

Theoretical physics has a reputation for being complicated. I beg to differ. That we are able to write down natural laws in mathematical form at all means that the laws we deal with are simple — much simpler than those of other scientific disciplines. Unfortunately, actually solving those equations is often not so simple. For example, we have a perfectly fine theory that describes the elementary

1d

 

Testing the reproducibility of social science research

A team co-led by Gideon Nave of Penn's Wharton School replicated 21 high-profile social science studies and found discrepancies with the original research, including eight studies that failed to find significant evidence for the original finding. Researchers betting in prediction markets, however, were quite accurate at predicting which findings would replicate and which would not.

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Study finds sucralose produces previously unidentified metabolites

Sucralose, a widely used artificial sweetener sold under the trade name Splenda®, is metabolized in the gut, producing at least two fat-soluble compounds, according to a recent study using rats. The finding differs from the studies used to garner regulatory approval for sucralose, which reported that the substance was not broken down in the body.

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Did you solve it? A little Swedish magic

The answers to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set the following puzzles from Swedish magician Fredrik Cattani. Here they are with their solutions. Money, Money, Money Continue reading…

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Tesla shares slip after company decides to stay public

Shares of Tesla slipped on the first day of trading after the electric vehicle maker said it won't consider going private after all.

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Scientists 'fix' bacterial tree of life

Bacterial classification has been given a complete makeover by a team of University of Queensland researchers, using an evolutionary tree based on genome sequences.

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Predicting the response to immunotherapy using artificial intelligence

A study published in The Lancet Oncology establishes for the first time that artificial intelligence can process medical images to extract biological and clinical information. By designing an algorithm and developing it to analyse CT scan images, medical researchers at Gustave Roussy, CentraleSupélec, Inserm, Paris-Sud University and TheraPanacea (spin-off from CentraleSupélec specializing in arti

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Wildfire risk doesn't douse housing demand

Demand for real estate rebounds in high-risk areas within one to two years of a wildfire, UNLV study finds. Here's what the research may mean for homeowners in California and beyond.

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Holly Krieger's Favorite Theorem

The Cambridge mathematician expounds on the delightful irony of Brouwer's fixed-point theorem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Research methods that find serial criminals could help save tigers

A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists who collaborated on an innovative conservation research study.

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How do fruit flies grow legs? Solving a molecular mystery

What do cancer and the growing legs of a fruit fly have in common? They can both be influenced by a single molecule, a protein that tends to call the shots inside of embryos as they develop into living, breathing animals. Present in virtually every creature on the planet, this protein goes by the name Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor protein, or EGFR.

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Scientists Discover a Sixth Species of Ebola Virus — in Bats

For the first time, scientists found an Ebola virus in animals that hasn't been detected in humans.

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Culling Wildlife for the Sake of Research

A case in which the University of Florida killed birds to protect crop research raises questions on the ethics of field studies' potential side effects.

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Baby poop capsules: Coming soon to a pharmacy near you?

While the probiotic trend has been suspect at best, there is one therapeutic application that keeps holding up: fecal transplant. Read More

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Low-carb diets linked to earlier death, 25-year study finds

We've come full circle, once again: balance is key to a healthy diet. Read More

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Towards untangling the 'antennal grabbing' phenomenon in mating cuckoo bees

One can seldom spot a cuckoo bee, whose peculiar kleptoparasitic behaviour includes laying eggs in the nests of a certain host bee species, let alone a couple mating.

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Assessment, monitoring, and mitigation of stressors on bee health

Honey bees, bumble bees, and solitary bees pollinate crops and wildflowers and are essential for both human and planetary well-being. The new EU Horizon 2020 project PoshBee aims to support healthy bee populations, sustainable beekeeping and pollination, since bees face many threats and are often in decline.

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Serendipitous discovery by IUPUI researchers may lead to eco-friendly lubricant

Seed oil components of an ornamental flower could provide a direct pathway for designing a new class of environmentally friendly lubricants. Researchers at the School of Science at IUPUI identified the compound in the seed oil that is produced in a manner unlike any other fatty acid. The study was published online in the journal Nature Plants.

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Trilobites: A New Trick to Keep Barnacles From Sticking to Ships

By experimenting with tiny textures, scientists may have found a technique that could save the shipping industry billions of dollars each year.

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Researchers develop a modular metal-organic framework with highest electron charge mobilities ever observed

MOFs—or metal-organic frameworks—are highly customizable porous network solids featuring cages that can come in many sizes and can attract and hold a variety of chemical components, such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen gases. And it's this versatile specificity that gives MOFs so much potential for applications in next-generation batteries and in carbon capture, among a growing list. Desp

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Milk carton 'sell-by' dates may become more precise

The "sell-by" and "best-by" dates on milk cartons may soon become more meaningful and accurate. Cornell University food scientists have created a new predictive model that examines spore-forming bacteria and when they emerge, according to research published in the August 2018 print issue of the Journal of Dairy Science.

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Ideas about personality skew how we judge faces

We make snap judgments of others based not only on their facial appearance, but also on our pre-existing beliefs about how others’ personalities work, according to a new study. The research, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , underscores how we interpret others’ facial features to form impressions of their personalities. “Although these impressions are

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Measuring the tension of a cell with a molecule

Researchers have created a new fluorescent molecule with which they were able to measure the tension of a cellular membrane, and, in the process, discover how cells adjust their surface area relative to their volume.

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How do fruit flies grow legs? Solving a molecular mystery

What do cancer and the growing legs of a fruit fly have in common? They can both be influenced by a single molecule, a protein that tends to call the shots. Present in virtually every creature on the planet, this protein goes by the name Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor protein, or EGFR. Now a team of neuroscientists has figured out how to tease apart the many roles EGFR plays in the body — chall

1d

 

The sugar wars: Rhetoric or reason?

Over the past 50 years researchers, clinicians, professional organizations, and health charities have waged war on sugar, calling for dietary recommendations to be changed and for a sugar tax on soft drinks and sweet treats in an effort to reduce obesity and cardiovascular diseases.

1d

 

Online Bettors Can Sniff Out Weak Psychology Studies

Psychologists are in the midst of an ongoing, difficult reckoning. Many believe that their field is experiencing a “ reproducibility crisis ,” because they’ve tried and failed to repeat experiments done by their peers. Even classic results —the stuff of textbooks and TED talks—have proven surprisingly hard to replicate, perhaps because they’re the results of poor methods and statistical tomfooler

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The Sex-Abuse Scandal Has Come for Pope Francis

Pope Francis’s credibility has taken a major hit as the crisis over clergy sex abuse continues to roil the Catholic Church. Following weeks of horrifying revelations about the Church’s long-standing mismanagement of allegations against priests, the pope visited Ireland this weekend, asking forgiveness for a long list of “abuses” and “exploitation.” Reporters observed that crowds were nowhere near

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Experts assemble for UN-hosted meeting on 'killer robots'

Experts from scores of countries are meeting to discuss ways to define and deal with "killer robots"—futuristic weapons systems that could conduct war without human intervention.

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Researchers use crowdsourcing to speed up data analysis in corn plants

Teaching a machine to finish a complex task can save humans a lot of time, effort and money. But first, the machine has to learn how, and that comes with plenty of its own challenges.

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The digital divide—small, social programs can help get seniors online

In Australia, use of the internet is almost universal. At last count, 86% of the population was digitally connected.

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People who see men and women as fundamentally different are more likely to accept workplace discrimination

How should people who care about gender equality in the workplace argue their case? The most popular approach is to make the "business case" argument: that greater inclusion of women enhances profits and performance.

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Amid blackout scare stories, remember that a grid without power cuts is impossible… and expensive

Last Friday the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) released its annual Electricity Statement of Opportunities. This was widely (and inaccurately) reported as predicting widespread blackouts.

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Shedding light on shallow waters

Keeping an eye on our waters is more important than ever, as widespread drought continues to sweep Europe this summer.

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Cherry-picking undermines sustainability reporting

Companies may be cherry-picking sustainability measures that make them look good, while huge variation in what's reported makes meaningful comparisons across firms impossible, a new international study shows.

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Food scientists create healthy probiotic drink from soy pulp

Food scientists at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have given okara – the residue from the production of soy milk and tofu that is usually discarded – a new lease on life by turning it into a refreshing drink that contains live probiotics, dietary fibre, free isoflavones and amino acids. By encapsulating these nutrients in a beverage, they can be easily absorbed into the body, and promo

1d

 

Why you can smell rain

When those first fat drops of summer rain fall to the hot, dry ground, have you ever noticed a distinctive odor? I have childhood memories of family members who were farmers describing how they could always "smell rain" right before a storm.

1d

 

From farm to fridge: Milk carton 'sell-by' dates may become more precise

The 'sell-by' and 'best-by' dates on milk cartons may soon become more meaningful and accurate. Cornell University food scientists have created a new predictive model that examines spore-forming bacteria and when they emerge, according to research published in the Journal of Dairy Science.

1d

 

Connectome organization in childhood ALL and risk of delayed neurodevelopment

A new study provides novel insights into the cognitive effects of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and of chemotherapeutic treatment in long-term survivors of ALL.

1d

 

Jupiter had growth disorders

Researchers of the universities of Bern and Zürich and of ETH Zürich show how Jupiter was formed. Data collected from meteorites had indicated that the growth of the giant planet had been delayed for two million years. Now the researchers have found an explanation: collisions with kilometer-sized blocks generated high energy, which meant that in this phase hardly any accretion of gas could take pl

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Scientists 'fix' bacterial tree of life

Bacterial classification has been given a complete makeover by a team of University of Queensland researchers, using an evolutionary tree based on genome sequences.The study, led by Professor Philip Hugenholtz from UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences and the Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, relied on a technique called metagenomics, where bacterial genomes are obtained straight fr

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EXP2 protein helps deadliest malaria parasite obtain nutrients during infection

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have deciphered the role of a key protein that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum uses to obtain nutrients while infecting red blood cells. Their study appears in Nature Microbiology.

1d

 

Geologists uncover new clues about largest mass extinction ever

A new study could help explain the driving force behind the largest mass extinction in the history of earth, known as the End-Permian Extinction.

1d

 

Investigating what keeps metastatic breast cancer in check

New evidence suggests that inflammation may help prevent growth of tumor cells that have spread, with important implications for clinical trials.

1d

 

Child lead exposure study finds substantial reductions possible

Intervention by researchers reduced household lead below levels previously deemed achievable and reduced blood lead concentrations in more highly exposed children, though the decrease did not result in significant neurobehavioral improvements in children.

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Australian, UK scientists solve 30-year wheat rust genetics puzzle

Researchers have isolated the first major resistance genes against the stripe rust disease that is devastating wheat crops worldwide. The breakthrough by the scientists, who have cloned three related rust resistance genes — called Yr7, Yr5, and YrSP — will enable these important genes to be accurately monitored and integrated into breeding programs in the fight against ever-changing pathogens th

1d

 

Keeping cost from getting in the way of stroke prevention

Stroke survivors under age 65 are having less trouble paying for the crucial medications that can stave off a bigger health catastrophe, thanks to expanded Medicaid and other Affordable Care Act provisions.

1d

 

Breast cancer breakthrough: Some tumors can stop their own spread

Certain types of breast tumors can send signals that freeze the growth of their own secondary cancers, according to a major new study co-led by Australia's Garvan Institute of Medical Research.

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Researchers unearth secret tunnels between the skull and the brain

Bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside most of our bones, produces red blood cells as well as immune cells that help fight off infections and heal injuries. According to a new study of mice and humans, tiny tunnels run from skull bone marrow to the lining of the brain and may provide a direct route for immune cells responding to injuries caused by stroke and other brain disorders.

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ACA associated with decrease in cost-related medication nonadherence among survivors of stroke

Implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was associated with a decrease in cost-related nonadherence to medication by adult survivors of stroke (ages 45 to 64), as Medicaid coverage increased and uninsurance decreased in this group. This study analyzed survey data and included almost 14,000 survivors of stroke.

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Providing care for transgender patients

A review article discusses some best practices to help clinicians learn how to better engage with and care for transgender patients, and the article suggests ways health care facilities can move toward more inclusive systems of care.

1d

 

Ebola species found in bats ahead of any potential outbreak

For the first time, scientists discovered a new ebola virus species in a host prior to detection in an infected human or sick animal. The discovery of the Bombali virus in bats in Sierra Leone and the sequencing of the complete genome was officially published today in the journal Nature Microbiology.

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Mass. General team discovers channels connecting skull bone marrow to brain surface

A new study from a Massachusetts General Hospital research team has made two surprising discoveries — that immune system cells responding to a stroke or other brain injury in an animal model are more likely to come from bone marrow in the skull and that tiny, previously unknown channels through the skull's inner layer carry inflammatory cells from the marrow directly to the outer layers of the th

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As CO2 levels climb, millions at risk of nutritional deficiencies

Rising levels of carbon dioxide from human activity are making staple crops such as rice and wheat less nutritious and could result in 175 million people becoming zinc deficient and 122 million people becoming protein deficient by 2050, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Scientists identify a new kind of human brain cell

A team of scientists from the US and Hungary have uncovered a new type of human brain cell that has never been seen in mice and other well-studied laboratory animals.

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Epigenetic analysis of aggressive brain tumors

Glioblastoma is a brain cancer with devastating prognosis. It is caused by numerous genetic defects, which make it difficult to treat. A new study by scientists from CeMM, MedUni Vienna and the Austrian Brain Tumor Registry network demonstrates how epigenetic analysis of tumor samples collected in routine clinical practice could be used to better classify and treat the disease. The results were pu

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Measuring the tension of a cell with a molecule

Researchers at UNIGE, working under the umbrella of the National Centre for Competence in Research Chemical Biology, have created a new fluorescent molecule with which they were able to measure the tension of a cellular membrane, and, in the process, discover how cells adjust their surface area relative to their volume.

1d

 

Massive effort yields image-based cell sorting technology

Invented over 50 years ago, flow cytometry-based cell sorting has become a widely used tool in biology labs for physically isolating cells based on their global surface marker expression profiles. But on Aug. 27, 2018, in the journal Cell, an international, multi-institutional team of researchers unveil the next evolution in this critical process, 'Image-Activated Cell Sorting,' or IACS for short.

1d

 

Stabilizing dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane improves muscle function

In a head-to-head trial between the conventional glucocorticoid, prednisolone, and a modified glucocorticoid, vamorolone, in experimental models of LGMD2B, vamorolone improved dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane stability and repair. This correlated with increased muscle strength and decreased muscle degeneration, according to a Children's-led study published online Aug. 27, 2018, in Molecula

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A year after Hurricane Harvey, flawed flood risk maps are setting Texans up for another disaster

Environment Current maps greatly underestimate risks for certain areas. Harvey’s impacts in Houston provide an ideal case study for unsustainable human-environment interaction.

1d

 

Jupiter had growth disorders

Researchers can now show how Jupiter was formed. Data collected from meteorites had indicated that the growth of the giant planet had been delayed for two million years. Now the researchers have found an explanation: Collisions with kilometer-sized blocks generated high energy, which meant that in this phase hardly any accretion of gas could take place and the planet could only grow slowly.

1d

 

Epigenetic analysis of aggressive brain tumors

Glioblastoma is a brain cancer with devastating prognosis. It is caused by numerous genetic defects, which make it difficult to treat. A new study demonstrates how epigenetic analysis of tumor samples collected in routine clinical practice could be used to better classify and treat the disease.

1d

 

How the cholera bacterium survives water predators

EPFL scientists have deciphered mechanisms that help the cholera bacterium to survive grazing predators in aquatic environments.

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Crests of watery waves could transport vital chemicals in industrial separation process

Oil and water don't mix. The interface between the two liquids is a building block of the most widely used industrial process to purify chemicals in energy production (from nuclear energy to biofuels) and storage (batteries). A recent discovery may unlock mechanisms that transport molecules across the boundary between oil and water. Simulations and analyses reveal a highly diverse and dynamic stru

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Screw pine is a self-watering giant

Pandanus forsteri, a species of screw pine endemic to Lord Howe Island, grows tall like no other tree on Earth. To reach the canopy, these trees have evolved a rainwater harvesting system that enables them to water themselves.

1d

 

Image: Radar footprints over buried Mars lake

ESA's Mars Express radar team recently made an exciting announcement: data from their instrument points to a pond of liquid water buried about 1.5 km below the icy south polar ice of Mars.

1d

 

Attempt to replicate major social scientific findings of past decade fails

Scientists and the design of experiments under scrutiny after a major project fails to reproduce results of high profile studies Some of the most high profile findings in social sciences of the past decade do not stand up to replication, a major investigation has found. The project, which aimed to repeat 21 experiments that had been published in Science or Nature – science’s two preeminent journa

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Climate change will make hundreds of millions more people nutrient deficient

Crops grown in a high CO2 atmosphere are less nutritious, containing less protein, zinc and iron Rising levels of carbon dioxide could make crops less nutritious and damage the health of hundreds of millions of people, research has revealed, with those living in some of the world’s poorest regions likely to be hardest hit. Previous research has shown that many food crops become less nutritious wh

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In Psychology And Other Social Sciences, Many Studies Fail The Reproducibility Test

Many social sciences experiments couldn't be reproduced in a new study, thus calling into question their findings. The field of social science is pushing hard to improve its scientific rigor. (Image credit: Peter Barritt/Getty Images)

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Letters: When It Comes to Health Care, ‘Women Must Be Vocal, Be Militant, Be Vigilant, and Be Political’

The Doctor Doesn’t Listen to Her. But the Media Is Starting To. Doctors have historically dismissed women’s sexual- and reproductive-health concerns. But lately, Ashley Fetters wrote recently, public discourse has begun to take those concerns more seriously. I am 60 years old. In 1976, my university required women’s studies courses for undergraduates. In those courses, instructors presented the v

1d

 

Why Is Glioblastoma, the Cancer That Killed John McCain, So Deadly?

Most people diagnosed with the disease survive less than two years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

How our fat ‘rheostats’ make it tough to lose weight

Scientists have identified the function of a protein that has been confounding metabolism researchers for more than two decades. It may have implications both for treating obesity and for understanding weight gain during pregnancy and menopause. The protein, called the melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) maintains what Roger Cone, director of the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute, has ter

1d

 

EXP2 protein helps deadliest malaria parasite obtain nutrients during infection

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have deciphered the role of a key protein that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum uses to obtain nutrients while infecting red blood cells. Their study appears in Nature Microbiology.

1d

 

Geologists uncover new clues about largest mass extinction ever

A new study could help explain the driving force behind the largest mass extinction in the history of earth, known as the End-Permian Extinction.

1d

 

Scientists solve 30-year wheat rust genetics puzzle

Researchers from the University of Sydney, CSIRO, the United Kingdom's John Innes Centre, Limagrain UK and the National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB) have isolated the first major resistance genes against the detrimental stripe rust disease that is devastating wheat crops worldwide.

1d

 

As CO2 levels climb, millions at risk of nutritional deficiencies

Rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) from human activity are making staple crops such as rice and wheat less nutritious and could result in 175 million people becoming zinc deficient and 122 million people becoming protein deficient by 2050, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that more than 1 billion women and children could lose a lar

1d

 

Ebola species found in bats ahead of any potential outbreak

For the first time, scientists discovered a new ebola virus species in a host prior to detection in an infected human or sick animal.

1d

 

Massive effort yields image-based cell sorting technology

Invented over 50 years ago, flow cytometry-based cell sorting has become a widely used tool in biology labs for physically isolating cells based on their global surface marker expression profiles. But on August 27 in the journal Cell, an international, multi-institutional team of researchers unveil the next evolution in this critical process, "Image-Activated Cell Sorting", or IACS for short.

1d

 

Measuring the tension of a cell with a molecule

The volume of cells can vary dramatically. Similarly to an inflating balloon, the volume increase of growing cells pushes on the plasma membrane—the lipid envelope that surrounds the cell. This "turgor" pressure increases the tension of the membrane, which, if left uncorrected, will ultimately cause the cell to burst. To prevent this from happening, cells have evolved mechanisms to monitor the ten

1d

 

The Science Behind Social Science Gets Shaken Up—Again

An attempt to replicate some of the decade's best research shows some of it … doesn’t.

1d

 

Meet the Rosehip Cell, a New Kind of Human Neuron

Transcriptome sequencing technologies are opening the doors to a new era of cellular discovery, and not just in the brain.

1d

 

‘Replication crisis’ spurs reforms in how science studies are done

Redos of social sciences studies from major journals point to opportunities for improvement.

1d

 

Enzyme ducts in the pancreas are formed like rivers

With methods used to analyze road systems and rivers researchers have studied the formation of the pancreas' network of ducts transporting digestive enzymes in mice. The network resembles the structure of road networks and the formation of rivers. The new results can help the researchers gain a better understanding of disorders like cystic fibrosis.

1d

 

Reversing influences of intergenerational stress offers hope for addressing public health

Researchers have shown for the first time in an animal model it is possible to reverse influences of parental stress by exposing parents to behavioral interventions following their own exposure to stress. This study has important public health implications for preventing future generations from bearing influences of stressors their parents faced before the children were conceived.

1d

 

Scientists advance technique for developing novel light beams from synchrotron radiation

Structured light, created using the process of generating and applying light to a surface, is important in many of today's devices, such as 3D scanners, dual photography and microscopic technology.

1d

 

The sugar wars: Rhetoric or reason?

Over the past 50 years researchers, clinicians, professional organizations, and health charities have waged war on sugar, calling for dietary recommendations to be changed and for a sugar tax on soft drinks and sweet treats in an effort to reduce obesity and cardiovascular diseases.

1d

 

Microvascular dysfunction: A common cause of heart failure with preserved pumping capacity

Microvascular dysfunction, or small vessel disease, can be an important cause of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (preserved pumping capacity), an international team including researchers from Karolinska Institutet and AstraZeneca report in a study published in The European Heart Journal. The results can play a crucial part in identifying people in the risk zone for this type of hear

1d

 

Pineapple Waste Won't Be Wasted

Costa Rican scientists are extracting valuable materials from the peel and stubble of pineapples. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Aretha Franklin Finally Gets Credit for the Term She Popularized

The passing of Aretha Franklin earlier this month set off a rolling celebration of her deep and lasting contributions to American popular music. While the breadth of her life’s work is tremendous , one song more than any other emblematizes her cultural impact: “Respect,” the Queen of Soul’s smash hit from 1967. By reworking the lyrics and structure of Otis Redding’s original version, Franklin tra

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How art can shape America's conversation about freedom | Dread Scott

In this quick talk, visual artist Dread Scott tells the story of one of his most transgressive art installations, which drew national attention for its controversial use of the American flag and led to a landmark First Amendment case in the US Supreme Court.

1d

 

E.T., Phone Earth? How Neutron-Star Crashes Could Help Aliens Call Us

The first-ever observations of merging binary stars stunned the astronomy community last year, but not quite as much as the first-ever signal from extraterrestrial life might someday stun the world.

1d

 

How do fruit flies grow legs? Solving a molecular mystery

What do cancer and the growing legs of a fruit fly have in common? They can both be influenced by a single molecule, a protein that tends to call the shots. Present in virtually every creature on the planet, this protein goes by the name Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor protein, or EGFR. Now a team of neuroscientists has figured out how to tease apart the many roles EGFR plays in the body — chall

1d

 

Enzyme ducts in the pancreas are formed like rivers

With methods used to analyse road systems and rivers researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied the formation of the pancreas' network of ducts transporting digestive enzymes in mice. The network resembles the structure of road networks and the formation of rivers. The new results can help the researchers gain a better understanding of disorders like cystic fibrosis.

1d

 

New study examines wartime experiences and PTSD among female Air Force personnel

A study of deployed and non-deployed active duty, female Air Force personnel found that both rates of exposure to wartime experiences and reports of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increased between 2008 and 2013.

1d

 

Dårlig søvn ødelægger arterierne

Personer, der har kort eller forstyrret søvn, har forøget risiko for åreforkalkning, viser nyt studie.

1d

 

Fishing for new ways to expand the EU's aquaculture industry

The EU-funded DIVERSIFY project is contributing to the sustainable expansion of the Europe's aquaculture industry by promoting species diversification and product development.

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Just fixing eroded beaches blocks far-sighted adaptation to rising seas

Coastal communities around the world are struggling to adapt to rising sea levels and increasingly severe coastal storms. In the United States, local governments are making investments to reduce those risks, such as protecting shorelines with seawalls, "nourishing" eroded beaches by adding sand and rerouting or redesigning roads and bridges.

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Additional inhibitor can help anti-VEGF therapy overcome resistance in deadly brain cancer

Adding another inhibitor to therapies that cut off a tumor's access to blood vessels could be the key to helping those therapies overcome resistance in glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer.

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HIV RNA expression inhibitors may restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals

Immune activation and inflammation persist in the majority of treated HIV-infected individuals and is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. A new study suggests that use of HIV RNA expression inhibitors as adjunct therapy might diminish atypical inflammation and restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART).

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Particles give absolute age of asteroid Itokawa

Scientists have closely examined particles collected from the asteroid Itokawa by the spacecraft Hayabusa, finding that the parent body of Itokawa was formed about 4.6 billion years ago when the solar system was born and that it was destroyed by a collision with another asteroid about 1.5 billion years ago.

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Water vapor annealing technique on diamond surfaces for next-generation power devices

The existing surface termination technique using hydrogen to stabilize the diamond's structure for application in electronic power devices results in two-dimensional hole gas layers (2DHG). Attempting to remove these layers using oxygen-termination roughens the diamond surface and leads to degradation of the device performance. To overcome this, researchers removed 2DHG from diamond using water va

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High-sugar feeding only at active times of day reduces adverse effects in rats

Researchers showed that limiting the consumption of a high-sucrose diet to the nighttime, when rats are most active, alleviated some of its most harmful effects associated with high levels of fat in the blood and liver. This work suggested that temporal controls on sugar intake in humans could also help in the fight against components of metabolic syndrome such as diabetes, obesity, and high blood

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George Church: The maverick geneticist now wants to reverse ageing

He stirred controversy with his plans to bring back the woolly mammoth. But first he's working on editing sperm – and trying out his ageing reversal techniques on dogs

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DSB flytter værksted fra København til Næstved

Et nybygget lokomotiv- og togvognsværksted i Næstved skal fra 2025 gradvist overtage opgaver fra DSB's centralværksted i København. Udflytningen skal gøre DSB klar til fremtidens togdrift, lyder det fra DSB’s administrerende direktør.

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Samara Polytech geologists discovered the fullest skull of Wetlugasaurus

Traditionally, Petroleum Engineering Faculty staff and students of the Flagship University took part in the annual complex scientific expedition on monitoring the flora of Triassic and Jurassic deposits in the southeast of the Samara region. More than 50 specimens of the Triassic fauna containing amphibians and reptiles' bone fragments were collected. Unique geological material will replenish muse

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Reversing influences of intergenerational stress offers hope for addressing public health

Researchers at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have shown for the first time in an animal model it is possible to reverse influences of parental stress by exposing parents to behavioral interventions following their own exposure to stress. This study has important public health implications for preventing future generations from bearing influences of stressors their pare

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HIV RNA expression inhibitors may restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals

Immune activation and inflammation persist in the majority of treated HIV-infected individuals and is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. A new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers suggests that use of HIV RNA expression inhibitors as adjunct therapy might diminish atypical inflammation and restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals on combi

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Additional inhibitor can help anti-VEGF therapy overcome resistance in deadly brain cancer

Adding another inhibitor to therapies that cut off a tumor's access to blood vessels could be the key to helping those therapies overcome resistance in glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer.

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Towards untangling the 'antennal grabbing' phenomenon in mating cuckoo bees

One can seldom spot a cuckoo bee — whose peculiar habits include laying eggs in the nests of other bees, let alone a couple mating. Nevertheless, German scientists recently managed to record copulation in three different cuckoo bee species on multiple occasions. In their paper, published in the open-access Journal of Hymenoptera Research, they discuss the biological purpose and technicalities of

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Serial criminals could help save tigers

A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists. The results of their research help explain how villagers in Sumatra coexist with tigers. If used pre-emptively it could have helped cut attacks by half, saving tigers from poaching and retaliation killings.

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Happy older people live longer

In a new study, researchers have found that increase in happiness is directly proportional with a reduction in mortality. The study, which focused on Singaporeans aged 60 years and older, found that even small increments in happiness may be beneficial, suggesting individual activities as well as government policies and programs that maintain or improve psychological well-being may contribute to lo

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Turkey Made a Bet Against Assad—And Lost

Before the war in Syria broke out in 2011, a budding personal friendship between Bashar al-Assad, the leader of Syria, and Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the president of Turkey, augured close economic ties and an open border. That would be only the beginning: Turkey saw Syria as the launching pad for its plans to become the dominant economic force in the Arab world, a region it had largely retreated from

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West Virginia Roiled by Side Effect of Opioid Crisis–a Major Hepatitis A Outbreak

This disease can be transmitted by unwittingly consuming traces of contaminated feces — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Build a complete, lightweight camping kit that fits in a backpack

Technology Bring everything from a tent to a stove in one bag. Lightweight, space-saving camping essentials can provide warmth, shelter, and comfort without making you feel like a pack mule.

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Patienter med atrieflimmer har ofte hjerneskader

Nyt studie viser, at fire ud af ti patienter med atrieflimmer har ukendte hjerneskader.

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Sygehus Lillebælt ramt af 12.000 udeblivelser

De seneste syv måneder har Sygehus Lillebælt været ramt af 12.424 udeblivelser uden afbud fra patienterne. Det koster mange penge.

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Blødninger hos hjertepatienter kan give mistanke om kræft

Nyt studie finder sammenhæng mellem blødninger og kræft blandt patienter i behandling med antikoagulerende medicin.

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Hjertemedicin øger chance for overlevelse på lang sigt

Patienter, der har taget blodtryks- og kolesterolsænkende medicin i 10 år, har stadig forbedret chance for overlevelse.

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Happy older people live longer, say researchers

Happy older people live longer, according to Duke-NUS Medical School researchers. In a study published today, the authors found that an increase in happiness is directly proportional with a reduction in mortality. The study, which focused on Singaporeans aged 60 years and older, found that even small increments in happiness may be beneficial, suggesting individual activities as well as government

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Efficient removal of radionuclides U(VI) by rod-like metal organic framework (MOF-5) nanomaterials

As the radionuclide 235U(VI) is inevitably released into the natural environment, the potential toxicity and irreversibility impact on the natural environment has become one of the most forefront pollution problems in nuclear energy utilization. A recent study revealed that a rod-like metal-organic framework (MOF-5) nanomaterial was used as a high-efficiency adsorbent for sorption of U(VI) with a

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Upper Cretaceous trench deposits of the Neo-Tethyan subduction zone

Exposed along the southern side of the Yarlung Zangbo suture, the Jiachala Formation is a key unit to decipher the history of convergence and subsequent collision between the India and the Asia plates. A new research suggest that the Jiachala Formation was deposited during the Late Cretaceous (~88-84 Ma) in the trench formed along the southern edge of Asia during subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic

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How to decode the secret language of birds

DIY Learn to translate tweets. Birdsong isn’t just the sound of relaxation, a sign of spring, or nature’s alarm clock. It’s a language that can convey valuable information to the trained ear.

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Do single moms escape workplace bias against mothers?

The workplace biases facing parents may differ for single moms and dads, experiments suggest. Single moms don’t face penalties at work in the same way married mothers do, according to the findings. And at the same time, single dads don’t benefit in the workplace the way that married fathers do. Past studies in sociology have established the “motherhood penalty” and the “fatherhood premium.” Resea

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To Test Einstein's Equations, Poke a Black Hole

Researchers make significant progress toward proving a critical mathematical test of the theory of general relativity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sludge: How corporations 'nudge' us into spending more

Small changes in how choices are presented or designed can have a big impact on our behaviour. Governments are taking advantage of this to "nudge" us into making better choices without removing our right to choose.

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Physicists race to demystify Einstein's 'spooky' science

When it comes to fundamental physics, things can get spooky. At least that's what Albert Einstein said when describing the phenomenon of quantum entanglement—the linkage of particles in such a way that measurements performed on one particle seem to affect the other, even when separated by great distances. "Spooky action at a distance" is how Einstein described what he couldn't explain.

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15 of Spitzer's greatest discoveries from 15 years in space

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has spent 15 years in space. In honor of this anniversary, 15 of Spitzer's greatest discoveries are featured in a gallery.

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Red light at night: A potentially fatal attraction to migratory bats

Light pollution is rapidly increasing around the world. Nocturnal animals are likely to be especially affected, but how they respond to artificial light is still largely unknown. In a new study, scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin, Germany, tested the response of European bats to red and white light sources during their seasonal migration. So

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Improved efficiency and stability of CQD solar cells using an organic thin film

Recently, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of colloidal quantum dot (CQD)-based solar cells has been enhanced, paving the way for their commercialization in various fields; nevertheless, they are still a long way from being commercialized due to their efficiency not matching their stability. In this research, a KAIST team achieved highly stable and efficient CQD-based solar cells by using an

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Multiple NASA instruments capture Hurricane Lane

Instruments on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites were watching as Hurricane Lane—a category 2 storm as of Friday, Aug. 24—made its way toward Hawaii.

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New study reveals why women take sexy selfies

A new UNSW study has revealed the science behind sexy selfies, showing that women tend to sexualise themselves in environments with greater economic inequality, rather than where they might be oppressed because of their gender.

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A piercing celestial eye stares back at Hubble

This dramatic image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the planetary nebula NGC 3918, a brilliant cloud of colorful gas in the constellation of Centaurus, around 4,900 light-years from Earth.

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Undervaluing hidden benefits of rivers undermines economies and sustainable development

As floods and droughts ravage communities and countries worldwide, a WWF report published today highlights the capacity of healthy rivers to help mitigate these natural disasters but warns that all these 'hidden' benefits of rivers could be lost if they continue to be undervalued and overlooked.

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Taking the temperature of protoDUNE

When crane operators at CERN lowered a custom 7.5-metre thermometer into one of the prototypes for the planned Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) earlier this month, it looked like a silver straw sliding into a giant juice carton. But designing and installing this intricate instrument was far from child's play.

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Mutations in this molecule may have helped mammoths tolerate the cold

Columbia University biomedical researchers have captured close-up views of TRPV3, a skin-cell ion channel that plays important roles in sensing temperature, itch, and pain. In humans, defects in the protein can lead to skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema), vitiligo (uneven skin coloration), skin cancer, and rosacea.

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Being the market leader is not everything

The market share of a company does not have a strong influence on its financial performance, a new study in marketing at the Faculty of Management, Economics and Social Sciences of the University of Cologne shows. Companies should instead invest in building customer relationships and a strong brand. If the market share increases by 1 percent, the financial performance of companies only increases b

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Tree species richness in Amazonian wetlands is three times greater than expected

Throughout the alluvial plains of Amazonia, there are immense forests that are flooded for almost half the year. These Amazonian wetlands encompass a wide array of types of vegetation in or near stream gullies, including blackwater and whitewater inundation forests, swamps, white sand savannas, and mangrove types.

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Australian archaeologists dropped the term 'Stone Age' decades ago, and so should you

"Stone Age" is a term often used to refer to early periods in human cultural evolution, when deliberately manufactured sharp stone flakes were the main cutting tool.

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Testing new tech in cars of the future

Early warnings about pedestrians crossing a signalised intersection, red light violations and traffic queues are just some of the latest advanced vehicle warning systems being evaluated by QUT researchers.

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Research methods that find serial criminals could help save tigers

A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists who collaborated on an innovative conservation research study.The results of their research, published in Nature Communications, help explain how villagers in Sumatra coexist with tigers. If used pre-emptively it could have helped cut attacks by half, saving

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Scientists advance technique for developing novel light beams from synchrotron radiation

Structured light, created using the process of generating and applying light to a surface, is important in many of today's devices, such as 3D scanners, dual photography and microscopic technology.

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High-sugar feeding only at active times of day reduces adverse effects in rats

Nagoya University researchers showed that limiting the consumption of a high-sucrose diet to the nighttime, when rats are most active, alleviated some of its most harmful effects associated with high levels of fat in the blood and liver. This work suggested that temporal controls on sugar intake in humans could also help in the fight against components of metabolic syndrome such as diabetes, obesi

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New medications for diabetes management have additional heart benefits, study finds

A drug used to manage diabetes may reduce heart disease and death in people with diabetes regardless of their cholesterol levels and whether they are on a statin therapy, suggests a new analysis of the LEADER trial.

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Ross procedure may provide longer survival and better quality of life, study suggests

The Ross procedure, a valve replacement surgery that is largely unused in practice, may provide long-term benefits including longer survival, less clotting and bleeding complications and better quality of life than other valve replacement surgery, finds a study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital.

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World's largest transfusion study in cardiac surgery changes transfusion practices

Lower thresholds for blood transfusions for cardiac surgery patients compared to traditional thresholds provide positive patient outcomes and safety at six months after surgery, according to the world's largest research study on this topic.

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Particles collected by Hayabusa give absolute age of asteroid Itokawa

Japanese scientists, including those from Osaka University, closely examined particles collected from the asteroid Itokawa by the spacecraft Hayabusa, finding that the parent body of Itokawa was formed about 4.6 billion years ago when the solar system was born and that it was destroyed by a collision with another asteroid about 1.5 billion years ago.

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Water vapor annealing technique on diamond surfaces for next-generation power devices

The existing surface termination technique using hydrogen to stabilize the diamond's structure for application in electronic power devices results in two-dimensional hole gas layers (2DHG). Attempting to remove these layers using oxygen-termination roughens the diamond surface and leads to degradation of the device performance. To overcome this, researchers from Kanazawa University and the Nationa

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Cellular pumps protect the gut from toxins

If you've ever wondered why spicy chilies and strong medicines don't end up wiping out your gut's stem cell population, it's because the intestinal stromal cells that support and maintain them are intrinsically resistant to drugs, toxins and other compounds not naturally produced by the body. These master regulators of gut stem cells have pumps that protect them, and thus the gut, from the toxic e

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A new permafrost gas mysterium

In a new scientific article published in the journal Nature Communications a group of scientists led by University of Copenhagen authors shows that thawing permafrost releases a high amount and diversity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

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Getting a charge out of MOFs

Researchers have made a metal organic framework (MOF) with the highest electron charge mobilities ever observed, along with a technique to improve the conductivity of other MOFs.

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The heart: Digital or analog?

Scientists have found evidence that may disrupt conventional understanding about how electrical activity travels in the heart — a discovery that potentially can lead to new insight into medical problems such as heart arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death.

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Sensitivity to how others evaluate you emerges by 24 months

Even before toddlers can form a complete sentence, they are attuned to how others may be judging them, finds a new study.

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Cancer may lurk behind major internal bleeding in cardiovascular disease patients

Patients with cardiovascular disease who develop major internal bleeding are much more likely to be diagnosed with cancer, a large international clinical trial has found. Patients with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding are 18 times more likely to be diagnosed with GI tract cancer, and those who major genitourinary (GU) tract bleeding are 80-fold more likely to be diagnosed with GU cancer, than patien

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How the Dutch Do Sex Ed

Stepping into Nemo, Amsterdam’s science museum, visitors encounter the usual displays: bubbling vinegar, kinetic games, chain reactions, hydropower demonstrations, and experiments with lenses, prisms, and mirrors. But upstairs in the Teen Facts gallery, an area dedicated solely to puberty and sex, unsuspecting parents might be forced into a quick decision: proceed with the kids, or hightail it to

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Physicists experimentally verify 40-year-old fluid equations

For decades, researchers have been using equations derived in the mid-1970s for a variety of fluid applications involving inks, foams, and bubbles, among other uses. These fundamental fluid equations describe how much force is required to pull a solid particle from a liquid surface. Although these equations have been experimentally confirmed for millimeter-sized particles, experimental confirmatio

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Calcium-catalyzed reactions of element-H bonds

Calcium (Ca) is one of the most abundant elements on Earth, and it is easily accessible and very cheap. In comparison with transition-metal elements, Ca is biocompatible and environmentally friendly. Therefore, reactions using Ca compounds show a good prospect for large-scale production and application. During the last decade investigations on organocalcium catalysis have been unfolding. Besides c

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Medlemmer af midtjysk specialeråd er ikke enige om samling af KAG

Berigtigelse: Hjerteprofessor udtalte sig på egne vegne og ikke på vegne af Region Midtjyllands specialeråd.

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Antal patienter per praksislæge stiger fortsat

Praktiserende læge har nu i gennemsnit 1643 borgere tilknyttet. Det højeste antal nogensinde, fremgår det af den seneste PLO-analyse. Særligt læger i Nordjylland og på Sjælland har mange patienter.

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Regionsrådsformænd: Vi skal investere mere i danskernes mentale sundhed

De fem regionsrådsformænd fortæller i fælles opråb, at psykisk sygdom koster samfundet mange penge. De vil sikre bedre hjælp til børn og unge samt misbrugere med en psykisk sygdom.

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Sparerunde: Riget og Herlev Hospital foreslår at nedlægge ca. 200 fuldtidsstillinger

Hospitalerne i Region Hovedstaden vil fortrinsvist finde de 198 mio. kr., som de de kommende år skal spare af budgettet, ved at skære ned på antallet af stillinger og sengepladser. Det bekymrer politikere og tillidsfolk.

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Having a parent with cancer hampers grades and future income

Children with a parent who either had or died from cancer don’t do as well as their peers in school and may not earn as much later in life, according to new research. Researchers looked at data on every child born in Denmark between 1978 and 1999 and their parents—around 1 million Danes in total—and discovered that parental cancer during childhood not only affects the child’s final examinations i

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Football Addresses Head Trauma

Image: Shutterstock With a new professional football season on the horizon, there will be a lot of changes to the rules in an effort to reduce head trauma. The most significant change is the new use of “helmet rule,” which will be effect. The rule states that it is a foul if a player lowers his head to initiate and make contact with his helmet against an opponent. This rule pertains to all player

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Sensitivity to how others evaluate you emerges by 24 months

Even before toddlers can form a complete sentence, they are attuned to how others may be judging them, finds a new study by psychologists at Emory University.

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Even toddlers care what others think

By the time toddlers are forming two-word sentences, they are already aware that they may be judged by others, behavior that previously wasn't believed to emerge until years later, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Weight loss drug shows no increased risk in cardiovascular outcomes

For the first time, investigators report that a weight loss drug led to weight loss without increasing the incidence of heart attacks, strokes and death from heart disease in a population of people who are especially at risk for cardiovascular events.

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Cancer may lurk behind major internal bleeding in cardiovascular disease patients

Patients with cardiovascular disease who develop major internal bleeding are much more likely to be diagnosed with cancer, a large international clinical trial has found.Patients with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding are 18 times more likely to be diagnosed with GI tract cancer, and those who major genitourinary (GU) tract bleeding are 80-fold more likely to be diagnosed with GU cancer, than patient

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ARRIVE trial of daily aspirin does not show lower risk of first cardiovascular event

Findings from ARRIVE, a randomized, controlled clinical trial of the use of daily aspirin to prevent a first cardiovascular event among more than 12,500 participants considered to be at moderate cardiovascular risk, were presented at the European Society of Cardiology meeting.

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Fejl i næsten halvdelen af energimærker til nye huse

Flere boligejere får korrekte energimærker end tidligere – undtagen ejere af nybyggede huse. Her er fejlprocenten steget fra 35 til 44 procent.

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The Physics of Falling Into a Black Hole

This week, newspapers reported that a man had fallen into an art installation consisting of an 8-foot-deep circular hole painted black. It's kinda not his fault.

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Star Wars News: Rose Tico Is the Resistance's One True Hero

Kelly Marie Tran wrote an op-ed for 'The New York Times,' proving she's the leader the movement needs.

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Inside the Workspace of Audiovisual Designer Love Hultén

Enter the studio where Love Hultén synthesizes fine woodcraft and hand-wired electronics into musical works of art.

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Beluga whales and narwhals go through menopause

Scientists have discovered that beluga whales and narwhals go through the menopause — taking the total number of species known to experience this to five.

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How the cholera bacterium survives water predators

Scientists have deciphered mechanisms that help the cholera bacterium to survive grazing predators in aquatic environments.

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Illusions as Painkillers: the Analgesic Value of Resizing Illusions in Knee Osteoarthritis

A new study reports that illusory stretching and shrinking reduces knee pain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The heart: Digital or analog?

Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have found evidence that may disrupt conventional understanding about how electrical activity travels in the heart — a discovery that potentially can lead to new insight into medical problems such as heart arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death.

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Getting a charge out of MOFs

Researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have made a metal organic framework (MOF) with the highest electron charge mobilities ever observed, along with a technique to improve the conductivity of other MOFs.

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Marijuana found in breast milk up to six days after use

To better understand how much marijuana or constituent compounds actually get into breast milk and how long it remains, researchers conducted a study.

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In the race of life, the tortoise beats the hare every time

Researchers have discovered that, over the long-run, the race will indeed go to the slower, steadier animal. An analysis of the reported speeds of animals based on land, air and water shows that some of the world's fastest animals are actually some of the slowest when their movements are averaged throughout their lifetimes, giving credence to Aesop's fable 'The Tortoise and the Hare.'

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One in 3 US veteran firearm owners keeps a gun loaded and unlocked

One third of United States armed forces veterans store at least one firearm loaded with ammunition and unlocked, according to a new study that reports on the first survey of a nationally representative sample of this group regarding storage practices. Unsafe firearm storage practices appeared to be strongly related to perceptions about the need to keep firearms for protection.

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Clock drawing cognitive test should be done routinely in patients with high blood pressure

A clock drawing test for detecting cognitive dysfunction should be conducted routinely in patients with high blood pressure, according to new research.

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Listening to yoga music at bedtime is good for the heart

Listening to yoga music at bedtime is good for the heart, according to new research.

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How we judge personality from faces depends on our beliefs about how personality works

We make snap judgments of others based not only on their facial appearance, but also on our pre-existing beliefs about how others' personalities work.

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Only 150 of Your Facebook Contacts Are Real Friends

Even with social media, we max out at 150 real relationships — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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E. coli doesn't just give you food poisoning—it can also help you get essential nutrients

Health Not all strains are the same. Researchers hope a new discovery about E. coli may eventually lead to new and more successful treatments for iron-deficiency anemia.

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In ancient Rome, insults in politics knew hardly any boundaries

According to historians, political debates in ancient Rome were conducted with great harshness and personal attacks, which were comparable to examples of hate speech on the internet. "The attacks, also known as invectives, were an integral part of public life for senators of the Roman Republic," explains ancient historian Prof. Dr. Martin Jehne of Technische Universität Dresden.

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Flirting flies: More than just winging it

Studies of the song of fruit flies have revealed new findings of neuron function in a recent study. These results could lead to new knowledge on how brains in general function, which in the longer term, may have medical significance.

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Don't Bug Out! The Smithsonian Channel Is Going To Show You How To Cook Insects

Dried Manchurian scorpions? Think softshell crabs. Crickets? They're not far from crawfish. A new series aims to showcase the flavors of edible insects — prized ingredients in parts of the world. (Image credit: Smithsonian Networks)

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Stadion plages af rust- og duelorteproblemer for millioner

Næsten fem millioner kroner er ikke nok til at ordne rustproblemer på Blue Water Arena, der blev renoveret for 100 millioner kroner.

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How we judge personality from faces depends on our beliefs about how personality works

We make snap judgments of others based not only on their facial appearance, but also on our pre-existing beliefs about how others' personalities work.

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Listening to yoga music at bedtime is good for the heart

Listening to yoga music at bedtime is good for the heart, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2018.

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Left atrial fibrosis may explain increased risk of arrhythmias in endurance athletes

Left atrial fibrosis may explain the increased risk of arrhythmias seen in highly trained endurance athletes, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2018.

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Clock drawing cognitive test should be done routinely in patients with high blood pressure

A clock drawing test for detecting cognitive dysfunction should be conducted routinely in patients with high blood pressure, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2018.

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Diet has bigger impact on emotional well-being in women than in men

Women may need a more nutrient-rich diet to support a positive emotional well-being, according to new research.

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Under the Hood: Reaper and His New Car | Street Outlaws

Say goodbye to everything you thought you knew about gatekeeper Reaper. His new build is the lightest on the list and rocks a 634 ci motor. Check it out! Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow

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NASA venter på opkald fra sin gamle robotbil på Mars

Efter ekstrem sandstorm, der har dækket Mars i to måneder, kan NASA stadig ikke få kontakt med sin 15 år gamle robotbil.

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Vintner's Dream: Oil Additive Could Aid in Wine Production

Argan oil helps to protect yeasts from harsh industrial processes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image of the Day: Kaleidoscope

A single transcription factor regulates a harlequin ladybird’s colors.

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Artificial Intelligence Will Serve Humans, Not Enslave Them

AI will serve our species, not control it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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People who don't read the news better at predicting which articles will go viral

Using fMRI data, researchers found that the brain activity of people who don't frequently read the news better predicted the popularity of New York Times Health articles. Frequent readers, by contrast, responded positively to all articles. When seeking to have content go viral, say the authors, look beyond the most committed readers or advocates.

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IDA: Afskaf CPR-nummeret

CPR-systemet er ikke sikkert nok, mener Ingeniørforeningen IDA, som vil erstatte systemet med en nøgleordning, der giver borgeren mere kontrol over sine egne data.

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If the cashless dream goes sour, it will be the poorest who suffer

A few central banks are considering whether to issue digital analogues of cash, but unless done carefully, it could leave the most vulnerable out of pocket

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Sandra: A world where AI is less artificial than it seems

Orbital Teledynamics is hiring real women to work as digital assistants they call "Sandra". What's going on? Can it end well? Find out in this all-star podcast drama

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AI can make high-definition fake videos from just a simple sketch

AI can now make incredibly realistic fake videos, known as deepfakes, in high definition. The tool is freely available meaning anyone can make convincing fakes

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Dear Therapist: My Husband’s About to Take an Eight-Month Work Trip

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, In a couple of weeks, my husband will be going away to work on a cruise ship for eight months. We have a son who just turned two. We adopted him through foster care, so we have received a fair amount of traini

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Marijuana and Pregnancy: 5 Key Takeaways from the New Official Guidelines

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released its first-ever guidelines on marijuana use for pregnant and breast-feeding women.

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What Forehead Wrinkles Might Tell You About Your Heart Health

No one likes getting wrinkles, but a new study suggests that some wrinkles may be more than just a sign of aging — they might signal heart disease risk.

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Y Combinator Learns Basic Income Is Not So Basic After All

More than two years after revealing plans to give people a guaranteed monthly income, the incubator now says it hopes to begin the study in 2019.

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Elegant 3-D Drawings Show NYC Subway Stations Are Places, Too

New York City architect Candy Chan wants city residents to think more deeply about their fascinating, complex mass transit system.

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So Long, Fall TV: Big Year-Round Releases Flip the Script

Ever-morphing movie and marquee-show releases have upended conventional wisdom about when new content hits screens.

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See the ‘periodic table’ of molecular knots

A new table of knots points the way to twisting molecules in increasingly complex pretzels.

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Can Mars Be Terraformed?

If we’re limited to existing technology, the task would be daunting, to say the least — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Norsk dæmning brast: Kommunen gik imod konsulenternes råd

Konsulenter hævder at have givet flere råd, som ikke blev fulgt.

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Nicaragua's Actions Cast a Shadow over Its Leadership of Major Climate Group

The country’s environmental and human rights records raise alarm about its key position in the Green Climate Fund — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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LED-lys i fodboldbanen skal lede holdet til sejr

SDU-forskere bag et planlagt nationalt fodboldcenter i Odense mener, de har set lyset for fremtidens træningsbane.

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It Would Take Only a Single Senator

A few days ago I wrote a long item about changing assessments of Donald Trump: which first impressions had held up, and which had called for second thoughts over time. The last part of the post concerned the main, and depressing, area where second thoughts were necessary. That was the complete failure of the congressional governing party—Paul Ryan and his large Republican majority in the House, M

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John McCain’s Epiphany About Paul Manafort

A central feature of John McCain’s biography was his capacity for change. After he sullied himself in the Savings and Loan scandal of the late eighties, he self-consciously transformed into a warrior on behalf of the cause of political reform. And then, in the course of his insurgent challenge to the anointed candidacy of George W. Bush—which McCain referred to as the “Death Star”—he came to unde

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John McCain’s 2000 Campaign and the Republican Road Not Taken

In 2000, John McCain’s “Straight Talk Express” barreled down what has become the road not taken for the Republican Party. McCain’s 2000 bid for the GOP presidential nomination is best remembered for his irreverence in the hours he spent happily jousting with reporters on the bus while his campaign strategists abandoned any hope of controlling, much less directing, his message. But in his insurgen

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The Call to Do Better

John McCain has passed from this life. Peace be unto him, and those who love him. I’d never met McCain when I was hired on as senior policy adviser for his 2008 campaign. I knew him only a little when the campaign ended. But I had a front row seat to watch as he navigated one of the most unforgiving public environments, the glare of a presidential campaign he lost. I never saw him miss the opport

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Giv os nu et fælles, smidigt it-værktøj

En kort status på mine seneste 10 år i det danske sundhedsvæsen.

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Eksperter: Forsvarsminister har vildledt Folketinget om kampfly-støj

Forsvarsministeren undlod at give Folketinget væsentlige oplysninger op til en milliardbevilling til de nye kampfly.

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Percutaneously reducing secondary mitral regurgitation in heart failure appears futile

Percutaneously reducing secondary mitral regurgitation appears futile when tested in all heart failure patients, according to late breaking research presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018 and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Researchers discover first treatment to improve survival in rare heart condition

Munich, Germany — Aug. 27, 2018: Tafamidis is the first treatment to improve survival and reduce hospitalisations in a rare heart condition called transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy, according to late breaking research presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018 and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Antithrombin drug not effective in heart failure with sinus rhythm and coronary disease

The antithrombin drug rivaroxaban does not reduce the risk of a composite endpoint of survival, myocardial infarction and stroke after an episode of worsening heart failure in patients with heart failure, sinus rhythm, and coronary artery disease, according to late breaking results from the COMMANDER HF trial presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018 and with simultaneous publicat

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Long-term antiplatelet monotherapy after stenting is safe but does not improve outcomes

Long-term antiplatelet monotherapy after stenting is safe but does not reduce the risk of death or heart attack compared to standard dual antiplatelet therapy, according to late breaking results from the GLOBAL LEADERS trial presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018 and published in The Lancet.

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In the race of life, the tortoise beats the hare every time

Researchers have discovered that, over the long-run, the race will indeed go to the slower, steadier animal. An analysis of the reported speeds of animals based on land, air and water shows that some of the world's fastest animals are actually some of the slowest when their movements are averaged throughout their lifetimes, giving credence to Aesop's fable 'The Tortoise and the Hare.'

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How the cholera bacterium survives water predators

EPFL scientists have deciphered mechanisms that help the cholera bacterium to survive grazing predators in aquatic environments.

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Beluga whales and narwhals go through menopause

Scientists have discovered that beluga whales and narwhals go through the menopause — taking the total number of species known to experience this to five.

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Drug reduces deaths and hospitalizations from underdiagnosed form of heart failure

A study led by Columbia University cardiologist Mathew Maurer showed that tafamidis reduced deaths from a type of heart failure called transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy. The drug could be one of the first effective treatments for the disease.

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What is 'primitive technology' and why do we love it?

Why are millions of people watching videos of men in woods demonstrating "primitive technology"?

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Russia’s Favorite Mercenaries

In Russia, journalism is far from the safest profession—even more so when the subject of investigation happens to be a private mercenary army engaged in multiple active conflicts abroad. On July 30, three Russian journalists were killed in the Central African Republic (CAR) while investigating a particularly dangerous topic: the Russian private military company Wagner, a mercenary outfit highly a

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Beluga whales and narwhals go through menopause

Scientists have discovered that beluga whales and narwhals go through the menopause—taking the total number of species known to experience this to five.

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In the race of life, the tortoise beats the hare every time

Over the long-run, the race will indeed go to the slower, steadier animal.

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Berigtigelse: Medlemmer af specialeråd ikke enige om samling af KAG

Dagens Medicin kom i fredags fejlagtigt til at skrive, at Region Midts specialeråd på hjerteområdet bakker op om Region Midts samling af hjerteundersøgelser af typen KAG. Faktum er, at medlemmerne af specialerådet er uenige om hvorvidt det er en god idé.

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Coal Country: EPA Plan Is Short Term Boost, No Solution For Industry Decline

The Trump administration's proposed changes for coal plants could keep some of them operating longer. But even those in the industry say it won't stop coal's overall decline. (Image credit: Matthew Brown/AP)

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The peter principle is possibly a statistical artifact

submitted by /u/Shred77 [link] [comments]

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Ny skotsk rumhavn vil opsende 2.000 satelliter inden 2030

Sutherland Spaceport bliver navnet på en ny rumhavn, der skal booste den britiske rumfartsindustri og være hjemsted for nye 'mini-raketter'.

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Doomed crew seeking Northwest Passage didn’t die from lead poisoning

The Franklin expedition disappeared in 1845. One theory suggests lead in the crew’s diet impaired their judgement – but a new analysis suggests otherwise

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The Consolations of Physics by Tim Radford – review

This stellar ‘love letter to physics’ looks at the wonders of the universe – and asks if they can make you a happier person The space probe Voyager 1 was launched on 5 September 1977. Its identical twin, Voyager 2, had a 16-day head start on their grand tour of the outer planets. Each had a computing system with about one-millionth of the capacity and capability of a modern smartphone. The Voyager

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Did Juul Lure Teenagers and Get ‘Customers for Life’?

The e-cigarette company says it never sought teenage users, but the F.D.A. is investigating whether Juul intentionally marketed its devices to youth.

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Confronting homeopathy, naturopathy, homeopathy, and other quackademic medicine at my alma mater

Several years back, I was forced to confront quackery at my alma mater in the form of an anthroposophic medicine program at the University of Michigan. The situation has deteriorated since then, as now the Department of Family Medicine there is inviting homeopaths to give talks and teaching acupuncture as credulously as any acupuncturist. Will the disease metastasize to other departments in the un

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Studie: Kræft hos forældre sætter spor i børns skolegang og senere i livet

Med data fra en million danskere har forskere fra Københavns Universitet undersøgt, hvilken…

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Study reveals when and why people die after noncardiac surgery

The main reasons why people die after noncardiac surgery are revealed today in a study of more than 40,000 patients from six continents presented in a late breaking science session at ESC Congress 2018. Myocardial injury, major bleeding, and sepsis contributed to nearly three-quarters of all deaths.

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Nissan launches China-focused electric car

Nissan's first electric sedan designed for China began production Monday at the start of a wave of dozens of planned lower-cost electrics being created by global automakers for their biggest market.

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Can you solve it? A little Swedish magic

Gimme, gimme, gimme…a puzzle from Stockholm UPDATE: Solutions can be seen here. Hallå guzzlers! Today, I’ve four puzzles from the country of Abba, courtesy of Swedish magician and puzzle author Fredrik Cattani. His most recent book was his highest ever release; he dropped a copy out of a light aircraft flying at 120m. (The pun might work better in Swedish). Continue reading…

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Scammere hyrer danskere på Fiverr til at overbevise ofre

For at gøre sin salgstale mere overbevisende hyrer scammere danskere på freelancertjenesten Fiverr til at spille glade kunder.

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Sådan fik udviklerne et sjovt spil ud af 75 GB skattedata

Danske Donkraft Digital har lavet Pokemon Go for biler ud fra en massiv mængde åbne bildata fra Skat, og det var ikke uden udfordringer.

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New target could prevent progression of liver damage to cancer

Problems like obesity and alcoholism appear to chronically trigger in the liver a receptor known to amplify inflammation in response to invaders like bacteria, scientists report.The relentless, increased activity of TREM-1 in turn accelerates injury and scarring of the liver, a first step toward cirrhosis and liver cancer, says Dr. Anatolij Horuzsko, reproductive immunologist in the Georgia Cancer

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UBC study raises the standard for measuring nerve cell death

Researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have developed a new and improved method to judge the effectiveness of experimental therapies for neurodegeneration–the progressive loss of neurons.

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Diet has bigger impact on emotional well-being in women than in men

Women may need a more nutrient-rich diet to support a positive emotional well-being, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

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Study finds 1 in 12 children taking multiple medications at risk

About one in five children regularly use prescription medications, and nearly one in 12 of those children are at risk for experiencing a harmful drug-drug interaction. Adolescent girls are at highest risk.

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One in 3 US veteran firearm owners keeps a gun loaded and unlocked

One third of United States armed forces veterans store at least one firearm loaded with ammunition and unlocked, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine that reports on the first survey of a nationally representative sample of this group regarding storage practices. Unsafe firearm storage practices appeared to be strongly related to perceptions about the n

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Marijuana found in breast milk up to six days after use

To better understand how much marijuana or constituent compounds actually get into breast milk and how long it remains, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine conducted a study, publishing online Aug. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Active shooter simulations increase emergency department staff readiness and confidence

A new practice improvement initiative and study indicates active shooter training and simulations are vital to ensuring staff is equipped to respond effectively should their emergency department ever become a target for such an act of violence.

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Care coordination improves health of older patients with multiple chronic diseases

For older adults with multiple chronic diseases, such as diabetes, depression, heart disease and others, care coordination appears to have the biggest impact on better health, according to a study published in CMAJ.

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Dansk landbrug ramt af afrikansk svinepest i Litauen

Eksperterne er stadig i tvivl om, hvordan den danske besætning blev ramt af afrikansk svinepest.

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Kommuner springer lovpligtige PCB-screeninger over ved nedrivninger

Omkring 10 kommuner kræver ikke, at der skal screenes for PCB i forbindelse med nedrivning – og det på trods af, at der er lovkrav om at lave disse screeninger.

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Blood pressure and cholesterol lowering drugs continue to improve survival after a decade

New research finds that blood pressure and cholesterol lowering drugs continue to improve survival in patients with hypertension after more than a decade.

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Major cause of heart attacks in women investigated in new study

Researchers are reporting the initial findings of a study on spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a major cause of heart attacks in women.

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Patients with high blood pressure unlikely to reduce salt

New research shows that patients with high blood pressure are relying solely on medication to reduce their risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure, rather than decreasing salt intake as instructed by their physicians.

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Oxygen therapy for patients suffering from a heart attack does not prevent heart failure, study finds

Oxygen therapy does not prevent the development of heart failure. Neither does it reduce the long-term risk of dying for patients with suspected heart attack, according to a new study.

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Red light at night: A potentially fatal attraction to migratory bats

Night time light pollution is rapidly increasing across the world. Nocturnal animals are likely to be especially affected but how they respond to artificial light is still largely unknown. In a new study, scientists tested the response of European bats to red and white light sources during their seasonal migration.

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Do doctors really know how to diagnose a heart attack?

Confusion over how to diagnose a heart attack is set to be cleared up with new guidance launched today.

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Pregnant women with heart disease should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation

New guidelines recommend that pregnant women with heart disease should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation.

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Hints of Wolverine: Regenerating tissue in human beings

Could human beings one day regenerate limbs? It's a distant possibility. But Adameyko Labs in Boston, Massachusetts is a good place to start thinking about it. Read More

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Security millimetre wave body scanner safe for patients with pacemakers and defibrillators

New research finds that body scanners used for security checks are safe for patients with pacemakers and defibrillators.

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Short and fragmented sleep linked to hardened arteries

Results of a new study shows that sleeping less than six hours or waking up several times in the night is associated with an increased risk of asymptomatic atherosclerosis, which silently hardens and narrows the arteries.

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Sleeping five hours or less a night associated with doubled risk of cardiovascular disease

New research finds that middle-aged men who sleep five hours or less per night have twice the risk of developing a major cardiovascular event during the following two decades than men who sleep seven to eight hours.

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Long-term cooking with coal, wood, or charcoal associated with cardiovascular death

A new study finds that long-term use of coal, wood, or charcoal for cooking is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

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Too much of a good thing? Very high levels of 'good' cholesterol may be harmful

New research shows that very high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL or 'good') cholesterol may be associated with an increased risk of heart attack and death.

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Finding the sweet spot of a good night's sleep: Not too long and not too short

Researchers have found a sweet spot of six to eight hours sleep a night is most beneficial for heart health. More or less is detrimental.

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Four out of 10 patients with atrial fibrillation have unknown brain damage

A new study finds that four out of 10 patients with atrial fibrillation but no history of stroke or transient ischemic attack have previously unknown brain damage.

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Deep forehead wrinkles may signal a higher risk for cardiovascular mortality

According to a new study, people who have lots of deep forehead wrinkles, more than is typical for their age, may have a higher risk of dying of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

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In Sharp Objects, Love Is Poison

This article contains spoilers through all eight episodes of Sharp Objects. Men, Camille (Amy Adams) concluded in her summation of the Wind Gap murders, get to be warrior poets. Women are resigned to asserting themselves in other ways. Adora (Patricia Clarkson), Camille wrote, embodied a specifically female kind of rage: one of “overcare. Killing with kindness.” Mistreated by her own mother and f

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Scans cut heart attack rates and save lives, major study finds

Heart scans for patients with chest pains could save thousands of lives, research led by the University of Edinburgh suggests. The life-saving scans — called CT angiograms — helped to spot those with heart disease so they could be given treatments to prevent heart attacks. Researchers say current guidelines should be updated to incorporate the scans into routine care.

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Weight-loss pill hailed as 'holy grail' in fight against obesity

US study of 12,000 people shows drug lorcaserin does not increase risk of serious heart problems A weight-loss pill has been hailed as a potential “holy grail” in the fight against obesity after a major study showed it did not increase the risk of serious heart problems. Researchers say lorcaserin is the first weight-loss drug to be deemed safe for heart health with long-term use. Taken twice a d

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7 free cognitive tests to flex your mental muscle

Do you think you know who you are? After taking these 7 tests, you'll have a much greater understanding of your own noggin. Read More

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Earth has more moons than you might think

We aren't lunarly exclusive. Earth has a few minimoons whizzing around us, including one that comes back into our orbit every 20 years or so. Read More

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Should we blame our devices for the rise in teens with ADHD?

A recent op-ed in the New York Times says technology is not to blame for teens’ mental health struggles, but a new University of Michigan study suggests otherwise. Read More

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