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Nyheder2018dec19-2019jan09

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1: Exercise may be as effective as prescribed drugs to lower high blood pressure

Exercise may be as effective as prescribed drugs to lower high (140 mm Hg) blood pressure, suggests a pooled analysis of the available data, in what is thought to be the first study of its kind, and published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.


2: Nu skal vi måle efter 10 gange så mange pesticidrester i grundvandet

Dagens målinger af kemikalier i grundvandet er utilstrækkelige. Ny liste indeholder 363 stoffer, vi skal have overblik over.


3: Synthesis of medium-sized ring structured compounds

NUS chemists have discovered new reaction pathways to synthesise medium-sized heterocyclic compounds for the development of therapeutic drug molecules. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


4: NeuNetS: Automating neural network model synthesis for broader adoption of AI

On December 14, 2018 , IBM released NeuNetS, a fundamentally new capability that addresses the skills gap for development of latest AI models for a wide range of business domains. NeuNetS uses AI to automatically synthesize deep neural network models faster and easier than ever before, scaling up the adoption of AI by companies and SMEs. By fully automating AI model development and deployment, NeuN (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


5: New satellite tech offers a more detailed map of moving Antarctic glaciers

Scientists can now measure ice flow in Antarctica in far more detail, thanks to the help of a new satellite technology. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


6: Physicists provide first model of moon's rotational dynamics, accounting for the solid inner core

A new model of the moon's rotational dynamics—the first that takes into account the moon's solid inner core—helps explain why it appears to wobble on its axis. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


7: Food insecurity linked with binge-eating disorder and obesity

Food insecurity — difficulty affording enough food to support regular, balanced meals — was associated with increased likelihoods of binge-eating disorder and obesity in a recent study. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


8: Dancing may help older women maintain the ability to perform daily tasks

A new study examined the potential effects of 16 different exercise types for reducing disability for activities of daily living (ADL) in older women. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


9: New insights on animal movement in fire-prone landscapes

A new article considers how fire histories affect animals' movement and shape the distribution of species. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


10: Do personality traits of compulsive users of social media overlap with problem drinking?

A study found certain similarities and differences in personality traits when comparing compulsive use of social media with problematic or risky alcohol use. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


11: Kidney failure on the rise in Australians under 50 with type 2 diabetes

A study of more than 1.3 million Australians with diabetes has found that kidney failure is increasing in people with type 2 diabetes aged under 50 years, leading to reduced quality of life and placing growing demand on the country's kidney dialysis and transplantation services. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


12: Researchers develop a new houseplant that can clean your home's air

Researchers at the University of Washington have genetically modified a common houseplant to remove chloroform and benzene from the air around it. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


13: Unpacking the history of how Earth feeds life, and life changes Earth

At a fleeting glance, the study of life – biology – seems very separate from that of rocks, or geology. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


14: The Cheesy Endurance of the Made-for-TV Holiday Movie

Here is the plot of the 2018 Lifetime film A Very Nutty Christmas , as summarized by the network that airs it: Hard-working bakery owner Kate Holiday (Melissa Joan Hart), has more cookie orders than she has time to fill this holiday season, and when her boyfriend suddenly breaks up with her, any shred of Christmas joy she was hanging onto, immediately disappears. After Kate hangs the last ornamen (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


15: Workplace discrimination claims fare poorly in arbitration, study says

The use of arbitration to adjudicate worker complaints – and avoid costly litigation through the slow, unwieldy public court system – has been a controversial practice since its usage began to increase in the 1990s. And according to a new paper co-written by a University of Illinois expert in workplace dispute resolution, certain types of cases fare worse than other types that are resolved through (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


16: SBM in 2018 and Beyond

A look back at SBM in 2018 and the future of SBM. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


17: Too impatient to meditate? A mild shock to the scalp could help.

Health The benefits of being mindful take time, but there might be a way to speed them up. Despite its seeming simplicity (just empty your mind and focus on your breathing) and potential benefits, meditation is much easier said than done. A small cadre of… (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


18: House plants don’t clean your air that much – but this GM pothos might

The air-cleaning properties of house plants have been over-hyped. A GM house plant that breaks down indoor pollutants linked to cancer may do a better job (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


19: The sugar that makes up DNA could be made in space

Deoxyribose, the sugar of DNA, was created in a lab simulating ice in space. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


20: Rabbit gene helps houseplant detoxify indoor air

We like to keep the air in our homes as clean as possible, and sometimes we use HEPA air filters to keep offending allergens and dust particles at bay.


21: NASA satellites spot young star in growth spurt

An adolescent star in the midst of a dramatic growth phase has been observed with the help of two NASA space telescopes. The youngster belongs to a class of stars that gain mass when matter swirling around the star falls onto its surface. The in-falling matter causes the star to appear about 100 times brighter. Astronomers have found only 25 stars in this class, and only about half of those have b (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


22: Researchers use sound waves to prevent small chemical reactors from clogging up

Companies are keen to use miniature chemical reactors to make pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals, but are discouraged by their tendency to clog up. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have now devised an elegant way of using sound waves to keep the chemicals flowing. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


23: The Best Strollers (2019): Umbrella, Lightweight, Jogging, Bike Trailers

Whether you're pushing your kid down the beach, pulling them on a snowy track, or hauling them with a bike, we have the stroller for you. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


24: Turning old clothes into high-end building materials

Researchers at UNSW Sydney have developed an effective process to turn old clothing and textiles into high-quality building products such as flat panels. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


25: Paper outlines how L.A. County can adapt its water supply for climate change

The climate is changing, Earth's population is growing and more people are living in cities. That means urban areas—particularly those in arid or semiarid regions—need to update their water supply systems. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


26: Multicultural creatures of habit: Long-term study reveals migratory patterns of bats

Every year, trillions of animals migrate for thousands of kilometres between their summer and winter habitats. Among them are several species of bats whose journeys in the dark of the night unfold largely unnoticed by humans and have only partially been investigated by science. A reconstruction of individual migration patterns of the common noctule (Nyctalus noctula) in Central Europe has now reve (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


27: The Brain's Autopilot Mechanism Steers Consciousness

Freud’s notion of a dark, libidinous unconscious is obsolete. A new theory holds that the brain produces a continuous stream of unconscious predictions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


28: Regulating the rapidly developing fruit fly

From birth, it takes humans almost two decades to reach adulthood; for a fruit fly, it takes only about 10 days. During a fly embryo's initial stages of development, the insect looks different from minute to minute, and its body plan is defined in just a few hours. Caltech researchers have now gained new insights into how a fly's genes influence this fast period of development—work that ultimately (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


29: Photochemical deracemization of chiral compounds achieved

Enantiomeric molecules resemble each other like right and left hands. Both variants normally arise in chemical reactions. But frequently, only one of the two forms is effective in biology and medicine. Completely converting this mixture into the desired enantiomer has been deemed impossible. However, via a photochemical method, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now achieved (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


30: To the moon and back: Apollo 8 and the future of lunar exploration

Apollo 8 was supposed to be a test flight, meant to simulate atmospheric re-entry from the moon but never meant to go there. Hurtling toward Earth at 2,407.5 miles per hour is hairy business and NASA, having never done so before, needed practice. But then the USSR successfully launched two of its own moonshots (unmanned Zond 5 and 6) on the heels of President Kennedy's call for men on the moon by (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


31: Unique insights into an exotic matter state

The properties of matter are typically the result of complex interactions between electrons. These electrically charged particles are one of the fundamental building blocks of nature. They are well researched, and theoretical physics has determined the electronic structure of the majority of matter. However, the behavior of matter under extreme conditions is still largely unexplained. Such conditi (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


32: What causes extreme heat in North China?

Extreme heat over the North China Plain is happening with increasing frequency in recent years, posing a substantial threat to human health and social activities. Thus, the mechanism behind the formation of extreme heat is of broad concern. A collaborative research team from China has published a new analysis that shows the horizontal heat flux in the mixed layer plays a crucial role in extreme he (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


33: Focus on this: Team increases X-ray laser focusing ability

An X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) is an X-ray produced by a beam of free electrons that have been accelerated almost to the speed of light. XFELs produce laser beams with exceedingly high peak power intensity, which makes them attractive for applications in fundamental research, such as X-ray nonlinear optics and protein crystal structure determination, and also in medicine. It is important to p (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


34: Ancient Japanese pottery includes an estimated 500 maize weevils

Researchers have discovered an ancient Japanese pottery vessel from the late Jomon period (4500-3300 BP) with an estimated 500 maize weevils incorporated into its design. The vessel was discovered in February 2016 from ruins in Hokkaido, Japan. This extremely rare discovery provides clues on the cultivation and distribution of chestnuts, food in the Jomon era, and the spirituality of ancient Japan (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


35: New composite advances lignin as a renewable 3-D printing material

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have created a recipe for a renewable 3-D printing feedstock that could spur a profitable new use for an intractable biorefinery byproduct: lignin. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


36: Playing video games may help researchers find personalized medical treatment for sepsis

A deep learning approach originally designed to teach computers how to play video games better than humans could aid in developing personalized medical treatment for sepsis, a disease that causes about 300,000 deaths per year and for which there is no known cure. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


37: Study offers new view of how cartels work

Suppose you were building a cartel—a group of business interests who coordinate to fix high prices that consumers must pay. How would you design it? Received economic wisdom says transparency among cartel members is crucial: If colluding suppliers share information, they can keep prices high and monitor members of the cartel to make sure no one deviates from the cartel's norms. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


38: Report investigates 'shifting the peaks' of electricity consumption via three residential appliances

A University of Otago study has examined the potential for New Zealand residential electricity consumption to be shifted to reduce costs for consumers, demand on infrastructure and avoid future carbon emissions. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


39: Space telescope detects water in a number of asteroids

Using the infrared satellite AKARI, a Japanese research team has detected the existence of water in the form of hydrated minerals in a number of asteroids for the first time. This discovery will contribute to the understanding of the distribution of water in the solar system, the evolution of asteroids, and the origin of water on Earth. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


40: Mice give predators the cold shoulder

Starve or be eaten? For small animals, this challenge must be faced every day. Searching for food is a risky business, and small animals must balance their need to eat as much as possible against the risk of being eaten themselves. New research from Western Sydney University shows how mice, and likely other small prey, resolve this problem with the help of an energy-saving mechanism known as torpo (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


41: Image: Elf on the ISS

There is no escaping the holidays, even in space. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


42: Forskere: Praktiserende læger har fordomme om personer med svær overvægt

Praktiserende læger diskriminerer ikke i deres behandling, men synes at have negative fordomme over for personer med svær overvægt. Det konkluderer tre forskere fra Københavns Universitet på baggrund af et nyt studie. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


43: Miracle' Dinosaur Whose Bones Survived Being Blown Up Discovered in Italian Alps

The four-fingered beast is the largest, oldest predatory dinosaur on record.


44: Photos: Carnivorous Dinosaurs Discovered in Italian Alps

The newly identified dinosaur Saltriovenator zanellai was found in the Italian Alps. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


45: The oldest large-sized predatory dinosaur comes from the Italian Alps

Early Jurassic predatory dinosaurs are very rare, and mostly small in size. Saltriovenator zanellai, a new genus and species described in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ — the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences by Italian paleontologists, is the oldest known ceratosaurian, and the world's largest (1 ton) predatory dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian, ~198 Mya). (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


46: The Scandal That Reveals the Fiction of America’s Educational Meritocracy

Until two weeks ago, T. M. Landry College Preparatory School was the most enigmatic school in America. Small and with minimal resources, this private school was known for one thing: placing an extraordinary number of black, low-income students in America’s most elite colleges and universities. Almost everything else about it was mysterious. The school’s founders and namesakes, the married couple


47: China’s tech boom has inspired a wave of internet-related art

These artists are critiquing how technology promotes consumerism , shapes identity , and enables new forms of censorship . (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


48: China vs. the US: Who wins and who loses

An interview with Yasheng Huang, MIT professor and expert on entrepreneurship in China. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


49: The US and China aren’t in a “cold war” so stop calling it that

In our globalized economy, the term is not only outdated, it’s harmful. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


50: Science vs the state: a family saga at the Caltech of China

Three generations of personal and political history show the tensions between the Communist Party’s need for knowledge and its need for ideological control. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


51: China’s tech giants want to go global. Just one thing might stand in their way.

Multibillion-dollar companies like Alibaba and Tencent have thrived thanks to a government that provided incentives but otherwise let them grow. Can they count on that in the future?


52: Aboard the giant sand-sucking ships that China uses to reshape the world

Massive ships, mind-boggling amounts of sand, and an appetite for expansionism in the South China Sea: the recipe for a land grab like no other. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


53: The man turning China into a quantum superpower

Jian-Wei Pan, China’s “father of quantum”, is masterminding its drive for global leadership in technologies that could change entire industries. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


54: Why Japan Is a Rare Holdout in Asia’s Cash-Free Future

China and South Korea are hurtling toward a cashless future. But in Japan, where physical money is a crucial artifact, the transition is complicated.


55: How Amazon, Apple, and Google Played the Tax-Break Game

Amazon conducted a very public beauty contest for mini-headquarters, while Apple and Google worked more quietly for planned expansions.


56: This Humongous Fungus Has Been Around Since the Birth of Socrates

A humongous fungus lurking underground in Michigan is exceptionally old, tremendously heavy and has a curiously low mutation rate, a new study finds. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


57: China launched more rockets into orbit in 2018 than any other country

And in the next few years it plans to launch the world’s biggest space telescope, the world’s heaviest rocket, and a space station to rival the ISS. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


58: Editors letter: China’s technology ambitions—and their limits

Our special issue on China asks: What is China good at, and can it meet its goal of attaining global supremacy in key areas of technology? (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


59: Facebook gave more than 150 companies special access to your data

(Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


60: Ny praksisejer på Langeland vil give borgerne kontinuitet

Praktiserende læge Osman Aden Mohamed har købt Syddanmarks første regionsklinik i Rudkøbing. Med købet håber han at kunne tilbyde patienterne en bedre kontinuitet end hidtil – og dermed en bedre behandling. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


61: How to Approach the Problem of 'Oumuamua

The first interstellar object ever found provides an excellent test of the scientific process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


62: Elon Musk unveils prototype high-speed LA transport tunnel

The entrepreneur says his system will see modified electric cars travel at high speed underground.


63: Newfound Object Is the Farthest Solar System Body Ever Spotted

A newly discovered object is the most-distant body ever observed in the solar system — and the first object ever found circling at more than 100 times the distance from Earth to the sun. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


64: Saturn Is Losing Its Rings

Chances are, you wouldn't recognize Saturn without its trademark thick band of rings. But if you could travel 300 million years into the future, you would need to, because by then, chances are those rings would be gone — and they could disappear even fast (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


65: Getting the Dirt on Creation–Inside OSIRIS-REx's First Close Look at Bennu

NASA’s first sample-return mission to an asteroid is a voyage into the genesis of our solar system—and, perhaps, the precursors to life’s origins on Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


66: What Australia Knows About Recessions

It’s beginning to feel a lot like 2007. Or 2000. Or 1990. Or 1981. Stock prices are limping along, housing sales have gone soft , and banks are pulling back from risky loans . The sugar rush from President Donald Trump’s extraordinary round of fiscal stimulus is about to wear off, as the Federal Reserve continues to tap up interest rates. At the same time, global growth is slowing thanks to the t (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


67: Democrats Want Universal Background Checks on Guns

During the November elections, a number of Democratic House candidates made gun control a central theme of their midterms campaigns, and dozens more gave the issue strong emphasis on the trail. Next month, they might have a chance to follow through on their campaign promises with legislation requiring federal background checks on all gun sales. The legislation isn’t likely to become law. It will (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


68: The 17 Best Films of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018 ” coverage here . 2018 (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


69: Cheers! Saying thanks is good for you and those around you

The fad of privately recording your gratitude in a journal was all the rage, but it turns out if you actually pass on your thanks to others, the benefits are multiplied (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


70: Dark Matter Theorists Explore Axions as WIMPs Come up Short

After a year of disappointing experiments, the dominant theory in dark matter physics is losing its sheen while others gain prominence.


71: E-cigarettes caught fire among teens

High schoolers’ use of e-cigarettes shot up from 2017 to 2018, and public health officials are concerned that a new generation is at risk for nicotine addiction.


72: Consciousness, panpsychism, and AGI: What is it like to be a hat?

Panpsychism is the idea that there is an element of consciousness in everything in the universe. The theory goes like this: You're conscious. Ben Goertzel is conscious. And his hat is conscious too. What if consciousness isn't about the brain at all, but it's as inherent to our universe as space-time? "Now, panpsychism, to me, is not even that interesting, it's almost obvious — it's just the foun (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


73: 5G-frekvenser holder køreplanen trods udskudt auktion

På trods af forsinkelse og mørklægning, bliver de to vigtige frekvensbånd 700 og 900 Mhz klar til brug i 2020. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


74: Exercise may lower high blood pressure as much as medication

An analysis of nearly 400 trials suggests that exercise might be as effective for people with high blood pressure as taking the most commonly-used drugs (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


75: »Glem Mars. Vi kommer aldrig længere end til Månen«

Christian Rovsing var Danmarks Radios kommentator under månerejserne. Den 33-årige civilingeniør var bekymret for astronauternes helbred, da Apollo-æraen tog fart, og tror heller ikke i dag, at vi vil klare de lange rumrejser. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


76: »Havde jeg vidst, hvor rumfarten var i 2018, var jeg blevet skuffet«

Hendes hus hedder MECO (Main Engine Cut Off), og efter 30 års arbejde i Nasa er danske Mariann Albjerg ikke i tvivl: Vi kommer tilbage til Månen. Snart. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


77: »Apollo 11 var vores ‘Rumrejsen 2001’ – alt blev muligt«

Cand.scient. Henrik Stub var yngstemand i radioens ekspertpanel under månelandingen og var som alle andre grebet af »berusende begejstring«. I dag erkender han, at alle overså, at Apollo slet ikke var et rumprojekt, men et politisk projekt. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


78: Persondata-overblik på vej: Nu skal danskerne kunne se, hvilke data kommunerne har om dem

Fem kommuner tester en ny løsning, der giver borgerne adgang til at se, hvilke oplysninger kommunen behandler om dem. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


79: China warns US against 'weaponising' space

China said Wednesday it opposed the "weaponisation" of space as it criticised US President Donald Trump's orders to create a new command centre for controlling military space operations. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


80: Changing climate, longer growing seasons complicate outlook for coniferous forests

For decades, ecologists have differed over a longstanding mystery: Will a longer, climate-induced growing season ultimately help coniferous forests to grow or hurt them? A new University of Colorado Boulder study may help researchers find a more definitive answer. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


81: Research sheds new light on what drove last, long-term global climate shift

The quest to discover what drove the last, long-term global climate shift on Earth, which took place around a million years ago, has taken a new, revealing twist.


82: Who do we trust when human and machine intelligence disagree

A faulty sensor – and the automated action it led to – are being blamed for the loss of Lion Air flight JT 610. Is it time for AI to take a back seat, asks Peter Lemme (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


83: Hospitalsfejl førte til dødsfald: Børneafdeling havde advaret om patientsikkerheden

Børneafdelingen på Hvidovre Hospital har advaret ledelsen fire gange om farlig travlhed. Selvom ledelsen mener, at den har reageret, endte travlheden i et dødsfald. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


84: From eye drops to potential leukaemia treatment

An active ingredient in eye drops that were being developed for the treatment of a form of eye disease has shown promise for treating an aggressive form of blood cancer. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators have found that this compound, which targets an essential cancer gene, could kill leukaemia cells without harming non-leukemic blood cells. The results reveal a p (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


85: Research sheds new light on what drove last, long-term global climate shift

The quest to discover what drove the last, long-term global climate shift on Earth, which took place around a million years ago, has taken a new, revealing twist. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


86: High sodium intake may contribute to increased heart-disease deaths in China

Nearly a fifth of cardiovascular disease deaths among adults in a northern province of China in 2011 may be attributed to the blood pressure-raising effect of high-sodium diets. An initiative to reduce dietary sodium intake in the region suggested thousands of deaths may be averted with reduced sodium intake. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


87: For One City Manager, Climate Becomes A Matter Of Conscience

Steven Falk of Lafayette, Calif., has resigned because he says he cannot carry out policies that fail to address the urgent threat of a changing climate. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)


88: Why Aren't More Users Of Opioids Or Meth Screened For Hepatitis C?

As the number of people who inject drugs and share needles has soared, the rate of infection with Hep C has climbed too. Yet many drug treatment patients aren't tested for the liver-damaging virus. (Image credit: BSIP/UIG/Getty Images)


89: Ny Facebook-afsløring: Netflix og Spotify kunne se, skrive og slette Facebook-brugeres private beskeder

Facebook undtog over 150 firmaer fra deres almindelige privacy-regler, fordi de havde stemplet virksomhederne som partnere i en eller anden forstand. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


90: Danske mikrofoner skal sikre lydsporet under Nasas næste Mars-landing

Mikrofoner fra danske DPA Microphones skal sikre, at vi for første gang kan høre, hvordan det lyder, når et fartøj lander på Mars. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


91: From robotic companions to third thumbs, machines can change the human brain

People's interactions with machines, from robots that throw tantrums when they lose a colour-matching game against a human opponent to the bionic limbs that could give us extra abilities, are not just revealing more about how our brains are wired – they are also altering them. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


92: Robots are being programmed to adapt in real time

A robust, adaptable robot that responds to its environment on the fly and overcomes obstacles such as a broken leg without human intervention could be used to rescue people from an earthquake zone or clean up sites that are too hazardous for humans. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


93: EU agrees to ban most single-use plastics

EU countries and the European Parliament on Wednesday agreed details of a ban on single-use plastics, including plates, cutlery and drinking straws, in a bid to cut marine pollution. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


94: Norway sees boom in electric cars, fueled by the government

A silent revolution has transformed driving in Norway. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


95: OVERBLIK: Nu smider robotterne for alvor afskærmningen

Små samarbejdende robotter vælter frem i industrien. Nye samarbejdende robotmærker udfordrer den fynske robot­klynges markedsdominans. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


96: Podcast-special: Små samarbejdende robotter vælter frem

Universal Robots har de seneste ti år været verdens førende producent af samarbejdende robotter, der kan arbejde uden afskærmning. Men nu myldrer det frem med konkurrenter til den danske robotsucces. Og de var alle repræsenteret på robotmessen i Sydkorea. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


97: The very first dinosaurs probably evolved in South America

Dinosaurs conquered every major landmass, making it difficult to work out where they originally came from – but two studies both conclude they were southerners


98: Schweiziske eksperter: Kabler i italiensk katastrofebro var tæret halvt igennem

Kablerne inde i stagene på Morandi-broen, der kollapsede i august, var alvorligt gennemtærede viser foreløbige undersøgelser fra to schweiziske institutioner (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


99: Rehydration: Mexican forensic scientists' crime-fighting weapon

Jorge's putrefied corpse would have been buried in an unmarked grave but for a rehydration technique pioneered in Mexico that allowed him to be identified by his tattoos and given the send-off his family wanted. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


100: Sinking Greek village highlights nation's addiction to coal

If earthquakes struck in slow motion, the results might be visible in a place like the Greek village of Anargyri, a hardscrabble enclave in a black landscape gutted by coal mining. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


101: Stick insects: Egg-laying techniques reveal new evolutionary map

Scientists have created the best map of stick-insect evolution to date by combining DNA analysis and knowledge of their varied egg-laying techniques. The first stick insects flicked or dropped their eggs while hiding in the foliage, but they have evolved new egg-laying techniques after colonizing different habitats. Previous evolutionary theories, based on anatomical similarities, are inaccurate, (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


102: SoftBank mobile unit in record IPO but market debut flops

Japanese technology giant SoftBank celebrated the world's second-biggest IPO for its mobile unit Wednesday but the newly traded shares endured a torrid time in their debut session, plunging nearly 15 percent. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


103: End of an era as Germany's last black coal mine closes

Germany will close its last black coal mine on Friday, turning the page on two centuries of mining history in the Ruhr region that helped fuel the country's post-war "economic miracle". (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


104: Open Scientific Collaboration May Be Helping North Korea Cheat Nuclear Sanctions

New research shared exclusively with NPR suggests that Pyongyang is refining its weapons technology through open scientific research. China leads the way in scientific collaboration with North Korea. (Image credit: KCNA /Reuters)


105: Outrage as six baby seals decapitated in New Zealand

Six baby seals have been found decapitated in New Zealand in what wildlife rangers on Wednesday branded a "cruel and senseless" act against a protected species. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


106: Pennsylvania lets Uber self-driving cars back on roads

Authorities in the US state of Pennsylvania have given Uber the green light to resume testing self-driving cars, the ride-sharing giant said Tuesday, after a fatal crash in Arizona prompted a pause. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


107: New Zealand warns Google over naming murder accused

New Zealand warned Google to "take responsibility" for its news content Wednesday, after the internet giant broke a court order suppressing the name of a man charged with murdering a British backpacker. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


108: How Germany will turn lights out at last black coal mine

After more than 150 years, Germany's last black coal mine will close in the Ruhr region, posing a gigantic geological and environmental challenge to the former industrial heartland. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


109: Uncovering a key mechanism in assembly of Avian Sarcoma Virus, a 100-year-old oncogenic virus often used to study HIV-1

A key step in retroviral growth inside a cell, as described by Jamil Saad, Ph.D., and colleagues, is portrayed on the cover of The Journal of Biological Chemistry. It is a visual image, in molecular detail, of their journal article inside that looks at avian sarcoma virus, or ASV.


110: Loss of forest intactness increases extinction risk in birds

Fragmentation within intact forests has a higher impact on vertebrate biodiversity than equivalent losses in already degraded landscapes, but the relationship between forest 'intactness' and extinction risk has not been quantified. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


111: Tesla-stifter afslører underjordisk løsning på trafikpropper

Elon Musk fremviser første sektion af sit højhastighedsnetværk, hvor biler sendes gennem tunneler. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


112: How does your garden grow in space?

Astronauts in low-earth orbit could use a fresh salad to brighten up all those freeze-dried meals. But the microgravity space environment can affect plant growth in ways we're only beginning to understand. In research presented in a recent issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, Drs. Anna-Lisa Paul and Robert Ferl, and colleagues at the University of Florida Space Plants Lab, showed that two diff (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


113: Region H: Samlede pris for implementering af Sundhedsplatformen var 1,3 mia. kroner

Region Hovedstaden har fremlagt regnskab for implementeringen af Sundhedsplatformen. Det løber op i 1,3 milliarder kroner – og det er under budget, anfører regionen. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


114: Australian drug regulator takes action over claims products can treat disease

Therapeutic Goods Administration takes on Peptides Clinics Australia for alleged advertising breaches For the first time in almost a decade Australia’s drugs regulator has begun court action against a supplements seller, after the online company claimed its products could help people build muscle while also treating anxiety, depression, heart damage, joint diseases, bone diseases and other ailmen


115: The Swiftly Closing Borders of Europe

GAP, FRANCE —In a wood-paneled courtroom in this small town in the French Alps, a local judge dealt a hefty setback last week to the European Union’s treasured principle of open borders, one that has underpinned the bloc. And to do it, she fell back on a law that dates back to one of the darkest periods in European history. In sentencing two immigrants’-rights activists to jail time and handing s (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


116: Elon Musk Unveils the Boring Company’s Car-Flinging Tunnel


117: Saturn mister sine ringe tre gange hurtigere end først troet

Planetens egen tyngdekraft trækker ringene fra hinanden. Men bare rolig – de er først helt væk om 100 millioner år.


118: A swarming asexual midge is island hopping towards Antarctica

Biologists say biosecurity measures need to be stepped up to prevent a non-biting midge reaching Antarctica, because it could radically change the continent


119: Flu is serious for pregnant women and others at high risk

Those at high-risk for flu complications such as hospitalization and death — including pregnant women — should be tested and treated as soon as possible, suggest new influenza guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


120: High cost of re-operation after breast-conserving surgery

A small number of women require re-operation after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer, if the surgical margins are not free from cancer. A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) analysis reveals the expense of re-operation. If re-operation rates can be minimized, there may be considerable efficiency savings. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


121: New study demonstrates effectiveness and safety of vaginal estrogen

Despite its proven effectiveness in treating the genital symptoms of menopause, low-dose vaginal estrogen therapy remains underused largely because of misperceptions regarding its safety. However, a new study that followed women from the Nurses' Health Study demonstrates that its use is not associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Results are published online today in Men (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


122: Nightlights for stream dwellers? No, thanks

When the critters that live in and around streams and wetlands are settling into their nighttime routines, streetlights and other sources of illumination filter down through the trees and into their habitat, monkeying with the normal state of affairs, according to new research from The Ohio State University. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


123: Birthweight and early pregnancy body mass index may risk pregnancy complications

Women who were born with a low birthweight are at increased risk of pregnancy complications, according to a new Obesity study. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


124: Study highlights the effects of social class microaggressions on individuals

Although overt expressions of hostility are considered to be ill-mannered and undesirable behaviors, covert discrimination and degradation continue to be directed at individuals, communicating that recipients are less than dominant culture individuals, that they do not belong, and that their realities are invalid. These hostilities are known as microaggressions. A new Counselor Education & Supervi (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


125: Do personality traits of compulsive users of social media overlap with problem drinking?

A study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology found certain similarities and differences in personality traits when comparing compulsive use of social media with problematic or risky alcohol use. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


126: Loss of forest intactness increases extinction risk in birds

Fragmentation within intact forests has a higher impact on vertebrate biodiversity than equivalent losses in already degraded landscapes, but the relationship between forest 'intactness' and extinction risk has not been quantified. In a new Animal Conservation study, researchers assessed the threat to forest-dependent birds (about 23 percent of all the world's birds) in relation to the proportion (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


127: Mind-body exercises may improve cognitive function as adults age

Mind-body exercises — especially tai chi and dance mind-body exercise — are beneficial for improving global cognition, cognitive flexibility, working memory, verbal fluency, and learning in older adults. The findings come from a meta-analysis of all relevant published studies. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society analysis included 32 randomized controlled trials with 3,624 older adults (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


128: Alcoholic beverages are frequently considered migraine triggers

In a European Journal of Neurology study of 2,197 patients who experience migraines, alcoholic beverages were reported as a trigger by 35.6 percent of participants. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


129: Lung transplant patients face elevated lung cancer risk

In an American Journal of Transplantation study, lung cancer risk was increased after lung transplantation, especially in the native (non-transplanted) lung of single lung transplant recipients. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


130: Aggressive behavior brings emotional pain to the sadist

Sadists derive pleasure or enjoyment from another person's pain, yet new research shows that sadistic behavior ultimately deprives the sadists of happiness. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


131: Disordered crystals are promising for future battery technology

Tiny, disordered particles of magnesium chromium oxide may hold the key to new magnesium battery energy storage technology, which could possess increased capacity compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, find UCL and University of Illinois at Chicago researchers. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


132: When 'alien' insects attack Antartica

Of the known alien (non-native) species found in Antarctica, a non-biting species of midge currently presents one of the highest risks to terrestrial ecosystems, researchers have found. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


133: Nightlights for stream dwellers? No, thanks

Artificial light at night isn't just a health problem for those of us sitting in bed scrolling through Instagram instead of hitting the sack—it hurts entire outdoor ecosystems. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


134: How Google took on China—and lost

It used to be that while Google wanted China, China really needed Google. Not any more. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


135: How China got a head start in fintech, and why the West won’t catch up

Payment apps like Alipay and WeChat transformed daily life in China. The West won’t see a similar payments revolution—and that might even be a good thing. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


136: Opioids not much better than placebos at treating pain, study says

The study examined more than 26,000 people experiencing chronic pain. Opioids were only marginally better than placebos at treating pain and improving physical functioning. It's estimated that at least 2 million Americans have opioid use problems. None Opioids are only slightly more effective than placebos at treating pain, according to a new study. The study tracked the more than 26,000 people,


137: Canadian Government Ending Networks of Centres of Excellence Program

The funding future is uncertain for researchers studying topics including cancer, stem cells, and the Arctic. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


138: Weather stops plastic waste car reaching South Pole

A car made from waste plastic has been forced to abort its mission to the South Pole because of bad weather.


139: Allergan Halts Sales in Europe of Textured Breast Implants Linked to Rare Cancer

The company’s product, in use worldwide, has been under scrutiny since women began developing a type of lymphoma.


140: Targeting chemical signals between the gut and brain could lead to new treatment for obesity

New research published in the Journal of Physiology has shed light on how to disrupt chemical signals that affect how much someone eats, which could lead to a method for helping manage obesity. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


141: Note to Michael Flynn: Federal Court Is Not Twitter

Former National-Security Adviser Michael Flynn on Tuesday got an unpleasant lesson on the difference between politically effective arguments and legally astute ones. Backed by an array of well-wishers, including President Donald Trump, and buoyed by widespread conservative arguments that the FBI had violated his rights, Flynn walked into a federal courtroom in Washington, D.C., hoping for the pro


142: Wooden clothes?

A university in Finland has invented a process to turn waste wood into material for clothing.


143: Global warming didn't pause — researchers disentangle 'hiatus' confusion

The reality of ongoing climate warming might seem plainly obvious today after a summer of weather extremes in the whole northern hemisphere. A few years back however, some media and some experts were entangled in debates about an alleged pause in global warming. In two new studies, a group of international scientists joined forces to disentangle any possible 'hiatus' confusion, affirming that ther (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


144: British Journal of Cancer press notice

This release contains media summaries for upcoming papers published in the British Journal of Cancer. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


145: The Atlantic Daily: Discipline

What We’re Following Huawei in the World: In a rare and critical moment since the arrest in Canada of Huawei’s chief financial officer, whom the U.S. is accusing of violating American sanctions on Iran, an official from the Chinese telecoms giant is publicly engaging with foreign reporters . Huawei is a key player in China’s quest to become a technology powerhouse, as well as in growing economic (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


146: Three generations, 1,000s of miles: Scientists unlock mystery of a dragonfly's migration

Thanks to photos and films featuring clouds of stunning orange and black monarch butterflies flying across North America, many people today are familiar with how monarchs migrate. The migration patterns of other insects, however, remain more mysterious, for both the public and scientists alike. A new paper in Biology Letters describes a dragonfly's full life cycle for the first time, in compelling


147: Workplace 'resilience' programs might not make any difference

Workplace resilience programmes, designed to bolster mental health and wellbeing, and encourage employees to seek help when issues arise, might not make any difference, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


148: Food allergies linked to increased disease activity in multiple sclerosis

Food allergies are associated with heightened levels of disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), shows research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


149: People with extreme political views have trouble thinking about their own thinking

Science Your super liberal and super conservative relatives might all have one thing in common. Radical political views of all sorts seem to shape our lives to an almost unprecedented extent. But what attracts people to the fringes?


150: Use a Slo-Mo Video to Calculate How Fast Glass Shatters

Using footage shot by The Slow Mo Guys, you can get a pretty good estimate of the speed at which cracks travel through a sheet of glass.


151: AT&T's 5G+ Service Will Only Kinda Sorta Be What We Hope For

The new 5G+ service won't be as fast as the emerging network can be, and will only be available in limited areas.


152: A Terrifying Copycat

In 1989, the aspiring filmmaker Rolfe Kanefsky, who was then 19 years old, cobbled together $100,000 to make his dream movie. Thus, the first self-aware, meta-textual horror film was born. Although There's Nothing Out There was groundbreaking and garnered the attention of high-ranking studio executives, due to a series of unfortunate events, it tanked at the box office. It was dead on arrival. Ch (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


153: The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: When Ducey Picked McSally

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines A federal judge agreed to delay former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn’s sentencing for lying to the FBI. Flynn requested the delay, signaling his fear that he might serve prison time despite his cooperation with three separate investigations. Democrats rejected an offer from Senate Major (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


154: Removing sweets from checkouts linked to dramatic fall in unhealthy snack purchases

Policies aimed at removing sweets and chips from checkouts could lead to a dramatic reduction to the amount of unhealthy food purchased to eat 'on the go' and a significant reduction in that purchased to take home, suggests new research.


155: Southwest forest trees will grow much slower in the 21st century

Southwest forests may decline in productivity on average as much as 75 percent over the 21st century as climate warms. The finding is based on a treasure trove of about 20,000 unanalyzed tree cores discovered in a Utah laboratory about a decade ago. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


156: Using CRISPR technology for conditional gene regulation

CRISPR allows scientists to precisely target and edit DNA within living cells, which could help them correct anomalies that cause inherited diseases. A team has now developed a method to use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to set off a cascade of activities in cells, a phenomenon known as conditional gene regulation. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


157: Gender separation affects sense of smell

Olfactory sensory receptors in mice change as a function of exposure to odors emitted from members of the opposite sex, researchers have discovered. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


158: Scientists develop method to visualize a genetic mutation

A team of scientists has developed a method that yields, for the first time, visualization of a gene amplifications and deletions known as copy number variants in single cells. Significantly allows early detection of rare genetic events providing high resolution analysis of the tempo of evolution. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


159: Gifts that get better as they age

Gadgets About 99 percent of consumer goods aren't in use six months later. Let's strive for something different. Stop buying things that will get throw away six months later, and start buying stuff that could turn into family heirlooms.


160: MRI effective for monitoring liver fat in obese patients

MRI provides a safe, noninvasive way to monitor liver fat levels in people who undergo weight loss treatments for obesity, according to a new study. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


161: Machine learning-detected signal predicts time to earthquake

Machine-learning research reveals the detection of seismic signals accurately predicting the Cascadia fault's slow slippage, a type of failure observed to precede large earthquakes in other subduction zones. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


162: Experimental findings support a connection between mucins in the lung and pulmonary fibrosis

A team of investigators has identified a connection between mucus in the small airways and pulmonary fibrosis. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


163: Study of traditional medicine finds high use in Sub-Saharan Africa despite modern medicine

Researchers who have undertaken the first systematic review of into the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines (TCAM) in Sub-Saharan Africa found its use is significant and not just because of a lack of resources or access to 'conventional medicine'. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


164: Genetic cause of ALS and frontotemporal dementia blocked by RNA-binding compound

A new compound blocks the most common genetic cause of familial ALS and frontotemporal dementia. Results suggest that the target currently being pursued by many research groups may not actually be the one driving neuron death. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


165: Sound could replace lasers in surgery

Scientists announce the ability to simultaneously manipulate individual levitated objects. Using high-frequency sound waves may provide a safer alternative to laser microsurgery. Video of the research looks like a cartoon, but it's all real. For a while now, scientists have presented demonstrations of sound's ability to levitate and move suspended particles. It's pretty cool stuff, and you can fi


166: Netflix's ‘Roma’ Rollout Teaches the Company Some Lessons

Alfonso Cuarón's epic is the biggest theatrical release Netflix has undertaken—and the process has laid bare some weaknesses in the company's offline strategy.


167: A new study proves parachutes are useless

Scientists working at medical schools across the United States discovered that parachutes don't lower the death rate of people jumping out of airplanes. The study flies in the face of decades of anecdotal evidence. The findings should be carefully applied, due to "minor caveats" with the experimental structure. There is an old joke that says "If your parachute doesn't deploy, don't worry: you hav


168: Researchers find gender separation affects sense of smell

Olfactory sensory receptors in mice change as a function of exposure to odors emitted from members of the opposite sex, University of Wyoming researchers have discovered. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


169: The importance of 'edge populations' to biodiversity

More than two-thirds of Canada's biodiversity is made up of species that occur within the country's borders only at the very northern edge of their range. Biologists have long debated how much effort should be dedicated to conserving these 'edge populations.' One argument in their favor is that they may be especially well suited to lead northward range shifts for their species as the climate warms (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


170: Recruiting ants to fight weeds on the farm

Harvester ants that eat weed seeds on the soil's surface can help farmers manage weeds on their farms, according to an international team of researchers, who found that tilling less to preserve the ants could save farmers fuel and labor costs, as well as preserve water and improve soil quality. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


171: Low-income, rural kids at higher risk for second- or third-hand smoke exposure

Infants and toddlers in low-income, rural areas may be at higher risk for second- and third-hand smoke than previously reported, according to new research. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


172: Two ways cancer resists treatment are actually connected, with one activating the other

Researcher shows the two most common means of resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors are actually connected processes and can be targeted by other therapies. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


173: Upwind wind plants can reduce flow to downwind neighbors

New research highlights a previously unexplored consequence of the global proliferation of wind energy facilities: a wake effect from upwind facilities that can reduce the energy production of their downwind neighbors. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


174: Oroville Dam earthquakes in February 2017 related to spillway discharge

A closer look at small earthquakes that took place at the Oroville Dam in California's Sierra Nevada foothills in February 2017 — near the time when the dam's spillway failed — suggest that the seismic activity was related to reservoir discharge that opened and closed fractures in the rock below the spillway. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


175: HPV discovery raises hope for new cervical cancer treatments

Researchers have made a discovery about human papillomavirus (HPV) that could lead to new treatments for cervical cancer and other cancers caused by the virus, the most common sexually transmitted disease. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


176: Pathogen predicament: How bacteria propel themselves out of a tight spot

Scientists have deciphered how some types of 'swimming' bacteria have evolved to be able to escape when trapped in small spaces. The discovery could pave the way to finding new methods to stop the spread of certain bacteria, including species that cause food poisoning and stomach ulcers. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


177: James Mattis’s Letter of Resignation

On Thursday, December 20, Secretary of Defense James Mattis submitted a letter of resignation to President Donald Trump. “Because you have the right to a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned with yours on these and other subjects,” he wrote, “I believe it is right for me to step down from my position.” The full text of the letter is reproduced below. Dear Mr. President: I have been


178: Amoeba finds approximate solutions to NP-hard problem in linear time

Researchers have demonstrated that an amoeba—a single-celled organism consisting mostly of gelatinous protoplasm—has unique computing abilities that may one day offer a competitive alternative to the methods used by conventional computers.


179: Ice-filled Martian crater is a permanent winter wonderland

The European Space Agency's Mars Express probe captured this striking view of ice-filled Korolev Crater, near the north pole of the Red Planet


180: Trods EU-forbud vil Danmark bruge bidræber-pesticid på sukkerroer

Den danske sukkerbranche har fået Miljøstyrelsens tilladelse til at fortsætte med at bejdse frø til sukkerroer med et af de neonikotinoider, som skader bier.


181: Drones have forced London’s Gatwick airport to close, leaving thousands of passengers stranded


182: Juul Accepts Altria Investment and Embraces Big Tobacco


183: Like other animals, humans have a breeding season—and it’s right now

Science ‘Tis the season for conception. It turns out reproduction is seasonal across all living organisms, from plants, to insects, to reptiles, to birds and mammals—including human beings. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


184: Gadgets: Smart tags help you stay organized

If getting organized is on your New Year's resolution list, the Adero is what you need. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


185: The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Diversity, Division, and Demagoguery: Looking Back at 2018

In today’s look back at the year’s best Atlantic politics stories, we’re sharing a deep dive on President Donald Trump’s elusive immigration adviser, an exploration of the Democratic Party’s ideological trajectory, and a look at the “white men’s club” leading America’s largest cities. Thanks for reading, and we’ll be back tomorrow with more standout stories to finish up the year. — Elaine Godfrey (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


186: It’s only a matter of time before a drone takes down a passenger plane


187: Climate Team, and Its Boss, Just Got Harder to Find at Top Health Agency

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that it had folded its Climate and Health Program into a branch that studies asthma.


188: James Mattis’s Final Protest Against the President

Secretary of Defense James Mattis is resigning over conflicts with President Trump over American policy overseas—the highest profile official to quit the administration over disagreements of principle with the president. In a resignation letter , Mattis laid out a series of differences with Trump, who he said deserved to have a secretary of defense who was aligned with him. Mattis cited the impor


189: Fruitcake vs Aspic: Fruitcake wins!

It was quite a conundrum, that was for sure, You wouldn’t taste fruitcake and then ask for more. Nor would you give the old aspic a try, Without the feeling that perhaps you might die. But in the end there could only be one, And it turns out that the fruitcake was a little more fun! Congrats to team Fruitcake and thanks to all who participated! (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


190: Max Planck Society Ends Elsevier Subscription

The move is a show of support for Project DEAL and the open-access movement. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


191: How to brain hack your New Year's resolution for success

Every New Year people resolve to improve their lives, only to peter out during the "February Fail." Studies have shown that people who employ cognitive-behavioral processes, or brain hacks, can increase their chances of success. We look at how hacking the habit loop, setting SMART goals, and silencing your inner perfectionist can help make 2019 your year. The new year approaches and with it comes (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


192: How the brain reacts to loss of vision

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


193: To Get Antibiotics Off Your Plate, Vote With Your Wallet

Obama-era regulation was supposed to curtail livestock antibiotics. But consumers are pushing Perdue, McDonalds, Tyson, Walmart, and more to change.


194: How decorating for Christmas sends people to the ER

A study takes a stab at quantifying Christmas-related mishaps.


195: Scientists create genetically-modified houseplant that removes carcinogens from air

Houseplants are rumored to be natural air purifiers, but most research suggests their benefits are only marginal. Genetically-modified plants might change that because they're able to produce special proteins that absorb and break down particular compounds. The results of the recent research show promise for future applications of the technique. None A NASA experiment, in 1989, famously showed th


196: Cell-by-cell DNA science is 'Breakthrough of 2018'

The US journal Science on Thursday coined as "Breakthrough of the Year" for 2018 new technologies that reveal how DNA cues individual cells to grow through time.


197: Police interactions linked to increased risk of client violence for female sex workers

The more abusive interactions street-based female sex workers (FSWs) have with police, the higher their risk of violence at the hands of clients, a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


198: Cancer's metabolism subject of trailblazing study

No matter what form cancer takes in the body, it starts at the cellular level and grows via metabolism run amok. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


199: Exploring organisms cell by cell

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


200: News at a glance

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


201: Hints of young planets puzzle theorists

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


202: Universities 'held hostage' in Nicaragua's political crisis

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


203: Antarctic ice melt 125,000 years ago offers warning

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


204: Fossils push back origin of key plant groups millions of years

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


205: Link to Alzheimer's seen in nodding syndrome

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


206: Five Deeps' mission to explore mysterious ocean trenches

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


207: National Academies urges renewed commitment to fusion

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


208: Development cell by cell

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


209: Runners-up

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


210: Breakdowns of the year

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


211: Tessellating tiny tetrahedrons

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


212: Chemotherapy and tumor immunity

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


213: Seeing a global web of connected systems

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


214: Hydropatterning–how roots test the waters

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


215: Unusual transcription factor protects against heart failure

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


216: Escaping atmospheres of extrasolar planets

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


217: Next-generation wargames

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


218: The sex robots are here

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


219: Beyond blood

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


220: 2018: A Year of Great Books

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


221: Protect Third Pole's fragile ecosystem

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


222: The freshwater biodiversity crisis

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


223: China's reopened rhino horn trade

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


224: 2018 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award winners named

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


225: Annual Meeting focuses on boundary-breaking research

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


226: Rooting out the mechanism of asymmetry

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


227: Helium escaping from hot gas giants

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


228: Breaking through the nitrogen ceiling

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


229: Quantum dots line up as a quasicrystal

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


230: Not as advertised

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


231: The strength of long-range ties

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


232: Small molecules spark NK cell response

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


233: A safer way to probe for brain cancer

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


234: 3D-printed, partially passive piano player

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


235: Protecting the heart

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


236: Mechanism of promoter recognition

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


237: Architecture of the human TRPM2 channel

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


238: Cobalt unfettered by its ligand field

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


239: Cascading effects of regime shifts

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


240: Distinguishing two similar gut disorders

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


241: Reconnection in Earth's magnetotail

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


242: Late Permian seed-plant evolution

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


243: A painful lipid in irritable bowel syndrome

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


244: Membrane scission by ESCRTs

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


245: {gamma}{delta} T cells come to the fore

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


246: The importance of lugworms

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


247: Targeting brown fat to make less fat

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


248: Lymph node mass transport

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


249: Revelation in the gut virome

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


250: Electrochemically clicking on tyrosine

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


251: Connecting the dots

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


252: With role models come persistence

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


253: Cascading regime shifts within and across scales

Regime shifts are large, abrupt, and persistent critical transitions in the function and structure of ecosystems. Yet, it is unknown how these transitions will interact, whether the occurrence of one will increase the likelihood of another or simply correlate at distant places. We explored two types of cascading effects: Domino effects create one-way dependencies, whereas hidden feedbacks produce (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


254: Spectrally resolved helium absorption from the extended atmosphere of a warm Neptune-mass exoplanet

Stellar heating causes atmospheres of close-in exoplanets to expand and escape. These extended atmospheres are difficult to observe because their main spectral signature—neutral hydrogen at ultraviolet wavelengths—is strongly absorbed by interstellar medium. We report the detection of the near-infrared triplet of neutral helium in the transiting warm Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-11b by using grou (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


255: Ground-based detection of an extended helium atmosphere in the Saturn-mass exoplanet WASP-69b

Hot gas giant exoplanets can lose part of their atmosphere due to strong stellar irradiation, and these losses can affect their physical and chemical evolution. Studies of atmospheric escape from exoplanets have mostly relied on space-based observations of the hydrogen Lyman-α line in the far ultraviolet region, which is strongly affected by interstellar absorption. Using ground-based high-resolu (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


256: Electron-scale dynamics of the diffusion region during symmetric magnetic reconnection in space

Magnetic reconnection is an energy conversion process that occurs in many astrophysical contexts including Earth’s magnetosphere, where the process can be investigated in situ by spacecraft. On 11 July 2017, the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft encountered a reconnection site in Earth’s magnetotail, where reconnection involves symmetric inflow conditions. The electron-scale plasma measur (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


257: Single-component quasicrystalline nanocrystal superlattices through flexible polygon tiling rule

Quasicrystalline superlattices (QC-SLs) generated from single-component colloidal building blocks have been predicted by computer simulations but are challenging to reproduce experimentally. We discovered that 10-fold QC-SLs could self-organize from truncated tetrahedral quantum dots with anisotropic patchiness. Transmission electron microscopy and tomography measurements allow structural reconst (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


258: Magnetic hysteresis up to 80 kelvin in a dysprosium metallocene single-molecule magnet

Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) containing only one metal center may represent the lower size limit for molecule-based magnetic information storage materials. Their current drawback is that all SMMs require liquid-helium cooling to show magnetic memory effects. We now report a chemical strategy to access the dysprosium metallocene cation [(Cp i Pr5 )Dy(Cp*)] + (Cp i Pr5 , penta-iso-propylcyclopent (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


259: Elevated trawling inside protected areas undermines conservation outcomes in a global fishing hot spot

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly used as a primary tool to conserve biodiversity. This is particularly relevant in heavily exploited fisheries hot spots such as Europe, where MPAs now cover 29% of territorial waters, with unknown effects on fishing pressure and conservation outcomes. We investigated industrial trawl fishing and sensitive indicator species in and around 727 MPAs desi


260: Root branching toward water involves posttranslational modification of transcription factor ARF7

Plants adapt to heterogeneous soil conditions by altering their root architecture. For example, roots branch when in contact with water by using the hydropatterning response. We report that hydropatterning is dependent on auxin response factor ARF7. This transcription factor induces asymmetric expression of its target gene LBD16 in lateral root founder cells. This differential expression pattern (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


261: The strength of long-range ties in population-scale social networks

Long-range connections that span large social networks are widely assumed to be weak, composed of sporadic and emotionally distant relationships. However, researchers historically have lacked the population-scale network data needed to verify the predicted weakness. Using data from 11 culturally diverse population-scale networks on four continents—encompassing 56 million Twitter users and 58 mill (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


262: A hidden cradle of plant evolution in Permian tropical lowlands

The latitudinal biodiversity gradient today has deep roots in the evolutionary history of Earth’s biota over geologic time. In the marine realm, earliest fossil occurrences at low latitudes reveal a tropical cradle for many animal groups. However, the terrestrial fossil record—especially from drier environments that are thought to drive evolutionary innovation—is sparse. We present mixed plant-fo (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


263: NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity contributes to tumor control by a cytostatic drug combination

Molecularly targeted therapies aim to obstruct cell autonomous programs required for tumor growth. We show that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors act in combination to suppress the proliferation of KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells while simultaneously provoking a natural killer (NK) cell surveillance program leading to tumor cell death. The drug combi (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


264: ATP-dependent force generation and membrane scission by ESCRT-III and Vps4

The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) catalyze reverse-topology scission from the inner face of membrane necks in HIV budding, multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, and other pathways. We encapsulated ESCRT-III subunits Snf7, Vps24, and Vps2 and the AAA+ ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) Vps4 in giant vesicles from which membrane nanotubes reflecting the corre (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


265: New Products

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266: Forced to change–for good

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267: E-C coupling structural protein junctophilin-2 encodes a stress-adaptive transcription regulator

Junctophilin-2 (JP2) is a structural protein required for normal excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. After cardiac stress, JP2 is cleaved by the calcium ion–dependent protease calpain, which disrupts the E-C coupling ultrastructural machinery and drives heart failure progression. We found that stress-induced proteolysis of JP2 liberates an N-terminal fragment (JP2NT) that translocates to the n (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


268: Structures and gating mechanism of human TRPM2

Transient receptor potential (TRP) melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a cation channel associated with numerous diseases. It has a C-terminal NUDT9 homology (NUDT9H) domain responsible for binding adenosine diphosphate (ADP)–ribose (ADPR), and both ADPR and calcium (Ca 2+ ) are required for TRPM2 activation. Here we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of human TRPM2 alone, with ADPR, and with ADPR an (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


269: A linear cobalt(II) complex with maximal orbital angular momentum from a non-Aufbau ground state

Orbital angular momentum is a prerequisite for magnetic anisotropy, although in transition metal complexes it is typically quenched by the ligand field. By reducing the basicity of the carbon donor atoms in a pair of alkyl ligands, we synthesized a cobalt(II) dialkyl complex, Co(C(SiMe 2 ONaph) 3 ) 2 (where Me is methyl and Naph is a naphthyl group), wherein the ligand field is sufficiently weak (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


270: Structure of human TFIID and mechanism of TBP loading onto promoter DNA

The general transcription factor IID (TFIID) is a critical component of the eukaryotic transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) and is responsible for recognizing the core promoter DNA and initiating PIC assembly. We used cryo–electron microscopy, chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry, and biochemical reconstitution to determine the complete molecular architecture of TFIID and define the conf (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


271: Experiment sends engineered plants to ISS

If humanity is going to push the boundaries of space exploration, we're going to need plants to come along for the ride. Not just spinach or potatoes, though—plants can do so much more than just feed us. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


272: Brain of Mysterious 'Little Foot' Human Relative Was Half-Man, Half-Ape

The brain of a very old human ancestor looks a lot like an ape's and a little like a human's.


273: Photos: 50 Years Since Apollo 8 Showed Us Earthrise

On December 21, 1968, three humans climbed atop a massive rocket and left our planet for a six-day, round-trip journey to our nearest companion in the solar system, the moon. During the Apollo 8 mission, NASA astronauts Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders flew hundreds of thousands of miles across translunar space, becoming the first human beings to see the entirety of the Earth at onc


274: How China’s Elite Spies Stole the World’s Secrets


275: Watch the New 'Men in Black International' Trailer Now

Plus: 'To All the Boys I've Loved Before' gets a Netflix sequel and 'Aquaman' rules the box office.


276: HIV prevention app shows promise in Romania

A mobile app could improve the lives of LGBTQ people who lack access to HIV prevention and education, say researchers. Corina Lelutiu-Weinberger, assistant professor at the Rutgers University School of Nursing, recently introduced the first mobile program aimed at improving the sexual, behavioral, and mental health of gay and bisexual men in Romania—a country where HIV is on the rise among this g (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


277: Hold the fries! How calorie content makes you rethink food choices

Seeing pictures of food with calorie information not only makes food less appetizing but it also appears to change the way your brain responds to the food, according to a Dartmouth-led study published in PLOS ONE. When food images appeared with the calorie content, the brain showed decreased activation of the reward system and increased activation in the control system. In other words, foods that (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


278: Beyond Einstein

Theoretical physicists have been questioning if black hole singularities exist through complex mathematical equations over the past several decades with little success until now. LSU Department of Physics & Astronomy Associate Professor Parampreet Singh and collaborators LSU Postdoctoral Researcher Javier Olmedo and Abhay Ashtekar, the Eberly Professor of Physics at Penn State developed new mathem (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


279: Dinosaur-Era Shark Nabbed Flying Reptile, Losing a Tooth

A rogue tooth hints at a primeval encounter of sea and sky.


280: StreetCred Is Challenging Google Maps—and It Wants Your Help

The mapping startup wants to pay a volunteer mapping army in cryptocurrency to carry out its data missions.


281: What Are the Chances of a White Christmas?

What Are the Chances of a White Christmas? The probability of a snowy Christmas in any location depends on lots of factors — including the effects of climate change. Crater-Lake.jpg Crater Lake, Oregon Image credits: Adventures On Wheels via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Thursday, December 20, 2018 – 15:00 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) — Many Americans have fond memori (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


282: DNA barcodes track shark fins to black market

DNA barcoding can identify shark and ray species in commercial products in order to monitor the trade in protected species, researchers report. Shark and ray products are traded around the world, with an estimated 100 million individuals caught each year for various purposes, including cultural cuisines and traditional Chinese medicines. In many Asian communities, shark fins are a delicacy and fe (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


283: What Claire McCaskill's Exit Interview Reveals About the Democratic Party

Claire McCaskill has two words for her progressive critics: “Shut up.” In a Thursday interview with The New York Times , the outgoing Missouri senator described her frustration—among other grievances—that some of her fellow Democrats saw her as too quiet on the issue of abortion during the confirmation process for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. “Really? This is hard,” McCaskill said of ru


284: The Necessary Chaos of Harvey Weinstein’s Ongoing Court Case

“The only reasonably prudent decision would be to stop this chaos now.” That was Benjamin Brafman, a lawyer for Harvey Weinstein, in a document filed to the New York Supreme Court, making the argument that the criminal case against his client should be dismissed. Weinstein is currently facing five criminal charges stemming from the allegations that he forcibly performed oral sex on a woman in 200


285: Chinese hackers allegedly stole data of more than 100,000 US Navy personnel


286: Never Neglect a Dozer's Air Filter | Gold Rush

Learn from Big Rick why a dirty air filter can cause a dozer to lose power. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Ins (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


287: 3 out of 4 Americans are lonely, study says

The pang of loneliness is far higher than even the gloomiest of previous estimates, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, San Diego. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


288: Organic farming is 'much worse' for the climate than conventional food production, researchers say

A report from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, found that organic food production leads to higher carbon emissions. This includes livestock as well as vegetables, as organic farming requires no fertilizer usage. Certain types of organic foods are less impactful than others, the researchers note. None History has not been kind to Earl Butz. From 1971–76, the Indiana native served as secr


289: Dig Sector 12 is complete!

At long last, Sector 12 of The Dig is complete as of 12/20/2018! It was a big sector to be sure, in which we uncovered 174 cells. To celebrate, we’re hosting a 174 minute Happy Hour today starting at 4:00 PM EST. Regular HH bonuses apply. Join us! And with that, we’re down to the last “strip” of this portion of our data set! Think we’ll finish The Dig in 2019? (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


290: The inventors of the polar bear treadmill are back with a new scientific contraption

Animals Watch Nora the polar bear swim for science. The endlessly patient creators of the bear treadmill are bringing you another animal research invention: the polar bear swim chamber. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


291: DNA Could Help Bring Home Remains of Ancient Aboriginal People

Genetic material from bones could be used to locate living descendants for the remains’ repatriation, researchers showed. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


292: Seeing double: Tropical Cyclone Kenanga same strength as other storm

The Southern Indian Ocean is seeing double. Tropical Cyclone Kenanga was one of two storms at Category 2 hurricane strength in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. 20. Kenanga was sporting an eye on visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite, and so was Tropical Cyclone Cilida, located west of Kenanga. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


293: New brain changes in early Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have discovered new changes occurring in the human brain in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers used a multiomic approach to determine RNA, protein, and phosphorylation levels and carried out further neurobioinformatic analyses on them. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


294: Memory and cognition problems affect recovery in rehabilitation facilities

Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) added new ways to measure patients' abilities to perform their daily routines in nursing facilities and other after-care settings. Studies have not examined how skilled nursing care residents who have cognitive difficulties perform on the new self-care and mobility measurements. Researchers designed a new study to fill that knowledge g (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


295: Tysker fik slem overraskelse: Lytter andre med på din smart-højtaler?

Hvem har adgang til alle de data, du propper i dine smarthøjtalere? En tysk bruger har netop fået sig en slem overraskelse. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


296: The wall vs. legal marijuana: One is pointless, the other secures the border.

The report uses recent government data to examine the effects that marijuana legalization has had on drug and human smuggling by Mexican cartels. Overall, it appears that marijuana legalization has led to decreases in not only marijuana smuggling, but also smuggling of all drugs across the border. The report suggests that the benefits of marijuana legalization might also serve as a model for how


297: Scientists uncover how protein clumps damage cells in Parkinson's

Research into the root cause of Parkinson's aims to advance work on a disease-modifying treatment. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


298: Chemists create new quasicrystal material from nanoparticle building blocks

Brown University researchers have discovered a new type of quasicrystal, a class of materials whose existence was thought to be impossible until the 1980s. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


299: Not all marine protected areas are created equal

Europe's impressive network of marine protected areas (MPAs), which now cover 29 percent of territorial waters, is not as effective as has been thought at preserving the marine biodiversity it was created to protect. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


300: Science's 2018 Breakthrough of the Year: Tracking development cell by cell

Science has chosen single-cell analyses of gene activity through time as its 2018 Breakthrough of the Year, honoring a trifecta of methods that together are enabling researchers to determine, at the individual cell level, which genes are turned on and off as an early embryo develops. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


301: Hidden cradle of early plant evolution discovered in the Middle East

Several new plant fossils from present-day Jordan push back the ages of important seed plant lineages, suggesting these lineages survived the mass extinction event at the end of the Permian. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


302: Frog Picks Maternity Ward Like Goldilocks

The Bahia's broad-snout casque-headed tree frog needs a pool to raise its young that's just right. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


303: Better understanding of dog body language could make interactions safer

A better understanding of the way dogs communicate distress could be the first step in reducing the risk of dog bites for both children and adults, a new study has found. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


304: More plants survived the world’s greatest mass extinction than thought

Fossil plants from Jordan reveal more plant lineages that made it through the Great Dying roughly 252 million years ago.


305: There’ll be a domino effect as we trigger ecosystem tipping points

There are lots of interconnected tipping points linking the climate and environment, so drastic changes to the planet will have many unexpected consequences (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


306: The Miami blue was fluttering toward extinction. Then the scientists showed up

One crisp, sunny afternoon this month, grad student Sarah Steele Cabrera headed down a sandy path at Long Key State Park carrying two nylon bug containers. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


307: Risks of 'domino effect' of tipping points greater than thought, study says

Scientists warn policymakers not to ignore links, and stress that ‘every action counts’ Policymakers have severely underestimated the risks of ecological tipping points , according to a study that shows 45% of all potential environmental collapses are interrelated and could amplify one another. The authors said their paper, published in the journal Science , highlights how overstressed and overla (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


308: Do emoji have a place in serious 🔬 ✍️?

A new paper looks at the 👍️ and 👎️ of using emojis in biomedical documentation. It's the return of pictographs, millennia later. Do your thumbs even know how to avoid them? Did you know that the Oxford Dictionary selected the "face with tears of joy" emoji as Word of the Year for 2015? You know, this one: 😂. Putting aside for the moment that the symbol's official meaning is a phrase, not a wor


309: Dog kennel designed by Ford blocks fireworks, thunder noise

Ford Motor Co. has developed a prototype quiet kennel for dogs by using noise-cancellation technology created for high-end vehicles sold in Europe. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


310: Magnetoresistance ratio enhancement opens door to highly sensitive magnetic field sensors

By creating a new multilayer structure with an enhanced magnetoresisitance ratio, researchers show that it's possible to increase the sensitivity of magnetic field sensors. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


311: A major step closer to a viable recording material for future hard disk drives

By tweaking an iron-platinum alloy, researchers are trying to clear a few hurdles slowing the material's viability as a future perpendicular recording media. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


312: In response to heat, the more affluent use air-conditioners; low-income households use water

A new study has revealed that Singapore households from different socioeconomic groups vary significantly in their use of water and electricity for the relief of heat. The findings suggest that water provides heat relief for lower-income households while demand for electricity increases among the more affluent, likely through the use of air-conditioning, when temperatures rise. Results from the st (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


313: Facebook, Google to pay Washington $450,000 to settle lawsuits over political-ad transparency

Tech giants Facebook and Google will pay Washington state more than $450,000 to settle twin lawsuits filed by Attorney General Bob Ferguson accusing the companies of failure to abide by state laws on political advertising transparency. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


314: Charter schools may discourage applications from ‘hard’ kids

New research shows that charter schools and traditional public schools of choice ignore application inquiries from students they perceive as more challenging to educate. The research also finds that charter schools ignore inquiries from special needs students at higher rates. Isaac McFarlin Jr., an assistant professor of education and economics at the University of Florida, and Peter Bergman, an (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


315: Stem cell-derived neurons stop seizures and improve cognitive function

About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the drugs do work, people may develop cognitive and memory problems and depression, likely from the combination of the underlying seizu (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


316: For gait transitions, stability often trumps energy savings

Working with nine animal models, researchers find a preference for stability over energy conservation during speed-related gait transitions. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


317: World's smallest tic-tac-toe game board made with DNA

Researchers have developed new dynamic DNA origami technology.


318: Test detects protein associated with Alzheimer's and CTE

An ultrasensitive test has been developed that detects a corrupted protein associated with Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition found in athletes, military veterans, and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma. This advance could lead to early diagnosis of these conditions and open new research into how they originate. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


319: Australian study into how seals react to boats prompts new ecotourism regulations

Unable to differentiate between a predator and a tourist boat, seals react as soon as they sense a potential threat. The closer a vessel approaches, the more likely it is for the animals to rush to the water and the greater the risk of a stampede or predation in the sea. To inform management guidelines, researchers observed a colony on Kanowna Island, Bass Strait. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


320: Threat of 'nightmare bacteria' exhibiting resistance to last-resort antibiotic colistin

Researchers examined the dissemination of colistin-resistant bacteria among residents of rural communities in Vietnam to find that the prevalence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli in the intestines was extremely high, at about 70 percent. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


321: Discovery could lead to munitions that go further, much faster

Researchers have discovered a new way to get more energy out of energetic materials containing aluminum, common in battlefield systems, by igniting aluminum micron powders coated with graphene oxide. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


322: Your next domestic flight could have a big window in the bathroom

Technology Aircraft windows affect everything from a plane's weight to how passengers perceive cleanliness. Everything you ever wanted to know about bathroom windows on airplanes.


323: Questions Raised About Pertussis Reemergence

Scientists debate why the number of whooping cough cases is up, and whether the effectiveness of a vaccine introduced within the last two decades is to blame. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


324: Dogs help humans with disabilities socialize with others, researchers find

A pilot study has found that dogs help socialize those with intellectual disabilities at Australian group homes. Previous research finds that pets helps those who use wheelchairs "feel more secure and confident in public." People are far more likely to interact with someone with an intellectual disability if they were walking with a dog. None There are an estimated 5,000 people with a range of in


325: Cold War Meditates on Exile, Nationalism, and Love

PARIS— Cold War , the latest feature by the Polish director Pawel Pawlikowski, is a stormy love story filmed in black and white and set between Poland and Paris during the early 1950s. It is also a film about a time when borders defined lives. Watching it now, at an unsettling time when borders seem to be making a comeback in Europe—with Brexit, namely—confirmed my sense that Pawlikowski is one o


326: Apples pulls iPhone 7, 8 from German stores in patent spat

Apple is pulling older models of its iPhone from German stores after losing two patent cases brought by chipmaker Qualcomm, the company said Thursday.


327: For gait transitions, stability often trumps energy savings

A dog's gait, according to the American Kennel Club, is "the pattern of footsteps at various rates of speed, each distinguished by a particular rhythm and footfall." When dogs trot, for example, the right front leg and the left hind leg move together. This is an intermediate gait, faster than walking but slower than running. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


328: Rescue Highlights Dangers, and Possibilities, at Old Mining Sites

The rescue of three people from a mine in West Virginia focused new attention on the hundreds of thousands of former mines across the country.


329: Health checkups for alpine lakes

The best tool for assessing the health of mountain lakes comes in a very small package. According to new research, alpine species of zooplankton are excellent bioindicators of lake health. And as extreme climatic events have been shown to increase with elevation, understanding the changing ecosystems of alpine lakes is more important than ever. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


330: Age is more than just a number: Machine learning may predict if you're in for a healthy old age

Researchers analyzed skin cells from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. By applying machine-learning algorithms to these biomarkers, they were able to predict a person's actual age with less than eight years error, on average. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


331: Study on low noise, high-performance transistors may bring innovations in electronics

A research study has demonstrated micro/nano-scale transistors made of two-dimensional atomic thin materials that show high performance and low noise. The devices are less than one-hundredth of the diameter of a single human hair and could be key to innovating electronics and precision sensing. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


332: Vi sender flaget til tops for det periodiske system

PLUS. FN har udpeget 2019 til det internationale år for det periodiske system i anledning af 150-året for Dmitrij Mendelejevs første udgave af systemet. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


333: This blog is dead. Long live the blog.

Blogs are synonymous with the early internet. But what is a blog, and what has it become? A blog is a platform. And this one, Scicurious, is now gone.


334: Satellite catches the eye of rapidly intensifying Tropical Cyclone Cilida

Tropical Cyclone Cilida appeared much more organized on satellite imagery as it moved across the southwestern Indian Ocean and continued to rapidly intensify. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Cilida that showed a cloud-covered eye. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


335: Why insecure people buy more things

The link between a poor interpersonal life and materialism has been known for decades, but the exact reason for this connection hasn't been clear. New research shows that two problematic attachment styles can push people towards seeking the love and affection they crave in material wealth. The study shows both how broken-hearted people use materialism as a crutch and how this dependency can be re


336: Urine drug testing may be important in early phases of addiction treatment

A new study performed by Boston Medical Center shows that urine drug testing can be a useful tool to treat patients with opioid use disorder in a primary care setting. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


337: New pathways for implementing universal suicide risk screening in healthcare settings

In 2016 alone, more than 6,000 youth in the United States under the age of 25 died by suicide. Now a report, authored in part by researchers at the NIMH, provides guidance on how to implement universal suicide risk screening of youth in medical settings. The report describes a way for hospitals to address the rising suicide rate in a way that is flexible and mindful of limited resources. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


338: Bacteria rely on classic business model

The pneumonia causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. It generates two different cells — motile spreaders and virulent stickers. Researchers have now elucidated how the germ attaches to tissue within seconds and consecutively spreads. Just like the business model: settling — growing — expanding. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


339: Himalayan marmot genome offers clues to life at extremely high altitudes

Himalayan marmots can survive at altitudes up to 5,000 meters in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, and Pakistan and on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, where many of them face extreme cold, little oxygen, and few other resources. Now, researchers have sequenced the first complete Himalayan marmot genome, which may help them to better explain how the marmots live in such extremes. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


340: Network orchestration: Researcher uses music to manage networks

A researcher uses sound as a simpler alternative to manage complicated network tasks. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


341: Understanding repetitive head impacts in sports

A new study has found that eyeball and eyelid movement, or oculomotor function, which is used to detect symptomless brain injury, can be impaired by mild, repetitive head impacts in football players. But the function may adapt mid-season, even as athletes continue to incur head impacts. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


342: New memory study first to use intracranial recordings

New research is first memory study to use intracranial recordings to better understand how maturation of the prefrontal cortex drives memory development. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


343: Scientists program proteins to pair exactly

Proteins designed in the lab can now zip together in much the same way that DNA molecules zip up to form a double helix. The technique could enable the design of protein nanomachines that can potentially help diagnose and treat disease, allow for the more exact engineering of cells and perform a wide variety of other tasks. This technique provides scientists a precise, programmable way to control (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


344: Number of people with dementia doubled in just 26 years

The number of people living with dementia globally more than doubled between 1990 and 2016 from 20.2 million to 43.8 million, report researchers. The researchers also found that 22.3 percent of healthy years lost due to dementia in 2016 were due to modifiable risk factors. Their study looks at the global, regional, and national burden of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias from 1990-2016. The (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


345: Could a urine test identify multiple sclerosis early?

A biomarker for multiple sclerosis could be an early warning for the disease, according to new research. Researchers have discovered that acrolein, a molecule previously suspected as a metabolic waste product that accumulates in people with certain neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease, could possibly help diagnose MS. Multiple sclerosis affects an estimated 2. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


346: Researchers make world's smallest tic-tac-toe game board with DNA

Researchers in the lab of Lulu Qian, assistant professor of bioengineering, have developed new dynamic DNA origami technology. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


347: Novel imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Professor Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue shortly after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room. The researchers achieved this using a new portable optical imaging system developed in Boppart's lab. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


348: NASA-NOAA Satellite catches the eye of rapidly intensifying Tropical Cyclone Cilida

Tropical Cyclone Cilida appeared much more organized on satellite imagery as it moved across the southwestern Indian Ocean and continued to rapidly intensify. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Cilida that showed a cloud-covered eye. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


349: For gait transitions, stability often trumps energy savings

Working with nine animal models, researchers find a preference for stability over energy conservation during speed-related gait transitions. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


350: Stem cell-derived neurons stop seizures and improve cognitive function

About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the drugs do work, people may develop cognitive and memory problems and depression, likely from the combination of the underlying seizu (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


351: AIDS — an approach for targeting HIV reservoirs

Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Institut Pasteur scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus. Thanks to metabolic activity inhibitors, the researchers have managed to destroy these infected cells, or 'res (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


352: På Lindholm dyrker man landmandens mareridt

På Lindholm findes der sygdomme, der kan lægge dansk landbrug ned. Øen blev valgt, fordi den var isoleret – men ikke nok til at sygdom ikke kunne slippe væk. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


353: Find out if your holiday travels will take you into a flu zone

Health It’s already getting bad in some parts of the country. Most of the time, you probably don’t care much at all about what the flu looks like in other states. But this time of year you should. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


354: Human extinction! Don't panic; think about it like a philosopher.

A new opinion piece in The New York Times argues that humanity is so horrible to other forms of life that our extinction wouldn't be all that bad, morally speaking. The author, Dr. Todd May, is a philosopher who is known for advising the writers of The Good Place. The idea of human extinction is a big one, with lots of disagreement on its moral value. Humans could go extinct. The idea has been fl


355: Faint glow within galaxy clusters illuminates dark matter

A new look at Hubble images of galaxies could be a step toward illuminating the elusive nature of dark matter, the unobservable material that makes up the majority of the universe, according to a study published online today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


356: Land motion drives varying rates of sea level along the US East Coast

As sea levels rise around the world, they don't rise at the same universal rate. A team of researchers report in the journal Nature that along the US East Coast — where rates of sea level change are higher in the Mid-Atlantic region — these variations are the result of land motion driven by the ongoing effects of the end of the last ice age. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


357: Study from Indiana University aims to better understand repetitive head impacts in sports

A new study by Indiana University researchers has found that eyeball and eyelid movement, or oculomotor function, which is used to detect symptomless brain injury, can be impaired by mild, repetitive head impacts in football players. But the function may adapt mid-season, even as athletes continue to incur head impacts. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


358: 7 Arguments Against the Autonomous-Vehicle Utopia

Self-driving cars are coming. Tech giants such as Uber and Alphabet have bet on it, as have old-school car manufacturers such as Ford and General Motors. But even as Google’s sister company Waymo prepares to launch its self-driving-car service and automakers prototype vehicles with various levels of artificial intelligence , there are some who believe that the autonomous future has been oversold—


359: Last day in Paradise: the untold story of how a fire swallowed a town

A bucolic community was reduced to ash by a new kind of wildfire – the deadliest in California’s history. Survivors recall that horrible day William Goggia awoke to a poisonous orange atmosphere so thick with smoke he couldn’t see the sun. It was 8am on Thursday 8 November. He heard the piercing metallic clang of propane tanks exploding in the distance. His sister, who lived nearby, called to ask


360: Chinese scientists go in search of the soul with world's most powerful brain scanner

(Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


361: Dutch lawmakers pass ambitious law to reduce emissions

Dutch lawmakers overwhelmingly approved ambitious new climate legislation Thursday that aims to drastically drive down emissions of greenhouse gases. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


362: Beyond the black hole singularity

Our first glimpses into the physics that exist near the center of a black hole are being made possible using 'loop quantum gravity'– a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


363: Translating the 'language of behavior' with artificially intelligent motion capture

Researchers created LEAP, a flexible motion-capture tool that can be trained in a matter of minutes to track body parts over millions of frames of existing video with high accuracy, without any physical markers or labels. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


364: Virologists discover safer potential Zika vaccine

In mouse trials, a vaccine based on recombinant adenovirus protected against Zika without evidence of antibodies. Reports have shown Zika antibodies can worsen Dengue virus infection. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


365: Annual, biological rhythms govern milk production in dairy cows

The amount and composition of milk produced by dairy cows appears to be more regulated by internal, annual biological rhythms than by environmental factors such as heat and humidity, according to researchers who studied more than a decade of production records from herds across the country. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


366: The #MeToo movement shook up workplace policies in science

In the #MeToo era, the scientific community is confronting its own sexual harassment problems and looking to research for solutions.


367: Starchy food may reduce autoimmune reactions in people with lupus

A study in mice shows that certain gut bacteria may exacerbate lupus, but eating starch can halt their growth, hinting at a possible treatment


368: Harvard's Cass Sunstein: Algorithms can correct human biases

Algorithms help drive the modern world. Algorithms reflect human biases, but some — as Harvard's Cass Sunstein notes — can be built to help correct our biases. If you build the right algorithm, you might be able to help contribute to a better world. None Algorithms are part of the engine that drives the modern world. When you search for something on Google, you're relying on a search engine defin


369: Facebook: backlash threatens world's biggest platform

Facebook, the world's largest social network, faces a growing backlash over privacy and data protection, with revelations this week about sharing data with business partners adding to pressure.


370: Letter: That’s My Mom!

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET on December 20, 2018. Afghanistan in the 1950s and ’60s In 2013, Alan Taylor published photos taken in Afghanistan in the 1950s and ’60s , a period of modernization and liberalization in the country. * In one photo from 1962, students at the Faculty of Medicine in Kabul examine a plaster cast showing a part of the human body. Recently, Taylor heard from a woman who recogni


371: To Save Obamacare, Repeal the Mandate

In declaring invalid the entire Affordable Care Act, Judge Reed O’Connor claimed he was respecting congressional intent. Didn’t Congress say the individual mandate was “essential” when it first adopted Obamacare? So if the mandate is now unconstitutional because it can no longer be sustained as a tax, O’Connor reasoned, Congress must have wanted the entire law to fall with it. The reasoning is sp


372: ‘6 Months Off Meds I Can Feel Me Again’

Kanye West has been tweeting again. Last weekend, the always provocative rapper posted several dozen times on Twitter, which is often his public megaphone of choice. Many of the tweets concerned a topic that has been central to both his creative output and his public persona: his mental health. West, who revealed his diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 2017, declared he had been off his medication f


373: Let's Stop the Near-Drowning of Lab Animals

Scientists do it to test antidepressants, but it’s fantastically cruel—plus it doesn’t even work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


374: Faint starlight in Hubble images reveals distribution of dark matter

Astronomers have employed a revolutionary method to detect dark matter in galaxy clusters. The method allows astronomers to 'see' the distribution of dark matter more accurately than any other method used to date and it could possibly be used to explore the ultimate nature of dark matter. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


375: Performance enhancer: Sports compression stockings a winning advantage

Sports compression stockings are so effective they might be considered performance enhancers for soccer players, new research finds. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


376: US indicts Chinese govt hackers over attacks in 12 countries

The US Justice Department on Thursday indicted two Chinese hackers tied to Beijing's security services who allegedly targeted companies and agencies in a dozen countries, which US officials said showed President Xi Jinping had not fulfilled his pledge to stop cybercrime.


377: Researchers create a bacteria-based drug delivery system that outperforms conventional methods

An interdisciplinary team of three Virginia Tech faculty members affiliated with the Macromolecules Innovation Institute has created a drug delivery system that could radically expand cancer treatment options. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


378: How is big data impacting sports analytics?

Sports in all its forms, from Major League Baseball to Fantasy Football is driven by and produces huge amounts of data, and advanced data mining and machine learning techniques are now having a major impact on sports data analytics. A fascinating collection of research and perspective articles on the design, development, and evaluation of methods and their use in sports analytics, both on the busi (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


379: How is big data impacting sports analytics?

Sports in all its forms, from Major League Baseball to Fantasy Football is driven by and produces huge amounts of data, and advanced data mining and machine learning techniques are now having a major impact on sports data analytics. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


380: Bacteria-based drug delivery system that outperforms conventional methods

"Its (salmonella's) job as a pathogen is to penetrate through the tissue," Behkam said. "What we thought is if bacteria are so good at moving through the tissue, how about coupling nanomedicine with the bacterium to carry that medicine much farther than it'd passively diffuse on its own?" (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


381: Network orchestration: SLU researcher uses music to manage networks

A Saint Louis University researcher uses sound as a simpler alternative to manage complicated network tasks. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


382: Researchers identify genes associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

The researchers identified three new sites in the genome that appear to be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


383: Impact of diet intervention on autoimmunity in mice

Could a change in diet be beneficial to people with autoimmune diseases such as lupus? Researchers have revealed how a dietary intervention can help prevent the development of this autoimmune disease in susceptible mice. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


384: A mountain of evidence on air pollution's harms to children

A new study organizes the available scientific evidence on the effects of air pollution on children's health. The article is the first comprehensive review of the associations between various fossil fuel combustion pollutants and multiple health effects in children in the context of assessing the benefits of air pollution and climate change policies. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


385: Gold-complexed ferrocenyl phosphines as potent antimalarials

Researchers have developed novel ferrocene-based molecules that impair the malaria parasite's metabolic function leading to parasite death. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


386: Times Insider: How We Created a New Way to Depict Addiction Visually

We used video clips illustrated by software to interpret heroin addicts’ own words about their experiences. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


387: Study finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years

Earlier this year, the United Nations announced some much-needed, positive news about the environment: The ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation, and which was severely depleted by decades of human-derived, ozone-destroying chemicals, is on the road to recovery. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


388: Video: How kimchi gets its kick

Kimchi, the fermented cabbage dish beloved in Korea and around the world, has a signature pungent, sour tang. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


389: Finding opioid alternatives in cone snail stings

Science To Baldomero Olivera, venom is nature's drug industry. Olivera is the lead scientist at a 25-person lab that studies cone-snail venom. His job is to figure out how it works, and transform it into drugs that could soothe and…


390: Forests, like humans, require a balanced diet

The world's forests are on a fast food diet of carbon dioxide, which is currently causing them to grow faster. But a researcher finds evidence suggesting that forest growth may soon peak as the trees deplete nitrogen in the soil over longer growing seasons. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


391: Team creates and demonstrates first quantum sensor for satellite gravimetry

NASA and the Sunnyvale, California-based AOSense, Inc., have successfully built and demonstrated a prototype quantum sensor capable of obtaining highly sensitive and accurate gravity measurements—a stepping stone toward next-generation geodesy, hydrology, and climate-monitoring missions in space. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


392: Is the Psychology of Deadly Force Ready for the Courts?

In the absence of rigorous science, psychologists disagree about using the neurobiology of stress to defend police officers who kill — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


393: Device that works like a lung makes clean fuel from water

A device inspired by human lungs can split water into oxygen and hydrogen. If successfully scaled up it could help make clean fuel for hydrogen cars


394: There may be a link between erectile dysfunction and type 2 diabetes

A DNA analysis links type 2 diabetes with erectile dysfunction, hinting that having a healthier lifestyle may reduce the chances of getting erectile problems


395: Studies examine pediatric services in US emergency departments

Three papers from research teams led by a Massachusetts General Hospital physician examine the current readiness of US emergency departments (EDs) to care for children and describe an initiative that led to the appointment of a Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator — a step considered the single best intervention to improve pediatric emergency care — in all Massachusetts EDs. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


396: Pay-it-forward model increases STD testing among gay men in China

Chinese gay men who were offered a free STD test and then asked to donate to the testing of another man were 48 percent more likely to get tested than men offered the standard of care, UNC researchers found. Learn how this approach could be applied for testing of other diseases. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


397: Researchers from the CNIO and the Hospital 12 de Octubre make sense out of the chaos of melanoma

The study has discovered that numerous processes involved in the metastasis of melanoma, which were thought to be independent from each other, have a global coordinator: the p62 protein.The publication also discovered the involvement of another protein, FERMT2, in metastasis, and suggests that both, FEMT2 and p62, could represent indicators of bad prognosis in melanoma patients.These findings have (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


398: Translating the 'language of behavior' with artificially intelligent motion capture

Princeton researchers created LEAP, a flexible motion-capture tool that can be trained in a matter of minutes to track body parts over millions of frames of existing video with high accuracy, without any physical markers or labels. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


399: Study examines head impacts, changes in eye function in high school football players

Head impacts in youth sports, even when they don't cause symptoms of concussion, are a public health concern because these so-called subconcussive head impacts may result in long-term neurological issues if they are sustained repeatedly. This study looked at changes in measurements of near point of convergence (NPC), which is the distance from your eyes to where both eyes can focus without double (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


400: Yale Cancer Center scientists advise caution in immunotherapy research

In a new study, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists suggest that as the number of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy grows exponentially, some caution should be exercised as we continue to better understand the biology of these new therapeutic targets. The findings are published today in the journal Cell. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


401: New threat to ozone recovery

A new MIT study, published in Nature Geoscience, identifies another threat to the ozone layer's recovery: chloroform — a colorless, sweet-smelling compound that is primarily used in the manufacturing of products such as Teflon and various refrigerants. The researchers found that between 2010 and 2015, emissions and concentrations of chloroform in the global atmosphere have increased significantly (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


402: Study finds elevated risk of rare blood cancers after chemotherapy for most solid tumors

Findings from a new study by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) show that patients treated with chemotherapy for most solid tumors during 2000-2014 experienced an increased risk of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (tMDS/AML). The study was published December 20, 2018, in JAMA Oncology. NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


403: Bacteria rely on classic business model

The pneumonia causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. It generates two different cells — motile spreaders and virulent stickers. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now elucidated how the germ attaches to tissue within seconds and consecutively spreads. Just like the business model: settling — growing — expanding. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


404: Gut-brain connection signals worms to alter behavior while eating

MIT neuroscientists have discovered how neurons in the digestive tract of the worm C. elegans signal the brain to slow down when it encounters an area of plentiful food. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


405: Convincing evidence that type 2 diabetes is a cause of erectile dysfunction

Evidence that type 2 diabetes is a cause of erectile dysfunction has been found in a large-scale genomic analysis. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


406: A lung-inspired design turns water into fuel

Scientists at Stanford University have designed an electrocatalytic mechanism that works like a mammalian lung to convert water into fuel. Their research, published Dec. 20 in the journal Joule, could help existing clean energy technologies run more efficiently. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


407: Himalayan marmot genome offers clues to life at extremely high altitudes

Himalayan marmots can survive at altitudes up to 5,000 meters in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, and Pakistan and on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, where many of them face extreme cold, little oxygen, and few other resources. Now, researchers have sequenced the first complete Himalayan marmot genome, which may help them to better explain how the marmots live in such extremes. The fin (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


408: Mount Sinai researchers discover new drug cocktail that increases human beta cell proliferation at rapid rates

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a novel combination of two classes of drugs that induces the highest rate of proliferation ever observed in adult human beta cells — the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. The result is an important step toward a diabetes treatment that restores the body's ability to produce insulin. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


409: 45% of UK scientists don’t believe in God

Scientists in the United Kingdom are significantly less religious than the general population there, research finds. In addition, UK scientists at elite universities are more likely to never attend religious services than those at less prestigious schools. The study also indicates biologists are more likely to never attend religious services than physicists. The study uses data from a survey of b (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


410: Centralt dokument mangler, før solcelleejere kan overføres til flexafregning

Flexafregning er den eneste gangbare løsning for solcelleejere fremover, og efter planen skal den nye ordning indføres fra nytår. Men med årsskiftet lige om hjørnet lader et vigtigt dokument fra Energistyrelsen stadig vente på sig. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


411: Mighty morphing materials take complex shapes

Rice University scientists have created a liquid crystal elastomer that can be molded into shapes that shift from one to another when heated. The material is intended for biomedical and robotics applications. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


412: How kimchi gets its kick (video)

Kimchi, the fermented cabbage dish beloved in Korea and around the world, has a signature pungent, sour tang. Those unique flavors come from not only salt and spices but also fermentation by friendly microbes. In this video, Reactions explores the chemistry of why kimchi is so delicious and even tries to make a batch: https://youtu.be/DG4afs7C1XI. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


413: Beyond the black hole singularity

Our first glimpses into the physics that exist near the center of a black hole are being made possible using 'loop quantum gravity'–a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


414: A mountain of evidence on air pollution's harms to children

A new study led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) organizes the available scientific evidence on the effects of air pollution on children's health. The paper in the journal Environmental Research is the first comprehensive review of the associations between various fossil fuel combustion pollutants and multiple health effects in children in the conte (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


415: Genome offers clues to esophageal cancer disparity

A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. It suggests a possible target for prevention strategies, which preliminary work suggests could involve flavonoids derived from cranberries. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


416: New research shows how a fatty diet can lead to life-threatening liver disease

A new study by USC scientists provides new insight on how dietary fat and cholesterol drive the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


417: NIH-developed test detects protein associated with Alzheimer's and CTE

An ultrasensitive test has been developed that detects a corrupted protein associated with Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition found in athletes, military veterans, and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma. This advance could lead to early diagnosis of these conditions and open new research into how they originate, according to NIH scientists and (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


418: Yale-led team examines impact of diet intervention on autoimmunity in mice

Could a change in diet be beneficial to people with autoimmune diseases such as lupus? A Yale-led team of researchers have revealed how a dietary intervention can help prevent the development of this autoimmune disease in susceptible mice. The study was published in Cell Host & Microbe. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


419: Blood editors announce top 10 manuscripts of 2018

The editors of Blood, the most-cited journal in hematology, have selected the top manuscripts of 2018. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


420: Bacteria rely on classic business model

The pneumonia-causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. It generates two cell types—motile spreaders and virulent stickers. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now elucidated how the germ attaches to tissue within seconds and consecutively spreads just like a business model: settling—growing—expanding. The study has been (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


421: Gut-brain connection signals worms to alter behavior while eating

When a hungry worm encounters a rich food source, it immediately slows down so it can devour the feast. Once the worm is full, or the food runs out, it will begin roaming again.


422: Genetic study reveals how citrus became the Med's favorite squeeze

Genetic detective work has illuminated the important role of Jewish culture in the widespread adoption of citrus fruit by early Mediterranean societies.


423: Who Gets to Look Out to the Edge of the Universe?

The cosmos would seem like a dull and desolate void if it weren’t for the Hubble Space Telescope. The space-based observatory has revealed a trove of colorful, cosmic wonders , from sparkling stars and galaxies , to glowing clouds of gas and dust, to the glittering shards left behind after a supernova. Hubble has found these cosmic jewels scattered across the universe and followed them back in ti


424: What are you looking at? How attention affects decision-making

Scientists using eye-tracking technology have found that what we look at helps guide our decisions when faced with two visible choices, such as snack food options. But it is not as easy as saying we simply choose what we look at the most, the research found. Instead, our gaze amplifies our desire for choices we already like. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


425: Japan May Start Commercial Whale Hunting Again

Japan plans to leave the International Whaling Commission so that it can resume commercially hunting the marine giant, according to news reports from government sources.


426: In Taliban’s wake, more Afghans say marriage can wait

Attitudes on child marriage and education have changed significantly in Afghanistan’s most underdeveloped regions since the overthrow of the Taliban, a study finds. The study, which appears in the Journal of Adolescent Health , includes interviews with nearly 1,400 Afghans ages 12-15 and their parents, all in relatively poor rural districts of the country. In just one generation, the responses in (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


427: The real reason female entrepreneurs get less funding | Dana Kanze

Women own 39 percent of all businesses in the US, but female entrepreneurs get only two percent of venture funding. What's causing this gap? Dana Kanze shares research suggesting that it might be the types of questions start-up founders get asked when they're invited to pitch. Whether you're starting a new business or just having a conversation, learn how to spot the kinds of questions you're bein


428: What can you do to protect your data on Facebook?

Facebook has shared users' private messages, contact information and other personal data with companies such as Microsoft and Spotify, according to a New York Times report that was alarming even in light of previous disclosures about the social network's practices.


429: How Complex Wholes Emerge From Simple Parts

You could spend a lifetime studying an individual water molecule and never deduce the precise hardness or slipperiness of ice. Watch a lone ant under a microscope for as long as you like, and you still couldn’t predict that thousands of them might collaboratively build bridges with their bodies to span gaps . Scrutinize the birds in a flock or the fish in a school and you wouldn’t find one that’s


430: Neural network taught to detect age and gender by video almost 20 percent more accurately

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have created a technology to help neural networks identify certain people on video, detecting their age and gender more quickly and accurately. The development has already become the basis for offline detection systems in Android mobile apps. The results of the study were published in an article entitled 'Video-based age and gender recognition in mob (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


431: Memory and cognition problems affect recovery in rehabilitation facilities

Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) added new ways to measure patients' abilities to perform their daily routines in nursing facilities and other after-care settings. Studies have not examined how skilled nursing care residents who have cognitive difficulties perform on the new self-care and mobility measurements. Researchers designed a new study to fill that knowledge g (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


432: Parkinson's disease experts devise a roadmap

A recently discovered protein, alpha-synuclein, has become one of the most attractive targets for developing new drugs with the potential to slow down or arrest the progression of Parkinson's disease. Experts in the field of Parkinson's research have now proposed a roadmap for preclinical and clinical trials investigating compounds targeting alpha-synuclein. Their consensus white paper is publishe (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


433: Time to biochemical failure could be used as surrogate endpoint in treatment: LA prostate cancer

An analysis of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-RTOG 9202 showed that the interval of time to biochemical failure (IBF), or the time it takes for previously treated cancer to return as indicated by prostate specific antigen (PSA) rise, could be used as a surrogate endpoint for locally advanced prostate cancer. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


434: Lipid raft components offer potential cholesterol-lowering drug target

Excessive dietary cholesterol (and its uptake) can cause hypercholesterolemia. In a new paper, researchers show that intestinal cholesterol absorption requires the complex lipid GM3. Disrupting GM3 synthesis can reduce the incidence of high cholesterol in mice fed a high-cholesterol diet, suggesting the pathway as a lipid-lowering drug target. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


435: Research reveals 'fundamental finding' about Earth's outer core

Researchers used high-powered supercomputing techniques to make a critical discovery about the chemical composition of the Earth's outer core. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


436: Electrically charged higgs versus physicists: 1-0 until break

The last missing particle of the Standard Model, the Higgs boson, was discovered in 2012 in the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Since then, searching for new, related particles has been underway. Predicted by various theories that go beyond known physics, Higgs bosons with positive or negative electric charge are among the favorites to be observed. But do these particles really exist? (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


437: Americans Should Be ‘Screaming Mad’ About Amazon’s Free Money

You may have heard by now that Amazon’s new headquarters will soon call the New York and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas home. This decision has engendered much criticism. But the Atlantic staff writer Derek Thompson doesn’t think the vitriol is enough. “We should all be screaming mad about the state of corporate handouts in this country,” Thompson says in the latest Atlantic Argument . He a


438: ALMA gives passing comet its close-up

As comet 46P/Wirtanen neared Earth on December 2, astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) took a remarkably close look the innermost regions of the comet's coma, the gaseous envelope around its nucleus.


439: Apple risks iPhone ban in Germany after court case loss

A German court on Thursday ruled in favour of US chipmaker Qualcomm in a patent dispute case against Apple, which could lead to a ban on sales of iPhones in Germany.


440: Chemists discover new signatures to identify cystic fibrosis in infants sooner

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered several new biomarkers from a single drop of blood that could allow earlier and more definitive detection of cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic disease which strikes both children and adults, causing chronic problems with the digestive system and the lungs. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


441: Changing communities may affect the success of Iceland's evacuation guidelines

Icelanders generally responded well to evacuation guidelines when the volcano Eyjafjallajökull erupted in 2010 and caused widespread disruption to international travel. However, since then the demography, economy and political structure of Iceland have changed. For example, tourism has become especially important in South Iceland in the past few years. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


442: Major gaps remain in how traditional knowledge is used in salmon governance in Norway and Finland

A new article published today in the journal Arctic points to major challenges in the ways traditional knowledge is included in the management of Atlantic salmon in Norway and Finland. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


443: New study first to predict which oil and gas wells are leaking methane

A new study in Environmental Geosciences is the first to predict — with up to 87 percent accuracy — which oil and natural wells are most likely to be leaking methane. Research published in Science estimated that natural gas wells are leaking 60 percent more methane than the EPA estimates, offsetting much of the fuel's climate benefit. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


444: Scientists discover new brain changes in early Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have discovered new changes occurring in the human brain in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers used a multiomic approach to determine RNA, protein, and phosphorylation levels and carried out further neurobioinformatic analyses on them. The findings, drawing on data from a Finnish biobank of brain tissue samples, were published (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


445: Antennal sensors allow hawkmoths to make quick moves

All insects use vision to control their position in the air when they fly, but they also integrate information from other senses. Biologists at Lund University have now shown how hawkmoths use mechanosensors in their antennae to control fast flight maneuvers. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


446: Media alert: New articles in The CRISPR Journal

The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, announces the publication of its December issue. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


447: New optical memory cell achieves record data-storage density

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique that can store more optical data in a smaller space than was previously possible on-chip. This technique improves upon the phase-change optical memory cell, which uses light to write and read data, and could offer a faster, more power-efficient form of memory for computers. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


448: Australian study into how seals react to boats prompts new ecotourism regulations

Unable to differentiate between a predator and a tourist boat carrying humans curious to view a colony of seals while resting in their natural habitat, pinnipeds are quick to react defensively as soon as they sense what they perceive as a potential life threat. The closer the vessel approaches, the more likely it is for the animals to rush into the sea in an attempt to escape and the greater the r (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


449: InSight places first instrument on Mars

NASA's InSight lander has deployed its first instrument onto the surface of Mars, completing a major mission milestone. New images from the lander show the seismometer on the ground, its copper-colored covering faintly illuminated in the Martian dusk. It looks as if all is calm and all is bright for InSight, heading into the end of the year.


450: Quantum Maxwell's demon 'teleports' entropy out of a qubit

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, ETH Zurich, and Argonne National Laboratory, U.S, have described an extended quantum Maxwell's demon, a device locally violating the second law of thermodynamics in a system located one to five meters away from the demon. The device could find applications in quantum computers and microscopic refrigerators that cool down tiny objects (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


451: Why AI robot toys could be good for kids

A new generation of robot toys with personalities powered by artificial intelligence could give kids more than just a holiday plaything, according to a University of Alberta researcher. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


452: Fra nytår kan fjernvarmeselskaber ikke mere binde kunderne

Energiaftalens afsnit om forbrugerbindinger blev i dag til lov – men ikke med oppositionens velsignelse: Den stemte blankt (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


453: Trigonometry Is Essential to Physics. Here Are the Basics

Good ol' trig: that bastion of angles and triangles is essential to calculating velocity, momentum, and much more.


454: Scientists find nanoparticles with peculiar chemical composition

An international team from Russia and China discovered a host of new and unexpected nanoparticles and found a way to control their composition and properties the findings that break fresh ground in the use of nanoparticles. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


455: The production of Ac-225

This manuscript attempts to present an overview of availability sources of 225Ac and production methods by which additional supplies might be made available to the community of clinical researchers seeking their application in the treatment of human disease. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


456: Current concepts and perspectives on connexin43: A mini review

This review discusses current knowledge on the functional and structural abnormalities in Cx43 associated with heart disease and cancer, aiming to highlight the importance of this connexin as an emerging therapeutic target. Here, the current knowledge on the pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels were also summarized. Finally, we propose that this knowledge can be exploited to iden (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


457: NUS study: In response to heat, the more affluent use air-conditioners; low-income households use water

An NUS study has revealed that Singapore households from different socioeconomic groups vary significantly in their use of water and electricity for the relief of heat. The findings suggest that water provides heat relief for lower-income households while demand for electricity increases among the more affluent, likely through the use of air-conditioning, when temperatures rise. Results from the s (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


458: Central role of transforming growth factor type beta 1 in skeletal muscle dysfunctions

In this review we present the critical and recent antecedents regarding the mechanisms and cellular targets involved in the effects of TGF-β1 in the muscle, in pathological processes such as the inhibition of regeneration, fibrosis and atrophy. In addition, an update on the development of new strategies with therapeutic potential to inhibit the deleterious actions of TGF-β in skeletal muscle is di (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


459: Improved stem cell approach could aid fight against Parkinson's

Scientists have taken a key step towards improving an emerging class of treatments for Parkinson's disease. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


460: Chemotherapeutic drugs and plasma proteins: Exploring new dimensions

This review provides a bird's eye view of interaction of a number of clinically important drugs currently in use that show covalent or non-covalent interaction with serum proteins. Platinum drug-cisplatin interacts covalently and alters the function of the key plasma protease inhibitor molecule -alpha-2-macroglobulin and induces the conformational changes in the protein molecule and inactivates it (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


461: Enzyme's unfrozen adventure: In crystallo protein thermodynamics

Osaka University researchers and collaborators have reported the first in crystallo thermodynamic analysis of copper amine oxidase catalysis using a non-cryocooled technique. The method, which analyzes protein crystals coated with a water-soluble polymer, rather than cryogenically cooled crystals, can be temperature-controlled, allowing for conformational changes to be monitored over a range of te (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


462: Leuven scientists tackle one immune disease after the other

In two recent studies, the same team of scientists has uncovered the mechanisms underlying two distinct immunological disorders affecting both children and adults. Stephanie Humblet-Baron (VIB-KU Leuven) was the researcher at the helm of both projects. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


463: Technology helps new pilots better communicate with air traffic control, increase safety

Learning to speak a new language can be difficult in any setting. Now, imagine trying to learn the language of the sky as a new pilot, while also navigating the instrument panel and learning to fly the plane safely. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


464: Comet hunters successfully observe Wirtanen with newly modernized instrument

Astronomers are being treated to an exciting view of Comet 46P/Wirtanen at W. M. Keck Observatory, with sharper-than-ever data images of this icy and rocky space visitor. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


465: Novel imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

A team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Bioengineering Professor Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue shortly after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room. The researchers achieved this using a new portable optical imaging system developed in Boppart's lab. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


466: ESA's solar-powered giant one year on

ESA's 35-metre antenna in Australia has now been powered by the sun for over a year, cutting costs and reducing carbon emissions by 330 tonnes—equivalent to 1.9 million km driven by car. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


467: Making the Holidays Accessible to All

A Paralympic silver medalist offers a few simple tips for making wheelchair users welcome — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


468: Selfish genes can act as both makers, breakers of species

A selfish streak in genes known to drive species apart might occasionally bring them closer together, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Rochester. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


469: From a plant sugar to toxic hydrogen sulfide

In a doctoral research project conducted at the Department of Biology, researchers have described the degradation of the dietary sugar sulfoquinovose by anaerobic bacteria to toxic hydrogen sulfide for the first time—increased production of hydrogen sulfide in the human intestinal system has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


470: The myth of the American Frontier still shapes U.S. racial divides

When Americans study their 19th-century history, they tend to look at its great conflicts, especially the epic clash over slavery. They are less likely to recall its broad areas of agreement. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


471: Let go of toxic workplace 'emotional labour' in 2019

What will you leave behind in 2019? Here's one suggestion: toxic workplace emotional labour. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


472: Doing away with essays won't necessarily stop students cheating

It's never been easier for university students to cheat. We just need look to the scandal in 2015 that revealed up to 1,000 students from 16 Australian universities had hired the Sydney-based MyMaster company to ghost-write their assignments and sit online tests. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


473: Spectacular flying reptiles soared over Britain's tropical Jurassic past

Spectacular flying reptiles armed with long teeth and claws which once dominated the skies have been rediscovered, thanks a paleontology student's Ph.D. research. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


474: Madrid is the autonomous community that spends the most on the Spanish Christmas Lottery

The people of Madrid spend close to 470 million euros on the Spanish Christmas Lottery, approximately 20 percent of the total. This is one of the figures highlighted by the 'Yearbook of Gambling in Spain,' a report recently presented by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and CODERE. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


475: Age is more than just a number: Machine learning may predict if you're in for a healthy old age

A collaborative team at the Salk Institute analyzed skin cells from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. By applying machine-learning algorithms to these biomarkers, they were able to predict a person's actual age with less than eight years error, on average. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


476: A new way to cut the power of tumors

Instead of tackling tumors head-on, a team of researchers from the University of Geneva and the Amsterdam UMC, location VUmc chose to regulate their vascularization by intervening with cellular receptor overexpressed specifically in cancer blood vessels. By acting on the development of the blood vessels within the tumor, scientists hope to modulate vasculature and deliver the treatments extremely (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


477: Small family-run livestock farms stand out in Cordoba's dehesa

A University of Cordoba study maps out the characteristics of dehesa farms associated with feeding cooperatives in Los Pedroches and Upper Guadiato. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


478: Researchers develop method to non-destructively measure the salt content of concrete structures

Researchers have used a method, using the RANS compact neutron source, to non-destructively measure the salt content of structures such as bridges, tunnels, and elevated roadways, which can suffer from degradation due to exposure to salt from seawater and other sources. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


479: Scientists use magnetic defects to achieve electromagnetic wave breakthrough

In a new study, Argonne scientists have created small regions of magnetic defects. When electromagnetic plane waves interact with these defects, they are converted into helical waves, which encode more information for further materials studies. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


480: The Atlantic Hires Renowned Publishing Design Team Peter Mendelsund and Oliver Munday

Peter Mendelsund has been named creative director of The Atlantic , and his frequent design partner Oliver Munday will become the publisher’s new senior art director. Mendelsund, a longtime associate art director for Alfred A. Knopf, is widely recognized as one America’s preeminent designers. He now brings his vision and portfolio to The Atlantic, where he will direct the design and visuals acros (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


481: Feeling young isn’t always a reason to choose chemo

For older adults in a recent study, age was only one of the complex factors influencing their decisions to receive chemotherapy. For example, investigators encountered an 80-year-old patient who told investigators that he felt 20 and a 74-year-old who felt like he was 40 with a goal of outliving his 90-year-old father. The study volunteers were eligible if they had undergone cancer surgery and if (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


482: You should negotiate with your cable company to get a lower bill

DIY Cheaper television and internet are just a phone call away. Since you signed up for television and internet, your bills have been skyrocketing. Here’s how to talk the cable company back down to a more reasonable price.


483: Plastic waste disintegrates into nanoparticles, study finds

There is a considerable risk that plastic waste in the environment releases nano-sized particles known as nanoplastics, according to a new study from Lund University. The researchers studied what happened when takeaway coffee cup lids, for example, were subjected to mechanical breakdown, in an effort to mimic the degradation that happens to plastic in the ocean. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


484: Snowed in: Wolves stay put when it's snowing

Wolves travel shorter distances and move slower during snowfall events, according to new research. The effects were most pronounced at night, when wolves hunt, and behavior returned to normal within a day. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


485: Bacterial protein could help find materials for your next smartphone

A newly discovered protein could help detect, target, and collect lanthanides, rare-earth metals used in smartphones, from the environment. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


486: Mile-wide, potentially hazardous asteroid 2003 SD220 to swoosh by Earth on Saturday

A potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA), designated 2003 SD220 (or 163899), is expected to fly by the Earth on Saturday, December 22, at around 1:04 UTC. The space rock, estimated to be about a mile wide (1.6 kilometers), will pass by our planet at a distance of approximately 7.34 lunar distances (LD), what corresponds to 1.75 million miles (2.81 million kilometers).


487: Predicting the properties of a new class of glasses

ZIF glasses, a new family of glass, could combine the transparency of silicate glass with the nonbrittle quality of metallic glass, according to researchers at Penn State and Cambridge University in the U.K. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


488: Genome published of the small hive beetle, a major honey bee parasite

Beekeepers and researchers will welcome the unveiling of the small hive beetle's genome by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues. The small hive beetle (SHB) is a major parasite problem of honey bees for which there are few effective treatments. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


489: Suboptimal, inconsistent treatment for anaphylaxis due to unknown cause

A new Canadian study, led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), is shedding light on anaphylaxis due to an unknown trigger (AUT)–an unpredictable and potentially fatal allergic reaction, about which surprisingly little is known. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


490: Genome published of the small hive beetle, a major honey bee parasite

Beekeepers and researchers will welcome the unveiling of the small hive beetle's genome by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues. The small hive beetle (SHB) is a major parasite problem of honey bees for which there are few effective treatments. Completing the SHB genome takes on even more importance when you realize that among the SHB's close relatives are the destru (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


491: Micropores let oxygen and nutrients inside biofabricated tissues

Micropores in fabricated tissues such as bone and cartilage allow nutrient and oxygen diffusion into the core, and this novel approach may eventually allow lab-grown tissue to contain blood vessels, according to a team of Penn State researchers. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


492: Certain moral values may lead to more prejudice, discrimination

People who value following purity rules over caring for others are more likely to view gay and transgender people as less human, which leads to more prejudice and support for discriminatory public policies, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


493: Drone used to smuggle drugs into Kuwait

Kuwaiti authorities have arrested a man who used a drone to smuggle in drugs from a neighbouring country, the anti-narcotics department said Thursday. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


494: Study shows how plants evolve for faster growth

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have taken a step forward in understanding how evolution has changed the photosynthesis process in wild plants to help them grow more rapidly. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


495: Uber resumes autonomous vehicle tests in Pittsburgh

Uber is resuming autonomous vehicle tests in an area near downtown Pittsburgh.


496: Defects in nanoparticles help to drive the production of hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel

Nanomaterials that speed up the production of hydrogen gas have been created by A*STAR and NTU researchers. This work could help to develop more efficient technologies for making this clean fuel. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


497: Storbritannien ude af Galileo: Står uden navigationsatellitter om få måneder

Premierminister Theresa May smækker med døren og forlader forhandlinger om at lade Storbritannien forblive i det europæiske satellitprogram Galileo. Nu vil briterne bygge deres eget navigationssystem efter have brugt over 10 milliarder kroner på Galileo. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


498: Researcher finds a cheap way to identify invasive coconuts from space

Conservation scientists can use free satellite imagery to track invasive plant species on remote Pacific islands, according to new research. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


499: A molecular hammock for cotranslational modification

Proteins do most of the real work in cells and are modified in accordance with functional requirements. An LMU team has now shown how proteins are chemically altered on the ribosome, even before they fold into the active conformations. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


500: Spinifex promises stronger condoms

Spinifex grass could be used to create thinner, stronger latex for gloves and condoms, as well as more durable seals and tyres, an Australian scientist says. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


501: Tech Is Killing Street Food

Rosa Leon works as a tamale vendor in San Jose, California. But she has to do so on the sly, selling only at night. She considered obtaining permits, but she was daunted by the process. Now, the urban farm-and-food nonprofit Veggielution is helping her apply for them. In Bangalore, India, Sukumar N. T. sells gobi Manchurian, a fiery Indian-Chinese dish, from a mobile cart. He’s been on this corne


502: Cosmic ray telescope launches from Antarctica

The eye of the tiger is flying high above Antarctica once again. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


503: Sapphires and rubies in the sky

Researchers at the Universities of Zurich and Cambridge have discovered a new, exotic class of planets outside our solar system. These so-called super-Earths were formed at high temperatures close to their host star and contain high quantities of calcium, aluminium and their oxides—including sapphire and ruby. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


504: Researchers discover the initial stages of the folding mechanism of membrane proteins

An international team including the University of Valencia has proven that the folding of membrane proteins begins before they are inserted into biological membranes, a fact that has been central to biochemical research for decades. The study, published in Nature Communications, was coordinated by Ismael Mingarro, professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


505: Best Movies (2018): The Essential Films You Didn't See

This year had great blockbusters—'Black Panther'! 'A Star Is Born'!—but there are a few top-notch movies you might've missed.


506: Glitter-snegl, truet fugl og dragetusindben: Her er tre nye dyr fra 2018

Nogle er farverige og glitrende, mens andre dufter af død. Bliv klogere på nye arter, der alle er undersøgt af danske forskere. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


507: The 160K Natural Organism Library houses a wealth of novel compounds for biological research

A library based at A*STAR containing more than 160,000 biological specimens is a treasure trove of biologically active compounds for wide ranging applications. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


508: TV fiction reflects and reproduces national identities in times of crisis

In times of crisis, TV fiction becomes concerned with changes in the social world, but also with how responses to these changes are visible in a national identity. These conclusions are drawn in a thesis from the university of Gothenburg. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


509: A newly discovered catalyst promises cheaper hydrogen production

A new catalyst could dramatically decrease the cost of producing hydrogen, one of the cleanest renewable fuels. Based on molybdenum sulfide, the catalyst was developed by a group at the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, led by Shi Jie Wang. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


510: Austerity results in 'social murder' according to new research

The consequence of austerity in the social security system — severe cuts to benefits and the 'ratcheting up' of conditions attached to benefits — is 'social murder', according to new research. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


511: Leveraging the power of CRISPR-Cas9 to awaken antibiotics from their silent gene clusters

The bacterium Streptomyces roseosporus is the source of many common antibiotics such as daptomycin, which is active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and glycopeptide-resistant enterococci. A*STAR researchers have just unearthed a new antibiotic, auroramycin, from a silent biosynthetic gene cluster discovered in the S. roseosporus genome, and believe there are many more ju (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


512: No mistaking Australian steak – food agility project tackles food fraud

Three tonnes of Australian beef packed in Casino NSW and bound for China is being tracked and verified using blockchain and Internet of Things technologies. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


513: Climate change is putting wildlife at risk in the world's oldest lake

Climate change and human disturbance are putting wildlife in the world's oldest and deepest lake at risk, according to a new study by the University of Nottingham and University College London. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


514: New study touts agricultural, environmental benefits of biochar

The many benefits of a biomass-made material called biochar are highlighted in a new publication in which Ghasideh Pourhashem, assistant professor at NDSU's Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials and Center for Sustainable Materials Science, is the lead author. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


515: Why does nuclear fission produce pear-shaped nuclei?

Nuclear fission is a process in which a heavy nucleus split into two. Most of the actinides nuclei (plutonium, uranium, curium, etc) fission asymmetrically with one big fragment and one small. Empirically, the heavy fragment presents on average a xenon element (with charge number Z=54) independently from the initial fissioning nucleus. To understand the mechanism that determines the number of prot (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


516: The potential of nanomaterials to activate the body's antitumor immune response investigated

The importance of research into the role of the immune system in the development and therapy of oncological diseases was emphasized by the Royal Swedish Academy, which recently named James Allison and Tasuku Honjo recipients of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for launching an effective new way to attack cancer by treating the immune system rather than the tumor. In recent decades, i (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


517: Juul Closes Deal with Tobacco Giant Altria


518: ‘It Satisfies Every Childlike Curiosity’

Editor’s Note: Fifty years ago this month, the three-man crew of Apollo 8 swung around the moon’s far side and encountered a vision never before seen by human eyes: the sunlit Earth, juxtaposed against an ashen lunar plain, and a backdrop of infinite black space. Frank Borman, Apollo 8’s commander, has expressed frustration that he and his fellow astronauts failed to convey, with words, the cosmi


519: Is It Unethical to Give Your Cat Catnip?

Catnip can induce changes in cat behavior. An expert argues that giving it to cats raises questions about human power and animal autonomy.


520: Robots with sticky feet can climb up, down, and all around

Researchers have created a micro-robot whose electroadhesive foot pads, inspired by the pads on a gecko's feet, allow it to climb on vertical and upside-down conductive surfaces, like the inside walls of a commercial jet engine. Groups of them could one day be used to inspect complicated machinery and detect safety issues sooner, while reducing maintenance costs.


521: Chemical catalyst turns 'trash' into 'treasure,' making inert C-H bonds reactive

New research demonstrates the ability to use a dirhodium catalyst to selectively functionalize C-H bonds in a streamlined manner, while also maintaining virtually full control of the three-dimensional shape of the molecules produced. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


522: Researchers develop gold-complexed ferrocenyl phosphines as potent antimalarials

A team of researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed novel ferrocene-based molecules that impair the malaria parasite's metabolic function leading to parasite death. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


523: Analyzing 3-D neutron polarization under high pressure

A joint research team consisting of NIMS, JAEA and the Institut Laue Langevin has developed a high-pressure cell composed of completely nonmagnetic materials. The team then succeeded for the first time in analyzing neutron polarization in three dimensions at an extremely high pressure of several gigapascals using the cell. This technique is applicable to detailed analysis of electron spin arrangem (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


524: What Winter Solstice Rituals Tell Us About Indigenous People

For indigenous peoples, winter solstice has been a time to honor their ancient sun deity. Their rituals reveal a deep understanding of the natural world, from the mounds of Cahokia to the games of Blackfeet Indians. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


525: Bacterial protein can hunt smartphone materials

A newly discovered protein could help detect, target, and collect the rare-earth metals used in smartphones, report researchers. Two new studies describe the protein, which is 100 million times better at binding to lanthanides—the rare-earth metals in smartphones and other technologies—than to other metals like calcium. The first study, which appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Societ (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


526: Small changes in oxygen levels have big implications for ocean life

Oceanographers have found that even slight levels of ocean oxygen loss, or deoxygenation, have big consequences for tiny marine organisms called zooplankton. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


527: Targeted treatment slows progression of rare connective tissue tumor

A drug called sorafenib stopped progression of desmoid tumors for 80 percent of patients taking the drug over a two-year period as part of a phase 3 trial. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


528: Satellite study proves global quantum communication will be possible

Researchers in Italy have demonstrated the feasibility of quantum communications between high-orbiting global navigation satellites and a ground station, with an exchange at the single photon level over a distance of 20,000 km. The milestone experiment proves the feasibility of secure quantum communications on a global scale, using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


529: Diabetes drug could be used to treat common heart failure syndrome

Researchers have discovered that metformin, a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, might also be used to treat a common heart failure syndrome that is predicted to affect over 8 percent of people ages 65 or older by the year 2020. The study shows that metformin relaxes a key heart muscle protein called titin, allowing the heart to properly fill with blood before pumping it around the body. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


530: TSA airport security screening will get a lot more accurate just in time for some holiday travelers

Airport security is getting an upgrade. Soon, instead of stepping into cylindrical body scanners and staying perfectly still with hands overhead, travelers will be able to pass through an open-sided scanner that works much more quickly, NBC News reported Monday. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


531: How deep learning helped to map every solar panel in the US


532: The EU just finalized an agreement to ban tons of single-use plastics

Environment What next? In Brussels on Wednesday, EU leaders signed a provisional agreement to ban 10 major single-use plastic products and mandate cleanup of other items.


533: How climate change is affecting small Sierra Nevada lakes

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, are taking the temperature—and other measurements—of lakes of all sizes and shapes throughout the mountains of California to see how climate change is affecting them and what, perhaps, can be done about it. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


534: Winter Cycling Gear: Jackets, Waterproof Pants, Gloves, Lights

Just because it's bitter and nasty outside doesn’t mean you have to ride the bus. Stock up on this list of helmets, jackets, and warm stuff.


535: Uber's Self-Driving Cars Are Back on Pittsburgh Streets


536: We've Got the Screen Time Debate All Wrong. Let's Fix It

The narrative around tech addiction has been driven more by fear than facts. But that's finally starting to change.


537: Hacking Diplomatic Cables Is Expected. Exposing Them Is Not

Spies try to access government communications all the time. But an incident this week tested the limits of what happens when those compromises get discovered.


538: Researchers use DNA nanomachines to discover subgroups of lysosomes

The story of the lysosome is a classic smear campaign. Once dismissed as the garbage disposal of the cell—it does break down unneeded cell debris—it is now valued by scientists who realized all that dirty work also controls survival, metabolism, longevity and even neurodegenerative diseases. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


539: Carbon labeling can reduce greenhouse gases even if it doesn't change consumer behavior

In a new commentary piece published Dec. 18 in Nature Climate Change, Michael Vandenbergh, David Daniels Allen Distinguished Professor of Law and director of the Climate Change Research Network, examines how carbon labeling can help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in a variety of ways. The article, "From Myths to Action," is coauthored by Kristian Steensen Nielsen of the Copenhagen Business (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


540: Is a refrigerated food chain a net win or loss for climate emissions?

Few inventions have had a greater impact on our daily lives, and especially on the food we eat, than refrigeration. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


541: There Is No Such Thing as Conscious Thought

Philosopher Peter Carruthers insists that conscious thought, judgment and volition are illusions. They arise from processes of which we are forever unaware — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


542: Russian Scientists Hope to Restore Ice Age Steppe with 'Pleistocene Park.' Will It Work?

Russian scientists are bringing back ancient grasslands in Siberia.


543: Self-driving rovers tested in Mars-like Morocco

Robots invaded the Sahara Desert for Europe's largest rover field test, taking place in a Mars-like part of Morocco. For two weeks three rovers and more than 40 engineers tested automated navigation systems at up to five different sites. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


544: Nasa's InSight deploys 'Marsquake' instrument

The InSight mission begins to lay out the sensors that will listen to the Red Planet's "heartbeat".


545: Higher radiation dose needed to X-ray obese patients increases cancer risk

Extremely obese people are needing a far higher dose of radiation during x-ray examinations than people of normal weight, increasing their risk of cancer, new research has shown. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


546: Newborn insects trapped in amber show first evidence of how to crack an egg

Fossilised newborns, egg shells, and egg bursters preserved together in amber provide the first direct evidence of how insects hatched in deep time, according to a new article published today in the journal Palaeontology. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


547: Improving crop yields while conserving resources

When it comes to the health of the planet, agriculture and food production play an enormous role. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, roughly 37 percent of land worldwide is used for agriculture and food production, and 11 percent of the Earth's land surface is used specifically for crop production. Finding ways to make agriculture more sustainable and efficie (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


548: These Baby Sharks Swim from One Uterus to Another to Eat Their Unfertilized Siblings

The little sharks swim around inside their mom, switching between her multiple uteruses. When they get hungry they eat her unfertilized eggs.


549: Ancient Aramaic Incantation Describes 'Devourer' that Brings 'Fire' to Victims

The stone container dates back 2,800 years and is inscribed with scorpions and centipedes as well as the incantation.


550: Researchers develop non-destructive method to measure the salt content of concrete structures

Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP) have used a method, using the RANS compact neutron source, to non-destructively measure the salt content of structures such as bridges, tunnels, and elevated roadways, which can suffer from degradation due to exposure to salt from seawater and other sources. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


551: Q&A: Tracking the history of El Niño

In December 2018, forecasters announced a high likelihood that this winter will bring El Niño, which occurs when unusually warm Pacific waters create changes in weather patterns around the world. The phenomenon causes predictable fluctuations in temperature, winds and rainfall, and can be an important indicator for crop yields. But what do we really know about El Niño beyond contemporary times? Ho (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


552: London tester intelligente overvågningskameraer

Politistyrkerne i London afprøver overvågningskameraer, som kan genkende og gemme ansigter. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


553: The 21 (and Counting) Biggest Facebook Scandals of 2018


554: The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected

Visionaries thought technology would change books. Instead, it's changed everything about publishing a book.


555: A SpaceX Booster Went for a Swim and Came Back as Scrap Metal

The space company spent several days retrieving and inspecting a rocket booster that made an unplanned ocean landing. Now it appears to be toast.


556: DNA from ancient aboriginal Australian remains enables their repatriation

For many decades, Aboriginal Australians have campaigned for the return of ancestral remains that continue to be stored in museums worldwide.


557: Thermal energy storage: Material absorbs heat as it melts and releases it as it solidifies

MIT researchers have demonstrated a new way to store unused heat from car engines, industrial machinery, and even sunshine until it's needed. Central to their system is what the researchers refer to as a "phase-change" material that absorbs a large amount of heat as it melts and releases it as it resolidifies.


558: The battle over new nerve cells in adult brains intensifies

It’s not yet time to abandon the idea that adult human brains make new nerve cells.


559: How busting some moves on the dance floor is good for your brain

Whether you do the robot, shake your tail feather or go full ballroom, dancing has benefits that go way beyond having a good time


560: Rogue drones have brought Gatwick airport to a standstill UK Gatwick Airport


561: AT&T turns on its mobile 5G network on Dec. 21, starting with 12 cities and mobile hotspot

The mobile 5G race is officially at the starting block. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


562: 3-D Printing on Mars

It could make the vital job of building the habitats settlers need to stay alive vastly easier — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


563: Life on Mars: Will humans trash the planet like we have Earth?

Mountains of garbage, plastics that take thousands of years to disintegrate, oil spills in pristine environments from drilling into the soil or underneath the ocean: When we go to Mars, is it inevitable we'll repeat the same mistakes on Earth? (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


564: Apollo 8, 50 Years Later: The Greater Leap

The first flight to take astronauts around the moon looms larger than the first to land — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


565: Ny supercomputer placerer Danmark i øverste liga inden for life science

Danmarks Tekniske Universitet (DTU) og Københavns Universitet (KU) sikrer Danmark en ny supercomputer…. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


566: Dansk undersøgelse virkede: EU forbyder fire phthalater

Dansk undersøgelse af sundhedsskadelig kemi i toåriges hverdag fører til en begrænsning, der reelt vil virke som et forbud. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


567: Professor gruer for gratis adgang til forskningsartikler

Danske videnskabsfolk råber vagt i gevær over utilsigtede konsekvenser ved en plan, som vil give gratis adgang til offentligt finansieret forskning inden 2020. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


568: Molecule discovery holds promise for gene therapies for psoriasis

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have discovered a protein that could hold the key to novel gene therapies for skin problems including psoriasis – a common, chronic skin disease that affects over 100 million people worldwide. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


569: Parkinson's disease protein buys time for cell repair

Loss of the protein Parkin causes certain forms of Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative condition involving death of neurons.Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers in Australia showed that Parkin stifles cell death by blocking BAK, a protein which is a central player in cell death.Understanding the interactions between Parkin and BAK may lead to new therapeutic approaches to slow the prog (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


570: Google misleads kids and parents about apps, complaint filed with FTC says

Accusing Google of misleading practices about kids' apps, nearly two dozen child- and consumer-advocacy groups on Wednesday asked the FTC to investigate the Android maker. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


571: The Criminal-Justice Bill Had Broad Bipartisan Support and Still Almost Died

Though it’s a fairly modest measure with exceedingly broad support, the criminal-justice bill passed by the Senate on Tuesday evening barely made it out alive. Its near-demise illustrates how extreme partisanship and the permanent campaign have made reform legislation require a perfect storm in Washington. “It has died a thousand times and had life breathed back into it a thousand and one times,” (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


572: There’s No Real System to Counter Rogue Drones

Aeromexico Flight 773 from Guadalajara was just about to land last week when crew members heard a “pretty loud bang,” according to a cabin recording. A mysterious aerial collision had left the nose of the passenger jet badly mangled. By the time it landed safely in Tijuana, there was no confirmed culprit but one likely suspect: a drone. If confirmed, the incident would represent one of a very sma (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


573: The 27 Best Music Moments of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . It’s harder than ever to hear music in a vacuum. In this info-swamped era, the sound coming out of the speakers will be processed in the context of broad stories ( uh oh, is this song about Robert Mueller? ), and personal ones ( uh oh, is this song about my ex? ). The list below includes many of our favorite tunes of 2018 (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


574: Dinosaurs are alive! Here’s how we know, and why it matters

For most of the 20th century, figuring out the origin of birds was a great challenge of evolutionary biology — they didn't seem to fit anywhere. Then, in the late 20th century, a group of scientists discovered that birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs, which were large, bipedal meat-eaters like the Velociraptor or the T-Rex. The bird-from-dinosaur theory was considered to be a crackpot idea but (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


575: France fines Uber 400,000 euros over huge data breach

France's data protection agency said Thursday that it had fined the US ride-hailing group Uber 400,000 euros ($460,000) over a 2016 data breach that exposed the personal data of some 57 million clients and drivers worldwide. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


576: Look Back at How Much Space News Got Packed Into 2018

Many of the stories this year that kept our eyes pointed toward the stars, no matter what was happening on the ground. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


577: What We Learned in 2018: Health and Medicine

Developments in medicine and health that we’re still thinking about at year’s end. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


578: What We Learned in 2018: Science

Developments in science that we’re still thinking about at year’s end.


579: Nebraska virologists discover safer potential Zika vaccine

In mouse trials, a vaccine based on recombinant Adenovirus protected against Zika without evidence of antibodies. Reports have shown Zika antibodies can worsen Dengue virus infection. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


580: Embattled Noble Group completes $3.5 bn overhaul

Embattled commodities trader Noble Group has completed a $3.5 billion restructuring, it said Thursday, as the firm seeks to draw a line under a long-running crisis that pushed it to the brink of bankruptcy. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


581: Then one foggy Christmas eve, reindeers got connected

Rudolph and friends no longer need to rely on the famous reindeer's red nose to avoid getting lost. Now they have wireless technology. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


582: Nu skal 85.000 solcelleejere afregnes efter omstridt model

En ny afregningsmetode vil forringe vilkårene for de solcelleejere, der indtil nu er blevet årsafregnet. Retssag på vej. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


583: Midtjylland har fundet ny regionsdirektør

Pernille Blach Hansen bliver ny regionsdirektør i Region Midtjylland. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


584: S. Korea cab drivers protest Uber-like ride share app

Tens of thousands of taxi drivers in South Korea went on a nationwide strike Thursday, snarling up traffic in Seoul, in the latest protest at a planned Uber-like ride-sharing service. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


585: At Jesus's birthplace, an app is born to ease crowds

Bethlehem is buzzing, with more tourists expected this Christmas than have visited the Biblical city in years, causing the kind of problem that modern technology was almost born to deal with. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


586: Argentina puts 65-million-year-old dinosaur replica on display

Argentine paleontologists unveiled on Wednesday the replica of a 65-million-year-old skeleton of a plesiosaur marine reptile found in a Patagonian lake in 2009. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


587: Japan 'mulling IWC withdrawal' to resume commercial whaling

Japan is considering pulling out of the International Whaling Commission (IWC), officials told AFP on Thursday, as Tokyo reportedly gears up to resume commercial whaling activity next year. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


588: 100 years ago, airmail took flight

On December 25, 1918 a daring French industrialist launched the world's first ever airmail service, flying between the southwestern French city of Toulouse and Barcelona in northeastern Spain. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


589: Smiling at danger, China's finless porpoise fights to survive

In an oxbow lake along the middle reaches of the Yangtze River, a breathy sigh pierces the surface stillness as one of China's most endangered animals comes up for a gulp of hazy air. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


590: Pinterest planning 2019 stock market debut: report

Popular online bulletin board Pinterest is getting ready for a stock market debut early next year at a valuation of $12 billion or more, according to a Wall Street Journal report. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


591: Shares in SoftBank mobile unit rebound after earlier plunge

Shares in the mobile unit of Japanese technology giant SoftBank rebounded after steep early declines on a rollercoaster second trading day Thursday, after a bruising debut saw stocks close 14.5 percent lower. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


592: Astronauts land from ISS stint marred by air leak, rocket failure

Three astronauts landed back on Earth on Thursday after a troubled stint on the ISS marred by an air leak and the failure of a rocket set to bring new crew members.


593: Travelers face chaos as drones shut London's Gatwick airport

Thousands of passengers were delayed, diverted or stuck on planes Thursday as the only runway at Britain's Gatwick Airport remained closed into a second day after drones were spotted over the airfield.


594: Building a sustainable future, one brick at a time

This is due to balanced 'electrochemical' reduction and oxidation processes occurring inside the brick at the two faces. As long as electrodes at these faces are at different temperatures, the electrochemical reactions occur and electricity is generated. The compounds inside are not consumed, do not run out and can never be overcharged. As long as there is a temperature difference there can be ele (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


595: 2018’s weirdest stories: Friendly horses, toddler robots and moonmoons

New Scientist has covered some strange scientific findings this year. Here is our round-up of the weirdest and wackiest (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


596: Gladsaxe arbejder videre på overvågningsalgoritme – trods nej fra ministerium

Afslag på frikommune-ansøgning og regeringens nylige udmelding om at ligge modellen i skuffen får ikke kommunen til stoppe arbejdet. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


597: Giving birth associated with 14 percent higher risk of heart disease and stroke

Giving birth is associated with a 14 percent higher risk of heart disease and stroke compared to having no children, reports a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


598: Legislative Alchemy 2018: Chiropractors rebranding as primary care physicians continues

Chiropractors are not properly educated and trained to be primary care physicians. Yet, their campaign to rebrand themselves as PCPs via legislation continues. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


599: Rødgran, nordmann, øko eller i potte: Her er din juletræsguide

Og helt ærligt: Det gør ikke den store forskel for klima eller miljø, hvad du vælger. Så længe det ikke er plastik, siger forsker.


600: The joy of giving lasts longer than the joy of getting

The happiness we feel after a particular event or activity diminishes each time we experience that event, a phenomenon known as hedonic adaptation. But giving to others may be the exception to this rule, according to research forthcoming in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


601: Chemical synthesis breakthrough holds promise for future antibiotics

University of Colorado Boulder chemistry researchers have developed a novel way to synthesize and optimize a naturally-occurring antibiotic compound that could one day be used to fight lethal drug-resistant infections such as Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


602: Development of MEMS sensor chip equipped with ultra-high quality diamond cantilevers

A NIMS-led research group succeeded in developing a high-quality diamond cantilever with among the highest quality (Q) factor values at room temperature ever achieved. The group also succeeded for the first time in the world in developing a single crystal diamond microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chip that can be actuated and sensed by electrical signals. These achievements may populari (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


603: Always tired? Your immune system may be overactive.

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects millions of people worldwide, but scientists still aren't quite sure what causes it. A new study tracked people suffering from Hepatitis C (HCV) as they underwent a treatment course. The results showed that people with overactive immune responses developed chronic fatigue months following the treatment, and that the fatigue persisted even after their immune respon


604: The Grimch: Marathon Results!

Congratulations Eyewirers on a New Marathon Record! You finished this Grimchy green cell in an astonishing 2 hours 23 minutes! After finishing this first cell, you continued with your holiday cube cheer and finished a second marathon cell in 11 hours 13 minutes! Cheers to Cubes! (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


605: Trilobites: The Bullet Lodged in His Knee. Then the Injuries Really Began.

In an unusual medical case, a bullet left in the knee of a patient for 14 years led to joint damage and lead poisoning.


606: Juul May Get Billions in Deal With One of World’s Largest Tobacco Companies

A deal between the e-cigarette start-up and Altria, the maker of Marlboros, would create a powerful partnership in marketing and lobbying.


607: Top Cancer Doctor Resigns as Editor of Medical Journal

Dr. José Baselga, the former chief medical officer of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, was asked to resign after he failed to disclose corporate ties in dozens of scientific articles.


608: Warning against 'volcano tourism' risks

Thrill-seeking tourists are putting themselves in danger getting too close to volcanoes.


609: Tornado Touches Down Near Seattle, Causing Damage But No Deaths

The Port Orchard twister was extremely rare, especially for December, says the National Weather Service. No serious injuries were reported, but homes and other buildings were affected by the storm. (Image credit: Ted S. Warren/AP)


610: New study reveals 'startling' risk of stroke

Globally, one in four people over age 25 is at risk for stroke during their lifetime, according to a new scientific study. Researchers found a nearly five-fold difference in lifetime stroke risk worldwide, with the highest risk in East Asia and Central and Eastern Europe, and lowest in sub-Saharan Africa. The lifetime stroke risk for 25-year-olds in 2016 ranged from 8 percent to 39 percent, depend (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


611: Extinction Rebellion: The story behind the activist group

They've blocked bridges, held die-ins and closed roads – all in the name of stopping climate change.


612: Satellite study proves global quantum communication will be possible

Researchers in Italy have demonstrated the feasibility of quantum communications between high-orbiting global navigation satellites and a ground station, with an exchange at the single photon level over a distance of 20,000km.The milestone experiment proves the feasibility of secure quantum communications on a global scale, using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It is reported in ful (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


613: The Atlantic Daily: From the Brink

What We’re Following Facing Facebook: For years, Facebook has been sharing user data, including private messages, with other large technology platforms including Netflix, Spotify, and Microsoft’s Bing search engine, according to a New York Times report. Few of these data-sharing partnerships have even proven useful for Facebook, writes Alexis Madrigal, and the revelations are, most of all, a test (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


614: Carrying Tasers increases police use of force, study finds

A new study has found that London police officers visibly armed with electroshock 'Taser' weapons were more likely to be assaulted, and used force 48% more often, than those on unarmed shifts. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


615: Warming warning over turtle feminization

Up to 93% of green turtle hatchlings could be female by 2100, as climate change causes "feminisation" of the species, new research suggests.


616: Matter can travel to the future thru black holes, predicts new theory

Scientists calculate that black holes don't have singularities at their centers. Instead, the theory of loop quantum gravity predicts that black holes shoot out matter across the galaxy. The matter dispersal comes much later in the future. None Black holes are undoubtedly weird enough to imagine but two recent papers say we don't understand how they work at all. They go against the previous theor


617: This is why rocket launches always get delayed

Space Weather, weather, and sometimes boats. Four different rocket launches were scheduled to take off on Tuesday, and exactly none of those rockets actually took off.


618: The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Look Back at the Year in Politics: Gun Control, Gingrich, and the Georgia Governor's Race

Another year in American politics is coming to a close, and what a year it’s been! We saw congressional investigations, turmoil in the administration, debates over consequential policy issues such as immigration and health care, and midterm elections with record-high turnout. For the rest of the week, instead of our usual newsletter format, we’ll be sharing a selection of some of The Atlantic ’s (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


619: Lawsuit adds to Facebook woes on data protection

Facebook's woes mounted Wednesday as it faced a lawsuit alleging privacy violations related to data leaked to a consultancy working on Donald Trump's 2016 campaign, and as a new report suggested it shared more data with partners than it has acknowledged.


620: 10 atheist quotes that will make you question religion

Belief systems arise to address the time and social conditions of each era and culture. Your relationship to your community and environment is very influential in what you believe. Neuroscience explains many of the questions as to why we believe in the first place. None When I was studying for my degree in religion, I was most fascinated by what people believe. The fact that members of the same s


621: You Gotta Scratch That Itch

A particular set of brain neurons may be behind registering itch and inducing us to scratch. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


622: Facebook gave Spotify and Netflix access to users’ private messages


623: Number of Pets in Infancy Tied to Lower Allergy Risk

A study finds the effect is dose-dependent, with each additional pet further lowering the odds of developing allergies. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


624: A Devious Phishing Scam Targets Apple App Store Customers

Be on the lookout for emails that claim to be from the App Store.


625: Big Pharma Picks up on Medical Marijuana

A Novartis subsidiary is partnering with a Canadian cannabis company to sell medical marijuana worldwide. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


626: FACT CHECK: Facebook defines 'permission' loosely

Facebook gave companies such as Apple, Amazon and Yahoo extensive access to users' personal data, effectively exempting them from the company's usual privacy rules, according to a New York Times report .


627: After big earthquake, aftershocks continue to rattle Alaska

Nearly three weeks after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake shook up southcentral Alaska, the state continues to register frequent aftershocks. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


628: Should you be for-profit or nonprofit? Why not both?

Over the past fifteen years, I've had the opportunity to provide strategy for well over a hundred social change start-ups seeking to make the world a better place. The most common question they ask, "Should we be a for-profit or a nonprofit." My answer, "Why not consider both?" Let's review the advantages and disadvantages. The nonprofit option The nonprofit option is the most popular choice with (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


629: Facebook Didn’t Sell Your Data, It Gave It Away

The New York Times has once again gotten its hands on a cache of documents from inside Facebook , this time detailing data-sharing arrangements between the company and other corporations, which had “more intrusive access to users’ personal data than [Facebook] has disclosed” for most of the past decade, the article revealed. Microsoft’s search engine, Bing, got Facebook users’ friends, whether or


630: Prisoners who are sanctioned more are more likely to re-offend

Many prisons today use sanctions to discipline prisoners, including segregating them from other inmates, transferring them away from other inmates, and removing them from rehabilitation programs. A new longitudinal study that sought to determine the effect of these sanctions on recidivism found that prisoners who had greater exposure to formal sanctions were more likely to re-offend 1, 2, and 3 ye (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


631: An Invasive Midge Could Wreak Havoc on Antarctica

The insects have already transformed parts of Signy Island in the South Atlantic Ocean and could drastically change Antarctic ecosystems if introduced by humans. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


632: New research indicates that whale teeth are still present past mid-gestation, which is somewhat surprising

The humpback whale and a handful of similar whale species have a feeding mechanism utterly unique in the animal kingdom. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


633: Facebook’s Privacy Message Undermined by the Times—Again

Facebook has spent much of 2018 apologizing to people. A recent *New York Times* investigation calls all those apologies into question.


634: To Find Good News In The Universe Just Look To The Clouds

Astrophysicist Adam Frank likes to spread the universe's good news. Today's — the clouds in the sky exhibit a ceaseless power of creative transformation.


635: Deep Beneath Your Feet, They Live in the Octillions

The real journey to the center of the Earth has begun, and scientists are discovering subsurface microbial beings that shake up what we think we know about life.


636: URI researchers: Small changes in oxygen levels have big implications for ocean life

Oceanographers at the University of Rhode Island have found that even slight levels of ocean oxygen loss, or deoxygenation, have big consequences for tiny marine organisms called zooplankton. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


637: Study finds dinosaurs battled overheating with nasal air-conditioning

Researchers have long wondered how gigantic, heavily armored dinosaurs, such as the club-tailed ankylosaurs that lived in sweltering climates, avoided overheating. Now, as seen in the December 19 issue of PLOS ONE, researchers, led by a paleontologist from New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine at Arkansas State University (NYITCOM at A-State), have posed a new theory. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


638: Invasive asexual midges may upset Antarctica’s delicate moss banks

Fast-multiplying insects with earthworm powers have invaded Antarctica, and scientists are worried about how their waste could affect the continent.


639: 9 jaw-dropping facts about naked mole rats to celebrate the bloody ascent of their new queen

Animals Long may she reign. Naked mole rats are a real freaky bunch, as it turns out.


640: You can now drag and drop whole countries to compare their size

Our world maps lie to us: North America and Europe aren't really that big and Africa really is much bigger. It's all the fault of Mercator: even if the man himself wasn't necessarily Eurocentric, his projection is. This interactive map tool reveals countries' true sizes without having to resort to the Peters projection. Is Texas really bigger than Poland? Does Russia stretch further east to west


641: Hardware-software co-design approach could make neural networks less power hungry

Engineers have developed a neuroinspired hardware-software co-design approach that could make neural network training more energy-efficient and faster. Their work could one day make it possible to train neural networks on low-power devices such as smartphones, laptops and embedded devices. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


642: Tau protein suppresses neural activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

A study sheds new light on how the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease — amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles containing the protein tau — produce their damaging effects in the brain. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


643: Edging closer to personalized medicine for patients with irregular heartbeat

Biomedical engineers have determined which patients would benefit the most from a commonly used drug treatment. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


644: Elon Musk’s Boring Co. unveiled its prototype tunnel. Here are the first reviews.


645: Watch: Headsets track stress as new nurses learn

A new project uses headsets to measure how students’ brains and bodies react in stressful situations. As part of the New York University’s Holodeck Project, Winslow Burleson, a professor in the Rory Meyers College of Nursing, and his SuperComputing Collaboration team are advancing simulation-based education by testing new technologies. “We’re really creating the future of what the next generation (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


646: Huge armored dinosaurs battled overheating with nasal air-conditioning

Researchers show that the heavily armored, club-tailed ankylosaurs had a built-in air conditioner in their snouts.


647: Whale research helps answer long-sought scientific question

Scientists previously determined that fetal humpback whales develop the very beginnings of teeth, but they never erupt from the gums the way they do in human babies. Now, thanks to one SDSU graduate student's research, they have a better understanding of why this occurs. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


648: NASA analyzes newly formed Tropical Cyclone Cilidaa

An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite revealed where the strongest storms were located within recently formed Tropical Cyclone Cilida. Cilida formed in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. 18. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


649: Process makes stem-cell-derived heart cells light up

A faster, more cost-efficient, and more accurate method of examining the effectiveness of human pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiac muscle cells has been discovered, according to researchers from Penn State. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


650: We’re creeping back up to mid ‘90s-level gun death rates

Health Nearly 40,000 people died in 2017 from firearms. The 21st century has been fairly smooth sailing as far as gun deaths go, but in the last few years we’ve begun to ruin our track record. Data from the Centers for…


651: Trilobites: Watch a Robotic Hand Play the Piano With a More Human Touch

It hasn’t mastered Chopin or Debussy, but it can eke out a decent “Jingle Bells.”


652: Matter: ‘Spirits Won’t Rest’: DNA Links Ancient Bones to Living Aboriginal Australians

Museums around the world hold the remains of Aboriginal Australians, many of them stolen. Now geneticists may have found a way to return the bones to their homes.


653: Is giving all college students meningitis vaccines worth it?

Vaccinating all new college students against meningitis B may cost too much right now to justify preventing relatively few cases of the sometimes-deadly disease, according to a new study. But a computer model researchers have developed also suggests that if vaccine developers could significantly lower the price, universal vaccination on college campuses might be worthwhile. “Despite the poor prog (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


654: Battery-free tags let you control games with your clothes

RFID-embedded clothing could control avatars in video games or tell you when you should sit up straight. Researchers have found ways to track body movements and detect shape changes using arrays of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags in clothing. RFID tags are nothing new, which is part of their appeal for these applications, says Haojian Jin, a PhD student in Carnegie Mellon University’s (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


655: An autonomous robot swarm has self-organized by acting like natural cells


656: World’s Oldest Flower Unfurled Its Petals More Than 174 Million Years Ago

Dinosaurs that lived during the early Jurassic period could stop and smell the flowers if they so desired, according to a new study that describes the oldest fossil flower on record.


657: Tau protein suppresses neural activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital investigators sheds new light on how the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease — amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles containing the protein tau — produce their damaging effects in the brain. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


658: Better security achieved with randomly generating biological encryption keys

Data breaches, hacked systems and hostage malware are frequently topics of evening news casts — including stories of department store, hospital, government and bank data leaking into unsavory hands — but now a team of engineers has an encryption key approach that is unclonable and not reverse-engineerable, protecting information even as computers become faster and nimbler. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


659: Lower oxygen levels to impact the oceanic food chain

The North Pacific Ocean is losing oxygen, pushing species significant to the marine ecosystem to shallower water where there's more sunlight, higher temperatures and greater risk of predators. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


660: Helping make brain surgery safer

A biopsy needle that can help surgeons identify and avoid blood vessels in the brain during surgery has undergone initial tests in humans. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


661: The Man Who Smelled Like Rancid Creamed Corn to Usher In a New Scientific Era

When the nurse slipped the IV needle into his arm, Matt Sharp was calm. Yes, he knew the risks: As one of the first humans ever to receive the experimental treatment, he could end up with mutant cells running amok in his body. But he was too enamored of the experiment’s purpose to worry about that. For two decades, Sharp had been living with HIV. He’d watched the height of the AIDS crisis claim d


662: These Dinosaurs' Noses Made Breathing Complicated for a Very Good Reason

About 75 million years ago, in what is now Alberta, Canada, a dinosaur called Euoplocephalus took its final breath. That exhalation, like every other, was fleeting and insubstantial, but eons later, scientists can still reconstruct the path it took out of the dinosaur’s head. And that path, it turns out, was extraordinarily convoluted. Euoplocephalus was one of the ankylosaurs—a group of tank-lik


663: New environmental watchdog to get legal teeth after Brexit

The new Office for Environmental Protection will have similar enforcement powers to EU regulators.


664: Robot hand that plays Jingle Bells could help us make better limbs

A 3D-printed rigid replica of a human hand can play classic tunes on the piano like Jingle Bells without ever moving individual fingers


665: The more pets you meet as a baby, the lower your risk of allergies

Children that are exposed to multiple cats and dogs in their first year of life go on to have lower rates of asthma, hay fever and eczema later in life


666: The Bug-Like HAMR Robot Walks Upside Down Using Electricity

The magic ingredient isn’t glue, or a material that mimics the pad of a gecko’s foot, but voltage. Specifically, electroadhesion.


667: Can Facebook advertising prevent cancer?

Results from Colorado Cancer Screening Program study shows that text and social media can help to reach hard-to-reach populations with information about colorectal cancer screening (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


668: Mortality rates rising for Gens X and Y too

Declining life expectancies in the US include Gen X and Y Americans, in addition to the older Baby Boomers. But the causes of premature mortality vary by race, gender and ethnicity, according to a new study from Duke University. The researchers examined data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mortality Multiple Cause Files for the years 1990-2016. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


669: Scientists synthesize molecule capable of eliminating hepatitis C virus

The compound called GA-Hecate also acts on bacteria, fungi and cancer cells and will be tested against Zika and yellow fever viruses. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


670: Cost to walk away from Facebook for a year? More than $1,000, new study finds

How valuable is Facebook to its users, and how can you measure the value of the site when access is free? Three economists and a social media researcher pooled their work and expertise to assess Facebook's value to its users, in contrast to its market value or its contribution to gross domestic product.


671: Study shows huge armored dinosaurs battled overheating with nasal air-conditioning

Being a gigantic dinosaur presented some challenges, such as overheating in the Cretaceous sun and frying your brain. Researchers from Ohio University and NYITCOM at Arkansas State show in a new article in PLOS ONE that the heavily armored, club-tailed ankylosaurs had a built-in air conditioner in their snouts.


672: How to Have Great Sex in a Committed Relationship

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen talks with sex therapist Dr. Stephen Snyder about how to keep the flame burning for years to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


673: Contributors

(Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


674: How much money would you want to quit Facebook for a year? Most people say $1,000

Despite all the recent scandals, so many of us still stick with Facebook. This study might explain why.


675: Team locates nearly all US solar panels in a billion images with machine learning

Researchers have identified the GPS locations and sizes of almost all US solar power installations from a billion images. Using the data, which is public, they identified factors that promote the use of solar energy and those that discourage it. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


676: Groups of pilot whales have their own dialects

A new study has found that short-finned pilot whales living off the coast of Hawai'i have their own sorts of vocal dialects, a discovery that may help researchers understand the whales' complex social structure. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


677: Why natural disasters make men take more risks

The 2011 earthquake in Japan was among the most intense earthquakes to occur in recorded history. Thanks to regularly distributed surveys, however, it also became a unique research opportunity to compare civilians' behaviors from before the earthquake with their behavior after. Now, researchers have found data that suggests being exposed to a natural disaster tends to make men more prone to engag


678: Blind' on Climate, Trump Inspires Name for Sightless, Slimy, Worm-Like Creature

A blind, worm-like amphibian species has a new and presidential name.


679: Storm in a teacup in Britain over eco-friendly bags

Britons are up in arms over new environmentally-friendly teabags that leave a bitter taste in the mouth as they split open, spilling their contents into teacups across the land. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


680: Ryanair wants to sack all Eindhoven-based crew: union

Ryanair has filed for the collective dismissal of all Dutch-based staff at its now shuttered base at Eindhoven airport, a union representing pilots said Wednesday. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


681: Queen guitarist Brian May releases tribute to NASA spacecraft

Jamming and astrophysics go hand-in-hand for Queen lead guitarist Brian May, who announced Wednesday he is releasing a musical tribute to a far-flung NASA spacecraft that is about to make history.


682: 450 fossilized millipedes found in 100-million-year-old amber

Over 450 millipedes, fossilized in 100-million-year-old Burmese amber, were recently discovered by a research team. Using micro-CT technology, the scientists identified 13 out of the 16 main groups of modern millipedes amongst them. For half of these groups, the findings also represent the oldest known fossils.


683: Plastic waste disintegrates into nanoparticles

There is a considerable risk that plastic waste in the environment releases nano-sized particles known as nanoplastics, according to a new study. The researchers studied what happened when takeaway coffee cup lids, for example, were subjected to mechanical breakdown, in an effort to mimic the degradation that happens to plastic in the ocean. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


684: Researchers zero in on potential therapeutic target for diabetes, associated diseases

A recent study shows how a novel regulatory mechanism serves as an important biomarker for the development of diabetes, as well as a potential therapeutic target for its prevention. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


685: Twofold overweight risk for five-year-olds given milk cereal drinks in infancy

In five-year-old children, the risk for overweight is almost twice as high if they at 12 months had consumed milk cereal drinks every day, a study in the journal Acta Paediatrica shows. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


686: Lasting impact of concussions on young adults

Researchers have found that young adults who experienced repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussions, can experience persistent cognitive changes as well as altered brain activity. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


687: The 25 Most-Read WIRED Stories of 2018

From Facebook to Mueller, from Theranos to Yanny and Laurel, WIRED readers flocked to the articles that defined a new era.


688: Uber loses UK case on worker rights, expected to appeal

Uber pledged Wednesday to challenge a U.K. Court of Appeal decision that drivers should be classed as workers rather than self-employed employees, a verdict that has potentially wide-ranging implications for the rapidly growing gig economy and the rules that govern it. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


689: Local official sues Facebook over data misuse

The top legal officer in the US capital city has sued Facebook over privacy violations related to personal data leaked to the Cambridge Analytica consultancy working on Donald Trump's 2016 campaign. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


690: NASA finds extreme rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Kenanga

NASA found very cold cloud top temperatures within the Southern Indian Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Kenanga that indicate powerful thunderstorms reaching high into the troposphere. Those storms were generating very heavy rainfall as confirmed by the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


691: Precision experiment first to isolate, measure weak force between protons, neutrons

A team of scientists has for the first time measured the elusive weak interaction between protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom. They had chosen the simplest nucleus consisting of one neutron and one proton for the study.


692: The coming of age of plasma physics

Once upon a time, people thought that electrons and ions always stuck together, living happily ever after. However, under low density of matter or high temperatures, the components of matter are no longer bound together. Instead, they form plasma, a state of matter naturally occurring in our universe, which has since been harnessed for everyday applications such as TV screens, chip etching and tor (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


693: Preventing concrete bridges from falling apart

Extremes of temperature, rain, exposure to corrosive substances—all of these environmental factors contribute to the degradation of concrete. Specifically, a gas present in our environment, called hydrogen sulphide, turns into sulphuric acid, a corrosive substance, when combined with rainwater. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


694: Bacterial protein could help find materials for your next smartphone

A newly discovered protein could help detect, target, and collect from the environment the rare-earth metals used in smartphones. Two new studies by researchers at Penn State describe the protein, which is 100 million times better at binding to lanthanides—the rare-earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies—than to other metals like calcium. The first study, which appears in the Journ (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


695: Why is sea level rising faster in some places along the US East Coast than others?

Sea levels are rising globally from ocean warming and melting of land ice, but the seas aren't rising at the same rate everywhere. Sea levels have risen significantly faster in some US East Coast regions compared to others. A new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals why. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


696: Drugs of abuse: Identifying the addiction circuit

What happens in the brain of a compulsive drug user? Neurobiologists at UNIGE have discovered that the brain circuit connecting the decision-making region to the reward system is stronger in compulsive animals. The researchers also found that by decreasing the activity of this circuit, compulsive mice were able to regain control and that conversely, by stimulating the connection a mouse that initi (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


697: Researchers make liquid crystals do the twist

Researchers from the University of Maryland have for the first time measured an effect that was predicted more than 40 years ago, called the Casimir torque. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


698: Peanuts that do more with less water

The beloved peanut usually grows in sandy soil where there might not be much moisture. But some varieties of peanut perform better in drought than others. They use less water when there isn't much to go around, and remain productive as drought deepens. Crop scientists are trying to find the peanut varieties best at it. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


699: Nutrients in blood linked to better brain connectivity, cognition in older adults

A new study links higher levels of several key nutrients in the blood with more efficient brain connectivity and performance on cognitive tests in older adults. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


700: Study: Prehistoric horses were homebodies

Unlike today's zebras, prehistoric horses in parts of North America did not make epic migrations to find food or fresh water, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


701: Restoring canals shown as cost-efficient way to reverse wetland loss

LSU Boyd Professor of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences R. Eugene Turner has determined a cost-effective way to prevent coastal erosion and protect Louisiana's wetlands. Along with LSU alumna and now University of Central Florida Postdoctoral Fellow Giovanna McClenachan, Turner proposes a simple and inexpensive way to fill in canals that were once used for oil and gas mining. Their research was pu (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


702: E-bandage generates electricity, speeds wound healing in rats

Skin has a remarkable ability to heal itself. But in some cases, wounds heal very slowly or not at all, putting a person at risk for chronic pain, infection and scarring. Now, researchers have developed a self-powered bandage that generates an electric field over an injury, dramatically reducing the healing time for skin wounds in rats. They report their results in ACS Nano.


703: New study on low noise and high-performance transistors could bring innovations in electronics, sensing

A research study on low noise and high-performance transistors led by Suprem Das, assistant professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering, in collaboration with researchers at Purdue University, was recently published by Physical Review Applied. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


704: Metabolic syndrome starts sooner if you have PCOS

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome develop metabolic syndrome earlier than women without the condition—which likely puts them at higher risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Unlike other studies that examined polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome at only one point in time, the new study followed women for more than 20 years to observe new c (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


705: Sac with spiral surface patterns facilitate substance delivery

Imagine a micron-sized ball of fluid enclosed in a thin film, similar to the film in soap bubbles, but made up of molecules resembling liquid crystal. These molecules can lower their overall energy by aligning their directions with their ever-changing neighbours—a state referred to as smectic phase. This means stacks of parallel stripe-like liquid-crystal layers form in the film. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


706: The Casimir torque: Scientists measure previously unexamined tiny force

Researchers from the University of Maryland have for the first time measured an effect that was predicted more than 40 years ago, called the Casimir torque.


707: Holey graphene as Holy Grail alternative to silicon chips

Graphene, in its regular form, does not offer an alternative to silicon chips for applications in nanoelectronics. It is known for its energy band structure, which leaves no energy gap and no magnetic effects. Graphene antidot lattices, however, are a new type of graphene device that contain a periodic array of holes—missing several atoms in the otherwise regular single layer of carbon atoms. This (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


708: Loss of intertidal ecosystem exposes coastal communities

Artificial intelligence and extensive satellite imagery have allowed researchers to map the world's intertidal zones for the first time, revealing a significant loss of the crucial ecosystem. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


709: First Steps: Scientists launch evolutionary study to explore the origins of fish that walk

A new research collaboration with support from the National Science Foundation, or NSF, begins an unprecedented study of walking cavefish to better understand the "fin-to-limb" transition that enabled the first vertebrates to walk on land more than 350 million years ago. This new research collaboration between LSU, New Jersey Institute of Technology, or NJIT, and University of Florida is set to la (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


710: NASA finds extreme rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Kenanga

NASA found very cold cloud top temperatures within the Southern Indian Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Kenanga that indicate powerful thunderstorms reaching high into the troposphere. Those storms were generating very heavy rainfall as confirmed by the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


711: Letters: ‘The Inherent Nature of White Supremacy Demands We Be Exemplary’

Sometimes I Wish the Obamas Wouldn’t ‘Go High’ After the Obamas shook hands with the Trumps at George H. W. Bush’s funeral earlier this month, Jemele Hill analyzed the implications of the phrase Michelle Obama coined in 2016: When they go low, we go high. “ I sometimes wonder,” Hill wrote, “if the people who often cite that quote have a full understanding of the emotional toll it takes on people


712: They Shall Not Grow Old Is a Stunning World War I Documentary

What immediately stands out in Peter Jackson’s documentary They Shall Not Grow Old is the faces of its subjects. A painstaking restoration of century-old video footage from the First World War, the film is a complex project with a simple goal: to try to convey what it was like to live and fight on the Western Front from 1914 to 1918. But the technology Jackson deploys is so advanced that the docu


713: Nye afsløringer: Facebook deler dine private data med mere end 150 virksomheder

Det sociale medie udnytter et smuthul i reglerne til fortsat at dele dine private data til techgiganter som Microsoft, Spotify og Netflix – uden at spørge om lov.


714: Intellectual curiosity and confidence help children take on math and reading

Children's personalities may influence how they perform in math and reading, according to a study by psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


715: Climate change affects breeding birds

The breeding seasons of wild house finches are shifting due to climate change, a Washington State University researcher has found. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


716: DNA from 6000-year-old chewing gum reveals how an ancient woman lived

Lola lived 6000 years ago and made glue by chewing birch bark pitch. By analysing DNA left on the pitch we know about her diet, appearance, and ancestry


717: Turning Online Harassment and Abusive Comments Into Art

Victims of online harassment are using their experiences to inform their work—subverting spiteful comments to create meaningful art.


718: To assemble a Top 10 list, Science News starts in June

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses creating Science News' annual Top 10 science stories of the year. (Mon, 17 Dec 2018)


719: Sac with spiral surface patterns facilitate substance delivery

In a new study published in EPJE, Francesco Serafin, affiliated with both Syracuse University, New York, and the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UCSB, USA, and his supervisors determine the conditions under which it becomes easier for sac to pass through biological membranes and potentially deliver molecules attached to these them at specific locations. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


720: Snowed in: Wolves stay put when it's snowing, study shows

Wolves travel shorter distances and move slower during snowfall events, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. The effects were most pronounced at night, when wolves hunt, and behaviour returned to normal within a day. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


721: Meet Farout, the new most distant member of our solar system

Space It's the farthest object we've ever spotted in our neighborhood. Say hello to 2018 VG18, the most distant solar system object ever spotted. Nicknamed “Farout,” it’s about 120 to 130 astronomical units (AU) from the sun.


722: Cap-and-Trade for Cars Is Coming to the Northeast

Nine states and Washington, D.C., aim to rein in the rising share of emissions from transportation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


723: How AI Could Help Your Bad Back

Reconciling all data relevant to patient care is beyond any doctor’s brainpower — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


724: Diabetes drug could be used to treat common heart failure syndrome, study suggests

Researchers at the University of Arizona have discovered that metformin, a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, might also be used to treat a common heart failure syndrome that is predicted to affect over 8 percent of people ages 65 or older by the year 2020. The study, which was published December 19 in the Journal of General Physiology, shows that metformin relaxes a key heart muscle pro (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


725: Study links nutrients in blood to better brain connectivity, cognition in older adults

A new study links higher levels of several key nutrients in the blood with more efficient brain connectivity and performance on cognitive tests in older adults.


726: Eye-opening study differentiates iPS cells into various ocular lineages

Researchers revealed that culturing human induced pluripotent stem cells with different isoforms of the extracellular component laminin led to the creation of cells specific to different parts of the eye, including retinal, corneal, and neural crest cells. They showed that the different laminin variants affected the cells' motility, density, and interactions, resulting in their differentiation int (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


727: New light shed on what drove last, long-term global climate shift

The quest to discover what drove the last, long-term global climate shift on Earth, which took place around a million years ago, has taken a new, revealing twist. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


728: World's first success in analyzing 3D neutron polarization under high pressure

Scientists have developed a high-pressure cell composed of completely nonmagnetic materials. The team then succeeded for the first time in the world in analyzing neutron polarization in three dimensions at an extremely high pressure of several gigapascals using the cell developed by the team. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


729: Serious loneliness spans the adult lifespan but there is a silver lining

Moderate to severe loneliness can persist across adult lifespans, but researchers found it is particularly acute in three age periods: late-20s, mid-50s and late-80s. Wisdom proved a protective factor. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


730: Birthweight and early pregnancy body mass index may risk pregnancy complications

Women who were born with a low birthweight are at increased risk of pregnancy complications, according to a new study. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


731: A compound being developed to treat eye disease also kills leukemia cells

An active ingredient in eye drops that were being developed for the treatment of a form of eye disease has shown promise for treating an aggressive form of blood cancer. Scientists have found that this compound, which targets an essential cancer gene, could kill leukemia cells without harming non-leukemic blood cells. The results reveal a potential new treatment approach for an aggressive blood ca (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


732: Powder could help cut CO2 emissions

Scientists have created a powder that can capture CO2 from factories and power plants. The powder can filter and remove CO2 at facilities powered by fossil fuels before it is released into the atmosphere and is twice as efficient as conventional methods. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


733: Social animals have more parasite infections but lower infection-related costs

Animals living in large groups tend to have more parasites than less social animals do, but according to a new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, they may also be better protected from the negative effects of those parasites. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


734: RNA proofreading mistakes drive group of autoimmune diseases

Study shows how mistakes in an RNA proofreading system can generate out-of-control interferon signaling, setting off development of autoimmune disease. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


735: Getting yeast to make artificial sweets

The holiday season can be a time of excess, but low- or no-calorie sweeteners could help merry-makers stay trim. Stevia is a zero-calorie sweetener that is sometimes called 'natural' because it is extracted from the leaves of a South American plant. Now, a report in ACS Synthetic Biology describes a way to prepare large quantities of stevia using yeast, which would cut out the plant middleman and (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


736: Brain confetti — why our sense of smell declines in old age

As mammals age, their sense of smell deteriorates. In a study published in the journal 'Cell Reports', an interdisciplinary research team at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University Medical Centre Mainz investigated why this is the case. For their study, the researchers tracked the development of stem cells in the brains of mice using what are known as confetti reporters. They then analysed th (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


737: Are the late Stephen Hawking's religious beliefs typical of U.K. scientists?

The late Stephen Hawking famously didn't believe in God. Neither does the renowned Richard Dawkins. But is that typical for U.K. scientists? (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


738: Milestone Experiment Proves Quantum Communication Really Is Faster

Quantum computers are still a dream, but the era of quantum communication is here. A new experiment out of Paris has demonstrated, for the first time, that quantum communication is superior to classical ways of transmitting information. “We are the first to show a quantum advantage for transmitted information that two parties have to share to perform a useful task,” said Eleni Diamanti , an elect


739: Men Who Smoke Pot May Have Lower Sperm Count

Recreational marijuana use is becoming increasingly legal across the U.S., but that doesn't mean that it's safe.


740: Groups of pilot whales have their own dialects

A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that short-finned pilot whales living off the coast of Hawai'i have their own sorts of vocal dialects, a discovery that may help researchers understand the whales' complex social structure. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


741: Potential therapeutic target for lung fibrosis identified

No current treatments reverse or stop lung fibrosis — scarring of the lung that makes it difficult to breathe. Medical University of South Carolina researchers report they have identified a potential therapeutic target for lung fibrosis. The protein is an attractive target because it exerts its profibrotic influence earlier than other known profibrotic factors and increases their levels. Inhibiti (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


742: Stress related responses regulate immune function

The immune system is composed of a wide range of different immune cells each with dedicated functions. Natural killer T cells form a specialized immune cell that protects against a variety of diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity, metabolic disease or certain infections such as Lyme disease (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


743: The secret life of cloud droplets

Do water droplets cluster inside clouds? Researchers confirm two decades of theory with an airborne imaging instrument. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


744: Restoring canals shown as cost-efficient way to reverse wetland loss

LSU Boyd Professor of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences R. Eugene Turner has determined a cost-effective way to prevent coastal erosion and protect Louisiana's wetlands. Along with LSU alumna and now University of Central Florida Postdoctoral Fellow Giovanna McClenachan, Turner proposes a simple and inexpensive way to fill in canals that were once used for oil and gas mining. Their research was pu (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


745: E-bandage generates electricity, speeds wound healing in rats

Skin has a remarkable ability to heal itself. But in some cases, wounds heal very slowly or not at all, putting a person at risk for chronic pain, infection and scarring. Now, researchers have developed a self-powered bandage that generates an electric field over an injury, dramatically reducing the healing time for skin wounds in rats. They report their results in ACS Nano. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


746: New research suggests forests, like humans, require a balanced diet

The world's forests are on a fast food diet of carbon dioxide, which is currently causing them to grow faster. But a researcher at West Virginia University, along with an international team of scientists, finds evidence suggesting that forest growth may soon peak as the trees deplete nitrogen in the soil over longer growing seasons. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


747: From a plant sugar to toxic hydrogen sulfide

In a doctoral research project conducted at the Department of Biology, the degradation of the dietary sugar sulfoquinovose by anaerobic bacteria to toxic hydrogen sulfide was described for the first time — increased production of hydrogen sulfide in the human intestinal system has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


748: Some prehistoric horses were homebodies

A strontium analysis of fossilized horse teeth from Florida found that the animals did not travel far from where they were born. Researchers also found evidence that prehistoric horses fed along the coast like wild horses do today at places like Assateague Island National Seashore. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


749: Stanford team locates nearly all US solar panels in a billion images with machine learning

Stanford researchers have identified the GPS locations and sizes of almost all US solar power installations from a billion images. Using the data, which is public, they identified factors that promote the use of solar energy and those that discourage it. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


750: How to spot every solar panel in the United States

It is still challenging to put an accurate number on the US's total solar power installation and to describe what factors make solar power thrive in certain areas and not others. Now, researchers at Stanford University have developed a new tool and accompanying open access website that identifies solar panels from high-resolution satellite data, giving them unprecedented insight into the societal (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


751: Millennials Are Keeping Family Holiday Cards Alive

Six years ago, Ken Sarafin created his inaugural family Christmas card. Harnessing the aesthetic of Norman Rockwell—the 20th-century painter known for conveying the everyday life of Middle America—Sarafin illustrated a portrait of his sister, her husband, and their then-newborn daughter. The painting showed Sarafin’s niece crying on the floor with her father nearby wearing a disheveled tie and dr


752: MRI technique shows unique signatures of concussion in rugby players

The research team studied the brains of young female athletes and used a technique that combined multiple brain imaging measures to be able to look at structural and functional information at the same time. The result was a much more sensitive and complete picture of concussion injury. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


753: Scientists discover over 450 fossilized millipedes in 100-million-year-old amber

Over 450 millipedes, fossilized in 100-million-year-old Burmese amber, were recently discovered by a research team from the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig – Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversity. Using micro-CT technology, the scientists identified 13 out of the 16 main groups of modern millipedes amongst them. For half of these groups, the findings also represent the oldest known (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


754: UNH researchers find lasting impact of concussions on young adults

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that young adults who experienced repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussions, can experience persistent cognitive changes as well as altered brain activity. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


755: Stavbakterier og malerruller med hormoner skal give flottere danske juletræer

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet vil sikre europæerne flottere juletræer ved at pleje både rødder, knopper og nåle med en bred vifte af virkemidler. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


756: Research finds recreationists support offshore wind energy development

From boat enthusiasts to anglers, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found surprisingly widespread support for offshore wind energy development (OWD) among outdoor recreationists. Also unanticipated was the strong support across the entire political spectrum, from liberals to moderates and conservatives, with respondents seeing OWD as a positive impact upon their recreation experi (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


757: The joyful, perplexing world of puzzle hunts | Alex Rosenthal

Welcome to the strange, deviously difficult and incredibly joyful world of puzzle hunts. Follow along as Alex Rosenthal lifts the veil on one of the world's most complex puzzle hunts, the MIT Mystery Hunt — and reveals how puzzles can be found in the most unexpected places. (Hint: see if you can spot the puzzle hidden in this TED Talk.)


758: Mice lack stem cells in the heart needed for self-repair

Adult mice hearts have no stem cells, a study finds. The same may be true for people, and that’s not welcome news for those who’ve had a heart attack.


759: There’s a ‘new normal’ for children’s skeletons

Children born in the most recent century have bones that reach full maturity earlier—by nearly 10 months in girls and nearly 7 months in boys—according to a new study. “Our findings show there is a ‘new normal’ for timing when kids’ skeletons will reach full maturity,” says Dana Duren, director of orthopaedic research at the Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics at the University of M (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


760: Pause' in global warming was never real, new research proves

Claims of a 'pause' in observed global temperature warming are comprehensively disproved in a pair of new studies published today. An international team of climate researchers reviewed existing data and studies and reanalyzed them. They concluded there has never been a statistically significant 'pause' in global warming. This conclusion holds whether considering the 'pause' as a change in the rate (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


761: Getting a glimpse inside the moon

New research provides the first-ever model of our Moon's rotational dynamics, taking into consideration its solid inner core. Their model helps to explain why, as seen from Earth, the Moon appears to wobble on its axis.


762: Proton scattering reveals the secrets of strongly-correlated proton-neutron pairs in atomic nuclei

The nuclear force that holds protons and neutrons together in the center of atoms has a non-central component—the tensor force, which depends on the spin and relative position of the interacting particles. – An international research collaboration has reported the first experimental evidence that the strongly correlated proton-neutron pairs found in an atomic depend on nuclear structure. The experiment, conducted on a new beam line at the Osaka cyclotron facility, demonstrated the dominance of tensor interactions in the neutron pickup reaction. It is hoped that the findings will improve our understand (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


763: New houseplant can clean your home's air

Researchers have genetically modified a common houseplant to remove chloroform and benzene from the air around it.


764: Using sound to independently levitate a range of objects is achieved for the first time

Asier Marzo-Pérez, researcher at the Public University of Navarre (NUP/UPNA), and Bruce Drinkwater, lecturer at the University of Bristol (United Kingdom), have for the first time achieved the acoustic levitation of a whole range of objects independently. This technology could be used to manipulate small particles inside the human body without any type of incision, and also to display information


765: Scientists to give artificial intelligence human hearing

Russian scientists have come closer to creating a digital system to process speech in real-life sound environment, for example, when several people talk simultaneously during a conversation. Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), a Project 5-100 participant, have simulated the process of the sensory sounds coding by modelling the mammalian auditory periphery. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


766: UNH research finds recreationists support offshore wind energy development

From boat enthusiasts to anglers, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found surprisingly widespread support for offshore wind energy development (OWD) among outdoor recreationists. Also unanticipated was the strong support across the entire political spectrum, from liberals to moderates and conservatives, with respondents seeing OWD as a positive impact upon their recreation experi (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


767: Study finds gaba cells help fight alcoholism

Scientists of the Higher School of Economics, Indiana University, and École normale supérieure clarified how alcohol influences the dopamine and inhibitory cells in the midbrain that are involved in the reward system and the formation of dependency on addictive drugs. The results of the study were published in the article 'Dynamical ventral tegmental area circuit mechanisms of alcohol-dependent do (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


768: The role of calcium handling mechanisms in reperfusion injury

Cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) remain the major cause of death and disability worldwide.The overall goal of this review is to describe the different pathways that lead to I/R injury via Ca2+ overload, focus on recent discoveries and highlight prospects for therapeutic strategies for clinical benefit. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


769: Prospect. & struct. insight, binding plant-deriv. molecule of leea indica; inhibitor bace-1

Unveiled the lupeol as a potent BACE1 inhibitor from a manually curated dataset of Leea indica molecules, which may provide a new dimension of designing novel BACE1 inhibitors for AD therapy. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


770: Elon Musk's SpaceX cancels rocket launch again because of technical glitch

SpaceX first halted the launch of Falcon 9 rocket on Tuesday because of the same technical warning with its sensor Elon Musk’s SpaceX has cancelled the long-delayed launch of a navigation satellite for the US military, failing to complete its first designated national security mission for the United States because of technical issue with its rocket. SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket, carrying a roughly $5 (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


771: Does terrorism work? We studied 90 groups to get the answer

The famous Christmas Market in Strasbourg, France, became the latest place to be struck by terrorists. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


772: Air pollution may be making us less intelligent

Not only is air pollution bad for our lungs and heart, it turns out it could actually be making us less intelligent, too. A recent study found that in elderly people living in China, long-term exposure to air pollution may hinder cognitive performance (things like our ability to pay attention, to recall past knowledge and generate new information) in verbal and maths tests. As people age, the link (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


773: With the E-tron, Audi Shows What an Electric SUV Can Be

The new battery-powered luxury ride is capable, comfy, and clever.


774: Nasa hack exposes space agency staff's data

The US space agency says cyber-thieves may have compromised two of its computer servers.


775: Plan S: The Ambitious Initiative to End the Reign of Paywalls

A funder-driven push for freely accessible scholarly literature has divided the scientific community.


776: Why windows with a view are so important to older people

Windows are something that many of us take for granted – they're just part of the houses we live in or the buildings we work in. And yet for older people, windows can be vital as a way to access the world, especially for those who spend a lot of time indoors. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


777: Banning trophy hunting imports won't save the world's wildlife

Well-meaning celebrities and MPs recently published a letter in the Guardian, calling for a ban on trophy hunting imports into the UK. To the novice conservationist, this surely sounds like a good thing, right? After all, trophy hunting kills animals so how could it possibly be good for conservation? (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


778: Emerging trends in advanced nano-materials based electrochemical geno-sensors

Advanced nanomaterials indubitably represent one of the most propitious classes of new materials due to their intriguing optical, electronic and redox properties. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


779: Alterations detected in brain connectivity in patients with type 1 diabetes

Patients with Type 1 Diabetes have a brain connectivity network different from the healthy people, according to a new study led by researchers of the University of Barcelona. This confirmation reinforce the idea that these patients' brains develop a series of functional changes to adapt to cognitive alterations caused by this disease. These results could have potential implications in the diagnosi (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


780: Newly discovered adolescent star seen undergoing 'growth spurt'

Astronomers have discovered a young star undergoing a rare growth spurt — giving a fascinating glimpse into the development of these distant stellar objects. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


781: Sleeping in contact lenses puts you at risk of dangerous infection

A warning from emergency physicians supported by CDC case studies that show sleeping in contact lenses can lead to serious health problems. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


782: Global warming has already raised the risk of more severe droughts in Cape Town

Between 2015 and 2017 South Africa's South Western Cape region experienced three of its lowest rainfall years on record. This led to the progressive depletion of water supply reservoirs and by the summer of 2017/18 there was a real danger that – without drastic reductions in water use – the region, and especially the city of Cape Town, would run out of water. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


783: Study unearths new information on age, activity of Alaska's Wrangell volcanic belt

A new study by a team of geologists that includes Kansas State University's Matthew Brueseke has found that the Wrangell volcanic belt in Alaska's Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve is older than previously recognized and determined why its volcanic field has been persistently active since it formed about 30 million years ago. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


784: What to Do Before the Green New Deal

When I left Congress after four decades of service, my greatest regret was that we failed to address climate change. As the most pressing and critical challenge of our generation threatens species and civilization with unimaginable upheaval, our inability to legislate a federal solution is a national shame. We got as close as we ever have in 2009 when the American Clean Energy and Security Act wa


785: Vitamin A helps microbiome regulate immune system

New research uncovers another useful role of the microbiome: in mice, the gut microbiome regulates the host’s immune system so that it doesn’t attack these helpful bacteria. The trick to the microbiome’s work with the immune system is vitamin A, say the researchers. The bacteria moderate active vitamin A levels in the intestine, protecting the microbiome from an overactive immune response. That i (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


786: Colour me scientific: Two fun free colour-me-in downloads

Never heard of a querkle or a spiroglyphic? No worries – just get your colouring pens and follow the simple instructions to reveal two iconic images of science


787: What is 'green' dry cleaning? A toxics expert explains

The winter holidays are a busy time for many businesses, including retail stores, grocers, liquor stores – and dry cleaners. People pull out special-occasion clothes made of silk, satin or other fabrics that don't launder well in soap and water. Then there are all those specialty items, from stained tablecloths to ugly holiday sweaters. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


788: Comparing the world's mega-canals

There are more and more big canals and pipelines transporting fresh water from places where it is abundant to places where it is needed for drinking—or for industry and agriculture. Thirty-four such mega-systems are already in place and 76 are planned or are under construction; but—apart from the advantages of water transfer—the effects on humans and ecosystems are enormous. A first systematic rev (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


789: Radium revealed: 120 years since the Curies found the most radioactive substance on the planet

Scientific discovery can be achingly slow, but it was moving swiftly in the 1890s. X-rays had been discovered in Germany just a few days before Christmas in 1895. Several months later, while researching these new X-rays, the French physicist Henri Becquerel accidentally discovered another new mysterious type of ray when he detected radiation emitting from uranium. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


790: Why Are You Still Sleeping in Your Contact Lenses?

This bad habit could raise your risk of serious eye infections and even lead to vision loss.


791: Sådan skal ny bro hele både by og borgere i Genova

Som erstatning for den kollapsede Morandi-bro har bystyret i Genova hyret tre entreprenørselskaber til at bygge en ny bro designet af stjernearkitekten Renzo Piano (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


792: Radioactivity Levels in Crucial Middle East Water Source Exceed International Standards

Radioactivity Levels in Crucial Middle East Water Source Exceed International Standards Scientists sound alarm over radiation in Nubian Aquifer, but other experts say the health risk is unclear. girl-at-well_cropped.jpg Image credits: Paul Vinten/ Shutterstock Earth Wednesday, December 19, 2018 – 09:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — People in Egypt's western desert are drinking gro (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


793: Hepatitis: Liver failure attributable to compromised blood supply

In severe cases, a viral hepatitis infection can result in liver failure. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered how this occurs: by immune cells attacking cells in the vascular system, which disrupts the organ's blood and nutrient supply. This is responsible for the overwhelming damage that causes the liver to fail. Using an animal model, the researchers were then (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


794: Singapore researchers develop gold-complexed ferrocenyl phosphines as potent antimalarials

A team of researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed novel ferrocene-based molecules that impair the malaria parasite's metabolic function leading to parasite death.


795: How the brain reacts to loss of vision

If mice lose their vision immediately after birth due to a genetic defect, this has a considerable impact, both on the organisation of the cerebral cortex and on memory ability. Researchers demonstrated that, in the months after blindness emerged, the density of neurotransmitter receptors that regulate excitation balance and are required for memory encoding was altered in all areas of the cortex t (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


796: The potential of nanomaterials to activate the body's antitumor immune response investigated

Immunity plays an immense role in the body's fight against cancer. Every day, the cells of the immune system check all the cells of our body for 'normalcy' and kill the degenerated cells. Sometimes cells hide from the immune system and escape the immunological control, and then a tumor develops. Today, there are many different ways to deal with tumors, but often they prove incurable. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


797: Machine learning methods in precision medicine targeting epigenetics diseases

The huge amounts of epigenetic data coming from biological experiments and clinic, machine learning can help in detecting epigenetic features in genome, finding correlations between phenotypes and modifications in histone or genes, accelerating the screen of lead compounds targeting epigenetics diseases and many other aspects around the study on epigenetics, which consequently realizes the hope of (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


798: New research reveals why people really use food banks

Study suggests people's use of them is often more complex and more positive than is presented. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


799: Facebook defends data sharing after new report on partner deals

Facebook offered a renewed defense Wednesday of its data sharing practices after a report revealing that certain partners of the social network had access to a range of personal information about users and their friends.


800: Quest to solve global water plant mystery

Mass development of water plants in river and lakes causes headache for researchers and water managers all over the world. New research aims to reveal the causes of the explosive development and identify ecosystem effects of removing the water plants. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


801: Marmoset monkeys expect the melody's closing tone

In speech and music, words and notes depend on each other. Humans are highly sensitive to such dependencies, but the evolutionary origins of this capacity are poorly understood. Cognitive biologists at the University of Vienna conducted playback experiments with common marmoset monkeys and found that sensitivity to dependencies might have been present in the shared ancestor of marmosets and humans (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


802: How Amazon Alexa Uses Machine Learning to Get Smarter

Amazon's voice assistant made considerable gains in 2018 through the continued refinement of machine learning techniques.


803: Kræftkirurger advarer mod firma, der tilbyder eksperimentel behandling

Et dansk firma tilbyder patienter med prostatakræft en behandling i Tyskland, som vil »dræbe alle kræftceller«, men som ikke er godkendt i Danmark. Danske kræftkirurger kalder det for grov udnyttelse af mennesker i krise. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


804: This microscope could look for life on Jupiter's moon

Space Shamu dreams of Europa. This rugged field instrument can make real-time 3D movies even in harsh conditions.


805: Elon Musk bores tunnel to revolutionize city driving

Elon Musk on Tuesday took a break from futuristic electric cars and private space travel to unveil a low-cost tunnel he sees as a godsend for city traffic.


806: Why do people in Indonesia still live in disaster-prone areas?

The earthquakes and tsunami in Central Sulawesi that killed more than 2,000 people in September 2018 did not only leave a deep sorrow. It made us rethink the relationship between humans, technology and nature in Indonesia. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


807: Uranium-lead dating shows that the Cambrian explosion is younger than previously thought

Using uranium-lead dating, Senckenberg scientists, in cooperation with an international team, were able to date the onset of the "Cambrian explosion" to precisely 538.8 million years ago. During the "Cambrian explosion," all currently known "blueprints" in the animal kingdom appeared within a few million years, while at the same time the so-called "Ediacara biota" – a group of unique, specialized


808: Computer hardware designed for 3D games could hold the key to replicating human brain

Researchers at the University of Sussex have created the fastest and most energy efficient simulation of part of a rat brain using off-the-shelf computer hardware. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


809: Game over for Zika? KU Leuven researchers develop promising vaccine

Scientists at the KU Leuven Rega Institute in Belgium have developed a new vaccine against the Zika virus. This vaccine should prevent the virus from causing microcephaly and other serious conditions in unborn babies. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


810: Cover crops may increase winter temperatures in North America

Cover crops grown in fields during winter may be warming temperatures in the northern United States and southern Canada, according to a new study by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


811: World's first success in analyzing 3D neutron polarization under high pressure

A joint research team consisting of NIMS, JAEA and the Institut Laue Langevin developed a high-pressure cell composed of completely nonmagnetic materials. The team then succeeded for the first time in the world in analyzing neutron polarization in three dimensions at an extremely high pressure of several gigapascals using the cell developed by the team. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


812: Nanosatellite imaging technology could revolutionize how we manage climate change

A pioneering Finnish nanosatellite has now reached space equipped with the world's smallest infrared hyperspectral camera. The photos with infrared data taken from the satellite provide new solutions for monitoring and managing the effects of climate change. The hyperspectral camera is a trailblazing innovation from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The Reaktor Hello World nanosatellite wa


813: Highly scalable process to obtain stable 2-D nanosheet dispersion

A KAIST team developed technology that allows the mass production of two-dimensional (2-D) nanomaterial dispersion by utilizing the characteristic shearing force of hydraulic power. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


814: Self-healing electroluminescent (EL) devices

In a recent study, materials scientists Guojin Liang and his coworkers at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, have developed a self-healing, electroluminescent (EL) device that can repair or heal itself after damage. Inspired by the self-healing capacity of biological systems, the novel process paves the way for a range of new electronic applications.


815: How African cities can harness green technologies for growth and jobs

In 1967 one gigabyte of hard drive storage space cost US$ 1m. Today it's around two US cents. Computer processing power has also increased exponentially: it doubles every two years. This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to technological progress in the 21st century. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


816: Nu må Esbjerg bruge varmepumper i fjernvarmen – sandsynligvis

Odense, Aalborg og Esbjerg kommuner vil med stor sandsynlighed få dispensation fra kraftvarmekravet, som blandt andet forhindrer brug af store varmepumper i byernes fjernvarmeforsyning. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


817: The Science of Saying Goodbye to Santa

Have your kids stopped believing in Santa? You might be more upset than they are. Read this letter from Santa – ghostwritten by a scientist who specializes in imagination and human behavior.


818: Proposed test of quantum superposition measures 'quantum revivals'

Physicists have proposed an entirely new way to test the quantum superposition principle—the idea that a quantum object can exist in multiple states at the same time. The new test is based on examining the quantum rotation of a macroscopic object—specifically, a nanoscale rotor, which is considered macroscopic despite its tiny size.


819: When high tech goes underground

ANYmal, a robot developed at ETH, can see and hear, and even open doors. An international research team is now working to ensure the robot can function in extreme conditions – a mission that takes them to the labyrinth of drains and tunnels below Zurich. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


820: Scientists find a way to connect quantum and classical physics

Physicists from Skoltech have invented a new method for calculating the dynamics of large quantum systems. Underpinned by a combination of quantum and classical modeling, the method has been successfully applied to nuclear magnetic resonance in solids. The results of the study were published in Physical Review B.


821: Fatale medicinfejl er et symptom på problematiske sektorovergange

Fejlmedicinering med methotrexat har eksisteret siden 1998, og det vil fortsætte så længe, Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed ikke kigger på sektorovergange, siger overlæge på Regionshospital Nordjylland. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


822: Delivery method associated with pelvic floor disorders after childbirth

Research completed at Johns Hopkins and the Greater Baltimore Medical Center has demonstrated that vaginal childbirth substantially increases the probability a woman will develop a pelvic floor disorder later in life. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


823: X chromosome: how genetics becomes egalitarian

In cell biology, men and women are unequal: men have an X chromosome, while women have two. How can we get around this difference? Geneticists from the UNIGE observed how the second X chromosome in females gradually becomes inactive in order to avoid an overdose of genes encoded by the X. They also found that several genes bypassed this inactivation, which varied according to the tissue and life p (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


824: Anticancer vaccines gain new lease of life with personalisation techniques

Anticancer vaccines have gained a new lease of life with techniques to personalise them to individual patients. Cutting edge developments in this re-energised field were revealed at the ESMO Immuno-Oncology Congress in Geneva, Switzerland. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


825: Map of neuronal pathways of the mammalian cerebral cortex and their evolution

Using our in utero electroporation technique for ferrets, we investigated the axonal fibers in the developing cerebral cortex, where ferrets have two fiber layers; the inner axonal fiber layer projects contralaterally and subcortically, whereas the outer fiber layer sends axons to neighboring cortical areas. Furthermore, mice and ferrets were found to have unexpected similarities. Our results shed (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


826: Study suggests universal meningitis vaccination is not cost-effective for college students

A computer-generated model developed by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers adds to evidence that providing universal vaccination against meningitis B infection to students entering college may be too costly to justify the absolute number of cases it would prevent. The study also suggests that if vaccine developers could significantly lower the price, universal vaccination might be worth requiring (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


827: DNA 'webs' aid ovarian cancer metastasis, study reveals

Researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that ovarian cancer cells spread, or metastasize, to new tissue after being caught in DNA 'webs' extruded by immune cells. The study, which will be published Dec. 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that preventing immune cells from forming these webs reduces metastasis in mice, suggesting that simil (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


828: Eye-opening study differentiates iPS cells into various ocular lineages

Osaka University researchers revealed that culturing human induced pluripotent stem cells with different isoforms of the extracellular component laminin led to the creation of cells specific to different parts of the eye, including retinal, corneal, and neural crest cells. They showed that the different laminin variants affected the cells' motility, density, and interactions, resulting in their di (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


829: Lab study adds credence to life arriving on Earth from asteroids theory

A team of researchers at NASA's Ames Research Center has found some evidence that adds credence to the theory that the basic ingredients for life came to Earth from asteroids. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes the experiments they carried out, what they found, and why they believe their work offers evidence of life arriving from elsewhere.


830: New research reveals why people really use food banks

Food banks have become the subject of heated debate in the UK. For some they are an indictment of 'austerity Britain' and reflect an increase in the numbers living in extreme poverty, while others see them as little more than a 'free lunch for scroungers', but findings from a new study suggest that the reasons for people's use of them is often more nuanced than is presented by politicians and comm (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


831: Clarifying rates of methylmercury production

While volcanoes and forest fires release mercury, they are relatively small sources compared to the combustion of coal, oil, and other fuels. Mercury is toxic. Microbes turn mercury into a neurotoxin called methylmercury. They also turn the neurotoxin back into inorganic mercury. To predict the levels of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in the environment, scientists need to know how fast micro (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


832: BepiColombo's first routine firing in space

On Monday this week, BepiColombo began its very first routine electric propulsion firing. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


833: Inquiry into LGBTIQ hate crime could improve how police and communities respond

Lessons learnt from a NSW parliamentary inquiry into hate crimes against Australia's LGBTIQ community could change the way police and communities respond to complaints, and acknowledge the continued impact of past injustices. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


834: Exploring Australia's 'other reefs' south of Tasmania

Off southern Tasmania, at depths between 700 and 1,500 metres, more than 100 undersea mountains provide rocky pedestals for deep-sea coral reefs. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


835: Astronomers discover nine new variable stars

A team of astronomers from Chile has detected nine new variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 6652 and its background stream. Six of the newly found stars were classified as eclipsing binaries, one as an SX Phoenicis star, and two remain unclassified. The finding is detailed in a paper published December 10 on arXiv.org.


836: Houseplant with added rabbit DNA could reduce air pollution, study shows

Devil’s ivy with synthetic animal gene inserted helped reduce benzene and chloroform levels A humble houseplant with a dash of rabbit DNA could help lower our exposure to indoor air pollution, research suggests. Scientists have revealed that by inserting a rabbit gene into devil’s ivy ( Epipremnum aureum) the plant is able to clean the surrounding air by breaking down chemicals such as benzene an


837: What the US Can Learn from Israel and China's Collaboration

Opinion: What we can learn from Israel's surprising technological ties with with China.


838: High survival rate among children who have suffered from growth restriction

Almost all children live to see their eighteenth birthday despite a severe growth restriction, as long as they have survived their first month during infancy. This is indicated in a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, which is published in the journal PLOS Medicine. (Tue, 18 Dec 2018)


839: Giant fungus covering many acres found to have stable mutation rate

A team of researchers from Canada and the U.S. has found that a giant fungus covering many acres has a stable mutation rate. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the extremely old fungus and what they found.


840: Report calls for integrating emissions reduction and climate adaptation practices

A new Simon Fraser University report calls for governments to combine emission reduction and climate adaptation strategies and outlines best practices to reduce the severity of extreme climate impacts. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


841: The fossil fuel era is coming to an end, but the lawsuits are just beginning

"Coal is dead." (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


842: Planetary astronomers identify cycle of spectacular disturbances at Jupiter's equator

A regular pattern of unusual meteorological events at Jupiter's equator has been identified by planetary scientists at the University of Leicester.


843: Physics instructor writes book on shock waves

A sonic boom and a thunderclap may seem like different phenomena, but their behavior is the same, according to SDState Physics Instructor W. Robert Matson. This is one of the ways he explains shock waves in "Sonic Thunder," his latest book. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


844: More than 75% of artists in US museums are white men, data mining reveals

An innovative method of data mining and crowdsourced research reveals a shocking lack of diversity and gender balance.


845: Psykiatriske udrykningsteam udbredes til hele landet

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti vil sikre bedre og hurtigere hjælp til psykiatriske patienter med 80 mio. kr. øremærket til udrykningsteams landet over. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


846: Daimler, BMW win green light for car-sharing merger

German carmakers Daimler and BMW said Wednesday they had won final approval to merge their car-sharing services Car2Go and DriveNow, paving the way for the creation of a European giant to challenge the likes of Uber. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


847: London tester intelligent overvågning: Nu kan kameraerne genkende dit ansigt

Kameraer har de seneste to dage automatisk scannet gaderne for kriminelle ved hjælp af ansigtsgenkendelse. Det kan også være på vej i Danmark, siger ekspert.


848: Primary care docs can do it all (with 6 extra working hours)

The average primary care doctor would need to work six additional hours a day to make sure their patients get all the preventive and early detection care they want and deserve, a new study finds. Primary care doctors’ sleep, personal hygiene, and family time need to take a back seat so they can add 29 minutes to each patient appointment, according to the parody study, which appears in the satiric (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


849: Research shows there's a gold standard for tipping

Consumers equate gold with status and luxury—and it turns out seeing the color makes them more generous tippers, according to new research from University of Dayton Assistant Professor of Marketing Na Young Lee. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


850: Broadening the biodiversity catalogue of spider populations in the Iberian Peninsula

The biodiversity catalogue of Iberian Peninsula spiders now includes a dozen new species from seven newly discovered families mainly found in soil, according to an article led by Professor Miquel Àngel Arnedo from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


851: Study shows women lower their voice when competing for a man

A team of researchers with members from the U.K., Poland and Germany has found that women tend to lower their voices when competing sexually for a man. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study involving participants in a speed-dating event and what they found.


852: US cybersecurity firm: Hackers stole EU diplomatic cables

Hackers have spent years eavesdropping on the diplomatic communications of European Union officials, a U.S. cybersecurity firm said Wednesday, an operation disrupted only after researchers discovered hundreds of intercepted documents lying around on the internet. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


853: EU electricity reform calls end to coal subsidies

European Union member states and the European Parliament agreed Wednesday to reform the bloc's electricity market, including a call to end coal subsidies by 2025. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


854: Exposure to cannabis alters the genetic profile of sperm

New research suggests men in their child-bearing years should consider how THC could impact their sperm and possibly the children they conceive during periods when they've been using the drug. Much like previous research that has shown tobacco smoke, pesticides, flame retardants and even obesity can alter sperm, the new research shows THC also affects epigenetics, triggering structural and regulat


855: Did the Brexit referendum politically disengage women?

New research published in the European Journal of Politics and Gender claims that the Brexit referendum campaigns in 2016 did not produce high quality political engagement for women. (Wed, 19 Dec 2018)


856: High levels of carcinogenic chemical found in everyday consumer products

High levels of the carcinogenic chemical cadmium can still be found in everyday household products like second-hand plastic toys, drinking glasses, alcoholic beverage bottles, ceramics and artists' paints, according to new research by the University of Plymouth.


857: Evidence of a fearsome shark taking down a pterosaur in mid-flight

It was a prehistoric clash of the ages that didn't end pretty when a monster in the sky clashed with a beast of the deep.


858: The Republican Majority's Last Act: A Government Shutdown

The federal government on Friday evening stood on the verge of its second partial shutdown of the year, as congressional leaders and the White House scrambled to reopen negotiations hours before a midnight deadline. The talks represent the final act of unified Republican control in Washington—and a bookend to showdowns of years past over federal spending and immigration. With President Trump dug


859: A novel mechanism that regulates cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation


860: Responsible innovation key to smart farming

Responsible innovation that considers the wider impacts on society is key to smart farming, according to academics. Scientists argue that the concept of responsible innovation should underpin the so-called fourth agricultural revolution, ensuring that innovations also provide social benefits and address potentially negative side-effects. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


861: What helps people live well with dementia

Psychological aspects, such as optimism, self-esteem, loneliness and depression were closely linked to ability to optimize quality of life and wellbeing in both people with dementia and carers. Experience in other areas of life influences psychological well-being and perceptions of living well. Physical health and fitness was important for both groups. For both carers and people with dementia soci (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


862: Does alcohol on greeting cards undermine public health messages about harmful drinking?

Birthday and Christmas cards featuring alcohol or harmful drinking 'reflect and reinforce a social attitude that excess alcohol consumption is acceptable and associated with celebration,' warn experts in The BMJ today. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


863: The Atlantic Daily: Departures and Disarray

Programming note: The Daily will take a break on December 24 and December 25, and return each day with selections of the best Atlantic stories from this past year for the remainder of 2018. It’ll be back in full swing on January 2, 2019 (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


864: Female penises evolved twice in bark lice

In a group of bark lice, a penis has evolved twice — in the females. In their nutrient-scarce environment, 'seminal gifts' are an incentive for females to force mating, leading to the co-evolution of female penises and male vaginas. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


865: Laser diode combats counterfeit oil

The olive oil sector has witnessed a rise in fraudulent activities such as falsely labeling inferior products as high quality. To combat this practice, a research team has developed a tool based on laser diodes and chaotic algorithms to detect whether the label on a bottle corresponds or not to the content inside. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


866: How sperm stem cells maintain their number

Researchers have revealed a novel mechanism for stem cell number control. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


867: Oxygen might not lead us to aliens after all

Space A new study shows us why we may want to rethink how we search for extraterrestrial life. A new study published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry suggests the presence of atmospheric oxygen on another planet is far from a sure sign.


868: Huge Martian Crater 'Korolev' Appears Topped With Miles Of Pristine Snow

The European Space Agency's new images show a 51-mile-wide ice-filled depression in the surface of Mars caused by the impact of a meteorite or other celestial body. (Image credit: Björn Schreiner/ESA/DLR/FU Berlin)


869: Gingrich Shut Down the Government in a Fit of Pique 23 Years Ago

I’ve had it in my desk drawer for 23 years: a pink plastic pacifier, tucked into a piece of glossy card stock, with a cartoon of a diaper-clad Newt Gingrich brandishing a baby bottle and stomping his foot, and the caption, Now Boarding … Rows 30-35! It’s a treasured artifact of the 1995 government shutdown, when Gingrich confessed he’d forced the closing of the federal government partly because B


870: Genetics of California mountain lions: Research to inform future conservation

Mountain lions in California exhibited strong population genetic structure, and some California populations had extremely low levels of genetic diversity, with some exhibiting estimates as low as the endangered Florida panther. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


871: Influences of maternal diabetes on fetal heart development

A comprehensive review offers a 'state of the science' look at the impact of maternal diabetes, and potential gene-environmental influences in that context, on fetal heart development. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


872: Surfer's ear points to ancient pearl divers in Panama

Surfer's ear, associated with cold weather and water sports, led a bioarchaeologist at the Smithsonian in Panama to suspect that ancient shoreline residents were diving for pearls in an area of cold-water upwelling. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


873: Take a Number: Long-Acting Contraceptives Gaining Acceptance Among U.S. Women

At any given time, two-thirds of American women aged 15 to 49 are using contraception. More of them are turning to I.U.D.’s and implantable devices. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


874: Gifts for your bearded friends

Gadgets Help your bearded colleagues take control of their facial hair. Gifts for your bearded friends and colleagues to help them take control of their facial hair. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


875: Droughts boost emissions as hydropower dries up

Recent droughts caused increases in emissions of carbon dioxide and harmful air pollutants from power generation in several western states as fossil fuels came online to replace hampered hydroelectric power. A new study quantifies the impact. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


876: College binge drinkers are posting while drunk, 'addicted' to social media

College students who binge drink are frequently posting on social media while intoxicated and show signs of social media "addiction," according to a new study. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


877: Antibiotic overuse is high for common urology procedures

A new study suggests that antibiotics are being overused in up to 60 percent of patients undergoing common urological procedures. The study shows that the high rates of overuse were mostly due to extended use of antibiotics following the procedure. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


878: People with schizophrenia experience emotion differently from others, 'body maps' show

Researchers are working to understand how people with schizophrenia experience emotion through their bodies. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


879: New AI computer vision system mimics how humans visualize and identify objects

Researchers have demonstrated a computer system that can discover and identify the real-world objects it 'sees' based on the same method of visual learning that humans use. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


880: An inside look at the first solo trip to the deepest point of the Atlantic

Science To reach the bottom of all five oceans, this Texas businessman commissioned “the most significant vehicle since Apollo 11.” “Five Deeps" began when Vescovo asked Triton Subs if they could make him a vehicle capable of reaching any point in the world’s oceans. This was a big ask. Three years…


881: Bees can count with small number of nerve cells in their brains, research suggests

Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers.


882: Dust threatens Utah's 'greatest snow on earth'

New research found that dust deposition speeds up snowmelt in Utah's Wasatch Mountains. Scientists found that a single dust storm on April 13, 2017, deposited half of all dust for the season. The additional sunlight absorbed by the dust-darkened snow surface led to snow melting a week earlier. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


883: How the Grimch Stole Eyewire: Awards

The Grimch tried his best to foil the site, And he did do some damage, but try as he might, The players played on and on in defiance And taught the Grimch all about citizen science! So now it is time to find out how you scored, Here’s the best of the best, it’s time for awards! Accuracy Happy Hours Grimchy Cubes Games Makers Trivia Fruitcake vs Aspic Marathon Participants (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


884: Study examines primary drivers of increased hospitalizations of homeless individuals

A new study led by investigators from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women's Hospital examines patterns, causes and outcomes of acute hospitalizations between 2007 and 2013 for homeless individuals and non-homeless control groups in three populous and diverse U.S. states: Florida, California and Massachusetts. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


885: FDA Cracks Down on Purveyors of Stem Cell Treatments

The agency cites safety concerns with customers of Genetech who reported getting E. coli infections and sends letters to other stem cell companies reminding them to follow the rules. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


886: Holiday asteroid imaged with NASA radar

The December 2018 close approach by the large, near-Earth asteroid 2003 SD220 has provided astronomers an outstanding opportunity to obtain detailed radar images of the surface and shape of the object and to improve the understanding of its orbit. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


887: The brain's support cells show defective development in Huntington's disease

The neurological disorder Huntington's disease causes behavioral and motor changes, which among other things are a result of dysfunctional maturation or formation of glial cells, the brain's support cells, researchers demonstrate in a new study based on mice trials. The researchers' long-term goal is to be able to use the research results to develop a treatment for Huntington's disease using glial (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


888: Forecasters may be looking in wrong place when predicting tornadoes

Weather forecasters may be looking in the wrong place when working to issue tornado warnings, new research has demonstrated. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


889: NASA telescopes take a close look at the brightest comet of 2018

As the brilliant comet 46P/Wirtanen streaked across the sky, NASA telescopes caught it on camera from multiple angles. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


890: Study finds Tropical Cyclone Winston damaged fisheries as well as homes in Fiji

A newly published study by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has found that impacts of Tropical Cyclone Winston on the coastal communities of Fiji went beyond the immediate loss of lives and infrastructure. The cyclone also had a lingering effect on the fisheries many communities depend on, particularly on the availability of commercially important crustaceans. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


891: The World Has A New Largest-Known Prime Number

The Mersenne prime was discovered by a computer in Ocala, Fla., on Dec. 7. Mathematicians have spent the past two weeks verifying the calculations.


892: The coolest experiment in the universe

NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory on the International Space Station is the first facility in orbit to produce clouds of "ultracold" atoms, which can reach a fraction of a degree above absolute zero. Nothing in nature is known to hit the temperatures achieved in laboratories like CAL, which means the orbiting facility is regularly the coldest known spot in the universe. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


893: NASA's InSight places first instrument on Mars

NASA's InSight lander has deployed its first instrument onto the surface of Mars, completing a major mission milestone. New images from the lander show the seismometer on the ground, its copper-colored covering faintly illuminated in the Martian dusk. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


894: Statins are more effective for those who follow the Mediterranean diet

For those who have already had a heart attack or a stroke, the combination of statins and Mediterranean Diet appears to be the most effective choice to reduce the risk of mortality, especially from cardiovascular causes. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


895: Why Facebook is developing a cryptocurrency for WhatsApp users


896: The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Once More Unto the Shutdown

We’re ending the year as it began: with the U.S. government headed toward another shutdown, this time chiefly over funding for President Donald Trump’s proposed border wall. Meanwhile, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said he will resign at the end of February, citing disagreements with the president over foreign policy. Mattis is just the latest in a long line of senior administration staff, from Jo (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


897: Eyewire Release Report 12/21/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. When competitions are awarded, you should now automatically receive a notification detailing the results! This feature may be tweaked here and there going forward, but we hope you find it useful. Deleting pinned notifications from your notification list shoul (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


898: The best science jokes to make you laugh, groan, and Google

Entertainment Why did the bored internet user click on the link? You're about to find out. LOL is not on the Periodic Table.


899: Q&A: Seafood, in the Pink

Frozen fish often loses its healthy color, even though it’s perfectly good. The culprit: ice crystals. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


900: Study supports safety of overlapping surgery for outpatient orthopaedic procedures

At least for brief periods, overlapping surgery is safe for patients undergoing outpatient or 'same-day' orthopaedic surgery procedures, reports a study in the Dec. 19, 2018 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


901: The Worrisome Word in Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Cancer Diagnosis

On Friday, surgeons in New York removed the lower lobe of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s left lung. According to a statement from the Supreme Court, two nodules—which had been discovered in a CT scan after Ginsburg broke three ribs last month—were determined to be malignant. Images before the surgery showed no evidence of cancer elsewhere in her body, and doctors at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer


902: Not Tonight: Why Americans Are Having Less Sex

U up? Nah. (Image credit: barnimages.com / CC BY 2.0)


903: Inside a Historic Win on Election Day 2018

On Election Day 2018, Malcolm Kenyatta, a third-generation activist from North Philadelphia, hoped to become a Pennsylvania state representative in the 181st District, which has a 26 percent deep-poverty rate. He made history by becoming the first openly LGBT candidate of color elected to state office in Pennsylvania. Tim Harris, a friend of Kenyatta’s from college, had followed the activist’s tr


904: Study finds Tropical Cyclone Winston damaged fisheries as well as homes in Fiji

A newly published study by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has found that impacts of Tropical Cyclone Winston on the coastal communities of Fiji went beyond the immediate loss of lives and infrastructure. The cyclone also had a lingering effect on the fisheries many communities depend on, particularly on the availability of commercially important crustaceans. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


905: Why a little bit of leftovers really kills our self-control

New research looks at the tendency to overeat when we only have a little bit of food left over—and how we justify it by convincing ourselves that it’s not as unhealthy as it is. “Many of us were raised with this ‘clean your plate’ mentality, stemming from a desire to ensure one is not being wasteful or their children are eating well; however, this can also lead to overconsumption,” says Kelly Haw (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


906: Ruth Bader Ginsburg just had cancer surgery—here's why she should be okay

Health The Supreme Court Justice had malignant pulmonary nodes removed. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had two cancerous nodules removed from her lung today at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


907: Artificial Intelligence in NBA Basketball

Artificial Intelligence in NBA Basketball Data science and machine learning are helping basketball players up their game. Noah-Sensor-Above-Court.jpg Noah Basketball's camera-based system tracks the arc of a player's shot and other details to evaluate a shooter's skill. Image credits: Courtesy Noah Basketball Sports Friday, December 21, 2018 – 14:30 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — Gro (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


908: Turbulence in exceptionally hot solar corona

Astrophysicists are keen to learn why the corona is so hot. Scientists have completed research that may advance the search. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


909: Type 2 Diabetes May Be Linked to Erectile Dysfunction

It makes “good biological sense" (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


910: What are frankincense and myrrh?

Environment The mysteries of these botanicals go way beyond the Magi. Frankincense and myrrh are both tree resins. In their time, they were worth as much as gold, and fought over like oil today. Despite thousands of years of use, the…


911: Chemical engineers publish paper challenging theories of glass transition

Greg McKenna, Horn Professor and the John R. Bradford Chair in the Department of Chemical Engineering in Texas Tech University's Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering, has published his paper, "Testing the Paradigm of an Ideal Glass Transition: Dynamics of an Ultra-stable Polymeric Glass," in the journal Science Advances. The paper's results go against longstanding theories. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


912: Forskertalenter skal puffes ud af comfort zonen

Københavns Universitet søsætter nyt talentudviklingsprogram, UCPH Forward, der fra… (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


913: Ruling that blocked grizzly bear hunt plans appealed by US

U.S. government attorneys filed notice Friday that they are appealing a court ruling that restored protections for grizzly bears in the Northern Rockies and blocked plans to hold the first public hunts for the animals in decades. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


914: Privacy and other matters with Facebook's video-call gadget

It's rare that a new gadget these days serves a true need. Rather, it creates a want. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


915: Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Cilida north of Mauritius

Tropical Cyclone Cilida appeared as a large and powerful hurricane on imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on Dec. 21. Cilida is located north of the island of Mauritius in the Southern Indian Ocean. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


916: People really do drink more booze in cold, dark places

People living in colder regions with less sunlight drink more alcohol than their warm-weather counterparts, research shows. The study, which appears in Hepatology , finds that as temperature and sunlight hours dropped, alcohol consumption increased. Climate factors also were tied to binge drinking and the prevalence of alcoholic liver disease, one of the main causes of mortality in patients with (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


917: Tony Is Losing Gold in the Runoff | Gold Rush

After running pay-dirt nonstop for two days, Tony does a spot check. He discovers the gold is so fine that it's failing to settle in the sluice box. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


918: Surfer's ear points to ancient pearl divers in Panama

Surfer's ear, associated with cold weather and water sports, led a bioarchaeologist at the Smithsonian in Panama to suspect that ancient shoreline residents were diving for pearls in an area of cold-water upwelling. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


919: Liver disease could be picked up much sooner by nurse-led tests in GP surgeries

Research carried out by scientists at the University of Southampton has shown that simple tests in GP surgeries could potentially double the diagnosis rate of liver disease where patients are not displaying any symptoms. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


920: Frozen' copper behaves as noble metal in catalysis: study

A new study by scientists from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics shows that the electron structure of Cu can be changed, assisted by high energy plasma, making Cu exhibit significantly different catalytic behaviors than normal Cu in selective hydrogenation reactions. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


921: Photos of the Week: Halo Moon, Crouching Boy, Festive Penguins

Keyboard art in the Ivory Coast, darts fans in London, a new Boring Company tunnel in California, a coast-guard rescue in Turkey, a terrible fire in Brazil, huge protests in Budapest, a giant Santa in Shanghai, a naturalization ceremony in Los Angeles, and much more


922: Guitarist Has Brain Surgery, and Strums All the Way Through

Musa Manzini, a jazz bassist, was awake and playing slowly as surgeons performed an “awake craniotomy,” which allowed them to remove a brain tumor without causing damage.


923: Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials

'Topological materials' produce electron states that can be very interesting for technical applications, but it is extremely difficult to identify these materials and their associated electronic states. A 'crystal' made of light waves can now be used to deliberately drive the system out of equilibrium. By switching between simple and complicated states, the system reveals whether or not it has top (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


924: Chloroform emissions could delay ozone recovery by up to 8 years

A new study identifies another threat to the ozone layer's recovery: chloroform — a colorless, sweet-smelling compound that is primarily used in the manufacturing of products such as Teflon and various refrigerants. The researchers found that between 2010 and 2015, emissions and concentrations of chloroform in the global atmosphere have increased significantly. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


925: The way we serve food can boost cooperation

A new study asks: Could the way we serve and eat meals boost cooperation? The answer appears to be yes. When people in a business negotiation share not just a meal but also a plate, they collaborate better and reach deals faster, according to the new research from professor Ayelet Fishbach from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and Cornell University’s Kaitlin Woolley (a Booth Ph (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


926: Frozen' copper behaves as noble metal in catalysis: study

As a non-noble metal, copper oxidizes more easily to a positive valence (Cu+ or Cu2+) than same-family elements Au or Ag. In general, this chemical property is mainly determined by electron structure. Can we change the chemical properties of an element by regulating its electron structure? Can Cu act as a noble metal in catalytic reactions? (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


927: GM houseplant sucks cancer-linked chemicals from the air

Researchers have genetically modified a common houseplant—pothos ivy—to remove chloroform and benzene from the air around it. We like to keep the air in our homes as clean as possible, and sometimes we use HEPA air filters to keep offending allergens and dust particles at bay. But some hazardous compounds are too small for these filters to trap. Small molecules like chloroform, which is present i (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


928: Tons of dead fish wash up in Rio de Janeiro lagoon

Residents of a high-end neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro woke up to the unpleasant smell of 13 tons of rotting dead fish floating in the city's Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


929: Drone threat a steep learning curve for airport chiefs

Aviation chiefs are going to be on a steep learning curve to counter the security threat posed by drones after a costly and humiliating shutdown of London's Gatwick airport. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


930: Ford recalls 874,000 pickups in US, Canada on fire risk

Ford is recalling 874,000 of its best-selling F-series pickup trucks due to fire risk from the engine block heater system, the company announced Friday. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


931: Sight-saving treatment for eye infection or trauma

Scientists have developed a novel eye drop that rapidly reduces sight-threatening scarring to the surface of the eye. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


932: Reducing head impacts in youth football

The high head impact and concussion rates in football are of increasing concern, especially for younger players. Recent research has shown that limiting contact in football practice can reduce the number of head impacts. But what is the correct formula to lessen exposure while still developing the skills necessary to safely play the game? (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


933: Structure and function of photosynthesis protein explained in detail

Researchers have solved the structure and elucidated the function of photosynthetic complex I. This membrane protein complex plays a major role in dynamically rewiring photosynthesis. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


934: 9 most common New Year’s resolutions — and how to make them happen

The top three New Year's resolutions for 2018 were to eat healthier, get more exercise, and save more money. Care to guess what the top three are this year? We check in with experts to devise strategies for tackling the most common New Year's resolutions. Knowing exactly what you want to accomplish and how you will do it can help increase your chances of success in 2019 (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


935: A safe, wearable soft sensor

Harvard University researchers have developed a soft, non-toxic wearable sensor that unobtrusively attaches to the hand and measures the force of a grasp and the motion of the hand and fingers. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


936: The Year in Letters

The Atlantic’ s readers wrote eloquently and passionately about a wide range of news events, stories, and complicated ideas this year. Here’s a look back at some of what they had to say. February After the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Heather Sher, a radiologist who treated some of the victims, wrote about her experience in the emergency room . “As a doct (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


937: Gadget Lab Podcast: 2018 Was the Year of 'Oops!' in Tech

Wired’s Gadget Lab team sums up this year in tech. Plus: An interview with the CEO of a futuristic fitness company.


938: A big space crash likely made Uranus lopsided

Uranus is a lopsided oddity, the only planet to spin on its side. Scientists now think they know how it got that way: It was pushed over by a rock at least twice as big as Earth.


939: Flights suspended again at London Gatwick after drone report

In a new nightmare for holiday travel, flights were suspended again at London's Gatwick Airport after reports that another drone had been spotted over the airport late Friday afternoon, the airport and British police said. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


940: Researchers explore genetics of California mountain lions to inform future conservation

Fragmentation of wildlife populations is increasing on a global scale, and understanding current genetic structure, genetic diversity and genetic connectivity is key to informing future wildlife management and conservation. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


941: Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores

Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over a period of three years, the team discovered that several mammalian predators are living on various islands in this remote archipelago in Lake Superior.


942: Electric fish in augmented reality reveal how animals 'actively sense' world around them

Researchers have used augmented reality technology to unravel the mysterious dynamic between active sensing movement and sensory feedback. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


943: The New Old Age: This Type of Illiteracy Could Hurt You

More than half of older Americans lack the skills to gather and understand medical information. Providers must simplify, researchers say.


944: Inside CERN’s Large Hadron Collider

Beneath the fields of Switzerland and France lies the largest machine ever built. Tour the Large Hadron Collider in virtual reality. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


945: Gifts for someone who you just met

Gift Guides …who maybe is going to get you a gift. Gifts for someone who you just met who maybe is going to get you a gift. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


946: Photos of the Year

From 500-million-year-old fat to a newly discovered virus, here are some stunners from The Scientist in 2018. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


947: Incoming Democrat Wants to Make Climate a 2020 Election Issue

California Representative-elect, Mike Levin, thinks climate can rally voters in the next presidential race — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


948: 300 blind mice uncover genetic causes of eye disease

Hundreds of new genes linked to blindness and other vision disorders have been identified in a screen of mouse strains. Many of these genes are likely important in human vision and the results could help identify new causes of hereditary blindness in patients. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


949: Electric fish in augmented reality reveal how animals 'actively sense' world around them

In a new study, NJIT and Johns Hopkins researchers have used augmented reality technology to unravel the mysterious dynamic between active sensing movement and sensory feedback. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


950: New Study Questions Whether Death Rate Levels Off in Old Age

A demographer's model suggests the "mortality plateau" in the extreme elderly could be explained by clerical errors. Not everyone agrees. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


951: Facebook efter ny skandale: Medierne misforstår sagen

New York Times afslørede tirsdag, at Facebook deler brugerdata uden samtykke, men medierne tager fejl, mener Facebook. Dansk forsker kalder sagen uigennemskuelig. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


952: System lets A.I. play chemist to save months of work

A new system combines artificial neural networks with infrared thermal imaging to control and interpret chemical reactions with precision and speed that far outpace conventional methods. Machine learning algorithms can predict stock market fluctuations, control complex manufacturing processes, enable navigation for robots and driverless vehicles, and much more. Now, researchers are tapping a new (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


953: Teething necklaces, gels, and rings can be dangerous. Here’s what to use instead.

Health The FDA warns that jewelry marketed as baby-safe is anything but. The FDA has issued a warning this week about the number of reports they’ve received about babies sustaining serious injuries and even dying from teething jewelry.


954: NASA's GPM satellite examines weakening Tropical Cyclone Kenanga

Tropical Cyclone Kenanga is now on a weakening trend and NASA's GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall and cloud heights within the storm. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


955: Americans are sleeping less than they were 13 years ago

A survey suggests that nearly one-third of American adults are sleeping fewer than 6 hours a night, and minority groups are most affected.


956: This bank in Italy accepted cheese as collateral. Here's why.

When giving out a secured loan, most banks ask for a form of collateral to recoup their losses in case the borrower defaults. Most people put up their homes as collateral, but one bank in Italy accepts wheels of delicious, sharp, and valuable cheese. It might seem bizarre, but it's not the first time unusual items have been used as collateral. None If you were to take out a loan for buying a home


957: The Scientist's Most Stunning Infographics of 2018

From cellular self-digestion to the effects of exercise on the brain, our features editor picks her favorite art custom-made for the magazine. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


958: Christmas in La-La Land

LOS ANGELES—A cold coming they had of it, T. S. Eliot’s wise men did. I think of that line on crisp, clear December nights in Los Angeles, when the towering, century-old palm trees make our neighborhood seem as if it could pass for the Fertile Crescent, or at least the close-by Paramount Studios backlot where White Christmas was filmed. Christmas in the Mediterranean climate of Southern Californi


959: The Top 10 Ocean Conservation Victories of 2018

(Just kidding, there were only three this year) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


960: Science Needs More Public Faces

Social media provides a relatable platform to bring in a broader understanding and acceptance of the work of scientists and how it impacts society — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


961: More Babies Are Conceived Over the Holiday Season Than Other Times of Year

Is the crisp autumn air, or the joy (or anxiety) of the holiday season, triggering more unprotected sexual intercourse? Or is it something else …


962: Statins reduce your ‘good’ brown fat

Statins reduce beneficial brown adipose tissue, according to new research. But this is no reason to demonize these drugs, the researchers insist. A certain proportion of the adult population has not only white adipose (or fatty) tissue, but also brown fat. This brown adipose tissue helps to convert sugar and fat into heat. People with brown adipose tissue are better at regulating their body tempe (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


963: WATCH: First-Ever Footage of a Lizard Breathing Underwater

Lizards can't breathe underwater — or can they?


964: Bone Building Needs Bit of Breakdown First

The hormone irisin encourages bone remodeling, in part by first triggering another substance that encourages some bone breakdown. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


965: The Disturbing Trend Behind America’s Soaring Gun Deaths

In 2015 and 2016, Americans faced an alarming statistic: After a couple of decades of overall decline, major data centers reported a sharp uptick of crime in big cities. Donald Trump spoke with dystopian foreboding in his 2016 inaugural address about the “ American carnage ” wreaking havoc in the country’s metropolises; earlier, at one campaign event , he asserted that “places like Afghanistan” w


966: Why Kirstjen Nielsen Sounds Like the Hulk

On a worrisome day in Washington—with a government shutdown looming and the defense secretary resigning—a clip of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen served as unexpected comic relief. Nielsen, speaking before the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday, responded to a question from Representative Tom Marino by saying, “From Congress I would ask for wall. We need wall.” "I would ask for wa


967: Large-scale study identifies shared genetic architecture for polycystic ovary syndrome diagnosis

An international consortium of researchers identify genetic underpinnings associated with PCOS to understand and better diagnose it. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


968: How kindergartens serve as 'gendergartens'

Sociologists at the Higher School of Economics showed that preschool education has its own hidden curriculum: kindergarten teachers transmit social norms to children, including conservative ideas of femininity and masculinity. Girls are expected to have 'proper' character and behavior, to be obedient and pretty, take an interest in music and dance, and to like the color pink. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


969: Study compares scheduled vs. emergency-only dialysis among undocumented immigrants

A unique opportunity made it feasible for uninsured patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who received emergency-only dialysis in Dallas, Texas, to enroll in private, commercial health insurance plans in 2015 and that made it possible for researchers to compare scheduled vs. emergency-only dialysis among undocumented immigrants with ESRD. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


970: Millions of Google searches for sexual harassment, assault since #MeToo

An estimated 40 to 54 million Google searches for sexual harassment and assault were recorded in the United States in the eight months after public accusations against film producer Harvey Weinstein and the ensuing #MeToo movement. Searches related to reporting and preventing such actions also were up based on the results of a study that monitored and analyzed search activity. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


971: Study analyzes clinical trials of medications to control knee osteoarthritis pain

Managing osteoarthritis requires long-term treatment for symptoms such as pain and changes in joint structure that can lead to disability. This study analyzed the combined results of 47 randomized clinical trials that lasted at least 12 months for 33 drug interventions and 22,000 patients with knee osteoarthritis. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


972: Is program to reduce hospital readmissions associated with a change in patient deaths?

The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) was created under the Affordable Care Act and hospitals face financial penalties for higher-than-expected 30-day readmission rates for patients with heart failure, heart attack and pneumonia. Lower hospital readmission rates for those conditions have been associated with the program but it was unclear if the program was associated with a change in (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


973: Readmissions reduction program may be associated with increase in patient-level mortality

A policy designed to reduce hospital readmissions through financial penalties was associated with a significant increase in post-discharge mortality for patients with heart failure and pneumonia, according to a large-scale study by researchers in Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's (BIDMC) Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


974: Study looks at ED visits to examine opioid prescribing in pediatric patients

Opioids for pain management in pediatric patients are sometimes necessary but their use has raised concerns about the effects of opioids and later abuse. This analysis examined opioid prescribing rates using information from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2015 on more than 69,000 emergency department visits for patients younger than 18. Prescribing rates decrease (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


975: Lean electrolyte design is a game-changer for magnesium batteries

Researchers from the University of Houston and the Toyota Research Institute of America have discovered a promising new version of high-energy magnesium batteries, with potential applications ranging from electric vehicles to battery storage for renewable energy systems. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


976: How common is Hepatitis C infection in each US state?

Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of illness and death in the United States and injection drug use is likely fueling many new cases. This study, which used survey and vital statistics data, suggests about 1 percent of adults (0.93 percent) were living with hepatitis C from 2013 to 2016, and how common infections were varied by state and region. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


977: Two Type 2 diabetes drugs linked to higher risk of heart disease

Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat Type 2 diabetes carry a high risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure or amputation, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. The drugs are commonly prescribed to patients after they have taken metformin but need a second-line medication. This is the first study to compare how each of the six major second-line drugs imp (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


978: Stabilizing 2D layered perovskites for photovoltaics: setting up a defensive wall

A research team, led by Prof. GUO Xin and Prof. LI Can from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, improved the stability of PSCs by removing the gaps, called van der Waals gaps, in widely studied Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phase two-dimensional (2D) layered perovskite materials. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


979: Out There: Apollo 8’s Earthrise: The Shot Seen Round the World

Half a century ago today, a photograph from the moon helped humans rediscover Earth.


980: Earthrise: 50 Years Since Apollo 8

On Christmas Eve, 1968, astronauts orbiting the moon saw Earth rising for the first time.


981: Facebook might be developing a cryptocurrency that you could send via WhatsApp


982: 2019 Preview: Renewable energy race to ramp up as oil use skyrockets

As global demand for energy grows, we will need to switch to renewables even faster to avoid climate catastrophe (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


983: Stabilizing 2-D layered perovskites for photovoltaics: Setting up a defensive wall

Setting up a defensive wall in a soccer game is a primary sports challenge. No coach likes a gap between defensive players in the wall. Scientists are tackling a similar problem to improve the stability of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


984: These 2018 findings could be big news — if they turn out to be true

Discoveries about fossils, the Big Bang and more could shake up the scientific world – if they turn out to be true.


985: The Trump Administration’s Lowest Point Yet

Since the start of the Donald Trump administration, a morbid watch has been kept: Though the president is adept at creating his own crises, either intentionally or not , experts noted that he had not faced a full-scale crisis that was not of his own making. Those are the times that test presidents. How would Trump react when his moment came ? It’s fitting that during Advent, the season of waiting


986: New metasurfaces look bright in one direction, while dark in the opposite direction

Researchers at Aalto University have developed metasurfaces with extreme angle-asymmetric response. The surface reflections depend on the angle at which light hits it. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


987: Image: Hubble's cosmic holiday wreath

This festive NASA Hubble Space Telescope image resembles a holiday wreath made of sparkling lights. The bright southern hemisphere star RS Puppis, at the center of the image, is swaddled in a gossamer cocoon of reflective dust illuminated by the glittering star. The super star is ten times more massive than the sun and 200 times larger.


988: Report reveals seasonal iron depletion in U.K. coastal waters

Scientists from the University of Plymouth have found that a lack of summertime iron could be having a major impact on the overall health of our coastal waters and shelf seas. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


989: Infographic

(Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


990: Museums should honor the everyday, not just the extraordinary | Ariana Curtis

Who deserves to be in a museum? For too long, the answer has been "the extraordinary" — those aspirational historymakers who inspire us with their successes. But those stories are limiting, says museum curator Ariana Curtis. In a visionary talk, she imagines how museums can more accurately represent history by honoring the lives of people both extraordinary and everyday, prominent and hidden — a


991: Bees can count with just four nerve cells in their brains

Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


992: Twisting light to enable high-capacity data transmission

For the first time, researchers have used tiny gears made of germanium to generate a vortex of twisted light that turns around its axis of travel much like a corkscrew. Because germanium is compatible with the silicon used to make computer chips, the new light source could be used to boost the amount of data that can be transmitted with chip-based optical computing and communication. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


993: Research highlights what helps people live well with dementia

Psychological aspects, such as optimism, self-esteem, loneliness and depression were closely linked to ability to optimise quality of life and wellbeing in both people with dementia and carers. Experience in other areas of life influences psychological well-being and perceptions of living well. Physical health and fitness was important for both groups. For both carers and people with dementia soci (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


994: Artificial intelligence system learns to diagnose, classify intracranial hemorrhage

A team of investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Radiology has developed a system using artificial intelligence to quickly diagnose and classify brain hemorrhages and to provide the basis of its decisions from relatively small image datasets. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


995: Air pollution in Mexico City is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease

A new study by researchers at the Universities of Montana, Valle de México, Boise State, Universidad Veracruzana, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría and Paul-Flechsig-Institute for Brain Research heightens together with German company Analytik Jena concerns over the evolving and relentless Alzheimer's pathology observed in young Metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) urbanites.These findings are published in (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


996: Professor efter forbud mod ftalater: Husk stadig udluftning

Kroppen optager sundhedsskadelige stoffer gennem både huden og åndedrættet, og derfor kan rengøring og gennemtræk hjælpe meget. Men ikke alt. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


997: Breaking up (with Facebook) is hard to do: Here's how

Every relationship has a breaking point. Even yours with Facebook. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


998: Why the issue of drug resistance in animal farming means a fight against urban elites

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has been framed as one of the biggest threats to humanity in the 21st century. By 2050, more humans could die because of AMR than cancer. But despite alarming concerns from the early 1960s and warnings that the issue of antimicrobial resistance could cross barriers between animal species, the problems of antimicrobial use in animal farming have for long been ignored (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


999: Supercurrents gone chiral: new type of superconducting junction

Unconventional superconductors form one of the big mysteries in physics. Among them is strontium ruthenate, which stands out as a controversial superconductor. During his Ph.D., Leiden physicist Kaveh Lahabi has provided new insights into the nature of superconductivity in this material, leading to a new type of superconducting junction. Lahabi obtained his Ph.D. cum laude. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1000: Chemical bond versus electromagnetic waves

Vibrating carbon monoxide molecules adsorbed at the surface of a salt crystal stop moving after a few milliseconds. Scientists now discovered this is dominantly due to the emission of electromagnetic waves. The role of the chemical bond at the surface thereby appears to be less important than previously thought. Jörg Meyer from the Leiden Institute for Chemistry has contributed to the fundamental (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1001: The DRC's Ebola Outbreak Is an End-of-Year Nightmare

A major election, holiday travel, and violent clashes in the Democratic Republic of Congo are confounding all attempts to contain Ebola's spread.


1002: Mars: Pictures reveal 'winter wonderland' on the red planet

Earth is not the only planet with icy scenes this festive season, the European Space Agency says.


1003: A space startup was just hit with a $900,000 fine for illegally launching four tiny satellites


1004: Tiny bubbles of bacterial mischief

Margarethe (Meta) Kuehn studies vesicles—little bubbles that bud off bacterial membranes. All sorts of things may be tightly packed into these bubbles: viruses, antigens, and information a bacterium will need to make cells vulnerable to infection. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1005: Robin hushed: Wind turbines are making songbirds change their tune

Wind turbines are a leading source of green energy which could supply 12% of the world's energy by 2020. But their use is often criticised for its impact on wildlife, particularly birds. Larger birds can collide with turbines and some have even learned to avoid flying near them. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1006: December 2018 Crossword Puzzle Answers

(Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1007: Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials

Electrons are not just little spheres, bouncing through a material like a rubber ball. The laws of quantum physics tell us that electrons behave like waves. In some materials, these electron waves can take on rather complicated shapes. The so-called "topological materials" produce electron states that can be very interesting for technical applications, but it is extremely difficult to identify the (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1008: The Books Briefing: A Readable Feast

You could say that meals—especially holiday meals—are stories in themselves. Beyond the suspense of waiting for a cake to come out of the oven, or the satisfying denouement served in a steaming bowl of soup, there’s a wealth of symbolism (not to mention potential for drama) in gathering to share life-sustaining, life-affirming food. Gustave Flaubert uses turkeys and plum jam to mark the passing y (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1009: The Quiet Integrity of James Mattis

Since Jim Mattis grounds himself in the classics, it seems fitting to mark his resignation with a passage from Epictetus: “Authentic freedom places demands on us.” The quiet integrity with which he has done his job modeled a stoicism rare in our febrile political climate and sadly lacking elsewhere in the Trump administration. Mattis’s resignation letter may have been his most important act as th


1010: Forecasters may be looking in wrong place when predicting tornadoes, Ohio research shows

Weather forecasters may be looking in the wrong place when working to issue tornado warnings, new research led by Ohio University has demonstrated. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1011: Getting the most out of spinach — maximizing the antioxidant lutein

Eat your spinach in the form of a smoothie or juice — this is the best way to obtain the antioxidant lutein, according to research from Linköping University, Sweden. High levels of lutein are found in dark green vegetables, and researchers at the university have compared different ways of preparing fresh spinach in order to maximize the levels of lutein in finished food. The findings are publishe (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1012: Cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce brown adipose tissue

ETH Zurich scientists have shown that statins, one of the most commonly prescribed classes of pharmaceuticals, reduce beneficial brown adipose tissue. But this is no reason to demonize these drugs, the researchers insist. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1013: Researchers suggest ways to reduce head impacts in youth football

The high head impact and concussion rates in football are of increasing concern, especially for younger players.Recent research has shown that limiting contact in football practice can reduce the number of head impacts. But what is the correct formula to lessen exposure while still developing the skills necessary to safely play the game? (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1014: Study: Increased risk of heart attack, stroke in months leading up to a cancer diagnosis

Older adults with cancer are more likely to have had a heart attack or stroke in the months prior to their cancer diagnosis compared with similar adults who do not have cancer during the same period, according to a report published online today in Blood. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1015: New findings reveal the behavior of turbulence in the exceptionally hot solar corona

The sun defies conventional scientific understanding. Its upper atmosphere, known as the corona, is many millions of degrees hotter than its surface. Astrophysicists are keen to learn why the corona is so hot, and scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have completed research that may advance the search. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1016: Forecasters may be looking in wrong place when predicting tornadoes, research shows

Weather forecasters may be looking in the wrong place when working to issue tornado warnings, new research led by Ohio University has demonstrated. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1017: Scientists have developed high-strength material for aircraft industry

Scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) have designed a new, high-strength ceramic material that can withstand prolonged exposure to supersonic airflow at temperatures above 2600°C. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1018: Derfor kan en enkelt droneoperatør forstyrre julen for titusindvis af flypassagerer

Ulovlige droner omkring London-lufthavnen Gatwick har sat en stopper for flytrafikken. Britisk militær har taget jamming-teknologier i brug, men hverken droner eller bagmænd er endnu fundet. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1019: Quanta’s Science and Math Crossword Puzzle

Last December, we published our 2017 Science and Math Crossword as a holiday gift to Quanta readers. This year, I’m happy to say, it’s back by popular demand. The 2018 crossword is similar to the 2017 crossword in many ways. Like last year’s, the new crossword is a celebration of the excellent scientific articles that Quanta served up all year, and it’s also my tribute to Quanta ’s writers and ed


1020: New Horizons scientists puzzled by lack of a 'light curve' from their Kuiper Belt flyby target

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is bearing down on Ultima Thule, its New Year's flyby target in the far away Kuiper Belt. Among its approach observations over the past three months, the spacecraft has been taking hundreds of images to measure Ultima's brightness and how it varies as the object rotates.


1021: Want citizens to care about climate change? Write them a cheque

Climate scientists insist in a recent report that fundamental changes in how energy is consumed and supplied are urgently required to avoid serious damage to life and property from rising temperatures, rising sea levels and greater frequency of extreme weather events (hurricanes, drought-induced wildfires, etc.). (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1022: Earthrise, a photo that changed the world

December 24 is the 50th anniversary of Earthrise, arguably one of the most profound images in the history of human culture. When astronaut William Anders photographed a fragile blue sphere set in dark space peeking over the moon, it changed our perception of our place in space and fuelled environmental awareness around the world. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1023: How the perception of unfair economic inequality leads to civic unrest

Why are there not more mass demonstrations across the United States with a president as controversial as Donald Trump? The President's thoughts, tariffs, and tweets affect global economies, societies, and sensibilities. Amid all the anger, frustration, and unfairness felt by large sections of the American public, the lack of street demonstrations is surprising. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1024: On the right path to fusion energy

A new report on the development of fusion as an energy source, written at the request of the U.S. Secretary of Energy, proposes adoption of a national fusion strategy that closely aligns with the course charted in recent years by MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC) and privately funded Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS), a recent MIT spinout. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1025: Julekort fra Mars: Et krater fyldt med is og et køreklart måleapparat

Både amerikanske og europæiske sonder har sendt friske billeder hjem fra vores naboplanet Mars.


1026: The Year in Math and Computer Science

Youth ruled the year in mathematics. The Fields Medals — awarded every four years to the top mathematicians no older than 40 — went out to four individuals who have left their marks all over the mathematical landscape. This year one of the awards went to Peter Scholze, who at 30 became one of the youngest ever to win. But at times in 2018, even 30 could feel old. Two students, one in graduate sch


1027: Statins are more effective for those who follow the Mediterranean diet

For those who have already had a heart attack or a stroke, the combination of statins and Mediterranean Diet appears to be the most effective choice to reduce the risk of mortality, especially from cardiovascular causes. It is the result of an Italian study conducted at the I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, Pozzilli, Italy on over 1,000 adults recruited in the Moli-sani Study, published in the International Jo (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1028: The brain's support cells show defective development in Huntington's disease

The neurological disorder Huntington's disease causes behavioral and motor changes, which among other things are a result of dysfunctional maturation or formation of glial cells, the brain's support cells, researchers from the University of Copenhagen demonstrate in a new study based on mice trials. The researchers' long-term goal is to be able to use the research results to develop a treatment fo (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1029: With First-Ever Landing on Moon's Farside, China Enters "Luna Incognita"

The Chang’e-4 mission could have major effects on Earthbound science and politics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1030: The 5 Years That Changed Dating

On the 20th anniversary of The New York Times ’ popular Vows column, a weekly feature on notable weddings and engagements launched in 1992, its longtime editor wrote that Vows was meant to be more than just a news notice about society events. It aimed to give readers the backstory on marrying couples and, in the meantime, to explore how romance was changing with the times. “Twenty years ago, as n


1031: Alien Architects Didn't Build This Pre-Incan Complex, 3D Models Show

Scientists recently restored an ancient structure in Bolivia to its former splendor.


1032: Which is worse: Food waste or emissions from refrigeration?

New research weighs the emissions trade-offs of creating an unbroken refrigerated supply chain, or “cold chain,” in sub-Saharan Africa Few inventions have had a greater impact on our daily lives, and especially on the food we eat, than refrigeration. But there are still places in the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa, where a cold chain that keeps perishable food cold from farm to market is not y (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1033: The Year in Biology

Metcalfe’s law, which states that the value of a network grows with the square of its number of nodes, is a mainstay of telecommunications theory. But it also relates to biology because the web of life is a network, too. Each passing year brings to light new varieties of interconnections and relationships among the ever-widening diversity of organisms, cells, genes and biomolecules known to scien


1034: Botanical artist brings rare plants back to life

Artist Lucy Smith draws plants so that they can be recorded for science at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1035: Unmeltable chocolate and bean-to-bar: A cocoa expert highlights three sweet trends

'Tis the season to eat chocolate. And for the chocolate industry, there's nothing sweeter, since this is the time of year when it enjoys a spike in sales and, at least for some, rising profits. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1036: Swedish research multiplies the life of rechargeable NiMH batteries

Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a method to multiply the lifespan of nickel-metal hydride batteries. This means that the batteries can handle a great many more charging cycles without losing capacity. The new method also means that the batteries can easily be restored once they have begun to wear out, unlike other rechargeable batteries that must be melted down for recycling. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1037: Social ‘bursts’ influence how fast disease spreads

A new mathematical model could cure the potential to underestimate how quickly diseases spread. Its creators discovered that current predictive models may miss the influence of a critical aspect of the social behavior of individuals. In contrast to the current models—which generally assume a constant rate of spread—the new model takes into account the propensity for individual social interactions (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1038: New T-wave detector uses waves of the electronic sea in graphene

A team of researchers from Russia, Great Britain, Japan and Italy has created a graphene-based terahertz detector. The study was published in Nature Communications. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1039: First detection of rain over the ocean by navigation satellites

In order to analyse climate change or provide information on natural hazards, for example, it is important for researchers to gather knowledge about rain. Better knowledge of precipitation and its distribution could, for example, help protect against river flooding. On land, monitoring stations can provide data by collecting precipitation. At sea, it's not so easy. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1040: Anti-hacker team develops data sharing scheme for cloud storage

In cloud computing, there is still a pressing issue of data security. Scientists from the Laboratory of Problem-Oriented Cloud Computing at South Ural State University have developed an algorithm of improving information security, which allows to avoid providers' conspiracy. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1041: The Year in Physics

A decade ago, it was practically gospel truth among physicists that the universe began with a sudden unfurling of space known as cosmic inflation. Physicists also widely believed that the cosmos’s missing dark matter consists of invisible clouds of heavy, inert particles dubbed WIMPs, and that the laws of nature respect supersymmetry, a tidy mirroring of matter and forces. The only thing left to


1042: Seven apps to level up your resume

DIY Make your job applications stand out. To land that job, you need a resume that displays your work experience and strengths in an eye-catching way. These apps will help you build one that really stands out.


1043: »Uberørt« ingeniørformand vil rydde op i skandaleramt A-kasse

Formanden for IDA, Thomas Damkjær Petersen, forsøger at blive ny formand for Akademikernes A-Kasse, hvis samlede ledelse har trukket sig. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1044: Predicting enhancers from multiple cell lines and tissues: Different developmental stages

In this paper, we proposed a method based on support vector machines (SVMs) to investigate enhancer prediction on cell lines and tissues from EnhancerAtlas. Specifically, we focused on predicting enhancers on different developmental stages of heart and lung tissues. It is easier to predict enhancers from tissues of adult stage than from tissues of fetal stage, which is proven on both heart and lun (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1045: What really happens at femtosecond junctions?

When beams of ultra-short laser pulses running in the same direction intersect with each other at a noticeable angle, various interactions occur between the pulses. These physical phenomena are complicated, and their mathematical description becomes computationally complex. To carry out the appropriate simulations, entire computer clusters have to be engaged. The latest version of Hussar software (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1046: What do we see in a mirror?

Researchers at Aalto University developed metasurfaces with extreme angle-asymmetric response. The new device can be a good or bad reflector depending on the angle the light hits it. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1047: Human blood cells can be directly reprogrammed into neural stem cells

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the stem cell institute HI-STEM* in Heidelberg have succeeded for the first time in directly reprogramming human blood cells into a previously unknown type of neural stem cell. These induced stem cells are similar to those that occur during the early embryonic development of the central nervous system. They can be modified and multiplied (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1048: Interpreting emotions: A matter of confidence

We are exposed to the facial expressions of the people. But do we interpret them correctly? And do we trust our own judgment? This trust is essential for avoiding potentially dangerous situations. Researchers from UNIGE have been testing how confident we feel when judging other people's emotions, and what areas of the brain are used. These results demonstrate that beliefs of our own emotional inte (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1049: Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound

Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1050: Baby star's fiery tantrum could create the building blocks of planets

A massive stellar flare on a baby star has been spotted by University of Warwick astronomers, shedding light on the origins of potentially habitable exoplanets. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1051: Why Hong Kong, Japan and Iceland are the best countries for human development

Since its introduction in 1990, UN's Human Development Index has contributed to a better understanding of development, but has its flaws. Bocconi University's Simone Ghislandi and colleagues developed a new index that takes into account only the inequality-adjusted life expectancy at birth: at life expectancy parity, a country with many disadvantaged people dying young and many rich people dying o (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1052: New insight into what a mother gives to her baby in the womb besides genes

Beginning in the womb, a mother transmits a slew of molecules, microbes and cells to her baby. New insight underscores the importance of their transmission in regulating the development of organs like the brain, heart and immune system. Their dysregulation can increase the risk of birth defects and diseases as diverse as food allergy and schizophrenia. These topics are examined in a new special is (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1053: China bike-sharing pioneer Ofo hits the skids

Bicycle cemeteries, blocked pavements and angry users: the bike-sharing craze is beginning to look like an economic disaster in China, where fierce competition appears set to drive a pioneer of the sector into the ditch. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1054: Navigating NASA's first mission to the Trojan asteroids

In science fiction, explorers can hop in futuristic spaceships and traverse half the galaxy in the blink of a plot hole. However, this sidelines the navigational acrobatics required in order to guarantee real-life mission success. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1055: Thailand to honor beautiful, violent Siamese fighting fish

The Siamese fighting fish, a popular beauty in home aquariums and a popular bet for gamblers for their violent territoriality, is set to become Thailand's national aquatic animal. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1056: Researcher captures rare radar images of Comet 46P/Wirtanen

Barely visible to the naked eye, Comet 46P/Wirtanen keeps some secrets so close that only radar can uncover them. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1057: Electronically programmable photonic molecule

Physical systems with discrete energy levels are ubiquitous in nature and form fundamental building blocks of quantum technology. Artificial atom-like and molecule-like systems were previously demonstrated to regulate light for coherent and dynamic control of the frequency, amplitude and the phase of photons. In a recent study, Mian Zhang and colleagues engineered a photonic molecule with two dist


1058: New report examines key steps in removing carbon dioxide from air

Peter Kelemen is a geologist and the Arthur D. Storke Memorial Professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. A member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and an expert in carbonation of rock from Earth's mantle, Kelemen wrote a chapter on carbon mineralization for a new NAS report, Negative Emissions Technologies and Reliable Sequestration: A Research Agenda. The report was commissioned by (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1059: Mars Express gets festive: A winter wonderland on Mars

This image shows what appears to be a large patch of fresh, untrodden snow – a dream for any lover of the holiday season. However, it's a little too distant for a last-minute winter getaway: this feature, known as Korolev crater, is found on Mars, and is shown here in beautiful detail as seen by Mars Express. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1060: To cut depression stigma, consider the Grinch and Scrooge

Examining the motivations of the Grinch and Ebenezer Scrooge can help us better understand why people might feel lonely and disinterested during the holiday season, says psychiatrist Anthony Tobia. It’s an important lesson for people who struggle with depression, as well as for their loved ones and mental health providers. These narratives can remove the stigma from feelings of depression and iso (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1061: Lucianne Walkowicz: Should We Be Using Mars As A Backup Planet?

Lucianne Walkowicz is all for space exploration, but says we shouldn't expect Mars to save us from a damaged Earth. She warns us not to lose sight of preserving the home we already have. (Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED) (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1062: Lisa Nip: How Can We Engineer The Human Body To Survive On Mars … And Beyond?

Space is an extreme environment filled with radiation, and next to no oxygen. To survive there, Lisa Nip says humans are going to have to change themselves … genetically. (Image credit: John Werner) (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1063: Stephen Petranek: How Will Humans Live On Mars?

Stephen Petranek says, in the next decade, we will send humans to colonize Mars. He lays out the technology–from water-extraction to bricks made of Martian soil–that'll make life possible there. (Image credit: TED) (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1064: James Green: Could The Building Blocks Of Life Exist Elsewhere In Our Solar System?

Earth may not be the only place in our solar system with life, says James Green. New data shows life might have existed on Mars, and could exist now. But what does that mean for us on Earth? (Image credit: James Green) (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1065: Using climate information to protect vulnerable populations in Bangladesh

While traveling to Europe, Asia, and Africa as a graduate student, Melody Braun saw the effects that climate change was already having on vulnerable communities, and she realized that she wanted to work closely with these communities. Now she is a senior research staff associate at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) at Columbia's Earth Institute. She is also one of (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1066: There aren't plenty of fish in the sea, so let's eat all that we catch

"Tis the season for seafood. While those in colder parts of the world tuck into turkey and hot dinners, in the southern hemisphere we get festive with prawn cocktails at Christmas and smoked salmon for New Year's. Maybe crayfish and crab. Perhaps oysters and octopus. Or barramundi and more prawns on the barbie. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1067: A novel mechanism that regulates cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation

Phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils contain multiple lysosomes, which possess a variety of digestive enzymes. Upon stimulation, phagocytes secrete these digestive enzymes through a process called lysosomal exocytosis to lyse external pathogens or tumor cells. A research team led by investigators at Kanazawa University identified myoferlin as a critical regulator of this process. Further (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1068: Simple method rescues stressed liver cells

Isolated human hepatocytes are essential tools in preclinical and clinical liver research, but cell quality is highly variable. Now, researchers from Uppsala University have devised a simple protocol that improves hepatocyte quality and enables cells from a wider quality spectrum to be used in standard and advanced cell culture. The findings are published in Archives of Toxicology. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1069: PKU physicists bridge the equilibrium topological phases and non-equilibrium quantum dynamics

The emergent non-equilibrium topological patterns are shown in quench dynamics induced in a broad class of equilibrium topological phases, and provide universal dynamical characterization of such topological states. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1070: Preparation, characterization and in vitro biological activity of Soyasapogenol B

FTIR, particle size and TEM analysis confirmed that SSB was successfully loaded onto functionalized MWCNTs. Moreover, the different niosome formulations based on functionalized MWCNTs were prepared with sustainable SSB release in. The cytotoxicity could be minimized in case of chitosan and TEOS functionalization. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1071: How dietary fiber and gut bacteria protect the cardiovascular system

The fatty acid propionate helps defend against the effects of high blood pressure, including atherosclerosis and heart tissue remodeling, a study on mice has found. Gut bacteria produce the substance — which calms the immune cells that drive up blood pressure — from natural dietary fiber. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1072: North-star perspectives for Actinium-225 production at commercial scale

Resolution of both supply and cost issues allows clinical research to proceed through clinical trials and potentially produce one or more effective therapies for cancer or infectious diseases that could benefit the public.NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, has investigated several routes that could lead to commercial scale production of actinium-225.The outlook for future supplies of actinium-22 (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1073: Looking at molecules from two sides with table-top femtosecond soft-X-rays

Researchers at the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have successfully combined a table-top laser-based extreme high-order harmonic source for short-pulse soft-X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the water window with novel flatjet technology. They are the first to demonstrate the simultaneous probing of carbon and nitrogen atoms in organic molecules in aqueou (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1074: Kidney patients are the most complex patients

A study published in JAMA Network Open showed: nephrologists treat the most complex patients. As ERA-EDTA president Professor Carmine Zoccali explains, kidney patients are highly vulnerable and need special care, but nephrology is a neglected discipline in many European healthcare systems. According to the ERA-EDTA it is time for a better financial funding of nephrology as well as more efforts to (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1075: Description of rotating molecules made easy

By turning highly complex equations into sets of simple diagrams, Feynman diagrams have established themselves as one of the sharpest tools in a theoretical physicist's toolbox. Scientists at IST Austria have now extended the technique: originally devised for subatomic particles, the simplest objects imaginable, the technique can now work with molecules. The research, which was published in the jo (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1076: To find life beyond Earth,"take off the blinkers," says U of T's Barbara Sherwood Lollar

Is there life beyond Earth? (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1077: Nu har staten samlet hele gasnettet på egne hænder

Det statslige Energinet køber det sidste af de selvstændige naturgasselskaber, HMN, for knap to milliarder kroner. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1078: Spareøvelser på kommende Kattegatbro bringer unikt naturområde i fare

En vejbro over Kattegat bliver dyrere end estimeret i foråret. Dermed kan den kun betales af brugerne alene, hvis der findes besparelser på projektet. Det får beboere på Vestsjælland til at frygte for den unikke natur på Røsnæs.


1079: In 1968, Apollo 8 realised the 2,000-year-old dream of a Roman philosopher

Half a century of Christmases ago, the NASA space mission Apollo 8 became the first manned craft to leave low Earth orbit, atop the unprecedentedly powerful Saturn V rocket, and head out to circumnavigate another celestial body, making 11 orbits of the moon before its return. The mission is often cast in a supporting role – a sort of warm up for the first moon landing. Yet for me, the voyage of Bo (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1080: Remember the discovery of methane in the martian atmosphere? Now scientists can't find any evidence of it, at all

In 2003, scientists from NASA's Goddard Space Center made the first-ever detection of trace amounts of methane in Mars' atmosphere, a find which was confirmed a year later by the ESA's Mars Express orbiter. In December of 2014, the Curiosity rover detected a tenfold spike of methane at the base of the Gale Crater, and uncovered evidence that indicated that Mars has a seasonal methane cycle, where (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1081: Arcimoto's Electric FUV 3-Wheeler Makes City Driving a Blast

The battery-powered ride may not revolutionize how we get around, but it could make life on the road a lot more enjoyable.


1082: See Peru's Pastoruri Glacier Melting via Drone-Mounted LEDs

Photographer Reuben Wu devised a creative way to shoot Peru's Pastoruri glacier at night.


1083: One of the world's fastest cameras captures motion of electrons

During the conversion of light into electricity, such as in solar cells, a large part of the input light energy is lost. This is due to the behaviour of electrons inside of materials. If light hits a material, it stimulates electrons energetically for a fraction of a second, before they pass the energy back into the environment. Because of their extremely short duration of a few femtoseconds—a fem (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1084: Industrial fishing in marine protected areas poses significant threats to endangered sharks and other species

What began as a Dalhousie Ph.D. student's investigation into North Atlantic shark populations turned into an eye-opening discovery that shows a number of European Union-designated marine protected areas (MPAs) are falling short of protecting threatened biodiversity. The research will be published in Science this week (Dec. 21). (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1085: Cold atoms offer a glimpse of flat physics

These days, movies and video games render increasingly realistic 3-D images on 2-D screens, giving viewers the illusion of gazing into another world. For many physicists, though, keeping things flat is far more interesting.


1086: Next generation of scientists for modelling and analysing complex systems

Quantitative models based on nonlinear dynamics and complex systems are frequently used in various areas ranging from climate research to neuroscience to power networks. Such systems, including biological organisms, consist of interacting units with oscillatory elements. For example, several measurable quantities in living systems such as blood flow, respiration and brain activity are oscillatory (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1087: Winter solstice: The astronomy of Christmas

From the Neolithic to present times, the amount of sunlight we see in a day has had a profound impact on human culture. We are fast approaching the winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere, which takes place on December 21. This is the longest night of the year – once celebrated as "Yule" by the pagan people of Northern Europe before it became Christmas. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1088: Female penises evolved twice in bark lice

In a group of bark lice, a penis has evolved twice — in the females. In their nutrient-scarce environment, 'seminal gifts' are an incentive for females to force mating, leading to the co-evolution of female penises and male vaginas. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1089: A subtle strategy to spend more responsibly

Couples who spend from joint accounts are more likely to spend their money on utilitarian purchases rather than pleasurable items. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1090: Heroes and villains influence what you buy

The findings from a new study show that consumers are influenced to buy certain products based on the heroes or villains shown on the labels. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1091: Is the US a tinderbox ready to ignite?

What is the tipping point at which tolerance for hardship and injustice turns into civic discontent in the form of street demonstrations, and how it might be closer than it seems. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1092: Standout Science Visualizations, the Quest for Quasicrystals and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1093: Measuring individual argon atoms helps in understanding ocean ventilation

The age of the water in the world's oceans is critical for understanding ocean circulation, especially for the transport of gases from the atmosphere into the deep ocean. Researchers from Heidelberg University recently used an atomic physics technique they developed to determine the age of deep ocean water ranging from 50 to 1,000 years. This new dating method, which measures individual argon atom (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1094: Explorer Reaches the Deepest Point in the Atlantic Ocean

Having traversed the tops of the world, he's now going deep.


1095: We discovered more about the honeybee 'wake-up call'—and it could help save them

Worldwide honeybee populations are in peril – and it's a dire situation for humans. Threats from climate change, toxic pesticides, and disease have all contributed to a steep honeybee population decline since 2006. And as a third of the food we eat is a direct result of insect pollination – including by honeybees – there could be serious consequences for us if the species goes extinct. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1096: How to halve the environmental impact of your Christmas dinner

The roast Christmas dinner is a valued tradition for many families in the UK and across the globe. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1097: Power plants produce more ultrafine dust than traffic

Ultrafine particles affect both health and climate. In urban areas, road traffic is considered to be the main source of the small particles. However, a long-term measurement campaign of researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) outside of cities has now revealed a source that particularly affects regional climate: modern coal-fired power plants. In the Bulletin of the American Meteoro (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1098: Kondo metamagnet' is first in a family of eccentric quantum crystals

There's an oddball in most families, but Rice University physicist Emilia Morosan has discovered an entire clan of eccentric compounds that could help explain the mysterious electronic and magnetic workings of other quantum materials engineers are eying for next-generation computers and electronics.


1099: When a brand is like a secret lover

Consumers who hide the fact that they use certain brands can increase in individual's connection to the brand. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1100: Four People Who Could Be the Next Defense Secretary

Rumors about James Mattis’s impending departure as President Donald Trump’s defense secretary have swirled for months. On Thursday, those rumors became reality. Whoever succeeds Mattis—who resigned in protest over the president’s military policy—will face the same challenges as the outgoing defense secretary: an impetuous president, fraying alliances, and rising dangers from adversaries old and n


1101: NASA's Webb Telescope wrapped in a mobile clean room

Before moving NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, and to assure that it's kept clean and safe, Webb got a very special wrapping treatment. The wrapping acts as a "mobile clean room," safeguarding the technological marvel from contaminants. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1102: David vs. Goliath: What a tiny electron can tell us about the structure of the universe

What is the shape of an electron? If you recall pictures from your high school science books, the answer seems quite clear: an electron is a small ball of negative charge that is smaller than an atom. This, however, is quite far from the truth. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1103: Disappointment About Gifts Is Good for Kids Who Have Enough

Disappointment is a natural human emotion that occurs after a perceived failure. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1104: Structure and function of photosynthesis protein explained in detail

An international team of researchers has solved the structure and elucidated the function of photosynthetic complex I. This membrane protein complex plays a major role in dynamically rewiring photosynthesis. The team from the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Osaka University and Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with their collaboration partners report the work in the journal Science, publish (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1105: Best of Last Year—The top Phys.org articles of 2018

It was another great year for science, and physics was front and center, as a team at the University of Oxford announced that they may have solved one of the biggest mysteries in modern physics. They came up with a new theory that could explain the missing 95 percent of the cosmos, and in so doing bring balance to the universe. Their theory unites dark matter and dark energy, resulting in a fluid,


1106: Happy Holidays!

Please note our office will be closed from December 24-January 1. See you in the new year! (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1107: Researcher suggests rivers may cause earthquakes

Ryan Thigpen, an assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, has co-authored a paper that describes how river erosion may lead to more earthquakes. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1108: Same genes allow humans and domestic animals to survive in Arctic conditions

Juha Kantanen, a research professor at the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), has collected a large set of biological materials and data for the study of the genomes of Northern domestic animals, reindeer, cattle and horses during his expeditions in a project called Arctic Ark. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1109: Major gaps remain in how traditional knowledge is used in salmon governance in Norway and Finland

A new article published today in the journal Arctic points to major challenges in the ways traditional knowledge is included in the management of Atlantic salmon in Norway and Finland. Comparing different policy and research approaches in the two countries in relation to international expectations towards traditional knowledge inclusion (i.e. the Convention on Biodiversity and at the Arctic policy (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1110: Sulfate helps plants cope with water scarcity

Plants absorb the mineral sulfate from groundwater. An international research team led by scientists from Heidelberg University has uncovered how sulfate controls the production of the drought stress hormone ABA in plants and thus contributes to their drought-resistance. These findings improve scientists' understanding of how the drought-stress signal travels from the roots to the leaves. The stud (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1111: A rose with a thousand petals' … what makes an aphorism – and is this a golden age?

Forget haikus, epigrams, proverbs, maxims, adages and riddles. If you’re needing a sliver of wisdom, try an aphorism. There are certainly plenty around … “Be the change you want to see in the world.” “Raise your words, not your voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.” “Winners are not those who never fail, but those who never quit.” Social media, these days, burgeons with such words of


1112: Tree resin could replace fossil fuels in everything from printer ink to shoe polish

Nexus Media News Genetically engineered trees could supply the chemicals needed to make glue, paint, varnish and other household goods. Tree resin could replace the oil and gas byproducts used in adhesives, cleaning supplies and other household goods. To lower the cost of resin, scientists want to…


1113: Study: You're Going to Keep Aging Until You Die

Once you reach a very advanced age, you reach a sort of "aging plateau," according to some experts. A new study argues that this is wrong.


1114: Wildlife struggle to cope with extreme weather

The mass death of flying foxes in extreme heat in North Queensland last month underscores the importance of University of Queensland wildlife research released today. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1115: How different types of knowledge impact the growth of new firms

Diversifying into new industries is vital to an economy's ability to grow and generate wealth. But to branch out into new industrial activities, a city, region or country must first have a pool of people with the right mix of knowledge and experience to make those pioneering firms a success. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1116: Elby S1 9-Speed E-Bike Review: Heavy and Expensive, but Great

Elby asked: How do you get people on an electric bike who have never biked before?


1117: Aquaman Has No Business Being This Good

Far be it from me to judge other nations, but there’s something rotten at the core of Atlantis, the underwater setting of the new DC Comics blockbuster Aquaman . The realm’s monarchical system of primogeniture has handed the throne to a warmongering maniac named Orm (played by Patrick Wilson). Relationships with the crab people of the Brine kingdom and the spiky monsters of the underwater trenche


1118: Low Quality Studies Belie Hype about Research Boom in China

Few Chinese researchers are regarded as global leaders, as the pressure for rapid output prevails — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1119: Mercury levels in fish fluctuate along with water levels in lakes

A new study has found an unexpected connection between water levels in lakes and toxic mercury levels in fish. When droughts cause water levels to drop, the levels of mercury found in fish also plummet. In wetter weather, water levels rise and levels of mercury in fish increase. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1120: Latest step toward world's largest telescope that will observe 'first stars and galaxies ever formed'

A cutting-edge instrument developed by scientists at the University of Oxford has passed critical tests and gained a powerful adaptive optics system.


1121: Study projects a dramatic increase in annual high-heat days in the U.S. Northeast by the century's end

Long-term assessment of likely regional and local climate impacts is critical to enabling municipalities, businesses, and regional economies to prepare for potentially damaging and costly effects of climate change—from prolonged droughts to more frequent and intense extreme events such as major storms and heatwaves. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1122: Seeds of giant galaxies formed in the early universe

Modern galaxies show a wide diversity, including dwarf galaxies, irregular galaxies, spiral galaxies, and massive elliptical galaxies. This final type, massive elliptical galaxies, provides astronomers with a puzzle. Although they are the most massive galaxies with the most stars, almost all of their stars are old. At some time during the past the progenitors of massive elliptical galaxies must ha


1123: Bulletin details pre- and post-fire soils research

A new University of Wyoming bulletin contributes to the growing knowledge base of ecosystem recovery following high-intensity forest fires. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1124: Svenske deleløbehjul lander i København efter nytår

200 e-scooters, også kendt som elektriske løbehjul, bliver tilgængelige på Vesterbro og Nørrebro i starten af 2019 , oplyser svensk selskab. Men kommunen har endnu ikke givet tilladelse, understreger enhedschef. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1125: The Genetic Legacy of the Spanish Inquisition

In 1492, best known as the year Columbus sailed the ocean blue, Spain also decided to expel all practicing Jews from its kingdom. Jews who did not leave—and were not murdered—were forced to become Catholics. Along with those who converted during earlier pogroms, they became known as conversos. As Spain expanded its empire in the Americas, conversos made their way to the colonies too. The stories


1126: How the Press Sustains the Forever War

When President Donald Trump was asked to identify America’s “biggest foe globally” earlier this year, he singled out the European Union . He regularly directs harsh criticism at the leaders of western-European allies, yet lavishes extravagant praise on murderous autocrats, even becoming the first president to profess “ love ” for a North Korean dictator. There’s no doubt, in other words, that out


1127: 3 tips for avoiding ‘wine teeth’

Why do some people’s teeth stain after drinking red wine—and how can you prevent it while enjoying a glass or two during the holidays? The answer lies in understanding the relationship between the nature of wine and your tooth enamel, says Uchenna Akosa, a dentist who heads Rutgers University Health University Dental Associates in New Brunswick, New Jersey, the faculty practice of Rutgers School (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1128: Brækvirus topper i julen: 5 råd til at undgå smitsom julebuffet

Mangelfuld håndvask og lemfældig omgang med knive, gafler og skeer lægger mange danskere ned med Roskildesyge. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1129: In Project Maven's Wake, the Pentagon Seeks AI Tech Talent

The Defense Department wants to use AI in warfare. In the aftermath of Project Maven, it still needs Big Tech’s help.


1130: A Courting Peacock Can Shake Its Partner’s Head From Afar

A peacock’s tail is so ostentatious that you could easily miss other parts of its anatomy that, on any other bird, would be unmissable. On the heads of both male and female peafowl, there’s a crest of stiff, spatula-like feathers that resemble the helmet of a Roman centurion. It’s a flamboyant, standout trait that, under the circumstances, is just another decoration among many equally eye-catchin


1131: A man asked for his data from Amazon—and they sent him 1,700 recordings of someone else


1132: Hominin v monkey deathmatch ended in a draw when they fell down a hole

Fossils suggest that a 3.6-million-year-old early human ancestor called "Little Foot" may have died in a violent encounter with a primitive baboon (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1133: Mars Express beams back images of ice-filled Korolev crater

Trapped layer of cold air keeps water frozen in 50-mile-wide impact crater The stunning Korolev crater in the northern lowlands of Mars is filled with ice all year round owing to a trapped layer of cold Martian air that keeps the water frozen. The 50-mile-wide crater contains 530 cubic miles of water ice, as much as Great Bear Lake in northern Canada, and in the centre of the crater the ice is mo


1134: Gel made from birch bark reduces skin scarring from cuts and burns

A dressing made from birch bark – which has long been used in traditional medicine to wrap wounds – allows cuts and burns to heal faster with less scarring


1135: Seeking the perfect cocktail? Let science be your bartender

Your fizz lost its fizz and your sling its swing? Using network theory and a dash of psychology, New Scientist has created drinks recipes to leave you shaken and stirred (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1136: YouTube Is a Metaphor for the Great American Dumpster Fire

YouTube has had a harrowing, high-profile year, and its growing pains reflect the garbage mess that is America in 2018.


1137: Women are finally getting equal access to the Hubble Space Telescope

For years, women were not receiving a fair share of access to the Hubble Space Telescope, but making requests anonymous has led to parity with men for the first time


1138: Who Wins When Cash Is No Longer King?

Of the most popular coffee shops in San Francisco’s Financial District, only one is manned by a robot . Every morning, in a glass-and-wood booth on the corner of One Bush Street, customers queue around a whirring hydraulic arm, waiting for it to serve them cappuccino. It’s an odd sight. Cafe X has three San Francisco locations, and all are cashless and fully automated, with orders taken via app.


1139: The day I tasted climate change

Every one of us will have a moment when global warming gets personal.


1140: Pterosaurs may have been covered in fur and primitive feathers

A new study provides evidence of plumelike structures in ancient flying reptiles.


1141: The Ethics of Paternalism

Should policy makers intervene to make people stop doing things that are bad for them? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1142: The idiosyncratic mammalian diversification after extinction of the dinosaurs

Mass extinction typically conjures a picture of a meteor falling to Earth and decimating the dinosaurs along with everything else. However, this is not exactly what happened. Different groups of living beings were affected differently by the various mass extinctions that have occurred during the planet's history. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1143: How sperm stem cells maintain their numbers

The steady production of sperm relies on the number of sperm stem cells in the testis remaining constant. Researchers including Assistant Professor Yu Kitadate and Professor Shosei Yoshida (developmental biologists at the National Institute for Basic Biology within the National Institutes of Natural Sciences in Japan) and Professor Benjamin Simons (a theoretical physicist at the University of Camb (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1144: Paper sensors remove the sting of diabetic testing

A technique that enables biologically active enzymes to survive the rigors of inkjet printing presents a promising alternative to routine blood screening finger jabs for diabetic blood sugar levels. The KAUST-led team used this approach to make disposable devices that can measure glucose concentrations in human saliva. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1145: In response to heat, the more affluent use air-conditioners while low-income households use water

Singapore households from different socioeconomic groups vary significantly in their use of water and electricity for heat relief, according to a recent study conducted by Associate Professor Alberto Salvo from the Department of Economics at the National University of Singapore (NUS) Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1146: More young and other traits help mammals adapt to urban environments

Species of mammals that live in urban environments produce more young compared to other mammals. But along with this advantage, mammals have other strategies to successfully inhabit cities. This is what Radboud University ecologist Luca Santini and colleagues found in a study that they will publish in Ecology Letters on 21 December. "This is the first step of many to understand why certain mammals (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1147: Mærsk-partners plastoprydning i Stillehavet sejler

The Ocean Cleanups flydebom opsamler godt nok plasten, men den forsvinder igen. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1148: Plant Hallucinogen Holds Hope for Diabetes Treatment

A potent molecular cocktail containing a compound from ayahuasca spurs rapid growth of insulin-producing cells — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1149: Scuba-diving lizard can stay underwater for at least 16 minutes

The water anole of Costa Rica dives underwater to escape from predators such as birds by blowing out and re-inhaling a large bubble of air


1150: Derfor trækker det igen ud med den tyske godkendelse af Femern-tunnelen

En retssag om en motorvej og problemerne med at finansiere tunnelen gør, at der skal en ekstra kvalitetssikring af den tyske miljøgodkendelse til, inden de 1.200 sider kan trykkes og lægges frem for borgerne.


1151: For første gang får lastbiler krav om at sænke CO2-udslippet

Nye lastbiler i EU skal udlede 15 procent mindre CO2 i 2025 og 30 procent mindre i 2030, lyder det fra ministerrådet. Danmark håber, at Europa-Parlamentet kan skærpe kravene (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1152: The Special Counsel Is Bearing Down on Roger Stone

Roger Stone, a longtime adviser to President Donald Trump, appears to be at the center of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into a potential conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia because of his uncanny predictions throughout 2016 about WikiLeaks, which published Democratic documents stolen by Russia during the election. The self-proclaimed “dirty trickster” said several times in 2


1153: Kirsten Gillibrand’s Invocation of ‘Intersectionality’ Backfires

On December 4, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand tweeted something that was consistent with her established mode of communication: It was self-serving; it helped to distance her from her former identity as a lawyer for Big Tobacco and as a Democratic congresswoman from a conservative district who had supported gun rights and opposed any form of amnesty for illegal immigrants; and it wrapped her in the b


1154: Much Ado About 2,200 Troops in Syria

Rarely has the repositioning of 2,200 American troops out of a far-flung military theater caused such a ruckus. Donald Trump’s abrupt decision to withdraw U.S. ground forces from Syria left his hawkish allies in the Republican Party, along with much of the American foreign-policy establishment, positively aghast. It even prompted Trump’s secretary of defense, James Mattis, to resign on Thursday.


1155: Vice Is a Goofy and Pedantic Dick Cheney Biopic

My problems with Vice , the writer-director Adam McKay’s zany yet hectoring biopic of Dick Cheney, begin with its title. It might be apt for a movie about Vice Media, for instance. (There would appear to be plenty to work with .) Or perhaps for a film about policing Times Square in the 1970s and ’80s. But as much as the film tries to persuade us otherwise, no one refers to the vice president of t


1156: A Shutdown Would Be a Fitting End to the GOP Majority

Anyone who says that the era of divided government will begin when Democrats take control of the House next month clearly hasn’t been watching Congress closely for the past few years. There’s already been divided government—it’s just divisions among Republicans that have defined the era. Speaker Paul Ryan is on the verge of handing over the gavel to Nancy Pelosi, but first the GOP majority was de


1157: If you lost friends in the 2016 election, watch this

As the saying goes: Diversity isn't rocket science—it's harder. Living in a diverse civil society isn't just about embracing the things we like, says Eboo Patel. That's the 'egg rolls and samosas' view. Diversity means cooperating through disagreements. Have you ever judged someone harshly, ended a relationship or avoided one because of a fundamental disagreement? "Does the fact of that disagreem (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1158: We tried teaching an AI to write Christmas movie plots. Hilarity ensued. Eventually.

Using a neural network to create ridiculous plot lines takes a lot of work—and reveals the challenges of generating human language.


1159: Pollutants from wildfires affect crop and vegetation growth hundreds of kilometers from impact zone

The startling extent to which violent wildfires, similar to those that ravaged large swathes of California recently, affect forests and crops way beyond the boundaries of the blaze has been revealed. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1160: Forget-me-not: Scientists pinpoint memory mechanism in plants

Plant scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Nottingham have unravelled a mechanism that enables flowering plants to sense and 'remember' changes in their environment. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1161: University of Birmingham develops sight-saving treatment for eye infection or trauma

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have developed a novel eye drop that rapidly reduces sight-threatening scarring to the surface of the eye. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1162: Fire air pollution weakens forest productivity

Fire impacts on global carbon cycle. The damage to ecosystem productivity not only occurs in fire regimes, but also over the downwind areas through long-range transport of air pollution. Such negative impacts may exacerbate in the future as fire activities are expected to escalate in a warming climate. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1163: Studie: Hjernens støtteceller har defekt udvikling ved Huntingtons sygdom

Den neurologiske lidelse Huntingtons sygdom medfører ændringer i adfærd og motorik,… (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1164: DSB vil have data, der kan kortlægge rejsemønstre over hele landet

Med mobilitetsdata fra eksempelvis teleselskaber vil DSB kortlægge rejsemønstre og bruge dem i den fremtidige planlægning af den kollektive transport. Data skal indsamles på tværs af alle transportformer og over hele Danmark. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1165: Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

Research suggests the winter blues are triggered by specialized light-sensing cells in the retina that communicate directly with brain areas involved in mood. (Image credit: Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source)


1166: Mattis Always Understood Trump’s Severe Defects

In the spring of 2016, not long after The Atlantic published an article I had written about President Barack Obama’s foreign-policy record , I visited the Hoover Institution, a think tank on the campus of Stanford University, where James Mattis had sequestered himself in exceedingly comfortable exile. He was writing a book, teaching a bit, and trying to suppress, with intermittent success, the re


1167: Quantum Communication Can Travel Faster—It's Not Just a Myth

A new experiment showed for the first time that quantum messages can indeed be speedier than what's seen in regular computing. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1168: Forskere: Skru op for bakteriedræbende lys og ned for antibiotika

Dansk forskningsprojekt viser, at en kombineret behandling med ultraviolet lys og antibiotika er så effektiv, at 90 procent af medicinen kan spares væk.


1169: I år kom klimaet for alvor på dagsordenen

fik klima- og energipolitikken så stor opmærksomhed som aldrig før, og vi fik en længe ventet, bred energiaftale med alle Folketingets partier – men ingen klimaplan, som mange ellers havde håbet på.


1170: Connected cars accelerate down data-collection highway

That holiday trip over the river and through the woods to grandmother's house could turn into nice little gift for automakers as they increasingly collect oodles and oodles of data about the driver. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1171: The science stories that shook 2018

Our guest scientists pick the breakthroughs and discoveries that defined their year, from insights into human evolution to our first trip aboard an asteroid Take a deep breath. Dive into the emerald water. It’s 13 minutes and 70 metres down to lunch. Are you dead yet? Not if you are one of the Bajau “sea nomads ” of south-east Asia, who have been free-diving like this for more than 1,000 years, re


1172: Divining roots: Revealing how plants branch out to access water

New research has discovered how plant roots sense the availability of moisture in soil and then adapt their shape to optimise acquisition of water.


1173: DNA-test under juletræet? Virksomhed sælger resultaterne til medicinalgigant


1174: Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor ser vi en strålekrans omkring stjernerne?

En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor vi på fotografier ofte ser en strålekrans rundt om stjernen, som jo ellers er rund. Var det mon den, hyrderne i Bethlehem så? Det svarer Ole J. Knudsen fra Aarhus Universitet på. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1175: You can help beat cancer

Meet Claire, a PhD researcher developing cancer treatments. Find out why she needs your help to beat cancer (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1176: Koks i hukommelsen: Var julen hvidere, da far var dreng?

Vi har haft hvid jul overraskende få gange gennem tiden ifølge DMI. Men din hukommelse fortæller muligvis noget andet, siger forsker. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1177: Cognitively Demanding Object Negotiation While Walking and Texting

(Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1178: Volcano' tsunami kills at least 43 in Indonesia

At least 43 people have been killed and nearly 600 injured in a tsunami in Indonesia that may have been caused by a volcano known as the "child" of the legendary Krakatoa, officials said Sunday.


1179: Slack: Some accounts mistakenly deactivated during update

Slack says it mistakenly deactivated accounts for some of the users of its work-focused messaging service this week as it implemented a system update to comply with U.S. economic sanctions and trade embargoes. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1180: Eleanor Maccoby, Pathbreaker on How Boys and Girls Differ, Dies at 101

An eminent psychologist, she focused on various factors in the development of the sexes, finding that social settings magnified differences.


1181: Howler monkey study examines mechanisms of new species formation

A new study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1182: 5 holidays to celebrate this year that aren’t Christmas

Christmas is an all consuming holiday, celebrated even in cultures where Christianity never took root. However, some people just can't take it anymore. Some of them even invented new holidays as alternatives. While some of the holidays are celebrated half jokingly, they all offer an escape from an often overbearing Christmas season. Christmas can be maddening. Between the endless barrage of tacky


1183: From 1990 to 2016, dementia has more than doubled

The incidence of dementia is rising at an alarming rate While it's primarily diagnosed over age 50, it starts decades earlier Modifying behavior to avoid a handful of known risk factors can help reduce the chance of getting dementia A multi-university study lead by the University of Melbourne and the University of Washington has found that the number of people living with dementia worldwide shot


1184: GeoBits: Unearthly, Bizarre and Shiny Edition

The latest roundup of geologic goodness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1185: Crayfish experience something like anxiety when they shed their armour

Crayfish have to shed their armour to grow, leaving them temporarily undefended. During this time, they show signs of anxiety – but human anti-anxiety drugs change this


1186: The Lunar Farside and the Cosmic Dark Age

China's Chang'e 4 mission to the moon has something else up its sleeve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1187: Russisk robot var et menneske: Her er fem andre videnskabelige fupnumre

Fra falskt abemenneske til klippe-klistre-dinosaur. Gang på gang er vi blevet snydt af opfindsomme svindelnumre forklædt som videnskab. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1188: Hamish the polar bear turns one

Hamish the polar bear celebrates his first birthday in his Highland home.


1189: Christmas plastic workshop to help reduce festive waste

Workshops have been held in Whitley Bay to help reduce the use of plastic over Christmas.


1190: Can Intelligence Buy You Happiness?

New research suggests that IQ leads to greater well-being by enabling one to acquire the financial and educational means necessary to live a better life. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1191: 2019 Preview: 30 cold cases to be solved using DNA ancestry websites

Arrests will finally be made in connection to dozens of decades-old murder and rape cases, as thousands more people upload their DNA to family tree websites


1192: Slucifer Is Busting at the Seams | Gold Rush

With no water, Slucifer is building up with material, causing it to break down. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1193: Hundredårsjagten på det perfekte dæksel – prolog og kapitel 1

PLUS. En fortælling i tre dele om en matematisk udfordring. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1194: Too far right and left? DC think tank releases manifesto for radical centrism

Niskanen Center, a Washington think tank, argues for avoiding the extremes of political positions. The analysts propose that both a regulated free market and bolstered social insurance programs are important. If we don't correct course soon, the American political system may never recover, warn the authors. None If you've had enough of all the political bickering coming from all sides, a Washingt


1195: Brazil court overrules injunction on Boeing-Embraer tie-up

A Brazilian court on Saturday shot down a fresh injunction by a judge over a plan by planemakers Boeing of the US and Embraer of Brazil to create a $5.26-billion joint venture, Brazil's state news agency said. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1196: Getting into the spirit: how Christmas makes us think of ghosts

Yuletide ghost stories have shaped my life – as well as my understanding of what happens next… Scrooge was famously haunted by three spectral visitors at Christmas time, but the tradition of telling ghost stories at midwinter goes back much further than Dickens. People have been gathering around the fire to tell stories at Yule, the pagan festival to mark the winter solstice, for centuries. As th


1197: NASA probe will hurtle past the most distant object we’ve ever visited

In 2015, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft whizzed past Pluto. Now it is about to arrive at Ultima Thule, a tiny space rock 6.6 billion kilometres away from Earth (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1198: The Most-Read WIRED Business Stories of 2018

Scandals of all stripes dominated the news, from Facebook's data leaks to Google's diversity war.


1199: Space Photos of the Week: Juno Spies Jupiter's Mesmerizing Clouds

The gas giant could hold clues to the formation of our solar system.


1200: This Year’s Must-Read Letters to the Editor

Over the course of 2018, thousands of Atlantic readers wrote us letters about articles in our magazine and on our website. Here are some of the most memorable. A Pediatrician Tells His Former Patient: “I Am Disappointed in Myself” “I never initiated discussions relating to sexuality, abuse, or rape.” “ I Want to Grow Up to Be Someone That Fights for Families Like Yours” Teenagers in California re


1201: Family Weekly: How Tinder Sparked a Dating Revolution

This Week in Family In 2013, the dating app Tinder became available to all smartphone users. Five years later, it’s clear that the app has changed how a generation of Americans approach dating and courtship , says the Atlantic staff writer Ashley Fetters. “Meanwhile, the underlying challenges—the loneliness, the boredom, the roller coaster of hope and disappointment—of being ‘single and looking,’ (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1202: The right and wrong ways to clear ice and snow from your car

DIY Not every melting solution is a good one. You head out in the morning, only to discover that your car sports a layer of ice, snow, or both. Here are the best ways to rescue your vehicle—and a few to avoid.


1203: Christmas 'Hippo' Asteroid Is Buzzing Earth, Its Closest Flyby in 400 Years

A small asteroid is flying safely by Earth Saturday (Dec. 22) and according to the folks at NASA, it looks just like the mighty hippo in new radar images.


1204: 10 Amazing Things We Learned About Humans in 2018

The human body is amazingly complex, which is why, even in this day and age, we continue to learn new things about ourselves.


1205: The Science of Bath Bombs (and How to Make Them)

Here's the science behind that satisfying fizz of a bath bomb, plus, how to make your own at home.


1206: 7 Illusions That Blew Our Minds in 2018

An arrow points right. Turn it 180 degrees, it still points right. Turn it again… it points right.


1207: Max Einstein' Will Help Kids Today Relate to the Genius

The latest from James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein looks at the scientist's work through the eyes of a 12-year-old girl.


1208: A NASA Hack, a PewDiePie Fan, and More Security News

Amazon sends Echo recordings to the wrong person, Russians tried to get US Treasury dirt on Clinton donors, and more of the week's top security news.


1209: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Rejection of ‘Having It All’

This article contains spoilers through Season 2 of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. In the first act of Stephen Sondheim’s Sunday in the Park With George , a painter sings “Finishing the Hat,” a melancholic but sweepingly lovely confession that art will always come first. The impulse, for George, to paint—to finish the hat, the dog, the grass, the sky—even when it costs him love, is paramount. “When th


1210: Area 51 and the epistemology of the unexplained

What if aliens have been visiting us all along? "Skeptical optimism" and investigations into the unknown Neurodiversity and deficiencies as sources of power None Between subjective experience and the things most people can accept as objective facts, there yawns a cavernous gulf. Imagine you're on a stage in front of 50,000 strangers trying to explain what it felt like to fall in love for the firs (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1211: Super-Fast Airport Scanners Are Coming—Eventually

They'll use AI and millimeter wave technology to speed you through the lines and even monitor crowds from afar.


1212: In 2018, Movies Finally Got the Internet Right—Well, Mostly

From 'The Incredibles 2' to indie breakouts like 'Eighth Grade,' Hollywood is finally starting to understand how completely technology shapes our lives.


1213: Researchers Show Parachutes Don't Work, But There's A Catch

A study found parachutes were no more effective than backpacks in preventing harm to people jumping from aircraft. The researchers' tongue-in-cheek experiment makes a deeper point about science. (Image credit: Michael Htten/EyeEm/Getty Images)


1214: Relaxation Music' Works–But So Does Chopin

So-called 'relaxation music' is only about as effective as a soothing Chopin piece at lulling listeners into a relaxed state. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1215: Udenfor med dig! Sådan undgår du vinterdepression

Lys er vigtigt for os. Derfor bliver nogle af os ramt af vinterdepression i de mørke vintermåneder. Men der er gode råd, som kan gøre dig vinterklar. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1216: Ingeniører jagter bryggefejl med tunge og næse

Jagten på fejl er sat ind, når Niras' smagspanel tester øl fra bryggerier verden over. For brygmester Jesper Kailow Hejselbæk er håbet, at han også kan hjælpe med at udbedre fejlene. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1217: Mere og mere forskning trækkes tilbage: En tredjedel skyldes snyd

Ny dansk forskning viser, at der er sket en voldsom stigning i antallet af forskningsartikler, der trækkes tilbage på grund af fejl – herunder snyd.


1218: Democrats in New York Are Ready to Deploy Their Newfound Power

NEW YORK —How blue can New York go? The Empire State has an understandable reputation as one of the nation’s foremost progressive bastions, having cast its presidential vote for a Democrat in each of the past eight elections—a longer streak than any large state in the country, including California. But for most of that time—indeed, for all but three of the past 70 years—Republicans have controlle


1219: What a Border-Wall GoFundMe Campaign Says About America

The federal government has partially shut down , and Donald Trump still doesn’t have money for a border wall. Earlier this week, the president rejected a funding bill that would keep nine federal departments operational, and Congress scrambled to find a fix by a deadline of midnight on Friday—but to no avail. The rejected bill didn’t include a desired $5 billion for Trump’s long-promised wall alo


1220: WIRED’s Favorite Gear of 2018: iPhone XR, Google Home Hub, and More

From our favorite phone to the best smart-home innovation, this is all of 2018's best gear.


1221: 2018 Was the Year That Tech Put Limits on AI

As employees and researchers push back, companies including Google and Microsoft are pledging not to use powerful AI technology in certain ways.


1222: Why do wombats poo cubes and turkeys spirals? One woman is finding out

Engineer Patricia Yang won an IgNobel prize for flushing out a universal law of animal urination. Next up? Discovering why wombat stools come out as cubes (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1223: The Kurds: Betrayed Again by Washington

The warning signs were there all along, yet President Donald Trump’s brusque decision to pull U.S. forces out of northeast Syria nevertheless stunned Syria’s Kurds. Overnight, their dream of establishing an autonomous Kurdish region has been dashed, and they must now choose between a return to the mountains in a bid for survival, or staying put, awaiting a resurgent Assad regime and what it has i


1224: Rare albino orangutan 'Alba' returns to the wild

Alba, the world's only known albino orangutan, has been through many months of rehabilitation.


1225: You Can't Serve Both Trump and America

The story is told of Jim Mattis, when he was the commanding general at Quantico, relieving a young lance corporal on Christmas. The rest of that wintry day, those entering the front gate of the Marine base were startled to see that the sentry was a general, checking passes and waving cars through so that a young man could spend the holiday with his family. It is the kind of behavior animated by s


1226: Resist the Lure of Theological Politics

There is something corrupting not just about the struggle for power through politics but about politics itself. Philosophers and pundits have long condemned the political as both profane and belittling, the near opposite of the pure and higher spiritual pursuits. In his valediction for the great, controversial scholar Edward Said, Christopher Hitchens wrote : “Indeed, if it had not been for the i


1227: Building a Chinese-Food Empire

Andrew Cherng started working in the United States at 18, while he pursued an undergraduate degree in mathematics at Baker University, in Kansas. Starting in 1967, he began spending his summers in New York City, working in a restaurant where his father had connections. It was his first real job. The work was fast-paced, his English wasn’t perfect, and New Yorkers were ruthless, he says. After Che (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1228: Feasibility of Reidentifying Individuals in Large National Physical Activity Data Sets From Which Protected Health Information Has Been Removed With Use of Machine Learning

(Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1229: Why “I’m not racist” is only half the story

White guilt is a roadblock to equality, says Robin DiAngelo. It takes race conversations off the table and maintains the status quo. "How do so many of us who are white individually feel so free of racism and yet we live in a society that is so profoundly separate and unequal by race?" asks DiAngelo. Stop feeling bad—that's not productive. Instead, start doing something to dismantle the systemic


1230: The very best of 2018! 10 videos to get smarter, faster

365 days, 365 videos — it's been another huge year for big ideas. We've tallied up the 10 most popular, as chosen by you, plus the most controversial and most talked about videos of 2018 (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1231: Earthrise: the story behind our planet's most famous photo

When Bill Anders took this photograph from the Apollo spacecraft on Christmas Eve in 1968, our relationship with the world changed forever This photograph is now half a century old. It was taken by the astronaut Bill Anders on Christmas Eve 1968 as the Apollo 8 spacecraft rounded the dark side of the moon for a fourth time. When Earth came up over the horizon, Anders scrabbled for his Hasselblad


1232: Christmas story: Unauthorized Bread by Cory Doctorow

In our exclusive extract, dripping with human kindness (well, butter) our heroine Salima receives her daily bread – eventually (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1233: Quiz: Kan du tippe 13 rigtige om 2019?

Vind tre flasker god rødvin i Ingeniørens julequiz: Kan du regne ud, hvad der kommer til at ske i det kommende år? Vi skal have dine svar senest 8. januar 2019. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1234: Gensaks i en gråzone – hvad dælen stiller vi op med Crispr?

PLUS. Genredigeringsværktøjet Crispr er efterhånden en moden teknologi. Men lovgivningen er stadig fyldt med uafklarede gråzoner. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1235: Protected Chilean sea lions are the 'enemy' of fishermen

Off the coast of Chile, fisherman face competition from a cunning carnivorous hunter that has decimated their industry due to its voracious appetite. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1236: Scott Pruitt never gave up EPA plans to debate climate science, records show

White House denied administrator’s ‘red team, blue team’ idea Emails: staff considered questioning greenhouse gases finding In Scott Pruitt’s final weeks as the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, his political advisers were still considering ways to formally raise doubts about climate change science, agency records show. Related: Deadly weather: the human cost of 2018's climate


1237: President Trump has signed a $1.2 billon law to boost US quantum tech


1238: 30% of children received trust issues from 'Santa'

New survey looks at how former children feel about being lied to by parents about Santa. 72 percent of former believers keep the Santa myth alive for their own kids. At press time, about 1,200 people have taken the survey. "During the last two years I have been overwhelmed by people getting in touch to say they were affected by the lack of trust involved when they discovered Santa wasn't [SPOILER


1239: U-M howler monkey study examines mechanisms of new species formation

A new University of Michigan study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species.


1240: Smartphone, spilkonsol eller tablet i julegave: "De her teknologier er ikke kun legetøj"

Træder dit barn ind i det digitale univers alene, kan det gå galt. Sæt dig ind i tingene og følg med, lyder rådet fra ekspert. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1241: Earthrise at 50: the photo that changed how we see ourselves

Picture taken by the Apollo 8 mission at the height of the space race gave a new perspective on Earth’s place in the universe Picture the Earth from space: the striking bright blue of the oceans, the swirls of white clouds. It’s really very easy for any of us to conjure this image in our minds today, but it wasn’t always so. The Earth in all its splendid majesty was seen for the first time on Chr


1242: World's first no-kill eggs go on sale in Berlin

Scientists can now quickly determine a chick’s gender before it hatches, potentially ending the need to cull billions of male chicks worldwide The world’s first ever no-kill eggs are now on sale in Berlin after German scientists found an easy way to determine a chick’s gender before it hatches, in a breakthrough that could put an end to the annual live shredding of billions of male chicks worldwi


1243: 3D-printed robot hand plays the piano

Scientists have developed a 3D-printed robotic hand which can play simple musical phrases on the piano by just moving its wrist. And while the robot is no virtuoso, it demonstrates just how challenging it is to replicate all the abilities of a human hand, and how much complex movement can still be achieved through design.


1244: Elegant trick improves single-cell RNA sequencing

Droplet microfluidics has revolutionized single-cell RNA sequencing, offering a low-cost, high-throughput method for single-cell genomics. However, this method has been limited in its ability to capture complete RNA transcription information. Researchers have now come up with an elegant, low-cost method that solves that problem. And not only does it push single-cell genomics forward, it may allow (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1245: Leprosy declines in Morocco after implementation of preventive drug

Since 2012, the number of cases of leprosy in Morocco has declined by more than 16 percent per year. That change can be attributed to the implementation, beginning in 2012, of single dose rifampicin as a preventive to spread leprosy through households, researchers report. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1246: Human mortality 'plateau' may be statistical error, not hint of immortality

Human error, not human biology, largely accounts for the apparent decline of mortality among the very old, according to a new report. The result casts doubt on the hypothesis that human longevity can be greatly extended beyond current limits. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1247: Genetic study reveals how citrus became the Med's favorite squeeze

Genetic detective work has illuminated the important role of Jewish culture in the widespread adoption of citrus fruit by early Mediterranean societies. (Thu, 20 Dec 2018)


1248: Cancer Doctors See Encouraging Signs for Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justice Ginsburg is recovering well after surgery to remove two malignant nodules from her lung, but tests will tell whether she needs more treatment. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1249: When we let politics put paid to Prospero | Brief letters


1250: 2019 Preview: DNA testing will lead to a decline in genetic disorders

A large trial of a pre-pregnancy DNA test could be the first step towards marked declines in inherited disorders being passed on to future generations (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1251: How Volcanic Activity Can Spawn Tsunamis


1252: Why 2018 Was a Breakout Year for Open Source Deals

Microsoft bought GitHub. IBM bought Red Hat. Those and other deals show how central open source software has become to companies big and small.


1253: Elon Musk's SpaceX launches military rocket after four attempts

The rocket launch marked the space transportation company’s first national security space mission for the US A SpaceX rocket carrying a military navigation satellite blasted off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral on Sunday, marking the space transportation company’s first national security space mission for the US. The Falcon 9 rocket carrying a roughly $500m GPS satellite built by Lockheed Martin Cor (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1254: Cirkulær økonomi: Kvaliteten af havplast er en udfordring

Omfattende plastforurening truer verdens have, og man tester forskellige metoder til at opsamle plasten. Genanvendelse af havplasten er dog vanskeligt, viser dansk projekt. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1255: Cannibalistic African clawed frog eats tadpoles of its relatives

The African clawed frog likes to dine on its own tadpoles – but it prefers those belonging to the endangered Cape platanna frog (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1256: The Most-Read WIRED Culture Stories of 2018

Netflix gets real about its programming, MoviePass struggles, and, of course, Yanny vs. Laurel divides the internet.


1257: Switching to a new fitness app? Here's how to bring your data with you.

DIY Change up your platform. You've stored months or years of fitness data in an app. If you switch to a new ecosystem, you need to take that with you. Here's how to transfer your health data. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1258: Building a Homemade 3-Ski Sled | Alaska: The Last Frontier

Otto builds a 3-ski sled for Shane and Kelli at Eivin's shop! Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AlaskaTLF https://twitter.com/Discove (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1259: Robocars, Elon, and More This Year in the Future of Cars

2018's biggest transportation stories include mathematicians willing to chat airplane peeing, clock-watching RAF pilots, and, of course, Mr. Musk.


1260: A Looming Government Shutdown Tops the Week's Internet News

As 2018 came to a close, the government was heading for a shutdown—a fitting end to a tumultuous year.


1261: Best Movies 2018: 'A Star Is Born' to Fill the 'Star Wars' Void

From 'Avengers' to 'Roma' it was an engrossing, and emotional, year at the multiplex.


1262: Way to Be Weird, Earth: 10 Strange Findings About Our Planet in 2018

This year brought many new discoveries about our oddball planet. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1263: 10 Things We Learned About the Brain in 2018

The brain sculpts not only who we are but also the world that we experience. It tells us what to see, what to hear and what to say.


1264: Visions of a Better World

Noam Chomsky, Richard Dawkins, Martin Rees and others answer the question: What’s your utopia? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1265: In 10 Years, the Large Hadron Collider Was a Smash — with More Discoveries to Come

Here's what the world's most powerful atom smasher has accomplished in the past 10 years and the fascinating physics it could still reveal. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1266: Why Exaggeration Jokes Work

Everything is formed by habit. The crow’s feet that come from squinting or laughter, the crease in a treasured and oft-opened letter, the ruts worn in a path frequently traveled—all are created by repeatedly performing the same action. Even neurons are formed by habit. When continuously exposed to a fixed stimulus, neurons become steadily less sensitive to that stimulus—until they eventually stop


1267: The First Holiday Without a Loved One

After Maryanne Pope’s husband, John, died in September 2000, the first Christmas without him, just a few months later, was a struggle. She used to cherish decorating a Christmas tree in her Calgary, Canada, home, but that year, there was no joy to be found. “Putting up a tree didn’t feel right to me. There was absolutely nothing to celebrate,” says Pope, the author of A Widow’s Awakening . “Plus,


1268: The 1950s Holiday Classic You Won't Hear at the Mall This Year

Starting around Thanksgiving, one can hardly run an errand or ride an elevator without being serenaded by Christmas music. The songs cover familiar seasonal territory—silver bells, open sleighs, roasting chestnuts—as well as a timeless emotion: desire. Just think of Eartha Kitt flirting with “Santa Baby,” Mariah Carey donning a Santa hat to sing “All I Want for Christmas Is You,” or George Michae


1269: Folie à deux and Homicide for the Holidays

Nothing says home for the holidays like a series of murders committed by family members with a shared delusion. So sit back, sip your hot apple cider or spiked egg nog, and revel in family dysfunction worse than your own. {Well! There is an actual TV show called Homicide for the Holidays , which I did not know. Kind of makes my title seem derivative… but it was coincidental.} “Folie à deux”, or (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1270: I Tried to Pick America’s Future Political Stars and Didn’t Come Close

One went to Congress, served on the House Rules and the Ways and Means Committees—and now toils as a county commissioner. Another was a scion of a powerful business and political family, became lieutenant governor, narrowly missed being elected to Congress—and now gives speeches about depression and is working on a novel. A third hoped to be on the Federal Reserve board—and is now pursuing Japane


1271: Six spectacular ice phenomena to look out for this winter

From candy-cane snow rollers to fragile flowers, ice can take on magical, complex guises. Here are six that might catch your eye this winter (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1272: Why It's Hard to Escape Amazon's Long Reach

The ecommerce company is also a cloud computing provider, TV producer, fashion designer, wind-farm backer, and organizer of crowdsourced micro-labor tasks.


1273: Closca's Bike Helmet Collapses a Common Bike-Sharing Problem

The helmet that collapses to half its size is easy to stash in a backpack—and have ready for any way and time you ride.


1274: Bakterier i atmosfæren dækker dele af Danmark med sne

Du tror måske, du ved hvorfor det sner. Men det er lidt mere kompliceret end som så.


1275: Vaccine for Honeybees Could Be a Tool to Fight Population Decline

Scientists hope the vaccine can make bees more resilient against diseases that can wipe out entire colonies.


1276: The 50 Best Podcasts of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . The word podcast has by now become completely untethered from its namesake—the iPod. Analytics that were once uncapturable have become fairly comprehensive ( downloads from Apple Podcasts surpassed 50 billion this year) and specific ( Chicago streams more podcasts on Spotify than any other U.S. city does), which has brough


1277: The Virtue Signalers Won’t Change the World

F eminist history is typically described in three waves: The struggle to secure voting rights, then workplace rights, and third—roughly—to upend stereotypes. The battle against racism and its effects is often described in a similar three-part timeline, with movements against slavery and segregation, and then—vaguely—the post-civil-rights era. The ambiguity of that last term masks that third-wave


1278: How overparenting backfired on Americans

American childhood is going, going… gone, says Professor Jonathan Haidt. In the mid-'90s there was a sharp shift to overprotective parenting. In previous generations, kids were allowed to out of the house unsupervised from age 5-8, which has now become age 12-16. As a result, their independence, resilience, and problem-solving skills suffer. "Give childhood back to kids so that they do what they (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1279: Plight of the Living Dead review – The making of real zombies

From cockroaches to humans, few creatures are immune from the complex strategies of the mind-stealing parasites at the centre of a gripping Christmas tale (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1280: South Korea to fine BMW $10 mn over engine fires response


1281: No warning meant no escape from Indonesia tsunami

An unpredictable chain of events and an inadequate early warning system combined to deadly effect with the tsunami that slammed into coastal areas of Indonesia killing nearly 300 people, disaster officials and experts said Monday. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1282: NASA spacecraft hurtles toward historic New Year's flyby

A NASA spacecraft is hurtling toward a historic New Year's Day flyby of the most distant planetary object ever studied, a frozen relic of the early solar system called Ultima Thule. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1283: Australia to beef up technology for drone 'crackdown'

Australia will introduce new surveillance technology for a "crackdown" on drones next year, aviation authorities said Monday, as concerns mount over their increasing prevalence in public areas. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1284: Top Technical Advances in 2018

The year's most impressive achievements include ecology research via drone, mice with two dads, and the use of artificial intelligence to identify and monitor cancer cells. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1285: Klar til i aften: Sådan forbereder du maven til julemaden

Hvis du vil nyde så meget lækker julemad som muligt, må du forberede din mave allerede nu. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1286: Earthrise: how the iconic image changed the world

Apollo 8 astronaut Bill Anders talks about Nasa’s orbit 50 years ago when he photographed Earth as it had never been seen before No one told them to look for the Earth. It was Christmas Eve 1968 and the first manned mission to the moon had reached its destination. As Apollo 8 slipped into lunar orbit the crew prepared to read passages of Genesis for a TV broadcast to the world. But as the command (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1287: Pediatric leukemia 'super drug' could be developed in the coming years

Scientists have discovered two successful therapies that slowed the progression of pediatric leukemia in mice, according to three studies published over the last two years. When a key protein responsible for leukemia, MLL, is stabilized, it slows the progression of the leukemia, the most recent study found. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1288: Measuring the Strength of a Person's Gaze

A new study suggests that, unconsciously, we actually do believe that looking exerts a slight force on the things being looked at. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1289: The Science Behind The Indonedia Tsunami

NPR's Michel Martin talks with geologist Stephen Johnston about how the tsunami in Indonesia overnight was triggered. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1290: 3 pieces of historical evidence for the existence of Jesus Christ

Jesus's historical existence is generally accepted among scholars. The evidence for the reality of Jesus Christ includes writings by historians, artifacts and eyewitness accounts. The spiritual and miraculous nature of Jesus is a different story. None Can we prove that Jesus Christ actually walked the Earth about 2,000 years ago? Without getting into the spiritual, science should be able to provi


1291: Another tsunami could hit Indonesia, experts warn

Another tsunami could strike Indonesia, experts warned on Sunday, a day after more than 200 people were killed by a wave triggered by a volcanic eruption. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1292: Neurons made from stem cells can suppress seizures

Researchers have discovered that transplanting stem-cell-derived neurons into the brain suppressed seizures in an animal model. About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the dr


1293: Harnessed horse unearthed in ancient stable near Pompeii

Archaeologists have unearthed the petrified remains of a harnessed horse and saddle in the stable of an ancient villa in a Pompeii suburb.


1294: Some 100-year-olds have the DNA markers of people in their 20s

Researchers have discovered age- and health-related differences in fragments of DNA found floating in the bloodstream (not inside cells) called cell-free DNA (cfDNA). These differences could someday indicate biological age—whether a person’s body functions as older or younger than their chronological age, the researchers say. In a proof-of-concept study, researchers extracted cfDNA from blood sam (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1295: 222 dead as volcano-triggered tsunami hits Indonesia

A volcano-triggered tsunami has left at least 222 people dead and hundreds more injured after slamming without warning into beaches around Indonesia's Sunda Strait, officials said Sunday, voicing fears that the toll would rise further. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1296: Indonesia's angry 'Child of Krakatoa' rumbles on

The volcano that triggered a deadly tsunami in Indonesia late Saturday emerged from the sea around the legendary Krakatoa 90 years ago and has been on a high-level eruption watchlist for the past decade. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1297: SpaceX launches Air Force's best GPS yet, ends banner year

SpaceX has launched the U.S. Air Force's most powerful GPS satellite ever built.


1298: India's no-frills hotel giant eyes European markets

An Indian startup is turning its attention towards usurping the West's largest hotel chains after establishing itself as India's biggest player and shaking up the Chinese market. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1299: China's Huawei faces new setbacks in Europe's telecom market

The U.S. dispute with China over a ban on tech giant Huawei is spilling over to Europe, the company's biggest foreign market, where some countries are also starting to shun its network systems over data security concerns. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1300: Photos: Deadly Tsunami Strikes Indonesia’s Sunda Strait

At least 222 people have reportedly been killed along the Sunda Strait in Indonesia, and another 800 injured late Saturday night by a tsunami, likely triggered by an eruption of the Anak Krakatau volcano. Water swept along the shoreline with no warning, crashing into homes, hotels, and beach side holiday events. Electricity and water services, as well as roads, have been badly damaged; remote are


1301: Why Are We So Surprised by Facebook’s Data Scandals?

Facebook’s business model has always been to monetize user data. So why are we so shocked to learn how they did it?


1302: Ny teknik kan afsløre langt flere tilfælde af livmoderhalskræft

En ny teknik kan sikre, at vi opdager næsten alle kvinder med livmoderhalskræft og samtidig undgår overbehandling. Det har stort potentiale i Danmark, vurderer ekspert. (Sun, 23 Dec 2018)


1303: How the stunning Earthrise became the world’s most famous photograph

On Christmas Eve 1968, Apollo 8 became the first crewed spacecraft to circle the moon. Emerging from its dark side, one astronaut reached for his camera


1304: 10 great minds we lost in 2018

We lost a great deal of internet pioneers and geniuses of physics in 2018. Creations of fiber optic cables, men on the moon and the unsung heroes of the life sciences made their mark on the scientific enterprise. The loss of men like Stephen Hawking leaves a hole in the sciences, but his work and many others will continue to inspire the generations to come. Death is an inevitability every passing


1305: Podcast-special: Månen trækker igen i verdens rumfartsnationer

I 50-året for den amerikanske Apollo 11-mission lægges der igen planer om bemandede ture til Månen, og denne gang har Kina også meldt sig ind i rumkapløbet. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1306: Britain bans puppy and kitten sales by pet shops

Britain is forbidding puppies and kittens from being sold by pet shops in a bid to crack down on animal exploitation and abuse. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1307: Run to the hills': Tsunami fears spark chaos in Indonesia town

Hundreds of panicked residents, many sobbing and clutching small children, tried to flee Sumber Jaya village Tuesday as word spread that another tsunami was about to smash into the shattered Indonesian community. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1308: 2019 Preview: Electric cars of all shapes and sizes will hit the road

Various kinds of electric cars are on their way from manufacturers who have never made them before, such as Volkswagen, Volvo and Audi (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1309: Bacon-cancer link: head of UN agency at heart of furore defends its work

IARC’s outgoing director attacks vested interests of critics but admits it could have communicated better The head of the UN agency that provoked a massive outcry and some ridicule when it declared that bacon, red meat and glyphosate weedkiller caused cancer has defended its work, denying the announcements were mishandled and insisting on its independence. Its outgoing director, Christopher Wild, (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1310: Coffee vs. Tea: The Rematch!

It’s another VS rematch from Eyewire days gone by! Starting at 11 AM EST on 12/27 and going for 24 hours, we’re revisiting something warm and cozy for the holiday season: what else but Coffee vs. Tea? Last time , Team Tea triumphed, but perhaps this time Team Coffee will have a (turbo) shot. Choose your team wisely: Coffee Name originates from Italian caffè , which in turn comes from Ottoman Turk (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1311: Lost ‘Darwinia’ islands could be origin of species in the Galapagos

Millions of years before the Galapagos existed, another island chain may have shaped the evolution of the unusual wildlife that later inspired Charles Darwin (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1312: The Most-Read WIRED Ideas Stories of 2018

Readers dived into a feminist reading of Elizabeth Holmes' downfall, a story about Silicon Valley's hidden caste system, and the perplexing case of a deadly yeast.


1313: The most environmentally-friendly ways to get rid of your Christmas tree

DIY This holiday season, help save the planet. Let's keep Christmas-tree carbon locked up in the wood. Here's how to get rid of your Christmas tree without damaging the environment. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1314: The Mind-Bending Final Confrontation of Annihilation

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Alex Garland’s Annihilation . (Read our previous entries here .) The denouement of Jeff VanderMeer’s novel Annihilation is Lovecraftian in its sci-fi inscrutability. The main character, an unnamed biologist, (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1315: 16 Decades of Atlantic Christmases

Since publishing its first issue in 1857, The Atlantic has marked 160 Christmases. Contributors, by dint of the magazine’s New England and Christian roots, made a point each year to memorialize the birth of Jesus and the many traditions celebrating it in every section and medium of the publication. For more than 16 decades, there have been myriad articles, stories, poems, book reviews, recipes, a (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1316: Letters: ‘People Got to Expecting Our Caravan of Crazy Every Year’

Unusual Winter-Holiday Traditions Last month, The Atlantic asked readers to share their strangest, silliest holiday traditions. The Family section commissioned illustrations for a handful of the responses ; we’ve rounded up some of the other weird and wonderful submissions here. When our children were young, they helped my wife make an “angel” to go on top of the tree. It ended up resembling a ch (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1317: Best TV Scenes (2018): 'Killing Eve,' 'Atlanta,' and More

From 'Homecoming' to Teddy Perkins to "take me to the hole!" we've rounded up all of the year's biggest small-screen memories.


1318: Inside the dark web: why it’s odder than you can imagine

We all know about the dark web’s illegal markets and shady deals. But from playing better chess to protecting political freedom, it's full of surprises (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1319: Hunger Hormone' Ghrelin Aids Overindulgence

Ghrelin, the hormone that makes you hungry, also makes food, and food smells, irresistibly appealing. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1320: 10 Times Science Proved the World is Amazing in 2018

Our world is enchanted — and if you need proof, just turn to science. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1321: 10 Fascinating Biblical-Era Discoveries from 2018

In 2018, archaeologists found the face of Jesus, discovered the visage of an ancient king, and might have uncovered a long-lost kingdom.


1322: 10 Things We Learned About the First Americans in 2018

was full of scientific discoveries about the first Americans, including how and when they arrived. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1323: Forsker: Gensplejset plante kan fjerne kemikalier fra luften i din stue

Der ophobes farlige stoffer i luften, når vi laver mad eller går i bad. Nu har amerikanske forskere måske fundet en ’grøn’ løsning. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1324: Don't Ask When Self-Driving Cars Will Arrive—Ask Where

Autonomous vehicles are already on the road. Whether they're "here" depends on where you are.


1325: How the right Christmas lunch can help save Earth from climate change

There’s nothing like Christmas to make you think about food. The first of our 12 Days of Culture reveals how you can make the right decision about what’s on your plate (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1326: Thinking about Climate on a Dark, Dismal Morning

Hope is the knowledge that we can prevent bad things—but also the realization that we might choose not to — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1327: The High-Stakes World of Christmas Tamales

At first glance, a tamal might seem simple enough: masa dough stuffed with filling, wrapped in a husk or a leaf and steamed. But as those who have made tamales know, their simplicity is a ruse. It’s a process that takes hours and often days to complete, requiring nimble fingers to wrap the palm-sized packages of dough and watchful eyes on them while they steam—an ordeal best left for the holidays


1328: The Trump Administration Is Closing the Door on Migrant Children

Gilberto Flores had to leave. A teacher at his school in Jocoro, El Salvador, had just been dismembered by his own students after he was outed as a gay man. Gangs were dumping bodies in the streets around his home. Not long before, Flores had come out to his school as openly gay. His mother, who is still in El Salvador, didn’t think it was safe for him to stay. He was 14 years old when he left hi


1329: If Beale Street Could Talk and the Urgency of Black Love

If Beale Street Could Talk , the 1974 James Baldwin novel, begins with a bittersweet announcement of new life. “Alonzo, we’re going to have a baby,” Clementine “Tish” Rivers tells her fiancé from across the cold glass of a New York City jail’s visitation room. Tish narrates the story, so the reflection that follows is in her voice. “I looked at him. I know I smiled,” she says. “His face looked as


1330: How Set Up New Devices: iPhone, Amazon Echo, Google Home, TV

You got a cool gadget for the holidays! You lucky duck. Now you’ve gotta set it up. You poor sap.


1331: 11 Fantastic Science Books to Binge Over the Holidays

Snuggle up with your favorite display technology and ignite your neurons with these recommended science books from 2018.


1332: The quantum trick that can help you live a better life – probably

Quantum theory suggests everything that can happen, does. Now a phone app gives us a way to exploit this weirdness – and enjoy the best of all possible worlds


1333: How Did Rifles With an American Stamp End Up in the Hands of African Poachers?

The question is at the heart of investigations by Congress and federal agencies into whether an American gun manufacturer is entangled in the shadowy world of arms smuggling and wildlife poaching.


1334: Vanity Fair Is a Misanthropic Holiday Treat

If Becky Sharp were alive in contemporary America, she would almost certainly be working in Donald Trump’s White House. It’s too easy to imagine William Makepeace Thackeray’s grifter antiheroine slapping on an Ann Taylor shift dress and pearls to lavishly praise the president on CNN, only to spin her way to a seven-figure tell-all and a prominent perch on the speaking circuit. As Thackeray wrote


1335: I Used to Write for Sports Illustrated. Now I Deliver Packages for Amazon.

Holiday parties were right around the corner, and I needed a cover story. I didn’t feel like admitting to casual acquaintances, or even to some good friends, that I drive a van for Amazon. I decided to tell them, if asked, that I consult for Amazon, which is loosely true: I spend my days consulting a Rabbit, the handheld Android device loaded with the app that tells me where my next stop is, how


1336: From the Archives: ‘Christmas Poem’ by e. e. cummings

Over the past 160 years, The Atlantic has published the work of some of the world’s most notable poets, from Walt Whitman to Emily Dickinson to Pablo Neruda. In the last years of his prolific career, e. e. cummings joined their ranks, contributing three poems to the magazine in the 1950s. His “Christmas Poem,” printed in December 1956, was the last to appear. The poem presents a modernist take on


1337: Sådan gik det i 2018 – hvor mange quizspørgsmål kunne du svare på?

Én læser med gode spådomsevner fik alle 13 spørgsmål rigtige i sidste års tipskupon om begivenheder i 2018. Læs her, hvad du skulle have svaret. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1338: From 300lbs to a Navy SEAL: How to gain control of your mind and life

David Goggins is scary tough. He is the only person to have completed Navy SEAL training (including two Hell Weeks), Air Force tactical air controller training, and U.S. Army Ranger School. Not that he was always a super soldier: Goggins once weighed 300lbs and was by his own admission lazy and undisciplined. Here, Goggins explains how he transformed himself and won the war in his mind—from posit (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1339: 50-året for Apollo 11 nærmer sig: Kommer vi nogensinde tilbage til Månen?

PLUS. Svaret er ja. Og det bliver også med bemandede missioner engang i 2020’erne. Spørgsmålet er blot, hvem der kommer først – USA eller Kina. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1340: Sicilian airport reopens amid Mount Etna's latest eruption

Italy's Catania airport resumed full operations Tuesday, a day after an ash cloud from Mount Etna's latest eruption in eastern Sicily forced it to shut down. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1341: Did 2018 usher in a creeping tech dystopia?

We may remember 2018 as the year when technology's dystopian potential became clear, from Facebook's role enabling the harvesting of our personal data for election interference to a seemingly unending series of revelations about the dark side of Silicon Valley's connect-everything ethos. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1342: Court orders bail for Nissan executive linked to Ghosn case

A Tokyo court on Tuesday granted bail for a Nissan executive accused of a key role in the financial misconduct case involving auto tycoon Carlos Ghosn, who remains in detention. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1343: Huawei Shipped 200 Million Phones In 2018

(Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1344: Charlatans for Christmas

A novel by Robin Cook is a great read with a medical theme. It brings up some serious questions about quality control and medical education. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1345: Gluten, kokosolie og alkohol: Tre store sundhedsnyheder i 2018 – som ikke holdt

Kokosolie er 'ren gift', stod der på dr.dk. Men det var en overdrivelse som både forskere og journalister bærer en del af ansvaret for, vurderer ekspert. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1346: Gay Life in Berlin Is Starting to Echo a Darker Era

BERLIN—The fetish cruising bar Bull is a place of pilgrimage in Berlin for more than one reason. To patrons, it is a 24-hour safe space that caters to every palate. To the British historian Brendan Nash, it is a symbol of “Babylon Berlin,” a golden decade of LGBT freedom in the city in the 1920s, when the bisexual Hollywood star Marlene Dietrich mixed with prostitutes and transgender dance-hall g


1347: Chestnut-killing wasp threatens major harvest

A small, invasive wasp is threatening the cultivation of chestnuts in Spain.


1348: Will the Christmas Goat Meet a Fiery Death Like it Usually Does?

Every year since 1966, the small town of Gävle in Sweden erects a 40-foot straw goat on the first day of Advent. For 37 of those years, the Gävle goat has been destroyed; more often than not, it has been set ablaze and burned to the ground. So ensues the annual conflict for the spirit of Christmas, fought between the Christians who run Gävle ’s businesses—who believe that the effigy brings local


1349: Death toll climbs past 370 in Indonesian tsunami disaster

Body bags were laid out along the shattered coastline as Indonesian authorities stepped up efforts to collect the dead and save the injured Monday in the aftermath of a tsunami that was apparently triggered by a volcanic eruption. The death toll climbed to 373 and was certain to rise. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1350: Annals of Internal Medicine embargoed news; Catheter ablation superior to standard drug

A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials found that catheter ablation was superior to conventional drug therapy alone for patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1351: Idaho lab protects US infrastructure from cyber attacks

It's called the "Dark Side" because the 50 workers there prefer to keep the lights low so they can dim the brightness on their computer screens. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1352: Mount Etna eruption causes airspace closure

The Mount Etna volcano erupted on Monday, spewing ash as several minor earthquakes hit the region, and prompting a partial closure of the Sicilian airspace around the mountain.


1353: Sustainable 'plastics' are on the horizon

A new Tel Aviv University study describes a process to make bioplastic polymers that don't require land or fresh water—resources that are scarce in much of the world. The polymer is derived from microorganisms that feed on seaweed. It is biodegradable, produces zero toxic waste and recycles into organic waste.


1354: Pitt-led research describes how neurons could disconnect from each other in Huntington's disease

Newly described mechanism called 'neuritosis' could play an important role in normal brain development, aging and neurodegenerative disease. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1355: Trees' enemies help tropical forests maintain their biodiversity

Scientists have long struggled to explain how tropical forests can maintain their staggering diversity of trees without having a handful of species take over — or having many other species die out. The answer, researchers say, lies in the soil found near individual trees, where natural 'enemies' of tree species reside. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1356: Hotter days will boost Chinese residential electric use

A new study from Duke University and Fudan University in China is the first to estimate how much Chinese residential electricity consumption would increase due to climate change. It's a lot. By the end of the 21st century, each degree Celsius increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) would raise average Chinese residential electricity use by about 9 percent. Peak electricity use will rise (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1357: Hotter days will boost Chinese residential electric use

A new study from Duke University and Fudan University in China is the first to estimate how much Chinese residential electricity consumption would increase due to climate change. It's a lot.


1358: Can relationship anarchy create a world without heartbreak?

Can you imagine a world without heartbreak? Not without sadness, disappointment or regret – but a world without the sinking, searing, all-consuming ache of lost love. A world without heartbreak is also a world where simple acts cannot be transformed, as if by sorcery, into moments of sublime significance. Because a world without heartbreak is a world without love – isn't it? More precisely, it mi


1359: Verdens hidtil største primtal er fundet: 'Det er helt vanvittigt stort'

Tallet har så mange cifre, at det ville tage mere end halvandet år at tælle dem, siger lektor i matematik. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1360: Brain activity predicts fear of pain

Researchers applied a machine learning technique that could potentially translate patterns of activity in fear-processing brain regions into scores on questionnaires used to assess a patient's fear of pain. This neuroscientific approach, reported in eNeuro, may help reconcile self-reported emotions and their neural underpinnings. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1361: Breast cancer drug impairs brain function

A comprehensive study of monkeys given the breast cancer drug letrozole reveals side effects that impact the brain. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1362: How socioeconomic status shapes developing brains

The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and brain anatomy is mostly stable from childhood to early adulthood, according to a longitudinal neuroimaging study of more than 600 healthy young people published in JNeurosci. This finding suggests interventions designed to mitigate the influence of low SES on brain and mental health may be most beneficial for children younger than age five. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1363: Bizarre ‘dark fluid’ with negative mass could dominate the universe – what my research suggests

It's embarrassing, but astrophysicists are the first to admit it. Our best theoretical model can only explain 5% of the universe. The remaining 95% is famously made up almost entirely of invisible, unknown material dubbed dark energy and dark matter . So even though there are a billion trillion stars in the observable universe, they are actually extremely rare. The two mysterious dark substances (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1364: Global Health: Marburg Virus, Related to Ebola, Is Found in Bats in West Africa

The discovery was part of a U.S.-led effort to spot dangerous pathogens in animals before humans are endangered.


1365: The Major Flaw of You’ve Got Mail

You’ve Got Mail premiered, as a not-very-holiday-focused holiday movie, in late December 1998. It was a film that could only have emerged from its particular historical moment: a rom-com about two people, Kathleen Kelly (Meg Ryan) and Joe Fox (Tom Hanks), enemies in life, who find soulmate-level connection via the magic of the dial-up modem. “In life, they’re at odds,” the film’s trailer intones.


1366: Colorful Peacocks Impress Females with Good Vibes

Peafowls' head crests are specifically tuned to the vibrations produced by feather-rattling male peacocks, thus acting as a sort of antenna. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1367: Kilcher Christmas Piñata | Alaska: The Last Frontier

Atz Lee built a piñata for the Kilcher children. See who manages to open it with their homemade wooden sword. Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://t (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1368: These past convictions predict odds of future offenses

New research shows offenders convicted of a violent crime or other serious felonies will likely commit the same crime again. A life sentence in many states rarely means offenders will spend a lifetime behind bars. In fact, offenders sentenced for murder served 15 years on average before initial release from state prison, according to a recent Bureau of Justice Statistics report using national-lev (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1369: These Magnified Frost Crystal Images Are Totally Enchanting

Elizabeth Root Blackmer specializes in macro photography of natural phenomena too small for us to usually notice.


1370: How Miami's Amazon reseller army serves shoppers worldwide—and makes millions

If you bought your Christmas presents on Amazon this year, there is a decent chance someone in South Florida was taking your money. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1371: 2019 Preview: People will receive transfusions of artificial blood

Volunteers will be injected with red blood cells grown from stem cells in the lab. If it works it could mean blood donors are no longer required


1372: ‘Striking number’ of Danish households are food insecure

When people can’t afford enough good quality food, both their physical and mental health suffer, research in Denmark suggests. People living in approximately 200,000 households in Denmark can’t afford enough food, according to the new study. The work uses measurement methods used in the United States, where public authorities regularly monitor the prevalence of food insecurity. Because the study (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1373: Scientists have created a new quasicrystal

The strange class of materials known as quasicrystals has a new member. In a paper in Science , researchers describe a quasicrystalline superlattice that self-assembles from a single type of nanoparticle building blocks. This is the first definitive observation of a quasicrystalline superlattice formed from a single component, the researchers say. The discovery provides new insight into how these (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1374: Ski exoskeleton boosts leg power and reduces tiredness on the slopes

When hurtling down a mountain an exoskeleton could absorb some of the impact for skiers and snowboarders and give them extra power in their turns


1375: Here's how California can use fire to solve its wildfire problem

If California wants to get out in front of its wildfire problem, scientists have some clear but counterintuitive advice: Start more forest fires. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1376: Apple tweaks app rules to allow users to gift in-app purchases

Just in time for the holidays, Apple added a new gifting option that will allow you to give the gift of in-app purchases to your friends and family. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1377: The Most-Read WIRED Gear Stories of 2018

A review of the Air Fryer, a three-month sojourn in Bing, and a user's guide to how to disable throttling on an iPhone all topped this year's list.


1378: Muscle atrophy among critically ill kids occurs within one week of mechanical ventilation

Children with life-threatening respiratory failure who require mechanical ventilation in a pediatric intensive care unit commonly experience rapid muscle atrophy, according to a study published online Dec. 19, 2018, in PLOS ONE. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1379: Worry about Christmas commercialism goes way back

For as long as people have been shopping for Christmas, there’s been concern about turning a religious celebration into a commercial bonanza. This sentiment reaches back to when America was a backwater and the celebration of Christmas went from drinking and carousing to shopping and gift-giving. “People have complained about the excessive commercialization of Christmas ever since its incarnation (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1380: Hunt for survivors as Indonesian tsunami death toll climbs to 373

Dozens of filled body bags were hauled away from buildings flattened by Indonesia's volcano-triggered tsunami Monday, as the death toll climbed to 373 and search teams pushed on with the grim hunt for corpses. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1381: You just unwrapped a new device. Here's what to do first.

DIY Seven steps to protect your new tech and load it with apps you actually want. When you get a new phone or computer, you want to ensure it will have a long and secure life. Here are seven steps you need to take when you first unwrap your device.


1382: At botanical garden in Mexico, natural species blossom again

Imagine a botanical garden, and acres of carefully designed, highly manicured, delicately pruned "zoos for plants" may come to mind. But at El Charco del Ingenio, a botanical garden and natural protected area in central Mexico, the sprawling scrubland has been allowed to return to its unencumbered, wilder roots. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1383: Hundredårsjagten på det perfekte dæksel – kapitel 2

PLUS. En fortælling i tre dele om en matematisk udfordring. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1384: What Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice Teaches Readers

Before she was a writer, Jane Austen was a reader. A reader, moreover, within a family of readers, who would gather in her father’s rectory to read aloud from the work of authors such as Samuel Johnson, Frances Burney, and William Cowper—as well as, eventually, Jane’s own works-in-progress. Not surprisingly, then, in Austen’s novels, the act of reading is a key indication of how a character shoul


1385: Letters: ‘Biscuits in the American South Are Serious Business Y’all’

Why Most of America Is Terrible at Making Biscuits There’s a scientific reason no one outside of the South can make light and fluffy biscuits, Amanda Mull wrote in November . The secret to success, she showed, is White Lily flour—which is difficult to find north of Richmond, Virginia. I’m not buying hard-to-get White Lily flour as the magic bullet for good biscuits. My mother in Kentucky made bis


1386: The world’s great nations are revisiting the moon. But where’s Europe?

The half-century since the first lunar landing has seen more stories than ever being spun about the moon, and why we should go there


1387: 12 Best Xbox One Games (2019): Sidescrollers, Shooters, and More

Relive Halo classics, play co-op with friends, or enjoy the mayhem of a battle royale with our favorite Xbox One games.


1388: Past and present of imaging modalities used for prostate cancer diagnosis

This review illustrates a perspective on prostate cancer imaging summarizing current imaging approaches with a special focus on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA), Bombesin (BN) and Androgen Receptor (AR) targeted imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Positron Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) based on 99mTc and other radiotracers. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1389: Regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism by galanin-like peptide (GALP)

Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is composed of 60 amino acid residues and its sequence is highly homologous across species. GALP is produced in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and has diverse physiological effects such as the regulation of feeding, energy metabolism, and reproductive behavior. In this review article, the researchers summarize their recent research focusing on the mechanism whereby GA (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1390: Communication interception can be traced through meteor trails

Meteor burst communication is based on using meteors as cryptography assistants. Meteor trails reflect radio waves, which makes them suitable for radio transmissions at distances of up to 2,000 kilometers. Unpredictable nature of meteors makes pose a significant hindrance for signal interception. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1391: What Was Steve Mnuchin Thinking? Three Possibilities

Imagine having a runny nose, itchy eyes, congestion, and a sore throat, and your doctor telling you that you shouldn’t worry about cancer—she consulted her colleagues and they’re certain it is not cancer, and if it were, they could fight it. This is roughly what happened on Sunday evening, when Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin put out a press release on calls he held with executives from the cou


1392: The development of a hybrid micro mixer for biological and chemical experiments

An international team of scientists including an employee of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) developed a device for mixing chemical and biological reaction feeds. The team managed to increase the mixing efficiency up to 90 percent. The new device will be used in biological and chemical experiments. The article of the scientists was published in the RSC Advances journal. (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1393: New study shows how guinea pig fathers pass on adaptive responses to environmental changes

Adaptations to environmental change are the most important asset for the persistence of any plant or animal species. This is usually achieved through genetic mutation and selection, a slow process driven by chance. Faster and more targeted are epigenetic modifications. A new study carried out by scientists from the Leibniz-IZW in Germany shows for wild guinea pigs that epigenetic modifications spe (Sat, 22 Dec 2018)


1394: New insights into pion condensation and the formation of neutron stars

Performing studies on a doubly magic isotope of tin, researchers have shown that the pion condensation should occur at around two times normal nuclear density, which can be realized in a neutron star with a mass of 1.4 times that of the Sun. (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1395: Paramedics can safely evaluate psychiatric patients' medical condition in the field

Patients with psychiatric emergencies on involuntary holds are often taken to traditional hospital emergency departments, where they can spend hours to days in an emergency department bed waiting for access to specialized psychiatric personnel. New research finds that paramedics can use a screening process to determine whether to medically clear patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies before (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1396: The 10 Weirdest Science Stories of 2018

Things sure got strange in 2018: from a space-bound Tesla to crows having sex with their dead.


1397: A French Teenager Turned the Bible and Quran into DNA and Injected Them into His Body

The injection probably won’t bring enlightenment, but it's also unlikely to kill him.


1398: ‘Ghosts’ of fishing past can upend conservation

Conservation of a renewable resource like fish or other wildlife often hinges on habits or past decisions, research finds. The study challenges conventional expectations that the collapse of fast-growing natural resources is unlikely. Conservation is much easier to continue once it starts, says lead author Edward W. Tekwa, a postdoctoral associate in the ecology, evolution, and natural resources (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1399: 7 Odd Things That Raise Your Risk of Cancer (and 1 That Doesn't)

Some things that may raise people's risk of cancer don't get a lot of attention.


1400: 10 Ways Earth Changed Forever in 2018

Earth is always changing, and 2018 — a year filled with hurricanes, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes — was no exception.


1401: Megapixels: This incredible photo changed the way we look at Earth

Science The famous "Earthrise" turns 50 today. "Earthrise" is arguably the most famous family portrait on the planet—a snapshot of all of us together, captured by Apollo 8 astronauts on Christmas Eve, 1968.


1402: Why Coal Symbolizes Naughtiness

In 2014, The Killers released a Christmas single, “ Joel, the Lump of Coal .” Rather than featuring a traditional Christmas character, the song tells the bittersweet story of Joel, an animated chunk of coal who wants to be given as a Christmas present. Coal, everyone knows, is not a gift anyone desires; it is a punishment and a rebuke. But there was a time when Joel—and coal—would have been happi


1403: Families’ Weird Holiday Traditions, Illustrated

Part of the allure of the holidays is all the traditions: A turkey-and-mashed-potatoes feast on Thanksgiving, wrapped presents nestled under the bedazzled tree for Christmas, the lighting of the menorah during Hanukkah. It’s these iconic moments that Norman Rockwell captured in his popular illustrations of families’ snowy holiday revelry. But, then again, how Americans actually celebrate the holi


1404: Grande Arrival: The Year Digital Native Pop Stars Took Over

2018 saw the emergence of female artists whose online presence managed to be savvy without being sentimental, sensitive but still cynical.


1405: 50 Years Ago, *Earthrise* Gave Us the View of a Lifetime

Astronauts on NASA's Apollo 8 mission snapped the first photos of Earth from space, forever changing how we see our place in the universe.


1406: Cryptojacking Took Over the Internet in 2018

Move over, ransomware. Cryptojacking is officially the scourge of the internet.


1407: Team gets closer to precise treatment for arrhythmia

New research makes a significant step toward precision medicine for patients with a life-threatening form of irregular heartbeat by determining in which patients a common drug treatment would be most beneficial. In 2015, then-President Barack Obama launched a precision medicine initiative, saying that its promise was “delivering the right treatments, at the right time, every time to the right per


1408: 2018 in Quotes

From the effects of political upheaval on research to claims of gene-edited babies, the year has been a tumultuous one for the scientific community. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1409: The Tragic Fight Scene That Defined Black Panther

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. First up is Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther . (Read our previous entries here .) By the time we revisit the waterfall in Black Panther , about 75 minutes into the film, every viewer understands the stakes of the place. Wa


1410: Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend’s Wealthy Family Isn’t Fair with Their Money

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am in a loving, five-year, long-distance relationship with my boyfriend, who happens to have a twin brother. My boyfriend is the successful one, with a doctorate from a top university, while his brother has


1411: Toys are us: How childhood objects may have shaped human history

Tantalising evidence hints that key human innovations including the wheel and weaving were the outcome of, quite literally, child's play


1412: Forget Elon Musk's Troubles—Tesla Had a Blockbuster 2018

Look past the CEO's antics, and it's clear the automaker spent the year clearing major, long-standing hurdles.


1413: The Year Tech Workers Realized They Were Workers

Low-paid workers at Marriott hotels, in part, protested encroaching automation—finding unexpected common cause with some well-paid engineers across tech.


1414: 6 of the most amazing things that were 3D-printed in 2018

From bridges to cars, 3D printing proved this year that it’s still relevant and exciting.


1415: A Half Century Later, the Journey of Apollo 8 Still Inspires

On Christmas Eve 1968 people worldwide stepped back from the throes of crises and recognized themselves as citizens of a tiny, fragile planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1416: Western Drought Ranks among the Worst of the Last Millennium

As temperatures warm, it becomes more likely the drought will match past “megadroughts” for length as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1417: Techtopia #84: Bæredygtig business er fremtiden

FN har de startet projektet SDG Accelerator, hvor virksomheder kan få hjælp til at tilpasse forretningen til et eller flere af de 17 bæredygtighedsmål. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1418: Pablo Escobar’s hippos: Why drug lords shouldn’t play God

Lucy Cooke—an acclaimed zoologist, author, and TV presenter—tells the story of Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar's exotic animal menagerie, which included four hippos illegally imported from Africa. Four hippos became eight, and eight became sixteen, and now this non-native creature is running wild in South America. Cooke explains why this is a moment in evolution — these hippos will evolve into (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1419: Netflix Captures the Doom and Dread of Watership Down

“In the beginning,” says a dream-reverberant voice in the first seconds of Netflix’s Watership Down , “Frith made the world. And he made the stars by scattering his droppings across the sky.” And in the beginning, Richard Adams, who was working at the time for the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, told his children a story about some rabbits. Some of the rabbits were nice; some of the rab


1420: Trilobites: Perhaps Santa Had to Shout to His Eight Reindeer Because They Fell Asleep

A small study suggests the body clocks of the reindeer said to pull Mr. Claus’s sleigh swing wildly through the seasons, bringing near-hibernation in winter.


1421: B blop! Derfor rumler din mave ekstra højt til jul

Gemmer du plads i mavesækken til julemiddagen i aften, har du sikkert oplevet, at maven rumler. Men faktisk rumler din mave en lille smule hele tiden. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1422: Baby, Christmas Songs Have Always Been Controversial

This year’s battle in the War on Christmas is being fought over “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.” According to some, the song’s lyrics promote date rape. According to others, including a radio station in Kentucky playing the tune on continuous loop , it’s a harmless ditty and a Christmas classic. Commentators on Fox News, who look forward to the War on Christmas more eagerly than children await actual C


1423: Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

A question about heading soccer balls inspired a series of experiments to understand how the brain changes shape when someone's head takes a hit. (Image credit: Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images)


1424: If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

A growing body of research shows keeping a log of what you are thankful for can lower stress, help you sleep better, and may even reduce the risk of heart disease. But it's not for everyone. (Image credit: Kristen Uroda for NPR)


1425: Archaeologists find remains of horses in ancient Pompeii stable

Military officer’s stable preserved under ash from eruption of Mount Vesuvius Archaeologists have unearthed the petrified remains of a harnessed horse and saddle in the stable of an ancient villa in a Pompeii suburb. The Pompeii archaeological park’s head, Massimo Osanna, told the Italian news agency Ansa that the villa belonged to a high-ranking military officer, perhaps a general, in ancient Ro


1426: Tell us: how are you defying expectations about ageing?

If you’re still living life to the full at a time when many people expect you to be slowing down, we’d like to hear from you Are you in your 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s or older? Perhaps you’ve taken up a new sport (or got better at one you already enjoyed), discovered a new hobby, started a new career, met a new love… Tell us how you’ve defied expectations about ageing. Related: 'Life keeps evolving': si (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1427: Sending astronauts to Mars would be stupid, astronaut says

One of the first astronauts to orbit the Moon thinks there's no public support to send people to Mars.


1428: Danmark ignorerede alle røde lamper for at være først med ERTMS

PLUS. Danmarkshistoriens største jernbaneprojekt har de seneste to år udviklet sig til en skandale, der får IC4 til at blegne. Nu venter 11 år uden råd til nye problemer. Nye læsere kan stå på her. (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1429: Earthrise, A Photo That Changed The World Forever

(Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1430: SpaceX launches military satellite after four attempts

The Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral on Sunday after four previous launches were cancelled.


1431: Virkelighedstjek: Hvordan får vi 1 million elbiler på vejene i 2030?

Hvad snakker politikerne om, når de gerne vil have 1 mio. elbiler på vejene i 2030? Er det realistisk, og hvad skal der til? Læs, hvad eksperterne mener.


1432: Why fitness instructors shouldn’t talk about looks

Fitness instructors should make motivational comments about strength and health, not weight loss and appearance, research suggests. Some types of exercise seem to improve body esteem in women, whereas others have the potential to lower it. In other words, from a psychological perspective, not all fitness approaches are created equal. “Our goal was to determine whether the psychological outcomes o (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1433: When a Sponsored Facebook Post Doesn’t Pay Off

After rising to MySpace fame in the mid-aughts, singer-songwriter Kaila Yu amassed a following of nearly half a million fans on Facebook and 70,000 on Twitter and Instagram. Like all “influencers”—people who leverage a social-media following to influence others—Yu now makes her living monetizing her audience with branded content, promoting products and events through sponsored posts. In July, she (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1434: Migrating birds may face tougher winds going south

Depending on potential climate change scenarios, altered winds may make it harder for North American birds to migrate south in the autumn but easier for them to come north in the spring. Researchers came to this conclusion using data from 143 weather radar stations to estimate the altitude, density, and direction birds took during spring and autumn migrations over several years. They also extract (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1435: There's A Lot At Stake In The Weekly U.S. Drought Map

As drought has deepened across the West, much attention is paid to a colorful map that shows the hardest hit areas. The scientists who update the map each week face enormous pressure to get it right. (Image credit: Kami Engstrom/Courtesy of Matt Isgar) (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1436: The Most-Read WIRED Science Stories of 2018

Feast your mind on stories about brain-eating amoebas, the science of wildfires, and a criminal twist to the genetics revolution.


1437: 2018 Proved Game Streaming Can Still Get Bigger—and Messier

What will happen on with sites like Twitch in 2019? Hard to say—but we have some ideas.


1438: Illuminating nanoparticle growth with X-rays

Hydrogen fuel cells are a promising technology for producing clean and renewable energy, but the cost and activity of their cathode materials is a major challenge for commercialization. Many fuel cells require expensive platinum-based catalysts—substances that initiate and speed up chemical reactions—to help convert renewable fuels into electrical energy. To make hydrogen fuel cells commercially v (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1439: Rich people give more to charity when you make them feel powerful

Wealthy people donated 60 per cent more money when they received messages appealing to their personal power rather than their community-mindedness (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1440: Loopy Particle Math

Scientists are creating mathematical tools to identify novel particles and phenomena at the world's largest particle accelerator — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1441: How Exercise Affects Your Brain

Scientists are continuing to showing that everything from the “runner’s high” to the “yogi’s tranquility” can have profound effects on your brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1442: Wired that way: genes do shape behaviors but it’s complicated

Many of our psychological traits are innate in origin. There is overwhelming evidence from twin, family and general population studies that all manner of personality traits, as well as things such as intelligence, sexuality and risk of psychiatric disorders, are highly heritable. Put concretely, this means that a sizeable fraction of the population spread of values such as IQ scores or personalit (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1443: Novel biomarkers & therapeutic targets for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

In this review, the researchers describe the analytical techniques and workflow used in untargeted metabolomics. They also identify several case studies that highlight the use of untargeted metabolomics in cardiovascular research. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1444: Give it the plasma treatment: strong adhesion without adhesives

A Japanese research team at Osaka University used plasma treatment to make fluoropolymers and silicone resin adhere without any adhesives. Heat-assisted helium-plasma treatment created oxygen-containing functional groups on PTFE or PFA, while open-air plasma-jetting installed silanol groups on vulcanized PDMS. Under pressure, the treated PDMS strongly adhered to the treated polymers, copper, and g (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1445: What influences a person's psychological boundaries?

Professor Sofya Nartova-Bochaver of the Higher School of economics and colleagues from universities in Armenia and China conducted a comparative analysis of the psychological boundaries of individuals living in different countries. The results indicate that age and sex play a greater role in the formation of those boundaries than culture does. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1446: More bears needed to sustain Pyrenees population: activists

The release of additional bears into the Pyrenees mountains straddling France and Spain is needed to ensure the fledgling population's survival, the activist group charged with the bears' protection said Wednesday. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1447: Quake from Mount Etna volcano jolts Sicily, sparks panic

A quake triggered by Mount Etna's eruption jolted eastern Sicily before dawn Wednesday, injuring at least 10 people, damaging churches and houses on the volcano's slopes and prompting panicked villagers to flee their homes. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1448: Digitally enhanced: Estonia plots the end of bureaucracy

In the Estonian capital of Tallinn, three-day-old Oskar Lunde sleeps soundly in his hospital cot, snuggled into a lime green blanket decorated with red butterflies. Across the room, his father turns on a laptop. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1449: Cryptocurrencies crashed in 2018. Now they’re right where they should be.

A year ago, Bitcoin and its brethren were headed to the moon. These days they’re much more grounded. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1450: European wheat lacks climate resilience

A group of European researchers, including Professor Jørgen E. Olesen from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University, has found that current breeding programmes and cultivar selection practices do not provide the needed resilience to climate change. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1451: Autophagy and mitochondria: Targets in neurodegenerative disorders

Cellular homeostasis depends on the timely clearance of damaged cellular organelles and proteins via pathways including autophagy. Mitochondria and mitochondrial autophagy play a vital role in cellular health and failure of these pathways can have a devastating effect on cellular homeostasis. Here, the researchers review the involvement of mitochondrial and autophagy dysfunction in neurodegenerati (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1452: Targeting kinetoplastid and apicomplexan thymidylate biosynthesis as antiprotozoal strategy

Kinetoplastid and apicomplexan parasites comprise a group of protozoans responsible for human diseases, with a serious impact on human health and the socioeconomic growth of developing countries. Researchers review the available literature in relation to drug discovery studies targeting thymidylate biosynthesis in kinetoplastid (genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania) and apicomplexan (Plasmodium spp a (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1453: Flavonoids as P-gp inhibitors: A systematic review of SARs

This review concerned the recent updates on the structure-activity relationships of flavonoids as P-gp inhibitors, the molecular mechanisms of their action and their ability to overcome P-gp-mediated MDR in preclinical studies. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1454: Antifungal activity and detoxification of aflatoxins

Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by fungi of the genus Aspergillus, which occur naturally in cereals like corn, beans and rice. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the main aflatoxin produced by the fungi and has the highest toxicity, mainly targeting the liver, while also exhibits teratogenic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in humans and several animal models. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1455: Artificial activation of cancer cells to destroy them

This risky method of anti-cancer therapy was suggested by scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU). Their review of mechanisms for molecular activation of stem cells of gliomas (most widely-spread brain tumors) was approved for publishing in the Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience journal. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1456: Anesthetic-induced myocardial conditioning: Molecular fundamentals and scope

The objective of this study was to investigate the role that miRNAs play in the cardioprotective effect of halogenated anesthetics. A review was conducted of more than 100 studies to identify miRNAs involved in anesthetic-induced myocardial conditioning. Halogenated anesthetics regulate the expression of miRNAs involved in heart conditions. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1457: Discovery of topological LC circuits transporting EM waves without backscattering

NIMS succeeded in fabricating topological LC circuits arranged in a honeycomb pattern where electromagnetic (EM) waves can propagate without backscattering even when pathways turn sharply. These circuits may be suitable for use as high-frequency electromagnetic waveguides, which would allow miniaturization and high integration in various electronics devices, such as mobile phones. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1458: Setting speed limits too low ups fatal crashes

Setting speed limits just five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produces a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal, and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to researchers. “If (however) you lower the speed limit by 10, 15, 25 miles per hour, or more, drivers stop paying attention,” says Vikash Gayah, assistant professor of civil engineering at Pe (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1459: 60% of US children’s deaths in 2016 were preventable

The United States lost 20,360 children and teens in 2016—60 percent of them to preventable injuries, a new study shows. More than 4,100 of them died in motor vehicle crashes, though prevention efforts and better trauma care have cut the death rate of young people from such crashes in half in less than two decades. Meanwhile, firearms—the second cause of death in youth—claimed the lives of more th (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1460: Tree-ring analysis explains physiology behind drought intolerance

Tree rings tell the story of what's happening physiologically as fire suppression makes forests more dense and less tolerant of drought, pests and wildfires, new research shows. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1461: News releases about health, Earth science and social sciences make up EurekAlert!'s 2018 trending news list

Health news occupied six of the 10 most-viewed news releases on EurekAlert! in 2018. The most popular news release, 'Study: Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors," submitted by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health received 337,013 views. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1462: 10 Times Humans Were Total Morons Around Animals in 2018

Here are a few of humanity's most embarrassing and shameful moments involving animals this year. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1463: 14 Most Bizarre Scientific Discoveries of 2018

was a weird one in science, from boiling bats to blueberry Earth. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1464: Memristor device acts like competing neurons

A new electronic device can directly model the behaviors of a synapse, which is a connection between two neurons. For the first time, the way that neurons share or compete for resources can be explored in hardware without the need for complicated circuits. “Neuroscientists have argued that competition and cooperation behaviors among synapses are very important. Our new memristive devices allow us (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1465: Social Media Helped Make 2018 the Year of the Scammer

Hustlers have always tried to get over on the powerless—in 2018, though, the tables began to turn.


1466: The Finnish Swimmers Who Chill Out in Subzero Temperatures

Who needs a warm tropical beach when you can enjoy a hole in the ice? Definitely not the Finns.


1467: Glaciers "Sing" as They Crack at Night

Fracturing of Himalayan glaciers could make them melt faster, threatening the water supply for more than a billion people in Asia — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1468: Romaine to Honey Smacks Cereal: Why Were There So Many Foodborne Outbreaks in 2018?

From E. coli-tainted romaine lettuce to Salmonella in cereal, this year certainly had its fair share of foodborne illness outbreaks. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1469: Japan Embraces Commercial Whaling, Pulls Out Of Global Alliance That Banned Practice

Japan is leaving the International Whaling Commission, which put a moratorium on commercial whaling in the 1980s. The country will allow commercial hunts for the first time in 30 years next July. (Image credit: Kyodo/Reuters)


1470: Medical scientists describe optimal immune therapeutic strategies for liver cancer

KAIST medical scientists have presented a novel pathways involving T immune cell exhaustion, providing evidence and rationale for designing optimal strategies for immune checkpoint blockades in cancer patients. They succeeded in distinguishing the hepatocellular carcinoma group from the exhausted tumor infiltrating immune cell composition of liver cancer patients. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1471: What the Syria Hawks Refuse to Acknowledge

President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria is controversial partly because of the possible consequences for the country’s Kurdish minority. “Among the biggest losers are likely to be the Kurdish troops that the United States has equipped and relied on to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria,” The New York Times editorialized . “Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdog (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1472: The Way American Parents Think About Chores Is Bizarre

The practice of paying children an allowance kicked off in earnest about 100 years ago. “The motivation was twofold,” says Steven Mintz, a historian of childhood at the University of Texas at Austin. “First, to provide kids with the money that they needed to participate in the emerging commercial culture—allowing them to buy candy, cheap toys, and other inexpensive products—and second, to teach t


1473: The 19 Best Books of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . 2018 was a year whose realities sometimes seemed to approach the dystopias and dramas of fiction, as stories of family trauma, environmental disaster, and sexual assault played out on the world stage. The books our writers and editors were drawn to this year include many that illuminate these struggles and inequities, whet


1474: The Moon exhibition in Denmark re-enchants the moon for our times

We lament the loss of our connection to the light of stars and moon, but in the second of our 12 Days of Culture, a science-art exhibition imbues the moon with new meaning (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1475: Kronik: Colding – den glemte stadsingeniør og videnskabsmand

(Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1476: A New Type of DNA Testing Is Entering Crime Investigations

Geneology is about to send a lot more people to jail.


1477: How China Helped Make the Internet Less Free in 2018

Tech companies, democratic governments, and civil society need to work together to fight back against growing surveillance and censorship online.


1478: Those We Lost in 2018

The scientific community said goodbye to a number of leading researchers this year. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1479: China's Home-Grown Surge in Plant Biology

Studies to improve the productivity, resistance and taste of rice crops are central to China’s commanding position — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1480: How a Reclusive Lizard Became a Prize Find for Wildlife Smugglers

Scientists studying rare creatures face a tricky conundrum—how to publicize their research without launching their subjects into the exotic wildlife trade.


1481: Palaeontologists behaving badly, and other bitter feuds in science

What killed the dinosaurs? Does string theory count as science? Is Pluto a planet? Get embroiled in five explosive debates that have put researchers at each others' throats (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1482: Our best illustrations of 2018

Our artists’ thought-provoking, playful creations bring our stories to life, often saying more with an image than words ever could. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1483: 2018 was a busy year in space

This year, some missions started exploring the cosmos, while others were winding down.


1484: How to Return and Exchange Your Unwanted Holiday Gifts

You can't always get what you want. Here's how to get some cash (or store credit) instead.


1485: 2018 Was a Rough Year for Truth Online

The internet has been awash with misinformation for years, but researchers are finally realizing it's hard to quantify the scope of its impact.


1486: Josephine Klein obituary

Psychologist, psychotherapist, academic and community worker who founded the Refugee Therapy Centre in London The psychologist and psychotherapist Josephine Klein, who has died aged 92, had a passionate concern for social justice. It underpinned a variety of her initiatives as a researcher, writer and practitioner. Two books came out of a period in the research section of the National Association (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1487: Humanizing Dick Cheney

This article contains mild spoilers for Vice. The central conundrum of Dick Cheney’s political and historical identity is the gulf between the malevolence of his public persona (snarling, dark, relentless) and the mildness of his private personality (wry, relaxed, understated). It’s a dichotomy that Adam McKay tackles head-on in Vice , his tragicomedy of a biopic about the 46th vice president of


1488: What Populists Do to Democracies

When Jair Bolsonaro won Brazil’s presidential election in October to the consternation of the country’s traditional political elite, commentators were sharply divided about the implications. Some warned that Bolsonaro, a far-right populist who has openly expressed admiration for the brutal military dictatorship that ruled Brazil from 1964 to 1985, presented a clear and present threat to democracy


1489: Amazon's Autodidact Streak

Candace Thille’s mother, who had an undergraduate degree in physics and a master’s degree in mathematics, always told her that all work is honorable work, as long as you set a high standard for yourself. Her father, an electrical engineer, was the one who emphasized the importance of education: “The most important thing you can learn,” he’d tell her, “is how to teach yourself new things.” When Th


1490: Best After-Christmas Sales (2018): Bose, Beats, Blu-ray, and More

If you’re looking for deals or unwrapped some gift cards this season, there are plenty of killer year-end sales happening.


1491: Husker du robotdrabet og den nemme app? Seks tech-historier vi vil huske fra 2018

Teknologien vil mest blive husket for sine skyggesider, i året der rinder ud. Men heldigvis var der også et par lyspunkter, fx var årets mest populære app både hjælpsom og dansk. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1492: If we want a different politics, we need another revolutionary: Freud | Suzanne Moore

Marx is all very well, but to effect real change Sigmund Freud’s modern tools of self-examination hold the answers “If anything is certain, it is that I myself am not a Marxist.” I love that Karl Marx said that. I love his self-knowledge. I love the poetry of The Communist Manifesto . I love that he was a seer, a prophet of what we now call globalisation. I love that he understood that there is n


1493: The Transformers Summit: solving the problem of urban living

The UN wants to make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable by 2030. So innovators, entrepreneurs and policy makers are responding (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1494: As TikTok videos take hold with teens, parents scramble to keep up

Millions of teenagers seeking their 15 seconds of fame are flocking to TikTok, but many of their parents are only now learning about the express-yourself video app—often to their dismay. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1495: Israeli anti-drone company sees spike in interest

An Israeli technology company says its anti-drone system is drawing major interest after rogue unmanned aircraft sowed chaos at London's Gatwick Airport last week. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1496: Japan will resume commercial whaling, but not in Antarctic

Japan announced Wednesday it is leaving the International Whaling Commission to resume hunting the animals for commercial use but said it will no longer go to the Antarctic for its much-criticized annual killings of hundreds of whales. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1497: Indonesia says avoid coast near volcano, fearing new tsunami

Indonesian authorities asked people to avoid the coast in areas where a tsunami killed more than 420 people last weekend in a fresh warning issued on the anniversary of the catastrophic 2004 Asian earthquake and tsunami. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1498: Hundredårsjagten på det perfekte dæksel – kapitel 3, 4 og efterskrift

PLUS. En fortælling i tre dele om en matematisk udfordring. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1499: Året hvor vi vinkede farvel til rent, urenset grundvand

PLUS. I årtier har det været en fast del af den danske selvforståelse, at vi kan pumpe vand op fra undergrunden og sende det direkte ud i vandhanerne. Men efter flere fund af gamle pesticidrester lakker denne praksis mod enden.


1500: ‘Learning to relax can be life-changing’: how to find your comfort zone

Many of us have forgotten how to truly unwind. We ask the experts for ways to switch off in an always-on world How do you like to kick back, chill out and really relax? This sounds as if it should be a simple question. But I can’t be alone in having spent several evenings over the past couple of weeks slumped on the sofa, “watching TV” while my eyes flicker across Twitter and Facebook, as well as


1501: Skandaleår for Facebook: Men danskerne liker stadig på livet løs

Møgsagerne er kommet som perler på en snor igennem hele 2018 , hvor Facebook på det nærmeste har siddet i gabestok. Men det får ikke danskerne til at droppe firmaets platforme. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1502: Expedition sets out to map Larsen C ice shelf

Scientists head to Weddell Sea to model changes to the shelf since the calving, in 2017, of the massive iceberg A68 In the comings days, a team of scientists, technicians and other specialists will gather onboard the SA Agulhas II, a 13,500-tonne ice-breaker moored off the coast of Antarctica, and make final preparations for one of the most ambitious polar expeditions in decades. Guided by satell


1503: Research shows biases against immigrants with non-anglicized names

Using variations of the 'trolley-dilemma' where people choose who to save or not save others in a hypothetical situation, social psychologists show that for certain groups, under certain conditions in a hypothetical scenario, having an anglicized name means you're more likely to be saved than if you kept your original Asian or Arab name. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1504: Ten big science stories of 2018

The year 2018 provided plenty to chew on if you're interested in science and the environment.


1505: Absolute revolution': UK biotech firms thrive despite Brexit threat

Booming sector received nearly £1.6bn from investors in first eight months of 2018 Biotech is one of the most promising parts of the British drug industry, not least according to the investors who continue to pump vast sums into the sector despite the looming shadow of Brexit. In the first eight months of 2018 alone it received nearly £1.6bn, compared with £1.2bn for the entirety of 2017. An unas


1506: The Good News About These Short Days

Astrophysicist Adam Frank says to stop cursing the darkness of this time of year and enjoy its place in our cosmic concert. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1507: 2018: A Big Year In Space

This past year was a weird and eventful one for news from outer space. We saw everything from a red sports car being shot off the planet to a detailed new map of our Milky Way to a mysterious hole drilled in the International Space Station. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1508: NASA: Holiday asteroid looks like a hippopotamus

(Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1509: Map zooms in on declining snow mass in Western US

Some parts of the Western United States have had a 41 percent reduction in the yearly maximum mass of snow since 1982. Researchers have mapped the changes in snow mass from 1982 to 2016 onto a grid of squares 2.5-miles on a side over the entire contiguous US. A person could practically find the trend for their neighborhood, says first author Xubin Zeng, professor of hydrology and atmospheric scie (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1510: Watch: Morphing material goes from flat to face

Scientists have created a rubbery, shape-shifting material that morphs from one sophisticated form to another on demand. The shapes programmed into a polymer appear in ambient conditions and melt away when under heat. The process also works in reverse. The smooth operation belies a battle at the nanoscale, where liquid crystals and the elastomer in which they’re embedded fight for control. When c (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1511: Why giving gifts brings you more happiness than receiving them

Giving gifts results in longer happiness from the act, says new research. We can sustain the pleasure of a new experience every time we give to others. Hedonic adaptation makes it hard to continuously enjoy spending money on ourselves. None Just in time for the holidays, comes new research that says you get more satisfaction from giving gifts than receiving. Usually, a phenomenon known as hedonic


1512: Saturn’S Ring Are Disappearing Its Beauty Is Fleeting

(Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1513: Pres på madbudgettet er koblet til usund kost og dårligt psykisk helbred i mindst 100.000 danske husstande

Et betydeligt antal danskere oplever, at de er så hårdt presset på budgettet,… (Mon, 24 Dec 2018)


1514: Japan whale hunting: Commercial whaling to restart in July

One conservation group warns that the move shows "a troubling disregard for international rule". (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1515: Lightning's electromagnetic fields may have protective properties

Lightning was the main electromagnetic presence in the Earth's atmosphere long before the invention of electricity. There are some 2,000 thunderstorms active at any given time, so humans and other organisms have been bathed in extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for billions of years.


1516: Danmark kræver bakterie-dræbende program til opvaskemaskiner

Alle opvaskemaskiner skal kunne varmes op til 70 grader i minimum ti minutter for at sikre, at alle resistente bakterier bliver slået ihjel, mener både Statens Serum Institut og regeringen.


1517: Gray wolf arrives at New Mexico zoo for recovery program


1518: Nations count cost of 2018 climate disasters

Climate change-induced disasters cost nations at least $100 billion in 2018, a watchdog said Thursday, warning the spate of deadly wildfires, floods and superstorms was "a shadow" of things to come if greenhouse gas emissions aren't slashed. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1519: The Year in #MeToo

brought new revelations of sexual misconduct by high-profile scientists, as well as policy changes from funders and professional societies aimed at curbing bad behavior. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1520: Virtual Reality Helps Hospice Workers See Life And Death Through A Patient's Eyes

A Maine medical school and nearby hospice center are trying out a VR program aimed at fostering more empathy for dying patients among health workers-in-training. Not everyone is sold on the idea. (Image credit: Embodied Labs) (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1521: Immigrant kids in ‘tender age’ shelters face myriad risks

Separating immigrant children from their parents will very likely lead to negative effects on emotional and mental health, research shows. Young children placed in “tender age” shelters are the most vulnerable, experts say. “Recent changes in the US immigration system have resulted in a large number of children removed from their parents, drawing increased scrutiny to this abhorrent practice,” sa (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1522: Pluto explorer ushering in new year at more distant world

The spacecraft team that brought us close-ups of Pluto will ring in the new year by exploring an even more distant and mysterious world. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1523: Through 'bridge symptoms' social anxiety can develop into depression, and vice versa

The study examined the relationships between symptoms of major depressive disorder and social anxiety disorder. Traditionally, shared symptoms haven't been viewed as interacting elements that can cause someone suffering from one disorder to develop the other. The researchers argue that symptoms of one disorder can act as "bridges" that lead to the other. The findings suggest that treatments for d


1524: Universal basic income had a rough 2018

Some of the biggest and most promising experiments were plagued by delays and shutdowns. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1525: The Surgical Singularity Is Approaching

AI-powered robots may soon be doing some procedures faster, more accurately and with fewer complications than humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1526: The Military Must Remain Apolitical

The surprise visit by President Trump to military personnel in Iraq and Germany the day after Christmas was a particularly welcome development, given his previous departure from this time-honored tradition of his predecessors around the holiday season. The visits were marred, however, by the president’s overtly political rhetoric, and by his encouragement of the small number of uniformed personne


1527: The Year the Gun Conversation Changed

The year was not a month old when a 16-year-old allegedly opened fire in a cafeteria in Italy, Texas, injuring one of his classmates on January 22nd. It was the first shooting on a K–12 campus this year. One day later, in Benton, Kentucky, a 15-year-old student allegedly killed two of his classmates and injured 17 others. Over the next three weeks, there were shootings at or near Lincoln High Sch (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1528: Artificial intelligence is mastering a wider variety of jobs than ever before

In 2018, AI bested humans at following fauna, diagnosing disease, mapping the moon and more. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1529: Indonesiens tsunami-varsling hænger i laser

Pengeproblemer i Indonesien har flere gange bremset de teknologier, der skulle forhindre katastrofer udløst af tsunamier. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1530: Researchers develop novel 3-D printing method for transparent glass

A novel additive manufacturing platform was used for the digital fabrication of transparent glass at industrial scale. The G3DP2 platform, developed by MIT scientists and used to turn molten glass into 3-meter tall columns, is described in an article published in 3-D Printing and Additive Manufacturing. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1531: Pine needles from old Christmas trees could be turned into paint and food sweeteners in the future

Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research by the University of Sheffield. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1532: Magnitude 4.9 aftershock strikes near site of Alaska quake

A magnitude 4.9 aftershock has shaken an area of south central Alaska near where a powerful temblor jolted the region last month. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1533: Lighter load: Laundry detergents shrink for Amazon

Amazon's rise is forcing laundry detergents to shrink. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1534: The enduring legacy of Sigmund Freud, radical | Letters

Psychiatry professor Brendan Kelly , Peter Wilson , Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett , and Dr Ian Flintoff debate Suzanne Moore’s enthusiasm for the ideas of the father of psychoanalysis Suzanne Moore describes Sigmund Freud as “revolutionary” and says that he is now more relevant than Marx ( Forget Marx. Freud is the radical we need , 26 December). Moore is right: Freud was right and so, for th (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1535: FSU researchers unravel mystery of how, when DNA replicates

A team of Florida State University researchers has unlocked a decades old mystery about how a critical cellular process called DNA replication is regulated. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1536: Your brain rewards you twice per meal: When you eat and when food reaches your stomach

We know a good meal can stimulate the release of the feel-good hormone dopamine, and now a study in humans from the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research in Germany suggests that dopamine release in the brain occurs at two different times: at the time the food is first ingested and another once the food reaches the stomach. The work appears December 27 in the journal Cell Metabolism. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1537: Better mouse model built to enable precision-medicine research for Alzheimer's

Incorporating genetic diversity into a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease resulted in greater overlap with the genetic, molecular and clinical features of this pervasive human disease, according to a study funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1538: How scientists collect lava from an active volcano

Science It takes the right gear. Volcano researcher Jessica Johnson explains how she scoops up 1800°F lava—and what scientists can learn from it. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1539: 2019 Preview: AI to best humans at one of world’s most complex games

A team of AI bots were beaten at the video game Dota 2 by human players in June, but in 2019 they will return with a vengeance to become the world's best (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1540: 10 quotes to motivate you in 2019

Quotes can be good reminders that we're not alone in our struggles. The most powerful quotes remind us that while failure is not optional, how we treat it is. Fail well and learn from it, the most successful figures remind us again and again. None Good quotes are adrenaline shots, catalysts for perspective, reminders that as locked into our own thoughts as we sometimes become, others are walking


1541: Researchers unravel mystery of how, when DNA replicates

A team of Florida State University researchers has unlocked a decades-old mystery about how a critical cellular process is regulated and what that could mean for the future study of genetics. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1542: Historical genomes reveal recent changes in genetic health of eastern gorillas

The critically endangered Grauer's gorilla has recently lost genetic diversity and has experienced an increase in harmful mutations. These conclusions were reached by an international team of researchers who sequenced eleven genomes from eastern gorilla specimens collected up to 100 years ago, and compared these with genomes from present-day individuals. The results are now published in Current Bi (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1543: Simple Sugars Wipe Out Beneficial Gut Bugs

Fructose and sucrose can make it all the way to the colon, where they spell a sugary death sentence for beneficial bacteria. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1544: Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs — new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance

Researchers analyzing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA.Antibiotic-resistant superbugs could kill up to 1.3 million people in Europe by 2050, according to recent research. The World Health Organ (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1545: Five Times the Internet Was Actually Fun in 2018

There were lots of bad things online this year. Let’s celebrate some of the exceptions.


1546: Multicenter trial supports use of topical antibiotics in NICU babies

A team of doctors led by Karen L. Kotloff, M.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD), has performed a clinical trial involving multiple hospitals that tested the effectiveness of applying a topical antibiotic known as mupirocin for prevention of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infection in babies in the neonatal intensive care unit ( (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1547: Distinguishing between students who guess and those who know

Measuring the knowledge of students in online courses poses a number of challenges. Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Leuven made improvements to the model for assessing academic achievements and published their results in the journal Heliyon. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1548: New estimate of global human migration is much higher

Researchers have unveiled a new statistical method for estimating migration flows between countries, using the so-called pseudo-Bayes approach. They show that rates of migration—defined as an international move followed by a stay of at least one year—are higher than previously thought, but also relatively stable, fluctuating between 1.1 and 1.3 percent of global population from 1990 to 2015. In a (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1549: Toyota Wants to Put a Robot in Every Home and Make It Your Pal

(Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1550: The Biggest Science News of 2018

From disastrous scientific setbacks to the upending of scientific dogma and the end of a 40-year search for a protein (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1551: UK army tests eagle-inspired paragliding drone for delivering supplies

An autonomous paraglider inspired by nature could be help military supplies, such as food or trucks, and airlift people to safety (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1552: MIT researchers develop novel 3D printing method for transparent glass

A novel additive manufacturing platform was used for the digital fabrication of transparent glass at industrial scale. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1553: Genetic polymorphisms and zinc status

Zinc is an essential component for all living organisms, representing the second most abundant trace element, after iron. This element is widely distributed in the tissues of a human body where it is involved in normal growth, reproduction and several biological functions including immunity, energy metabolism and antioxidant processes. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1554: Phytochemistry, traditional uses and pharmacological profile of rose hip

The fruit of genus Rosa, known as 'rose hip,' is frequently used in different traditional medicines. Rose hips have long been used to treat kidney stones, gastroenteric ailments, hypertension and respiratory problems such as bronchitis, cough and cold. This review is focused on the ethnopharmacological uses of rose hip as well as phytochemical and pharmacological aspects. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1555: The Most-Read Security Stories of 2018

This year saw the most devastating cyberattack in history, a gang of teen hackers, and so much Mueller news.


1556: Expert tips: Stick to your New Year’s workout goals

Setting workout goals for the New Year? Increasing physical activity and aiming to improve your health are worthy goals, but can be challenging. To help you out, Brandon Alderman, an associate professor and vice chair of education and administration in the kinesiology and health department at Rutgers University, has some tips for setting realistic exercise goals that could also have a positive im (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1557: Weird winds to blame for Greenland’s huge water patch

A new analysis shows that odd winds, rather than simple global warming, were to blame for a vast expanse of open water that appeared in the sea ice above Greenland in February 2018. Although last winter did see unusually warm temperature spikes in the Arctic, researchers say the cause for the big pool of open water in the middle of the ice—known as a polynya—was strong surface winds triggered by (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1558: Does Weight-Loss Surgery Rewire Gut–Brain Connections?

Bariatric procedures are revealing new insights into the dialogue between bowel and brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1559: Your Christmas tree could help save the planet

Recycling your Christmas tree could help provide the materials needed to make food sweeteners and paint, as well as help cut greenhouse gas emissions.


1560: Understanding metabolic processes through machine learning

Bioinformatics researchers at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) are using machine learning techniques to better understand enzyme kinetics and thus also complex metabolic processes. The team led by first author Dr. David Heckmann has described its results in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1561: The landscape of protein tyrosine phosphatase (Shp2) and cancer

The current study was designed to focus on the allosteric regulation (autoinhibition) of the of Shp2 protein. Subsequently, it will cover the last 10-year recap of Shp2 protein, their role in cancer, and regulation in numerous ways (allosteric regulation). (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1562: Computational advances in the label-free quantification of cancer proteomics data

In this paper, the recent advances and development in the computational perspective of LFQ in cancer proteomics were systematically reviewed and analyzed. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1563: Silver nanowires promise more comfortable smart textiles

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from the Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications have developed a simple, scalable and low-cost capillary-driven self-assembly method to prepare flexible and stretchable conductive fibers that have applications in wearable electronics and smart fabrics. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1564: What President Trump Will Face in the New Year

The critical last layer of Donald Trump’s support in 2016 came from voters uncertain that he belonged in the White House. Now he appears determined to test how much chaos they will absorb before concluding they made the wrong decision. For all the talk about the solidity of Trump’s base, it’s easy to forget how many voters expressed ambivalence even as they selected him over Hillary Clinton. Full (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1565: The Disturbing Truth About Kevin Spacey’s ‘Let Me Be Frank’ Video

The video Kevin Spacey posted on Christmas Eve has been repeatedly described as “bizarre,” with good reason: No one knows what it means. Wearing a Santa apron and occasionally sipping from a mug, Spacey seems to inhabit his House of Cards character, Frank Underwood, drawling things such as, “We’re not done, no matter what anyone says.” The monologue hints at a desire to return to Cards , despite


1566: Nucleus-specific X-ray stain for 3-D virtual histology

Histology is used to identify structural details of tissue at the microscale in the pathology lab, but analyses remain two-dimensional (2D) as they are limited to the same plane. Nondestructive 3D technologies including X-ray micro and nano-computed tomography (nanoCT) have proven validity to understand anatomical structures, since they allow arbitrary viewing angles and 3D structural detail. Howe


1567: Alien Hunters, Stop Using the Drake Equation

For the precocious hunter of off-Earth life, the Drake equation is the ever-ready, go-to toolkit for estimating just how (not) lonely humans are in the Milky Way galaxy. But it's not useful. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1568: This Ship Sank Decades Ago. Now, a 3D Model Has Resurrected It.

A digital 3D reconstruction has recreated a ship that sank in 1995. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1569: Researchers monitor electron behavior during chemical reactions for the first time

In a recent publication in Science, researchers at the University of Paderborn and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin demonstrated their ability to observe electrons' movements during a chemical reaction. Researchers have long studied the atomic-scale processes that govern chemical reactions, but were never before able to observe electron motions as they happened. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1570: Coenzyme Q10 supplementation on metabolic profiles of patients with chronic kidney disease

This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were conducted to determine the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on metabolic profiles of patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD). (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1571: Impact of a psycho-educational team in early breast cancer patients' coping strategies

The main purpose of the psycho-educational groups was to help women with breast cancer, learn how to cope with the physical, emotional, and lifestyle changes associated with cancer as well as with medical treatments that can be painful and traumatic. With this study, the researchers wanted to detect the effects that group action had on the women who participated in it. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1572: Long-term memory encoding engram neurons are established by the transcriptional cycling

Long-term memory (LTM) is formed by repetitive training trials with rest intervals and LTM formation requires transcription factors, including CREB and c-Fos. Miyashita et al. found that ERK activity is increased during rest intervals to induce transcriptional cycling between c-Fos and CREB in a subset of mushroom body neurons. Significantly, LTM is encoded in these mushroom body neurons, and bloc (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1573: Vitamin D intake and obesity in occupational asthma patients and need for supplementation

The research was conducted to assess the vitamin D intake in occupational asthma patients and the relation with body mass index, comorbidities related to vitamin D deficit, lung function and quality of life. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1574: Endothelial regenerative capacity and aging: Influence of diet, exercise and obesity

This review will discuss the effects of advancing age on endothelial health and vascular regenerative capacity, as well as the influence of diet, exercise, and obesity on these cells, the mechanistic links and the subsequent impact on cardiovascular health. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1575: Synodos does it again: Breaking barriers to solve the 'impossible' problems

Treatment for low-grade gliomas in patients living with neurofibromatosis type 1 are now one step closer thanks to recent research discoveries initiated and funded by the Children's Tumor Foundation. The Foundation's SYNODOS consortium has just recently been published in Nature Medicine, showing that immunotherapy has the potential to impact gliomas. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1576: Treatment of Parkinson's disease: Separating hope from hype

This review emphasized the development of various non-pharmaceutical therapeutic approaches and mainly highlighted the cutting-edge treatments for PD including gene- and stem cell-based therapies, targeted delivery of neurotrophic factors, and brain stimulation techniques such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), and Deep Brain Stimulation (DB (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1577: New study shows link between secondhand smoke and cardiac arrhythmia

Continuous indoor exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke triggers changes in the heart's electrical activity, known as cardiac alternans, that can predict cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death, a new study from UC Davis Health researchers shows. The authors believe the study, conducted in mice, suggests that secondhand smoke exposure alters cells that regulate how the heart beats. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1578: How the brain enables us to rapidly focus attention

University of Queensland researchers have discovered a key mechanism in the brain that may underlie our ability to rapidly focus attention.Our brains are continuously bombarded with information from the senses, yet our level of vigilance to such input varies, allowing us to selectively focus on one conversation and not another. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1579: The Meme-ification of Asianness

Early every Sunday growing up in Australia, Anne Gu attended Chinese school, the weekend classes where many children of Chinese immigrants learn Mandarin. There, she bonded with her classmates over their shared sense of obligation. “We understood we had to be there because of our culture, our parents,” Gu said, “while our other friends were sleeping in.” They kept in touch via group chat, exchang


1580: Man Gets Black Widow Spider Bite. Then He Can't Pee.

There's a whole range of reasons you don't want to be bitten by a black widow spider, but you probably wouldn't think that losing the ability to pee is one of them.


1581: What really happens at femtosecond junctions?

When beams of ultra-short laser pulses running in the same direction intersect with each other at a noticeable angle, various interactions occur between the pulses. These physical phenomena are complicated, and their mathematical description becomes computationally complex. To carry out the appropriate simulations, entire computer clusters have to be engaged. The latest version of Hussar software (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1582: New source of very high energy gamma-ray emission detected in the neighborhood of the supernova remnant G24.7+0.6

Using MAGIC telescopes and NASA's Fermi spacecraft, an international team of astronomers has discovered a new source of very high energy gamma-ray emission around the supernova remnant (SNR) G24.7+0.6. The detection of the new source, designated MAGIC J1835–069, is detailed in a paper published December 12 on the arXiv pre-print server.


1583: Quiz of the year: Test your knowledge of 2018’s science stories

What is the punk turtle’s secret power? Or the US Navy’s newest secret weapon? Find out how well you’ve been paying attention with our fun festive quiz (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1584: The 10 Biggest Archaeology Stories of 2018

Here's a look back at the fascinating things archaeologists uncovered this year. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1585: 18 Times Quantum Particles Blew Our Minds in 2018

These are all the biggest, most shocking quantum discoveries we covered in 2018. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1586: 10 Strangest Medical Cases of 2018

Here are the most intriguing medical cases made headlines in 2018 (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1587: For 2019, smartwatches are sleeker, slicker and getting more affordable

A friend recently looked at the smartwatch on my wrist and said, "Why are you wearing that?" He held up his cellphone. "This can do everything that can do." (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1588: The Streaming Wars Began in 2018—and They'll Only Get Worse

From Marvel cancellations to 'Friends' scares, this year was just the beginning of a long, grueling siege.


1589: Your Voice Assistant May Be Getting Smarter, But It's Still Awkward

The more smart devices that sell, the more compelling the AI technology becomes. But the virtual assistants inside still stumble.


1590: What Can Baboon Relationships Tell Us about Human Health?

Strong relationships seem to help baboons overcome early life adversity, and that could have big implications for human health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1591: To spot anemia, app uses fingernail pics

Biomedical engineers have developed a smartphone app for the noninvasive detection of anemia. Instead of a blood test, the app uses photos of someone’s fingernails taken on a smartphone to determine whether the level of hemoglobin in their blood seems low. “All other ‘point-of-care’ anemia detection tools require external equipment, and represent trade-offs between invasiveness, cost, and accurac (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1592: Huawei expects 21% revenue rise despite 'unfair' treatment

Chinese telecoms giant Huawei expects to see a 21 percent rise in revenue for 2018, its chairman said Thursday despite a year of "unfair treatment" which saw its products banned in several countries over security concerns. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1593: Amazon, Walmart face hit from new India e-commerce rules

Traditional traders and local players rejoiced Thursday at new e-commerce rules imposed by the Indian government on global giants such as Amazon and Walmart which analysts said could force them to rethink their Indian operations. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1594: Wake-up timer saves power for I.o.T. sensors

Researchers have created a low-cost, “battery-less” wake-up timer—in the form of an on-chip circuit—that significantly reduces the power consumption of silicon chips for Internet of Things (IoT) sensor nodes. The wake-up timer can cut power consumption down to true picoWatt range (one billion times lower than a smartwatch). “We have developed a novel wake-up timer that operates in the picoWatt ra (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1595: When School Choice Means School’s Choice

Children should have equal access to a high-quality education. It’s a popular talking point among both the left and the right because it’s non-objectionable—yet it’s far from the reality of American primary and secondary education. As the landmark Reagan-administration report, A Nation at Risk, put it 35 years ago , “If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre e


1596: Leave No Trace Shows How to Critique Society—Without Demonizing an Entire System

Over the next month, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy moment. Next up is Debra Granik’s Leave No Trace . (Read our previous entries here .) The most impressive thing about Leave No Trace is that the enemy of the film is not the government. Yes, Debra Granik’s story is about a father, Will (Ben Fost


1597: Looking for Solar Panels on Distant Planets

What are the aliens thinking? That’s always been a problem for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence ( SETI ). Until recently, SETI ’s focus has been on alien “beacons,” signals that somebody somewhere intentionally beamed into space. But this traditional method involves making informed guesses about what the aliens were thinking when they built their beacons, and those guesses may turn ou (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1598: Sønderjyder går sammen for at forhindre datacentre i at fyre for fuglene

Fire sønderjyske kommuner opretter fælles energisekretariat, der skal rådgive om, hvordan de bedst udnytter spildvarmen fra datacentre og etablerer store varmepumper.


1599: Dream on: My year pursuing the third state of being

Dreaming can bring extraordinary ideas – if you can remember them. The 3rd article of our 12 Days of Culture explores the weird world of hypnagogic dreaming (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1600: Don't Fear the Robot Overlords—Embrace Them as Coworkers

In factories across the world, machines are beginning to work more intimately with humans without sending them to the unemployment line—or the grave.


1601: Naturopaths cannot call themselves “Medically Trained” in New Brunswick

A judge in the Canadian province of New Brunswick has ruled that alternative-to-medicine practitioners knows as naturopaths cannot claim that they are "medically trained" or that they offer "family practice".


1602: Surprising Changes Will Affect Biodiversity in 2019

Experts reveal 15 emerging trends that will significantly influence plants, animals and ecosystems—for better and worse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1603: Instagram’s Christmas Crackdown

Gabe Kenworthy, a 22-year-old freelance content manager for some of Instagram’s most notorious meme pages, was up at 2 o’clock on Christmas morning. He was sitting on his parents’ couch searching for heartwarming holiday content to post when he realized something was wrong. Just after he sent his boss some memes for approval, Kenworthy’s phone exploded with texts. The owner of a network of meme p


1604: Googles pakkedroner på vej til Helsinki

Google-ejeren Alphabet lancerer en pakkedrone-tjeneste i Finland under navnet Wing. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1605: Quiz: What were these six bamboozling inventions designed to do?

Can you tell a guillotine calibrator from a combustion-powered clock? A Victorian roller skate from a laser roulette wheel? Take our antiques quiz to find out


1606: The biggest technology failures of 2018

From gene-edited babies to guaranteed-fatal brain uploads, it was a bumper year for technology misfires and misuses.


1607: Is Smart Technology Making Us Dumb?

Yes and no: there are reasonable arguments on both sides of the question — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1608: The Terrible Joy of Yelling at an Amazon Echo

Life is stressful. And Amazon's voice assistant Alexa is a very convenient scapegoat.


1609: Pan Am Flight 103: Robert Mueller’s 30-Year Search for Justice

In December 1988 a bomb downed a Pan Am jet, leaving 270 dead. It was the first mass killing of Americans by terrorists. As the head of the Justice Department’s criminal division, Robert Mueller oversaw the case. And for him, it was personal.


1610: Privacy Law Showdown Between Congress and Tech Looms in 2019

Lawmakers spend the better part of 2018 talking tough to tech companies. Now the pressure is on for Congress to act.


1611: In 1993 my agency warned of climate change. In 1995 it was abolished | William Westermeyer

The US Office of Technology Assessment should be revived – in 2019 the world will need its expertise more than ever Many agree that one of the most pressing problems the world faces today is climate change. The question of what to do about it, however, has become highly politicised. Scepticism about climate change is typically a conservative position and trust in the conclusions of the scientific


1612: The Next Climate Frontier: Predicting a Complex Domino Effect

Motivated by events like Hurricane Harvey, researchers are trying to determine how climate change interacts with agriculture, energy, transportation and other human systems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1613: Indviklet problem: Videnskaben kan hjælpe dig med drilske lyskæder

Det kommer altid bag på dig, når du åbner kassen med lyskæder. Et stort rod. Men der er en videnskabelig forklaring på, hvorfor det sker, og på hvordan du skal pakke den sammen. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1614: After Pluto, New Horizons mission nears an object 'beyond the known world'

Three and a half years after giving humanity its first close-up view of Pluto, and almost 13 years after launching from Earth, the New Horizons spacecraft will explore another new frontier: a reddish hunk of rock and ice known as Ultima Thule. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1615: How to set up your new phone for iOS and Android—and get used to Apple's X series iPhones

Perhaps you have been using one of the older iPhone models, like a 6, 7 or 8, and just found yourself with a shiny new iPhone XR or XS model, minus the home button and plus new security system and features. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1616: Why Fans of Elena Ferrante Should Watch The Best of Youth

When fans of My Brilliant Friend have finished the first season of HBO’s acclaimed television adaptation, they may find themselves looking to fill a void . The eight-episode series, which aired its finale earlier this month, followed the lives of Lenù and Lila, two girls growing up in a poor neighborhood in Naples in the mid-20th century. Their thorny, intense friendship—which Elena Ferrante’s wi (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1617: Affirmative Action Shouldn’t Be About Diversity

I was a 16-year-old student at the Bronx High School of Science, scribbling Concrete Blonde lyrics at my desk, when my English teacher abruptly called on me, without a heads-up or any preparation, to explain my thoughts on the word nigger in Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn . Truth be told, I didn’t have an opinion, at least not a sophisticated, nuanced one, because I was a teenager re


1618: Om igen: Klagenævn bremser havmøllepark tæt på den jyske vestkyst

Miljøgodkendelsen omtalte et 'letopfatteligt, geometrisk mønster', men Vattenfall vil sætte vindmøller ved Holmsland Klit på en 15 km lang række. Den går ikke, men kræver et tillæg til miljøgodkendelsen, har Energiklagenævnet bestemt. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1619: Gadgets: Mixcder E7 active noise-canceling headphones, great escape

When you look at the Mixcder E7 active noise-canceling headphones, they appear fancy and expensive. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1620: How religion turned American politics into a bizarre anti-science spectacle

In the last 30 years, religion has radicalized American politics and seriously harmed the perception of science, says journalist and author Kurt Andersen. This can be directly tied to the rise of the Christian Right in the 20th century. To see this, you only have to look at the response to the same question posed to Republican presidential candidates over three election cycles, from 2008 to 2016: (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1621: Salk scientists find genetic signatures of biological aging

Some people appear to be considerably younger or older than their chronological age. Genetic signatures that may help explain this have been discovered by scientists at the Salk Institute. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1622: Hello, Alexa. Hey, Google: Getting your smart speaker up and running

If you just got a new smart speaker from Amazon or Google, you'll be barking commands out loud, and people around you may wonder what's going on. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1623: Drænrør banket ned i sandet ved Skagen: Orbicon bestyrer omstridt forsøg

Miljøministeriet har uden om Kystdirektoratet hyret et rådgiverfirma til på ny at teste opfinder Poul Jakobsens teknik til at sikre Vestkysten mod erosion.


1624: 50 years ago, astronauts orbited the moon for the first time

Apollo 8 launched on December 21, 1968, with three astronauts on board, making 10 revolutions around the moon — the first manned lunar orbits.


1625: NEC to buy Danish IT firm KMD for $1.2 billion

Japan's NEC said Thursday that it would buy Denmark's largest IT firm KMD for $1.2 billion as part of its effort to expand its European and global businesses. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1626: Britain voices 'grave' concerns over China's Huawei

British Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson has warned of his "very deep concerns" about Chinese technology giant Huawei being involved in the use of 5G on Britain's mobile network, The Times reported Thursday. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1627: London's Gatwick airport sold to French Vinci conglomerate (Update)

French conglomerate Vinci said Thursday it had bought control of Gatwick airport, Britain's second-busiest, for nearly three billion pounds only months before Brexit. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1628: Indian firefighters battle air pollution in New Delhi

Indian authorities have ordered firefighters in the capital to sprinkle water from high-rise buildings to settle dust and stop garbage fires and have banned construction activity as hazardous air quality affects millions of people. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1629: Den danske it-sværvægter KMD solgt for otte milliarder kroner til japansk selskab

Den japanske teknologigigant NEC køber den danske softwarevirksomhed af kapitalfond. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1630: Et turbulent år, hvor Sundhedsplatformen bed sig fast

PLUS. To ting står klart efter endnu et år, hvor Sundhedsplatformen er blevet beskudt fra alle sider: Kritikken har været berettiget – og systemet er kommet for at blive (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1631: Indonesia widens danger zone around island volcano

Indonesia raised the danger level for an island volcano that triggered a tsunami on the weekend, killing at least 430 people in Sumatra and Java, and widened its no-go zone. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1632: Fake moon landings and a flat Earth: why do athletes love conspiracy theories?

Sports stars as varied as Stephen Curry and Andrew Flintoff have flirted with conspiracy theories. But they are guided by very human emotions With Christmas Day just gone, it seems fitting that Steph Curry already has something he’d probably like to take back. Two weeks ago, the Golden State Warriors star gave the 24-hour news cycle an incredible gift during an appearance on The Ringer’s Winging


1633: Climate change: Huge costs of warming impacts in 2018

Ten weather events linked to climate change caused damage over $1bn in 2018, according to a study.


1634: Don’t miss January’s super moon blood moon lunar eclipse

(Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1635: Her er årets læserhits på ing.dk

Et bilkarosseri med funktion som et batteri, liftoff for raketten Falcon Heavy, en kritisk ADAC-undersøgelse af elbilers miljøvenlighed og nye super-elcykler på de danske cykelstier er arets absolutte tophits på ing.dk. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1636: Forsvarets it-sikkerhedsrådgiver forsømmer mail-beskyttelse

Mens Center for Cybersikkerhed under FET anbefaler DMARC-teknologien til at forhindre mail-phishing, har organisationen ikke beskyttet alle sine egne domæner. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1637: Klimaguide i 10 trin: Katastrofen kom kun tættere på i 2018

Har du svært ved at hitte ud af, hvordan det faktisk går med klimaet? DR Viden leverer en hjælpende hånd til forståelsen af klimaudfordringerne lige nu.


1638: Smarter Pricing Could Ease Parking Frustration

A new algorithm raises parking rates in busy neighborhoods and lowers them elsewhere, guaranteeing free parking spots regardless of location. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1639: Biokemisk gennembrud kan føre til nye dufte, smagsstoffer og medicin

Forskere fra bl.a. Københavns Universitet har fundet ud af, hvordan man manipulerer med vigtige kulstofforbindelser. Det kan bringe nye smagsindtryk til såvel mad som tandpasta.


1640: The best science long reads of 2018 (part one)

A selection of the best science and environment published this year.


1641: Sugar hampers gut bacteria linked to leanness

Sugar can silence a key protein required for colonization by a gut bacterium associated with lean and healthy individuals, according to a new study with mice. The gut microbiota plays a key role in human health, and its composition is associated with diet. Until recently, scientists believed that sugar absorbed into the intestine and never reached the gut. However, recent studies have shown sugar (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1642: 3-week-old elephant dies at Ohio zoo after sudden illness

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium says an elephant born three weeks ago has died. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1643: Hungry bacterial colonies swirl to suck up nutrients

Individual bacteria and biofilms can generate currents strong enough to draw distant nutrients, according to new research. Under threat of being scrubbed away with disinfectant, individual bacteria can improve their odds of survival by joining together to form colonies, called biofilms. What Arnold Mathijssen, postdoctoral fellow in bioengineering at Stanford University, wanted to understand was (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1644: Bad moods might be a sign of health trouble

Negative mood—such as sadness and anger—is associated with higher levels of inflammation and may be a signal of poor health, report researchers. The investigators found that negative mood measured multiple times a day over time is associated with higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. This extends prior research showing that clinical depression and hostility are associated with higher inflamma


1645: Plastic bag fee 'to double to 10p' and include every shop

The government wants to double the charge and extend it to all shops in England, to cut plastic use.


1646: The Atlantic Daily: The History of 2018

Dear Daily readers: This waning week of 2018 has been a maelstrom all its own. President Donald Trump landed in Iraq to visit U.S. troops stationed there. The avenues to asylum for migrant children arriving at the U.S. southern border continue to narrow. The U.S.-government shutdown continues, while markets swing down and up. An overnight tsunami has killed hundreds in Indonesia —the second major


1647: American adventurer completes solo trek across Antarctica (Update)

An American adventurer has become the first person to complete a solo trek across Antarctica without assistance of any kind. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1648: Sicily Is Shaken By Earthquake As Mount Etna Erupts Once Again

The volcano erupted two days ago, triggering 1,000 mostly small tremors. At least 10 people were injured and a number of buildings were damaged in Wednesday's quake. (Image credit: Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)


1649: For patients with kidney disease, genetic testing may soon be routine

DNA sequencing can be used to identify the underlying genetic cause of many rare types of chronic kidney disease, leading to better treatment, finds a new study from Columbia University. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1650: Yale experts treat severe, disfiguring sarcoidosis with novel therapy

An all-Yale team of researchers successfully treated a patient with disfiguring sarcoidosis, a chronic disease that can affect multiple organs, with a drug approved for rheumatoid arthritis. Successful treatment of two other patients with similarly severe disease suggests an effective treatment for an incurable, sometimes life-threatening illness is within reach, the scientists said.


1651: Kicking, yelling during sleep? Study finds risk factors for violent sleep disorder

Taking antidepressants for depression, having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety diagnosed by a doctor are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, according to a study published in the Dec. 26, 2018 , online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found me (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1652: The President Is Visiting Troops in Iraq. To What End?

Since Franklin D. Roosevelt secretly flew to Morocco to finalize Allied war plans with Winston Churchill and surprise American soldiers stationed in the country, American presidents have engaged in the well-worn tradition of meeting with troops in combat zones. Bill Clinton met with troops in the Balkans; George W. Bush and Barack Obama both visited troops in Iraq and Afghanistan; Bush spent Than


1653: What's Next For Tiny Satellites?

Two briefcase-sized satellites gave the control room of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in November what scientists had never been able to get before: real-time information about a spacecraft's landing. (Image credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)


1654: Confronting the side effects of a common anti-cancer treatment

Results of a new study by neuroscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that a new treatment approach is needed — and how this may be possible — to address adverse effects of aromatase inhibitors, drugs commonly prescribed to both men and women to prevent recurrence of estrogen-positive breast cancer. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1655: Tech addicts' seek solace in 12 steps and rehab

The young men sit in chairs in a circle in a small meeting room in suburban Seattle and introduce themselves before they speak. It is much like any other 12-step meeting—but with a twist. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1656: Tiny salamanders could complicate Shasta Dam project

A trio of salamander species in Northern California could complicate a controversial $1.4 billion public works project to heighten the Shasta Dam, the state's largest reservoir. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1657: Acknowledgment of Reviewers, 2018 [Reviewer Acknowledgment]

The PNAS editors would like to thank all the individuals who dedicated their considerable time and expertise to the journal by serving as reviewers in 2018. Their generous contribution is deeply appreciated. A Lars Aagaard Stuart A. Aaronson Pierre Abad Alejandro Aballay Snezhana I. Abarzhi Maria Abascal Adam R. Abate… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1658: Role of HHV-6 subtypes in accelerating EAE progression [Biological Sciences]

We enthusiastically read the article in PNAS by Leibovitch et al. (1), in which they show that intranasal inoculations with human herpesvirus (HHV)-6A and HHV-6B accelerate the onset and severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). They performed an outstanding job in utilizing marmosets to mimic the multiple sclerosis (MS)-like symptoms… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1659: Unraveling the blue paradox: Incomplete analysis yields incorrect conclusions about Phoenix Islands Protected Area closure [Social Sciences]

In PNAS, McDermott et al. (1) analyze a 2014–2016 central Pacific fishing surge, focusing on the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA) inside the Kiribati exclusive economic zone (EEZ). The authors incorrectly attribute the surge to the anticipated industrial fishing closure of PIPA and describe the phenomenon as a blue paradox… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1660: Reply to Hanich et al.: Alternate explanations for the blue paradox do not withstand statistical scrutiny [Social Sciences]

A primary goal of McDermott et al. (1) was to stimulate discussion of the “blue paradox” among proponents of marine reserves. We welcome the chance to engage with conservation experts and are grateful for the commentary provided by Hanich et al. (2). However, we are unconvinced by their arguments. Hanich… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1661: Reply to Zahednasab et al.: HHV-6 and marmoset EAE [Biological Sciences]

We thank Zahednasab et al. (1) for their enthusiastic support of our paper (2) and insightful comments. We wholeheartedly agree that additional studies are needed to more fully elucidate mechanisms underlying the association of HHV-6 and other viruses with neuroinflammatory pathologies like multiple sclerosis (MS). The authors correctly note that… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1662: Climate network percolation reveals the expansion and weakening of the tropical component under global warming [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Global climate warming poses a significant challenge to humanity; it is associated with, e.g., rising sea level and declining Arctic sea ice. Increasing extreme events are also considered to be a result of climate warming, and they may have widespread and diverse effects on health, agriculture, economics, and political conflicts…. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1663: Robust forecast aggregation [Economic Sciences]

Bayesian experts who are exposed to different evidence often make contradictory probabilistic forecasts. An aggregator, ignorant of the underlying model, uses this to calculate his or her own forecast. We use the notions of scoring rules and regret to propose a natural way to evaluate an aggregation scheme. We focus… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1664: Right temporal alpha oscillations as a neural mechanism for inhibiting obvious associations [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Creative cognition requires mental exploration of remotely connected concepts while suppressing dominant ones. Across four experiments using different samples of participants, we provide evidence that right temporal alpha oscillations play a crucial role in inhibiting habitual thinking modes, thereby paving the way for accessing more remote ideas. In the first… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1665: High-capacity preconscious processing in concurrent groupings of colored dots [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Grouping is a perceptual process in which a subset of stimulus components (a group) is selected for a subsequent—typically implicit—perceptual computation. Grouping is a critical precursor to segmenting objects from the background and ultimately to object recognition. Here, we study grouping by color. We present subjects with 300-ms exposures of… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1666: Dominance rank-associated gene expression is widespread, sex-specific, and a precursor to high social status in wild male baboons [Anthropology]

In humans and other hierarchical species, social status is tightly linked to variation in health and fitness-related traits. Experimental manipulations of social status in female rhesus macaques suggest that this relationship is partially explained by status effects on immune gene regulation. However, social hierarchies are established and maintained in different… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1667: Electrostatics, proton sensor, and networks governing the gating transition in GLIC, a proton-gated pentameric ion channel [Biochemistry]

The pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) has provided insightful structure–function views on the permeation process and the allosteric regulation of the pLGICs family. However, GLIC is activated by pH instead of a neurotransmitter and a clear picture for the gating transition driven by protons is still… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1668: Effective design principles for leakless strand displacement systems [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Artificially designed molecular systems with programmable behaviors have become a valuable tool in chemistry, biology, material science, and medicine. Although information processing in biological regulatory pathways is remarkably robust to error, it remains a challenge to design molecular systems that are similarly robust. With functionality determined entirely by secondary structure… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1669: Exploiting correlated molecular-dynamics networks to counteract enzyme activity-stability trade-off [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The directed evolution of enzymes for improved activity or substrate specificity commonly leads to a trade-off in stability. We have identified an activity–stability trade-off and a loss in unfolding cooperativity for a variant (3M) of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK) engineered to accept aromatic substrates. Molecular dynamics simulations of 3M revealed… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1670: Eigenvector centrality for characterization of protein allosteric pathways [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Determining the principal energy-transfer pathways responsible for allosteric communication in biomolecules remains challenging, partially due to the intrinsic complexity of the systems and the lack of effective characterization methods. In this work, we introduce the eigenvector centrality metric based on mutual information to elucidate allosteric mechanisms that regulate enzymatic activity…. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1671: Molecular basis for the acid-initiated uncoating of human enterovirus D68 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) belongs to a group of enteroviruses that contain a single positive-sense RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral capsid. Like common cold viruses, EV-D68 mainly causes respiratory infections and is acid-labile. The molecular mechanism by which the acid-sensitive EV-D68 virions uncoat and deliver their genome into a host… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1672: Structural-functional interactions of NS1-BP protein with the splicing and mRNA export machineries for viral and host gene expression [Cell Biology]

The influenza virulence factor NS1 protein interacts with the cellular NS1-BP protein to promote splicing and nuclear export of the viral M mRNAs. The viral M1 mRNA encodes the M1 matrix protein and is alternatively spliced into the M2 mRNA, which is translated into the M2 ion channel. These proteins… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1673: SREBP-1a-stimulated lipid synthesis is required for macrophage phagocytosis downstream of TLR4-directed mTORC1 [Cell Biology]

There is a growing appreciation for a fundamental connection between lipid metabolism and the immune response. Macrophage phagocytosis is a signature innate immune response to pathogen exposure, and cytoplasmic membrane expansion is required to engulf the phagocytic target. The sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcriptional regulatory proteins… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1674: Mitotic antipairing of homologous and sex chromosomes via spatial restriction of two haploid sets [Cell Biology]

Pairing homologous chromosomes is required for recombination. However, in nonmeiotic stages it can lead to detrimental consequences, such as allelic misregulation and genome instability, and is rare in human somatic cells. How mitotic recombination is prevented—and how genetic stability is maintained across daughter cells—is a fundamental, unanswered question. Here, we… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1675: Profiling proliferative cells and their progeny in damaged murine hearts [Cell Biology]

The significance of cardiac stem cell (CSC) populations for cardiac regeneration remains disputed. Here, we apply the most direct definition of stem cell function (the ability to replace lost tissue through cell division) to interrogate the existence of CSCs. By single-cell mRNA sequencing and genetic lineage tracing using two Ki67… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1676: TANGO1 and SEC12 are copackaged with procollagen I to facilitate the generation of large COPII carriers [Cell Biology]

Large coat protein complex II (COPII)-coated vesicles serve to convey the large cargo procollagen I (PC1) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The link between large cargo in the lumen of the ER and modulation of the COPII machinery remains unresolved. TANGO1 is required for PC secretion and interacts with PC… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1677: Steroidogenic differentiation and PKA signaling are programmed by histone methyltransferase EZH2 in the adrenal cortex [Developmental Biology]

Adrenal cortex steroids are essential for body homeostasis, and adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening condition. Adrenal endocrine activity is maintained through recruitment of subcapsular progenitor cells that follow a unidirectional differentiation path from zona glomerulosa to zona fasciculata (zF). Here, we show that this unidirectionality is ensured by the histone… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1678: Different iron storage strategies among bloom-forming diatoms [Environmental Sciences]

Diatoms are prominent eukaryotic phytoplankton despite being limited by the micronutrient iron in vast expanses of the ocean. As iron inputs are often sporadic, diatoms have evolved mechanisms such as the ability to store iron that enable them to bloom when iron is resupplied and then persist when low iron… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1679: Apurinic endonuclease-1 preserves neural genome integrity to maintain homeostasis and thermoregulation and prevent brain tumors [Genetics]

Frequent oxidative modification of the neural genome is a by-product of the high oxygen consumption of the nervous system. Rapid correction of oxidative DNA lesions is essential, as genome stability is a paramount determinant of neural homeostasis. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1; also known as “APEX1” or “REF1”) is a key… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1680: RNA-mediated gene fusion in mammalian cells [Genetics]

One of the hallmarks of cancer is the formation of oncogenic fusion genes as a result of chromosomal translocations. Fusion genes are presumed to form before fusion RNA expression. However, studies have reported the presence of fusion RNAs in individuals who were negative for chromosomal translocations. These observations give rise… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1681: Nuclear receptor HNF4A transrepresses CLOCK:BMAL1 and modulates tissue-specific circadian networks [Genetics]

Either expression level or transcriptional activity of various nuclear receptors (NRs) have been demonstrated to be under circadian control. With a few exceptions, little is known about the roles of NRs as direct regulators of the circadian circuitry. Here we show that the nuclear receptor HNF4A strongly transrepresses the transcriptional… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1682: Protein kinase p38{alpha} signaling in dendritic cells regulates colon inflammation and tumorigenesis [Immunology and Inflammation]

Dendritic cells (DCs) play pivotal roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but how the DCs regulate diverse immune networks on homeostasis breakdown remains largely unknown. Here, we report that, in response to epithelial barrier disruption, colonic DCs regulate the differentiation of type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells through p38α-dependent IL-27 production… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1683: Autoimmunity to hypocretin and molecular mimicry to flu in type 1 narcolepsy [Immunology and Inflammation]

Type 1 narcolepsy (T1N) is caused by hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neuronal loss. Association with the HLA DQB1*06:02/DQA1*01:02 (98% vs. 25%) heterodimer (DQ0602), T cell receptors (TCR) and other immune loci suggest autoimmunity but autoantigens are unknown. Onset is seasonal and associated with influenza A, notably pandemic 2009 H1N1 (pH1N1) infection and… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1684: Nanotechnology-mediated crossing of two impermeable membranes to modulate the stars of the neurovascular unit for neuroprotection [Medical Sciences]

The success of nanoparticle-mediated delivery of antioxidant and antiinflammatory-based neuroprotectants to the brain to improve neuronal functions in neurodegenerative diseases has demonstrated lesser impact instead of achieving its full potential. We hypothesized that these failures were due to a combination of parameters, such as: (i) unavailability of a delivery vehicle,… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1685: DeltaNp63-dependent super enhancers define molecular identity in pancreatic cancer by an interconnected transcription factor network [Medical Sciences]

Molecular subtyping of cancer offers tremendous promise for the optimization of a precision oncology approach to anticancer therapy. Recent advances in pancreatic cancer research uncovered various molecular subtypes with tumors expressing a squamous/basal-like gene expression signature displaying a worse prognosis. Through unbiased epigenome mapping, we identified deltaNp63 as a major… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1686: Integrating host response and unbiased microbe detection for lower respiratory tract infection diagnosis in critically ill adults [Medical Sciences]

Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) lead to more deaths each year than any other infectious disease category. Despite this, etiologic LRTI pathogens are infrequently identified due to limitations of existing microbiologic tests. In critically ill patients, noninfectious inflammatory syndromes resembling LRTIs further complicate diagnosis. To address the need for improved… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1687: Virus-inclusive single-cell RNA sequencing reveals the molecular signature of progression to severe dengue [Medical Sciences]

Dengue virus (DENV) infection can result in severe complications. However, the understanding of the molecular correlates of severity is limited, partly due to difficulties in defining the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that contain DENV RNA in vivo. Accordingly, there are currently no biomarkers predictive of progression to severe dengue… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1688: Human cytomegalovirus US21 protein is a viroporin that modulates calcium homeostasis and protects cells against apoptosis [Microbiology]

The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 gene family comprises a set of 10 contiguous genes (US12 to US21) with emerging roles in the regulation of virus cell tropism, virion composition, and immunoevasion. Of all of the US12 gene products, pUS21 shows the highest level of identity with two cellular transmembrane BAX… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1689: Phototaxis in a wild isolate of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus [Microbiology]

Many cyanobacteria, which use light as an energy source via photosynthesis, have evolved the ability to guide their movement toward or away from a light source. This process, termed “phototaxis,” enables organisms to localize in optimal light environments for improved growth and fitness. Mechanisms of phototaxis have been studied in… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1690: Translational switching of Cry1 protein expression confers reversible control of circadian behavior in arrhythmic Cry-deficient mice [Neuroscience]

The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal circadian clock of mammals, coordinating daily rhythms of physiology and behavior. Circadian timing pivots around self-sustaining transcriptional–translational negative feedback loops (TTFLs), whereby CLOCK and BMAL1 drive the expression of the negative regulators Period and Cryptochrome (Cry). Global deletion of Cry1 and Cry2 disables… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1691: Ventral striatum’s role in learning from gains and losses [Neuroscience]

Adaptive behavior requires animals to learn from experience. Ideally, learning should both promote choices that lead to rewards and reduce choices that lead to losses. Because the ventral striatum (VS) contains neurons that respond to aversive stimuli and aversive stimuli can drive dopamine release in the VS, it is possible… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1692: MTSS1/Src family kinase dysregulation underlies multiple inherited ataxias [Neuroscience]

The genetically heterogeneous spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are caused by Purkinje neuron dysfunction and degeneration, but their underlying pathological mechanisms remain elusive. The Src family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (SFK) are essential for nervous system homeostasis and are increasingly implicated in degenerative disease. Here we reveal that the SFK suppressor Missing-in-metastasis… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1693: Epigenetic regulator UHRF1 inactivates REST and growth suppressor gene expression via DNA methylation to promote axon regeneration [Neuroscience]

Injured peripheral sensory neurons switch to a regenerative state after axon injury, which requires transcriptional and epigenetic changes. However, the roles and mechanisms of gene inactivation after injury are poorly understood. Here, we show that DNA methylation, which generally leads to gene silencing, is required for robust axon regeneration after… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1694: Spatiotemporal activation of the C/EBP{beta}/{delta}-secretase axis regulates the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease [Neuroscience]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathological hallmarks include senile plaques with aggregated amyloid beta as a major component, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) containing truncated and hyperphosphorylated Tau, extensive neuronal loss, and chronic neuroinflammation. However, the key molecular mechanism that dominates the pathogenesis of AD remains elusive for AD. Here we show that the… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1695: Transgenerational hypocortisolism and behavioral disruption are induced by the antidepressant fluoxetine in male zebrafish Danio rerio [Physiology]

The global prevalence of depression is high during childbearing. Due to the associated risks to the mother and baby, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) is often the first line of treatment. Given that FLX readily crosses the placenta, a fetus may be susceptible to the disruptive effects of… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1696: Fluctuating selection on migrant adaptive sodium transporter alleles in coastal Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]

Stressors such as soil salinity and dehydration are major constraints on plant growth, causing worldwide crop losses. Compounding these insults, increasing climate volatility requires adaptation to fluctuating conditions. Salinity stress responses are relatively well understood in Arabidopsis thaliana, making this system suited for the rapid molecular dissection of evolutionary mechanisms…. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1697: SOG1 activator and MYB3R repressors regulate a complex DNA damage network in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

To combat DNA damage, organisms mount a DNA damage response (DDR) that results in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and, in severe cases, cell death. Underscoring the importance of gene regulation in this response, studies in Arabidopsis have demonstrated that all of the aforementioned processes rely on SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1698: Electrostatic effects, band distortions, and superconductivity in twisted graphene bilayers [Applied Physical Sciences]

Bilayer graphene twisted by a small angle shows a significant charge modulation away from neutrality, as the charge in the narrow bands near the Dirac point is mostly localized in a fraction of the Moiré unit cell. The resulting electrostatic potential leads to a filling-dependent change in the low-energy bands,… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1699: Yeast require redox switching in DNA primase [Biochemistry]

Eukaryotic DNA primases contain a [4Fe4S] cluster in the C-terminal domain of the p58 subunit (p58C) that affects substrate affinity but is not required for catalysis. We show that, in yeast primase, the cluster serves as a DNA-mediated redox switch governing DNA binding, just as in human primase. Despite a… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1700: Modulation of HIF-2{alpha} PAS-B domain contributes to physiological responses [Biochemistry]

Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcription factors in the basic helix–loop–helix PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) protein family that contain internal hydrophobic cavities within their PAS-A and PAS-B domains. Among HIFs, the HIF-2α PAS-B domain contains a relatively large cavity exploited for the development of specific artificial ligands such as PT2399. Administration of PT2399… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1701: Ubiquitin-dependent switch during assembly of the proteasomal ATPases mediated by Not4 ubiquitin ligase [Biochemistry]

In the proteasome holoenzyme, the hexameric ATPases (Rpt1-Rpt6) enable degradation of ubiquitinated proteins by unfolding and translocating them into the proteolytic core particle. During early-stage proteasome assembly, individual Rpt proteins assemble into the hexameric “Rpt ring” through binding to their cognate chaperones: Nas2, Hsm3, Nas6, and Rpn14. Here, we show… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1702: Integral feedback control is at the core of task allocation and resilience of insect societies [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Homeostatic self-regulation is a fundamental aspect of open dissipative systems. Integral feedback has been found to be important for homeostatic control on both the cellular and molecular levels of biological organization and in engineered systems. Analyzing the task allocation mechanisms of three insect societies, we identified a model of integral… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1703: Quantifying single-cell secretion in real time using resonant hyperspectral imaging [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cell communication is primarily regulated by secreted proteins, whose inhomogeneous secretion often indicates physiological disorder. Parallel monitoring of innate protein-secretion kinetics from individual cells is thus crucial to unravel systemic malfunctions. Here, we report a label-free, high-throughput method for parallel, in vitro, and real-time analysis of specific single-cell signaling usi (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1704: Cofactors are essential constituents of stable and seeding-active tau fibrils [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Amyloid fibrils are cross-β–rich aggregates that are exceptionally stable forms of protein assembly. Accumulation of tau amyloid fibrils is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Heparin-induced aggregates have been widely used and assumed to be a good tau amyloid fibril model for most biophysical studies. Here we… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1705: Combined molecular dynamics and neural network method for predicting protein antifreeze activity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a diverse class of proteins that depress the kinetically observable freezing point of water. AFPs have been of scientific interest for decades, but the lack of an accurate model for predicting AFP activity has hindered the logical design of novel antifreeze systems. To address this, we… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1706: MicroED structures of HIV-1 Gag CTD-SP1 reveal binding interactions with the maturation inhibitor bevirimat [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

HIV-1 protease (PR) cleavage of the Gag polyprotein triggers the assembly of mature, infectious particles. Final cleavage of Gag occurs at the junction helix between the capsid protein CA and the SP1 spacer peptide. Here we used MicroED to delineate the binding interactions of the maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) using… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1707: Crystal structure of the human NK1 tachykinin receptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The NK1 tachykinin G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) binds substance P, the first neuropeptide to be discovered in mammals. Through activation of NK1R, substance P modulates a wide variety of physiological and disease processes including nociception, inflammation, and depression. Human NK1R (hNK1R) modulators have shown promise in clinical trials for migraine, depression,… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1708: Cryo-EM structure of the native butyrylcholinesterase tetramer reveals a dimer of dimers stabilized by a superhelical assembly [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The quaternary structures of the cholinesterases, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), are essential for their localization and function. Of practical importance, BChE is a promising therapeutic candidate for intoxication by organophosphate nerve agents and insecticides, and for detoxification of addictive substances. Efficacy of the recombinant enzyme hinges on its having (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1709: Experimental accuracy in protein structure refinement via molecular dynamics simulations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Refinement is the last step in protein structure prediction pipelines to convert approximate homology models to experimental accuracy. Protocols based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have shown promise, but current methods are limited to moderate levels of consistent refinement. To explore the energy landscape between homology models and native structures… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1710: PCNA-mediated stabilization of E3 ligase RFWD3 at the replication fork is essential for DNA replication [Cell Biology]

RING finger and WD repeat domain-containing protein 3 (RFWD3) is an E3 ligase known to facilitate homologous recombination by removing replication protein A (RPA) and RAD51 from DNA damage sites. Further, RPA-mediated recruitment of RFWD3 to stalled replication forks is essential for interstrand cross-link repair. Here, we report that in… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1711: Trends and patterns in the contributions to cumulative radiative forcing from different regions of the world [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Different regions of the world have had different historical patterns of emissions of carbon dioxide, other greenhouse gases, and aerosols as well as different land-use changes. One can estimate the net cumulative contribution by each region to the global mean radiative forcing due to past greenhouse gas emissions, aerosol precursors,… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1712: Speleothem record of geomagnetic South Atlantic Anomaly recurrence [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The diminishing strength of the Earth’s magnetic dipole over recent millennia is accompanied by the increasing prominence of the geomagnetic South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), which spreads over the South Atlantic Ocean and South America. The longevity of this feature at millennial timescales is elusive because of the scarcity of continuous… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1713: Pliocene and Eocene provide best analogs for near-future climates [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

As the world warms due to rising greenhouse gas concentrations, the Earth system moves toward climate states without societal precedent, challenging adaptation. Past Earth system states offer possible model systems for the warming world of the coming decades. These include the climate states of the Early Eocene (ca. 50 Ma),… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1714: Pervasive iron limitation at subsurface chlorophyll maxima of the California Current [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Subsurface chlorophyll maximum layers (SCMLs) are nearly ubiquitous in stratified water columns and exist at horizontal scales ranging from the submesoscale to the extent of oligotrophic gyres. These layers of heightened chlorophyll and/or phytoplankton concentrations are generally thought to be a consequence of a balance between light energy from above… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1715: Bioenergy cropland expansion may offset positive effects of climate change mitigation for global vertebrate diversity [Ecology]

Climate and land-use change interactively affect biodiversity. Large-scale expansions of bioenergy have been suggested as an important component for climate change mitigation. Here we use harmonized climate and land-use projections to investigate their potential combined impacts on global vertebrate diversity under a low- and a high-level emission scenario. We combine… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1716: Continuous-range tunable multilayer frequency-selective surfaces using origami and inkjet printing [Engineering]

The tremendous increase in the number of components in typical electrical and communication modules requires low-cost, flexible and multifunctional sensing, energy harvesting, and communication modules that can readily reconfigure, depending on changes in their environment. Current subtractive manufacturing-based reconfigurable systems offer limited flexibility (limited finite number of discrete r (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1717: Termite mounds mitigate half of termite methane emissions [Environmental Sciences]

Termites are responsible for ∼1 to 3% of global methane (CH4) emissions. However, estimates of global termite CH4 emissions span two orders of magnitude, suggesting that fundamental knowledge of CH4 turnover processes in termite colonies is missing. In particular, there is little reliable information on the extent and location of… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1718: New insights into the evolution of wheat avenin-like proteins in wild emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccoides) [Evolution]

Fifteen full-length wheat grain avenin-like protein coding genes (TaALP) were identified on chromosome arms 7AS, 4AL, and 7DS of bread wheat with each containing five genes. Besides the a- and b-type ALPs, a c type was identified in the current paper. Both a and b types have two subunits, named… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1719: Inosine, but none of the 8-oxo-purines, is a plausible component of a primordial version of RNA [Evolution]

The emergence of primordial RNA-based life would have required the abiotic synthesis of nucleotides, and their participation in nonenzymatic RNA replication. Although considerable progress has been made toward potentially prebiotic syntheses of the pyrimidine nucleotides (C and U) and their 2-thio variants, efficient routes to the canonical purine nucleotides (A… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1720: Rapid evolution of a skin-lightening allele in southern African KhoeSan [Evolution]

Skin pigmentation is under strong directional selection in northern European and Asian populations. The indigenous KhoeSan populations of far southern Africa have lighter skin than other sub-Saharan African populations, potentially reflecting local adaptation to a region of Africa with reduced UV radiation. Here, we demonstrate that a canonical Eurasian skin… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1721: Dietary versatility of Early Pleistocene hominins [Evolution]

New geochemical data from the Malawi Rift (Chiwondo Beds, Karonga Basin) fill a major spatial gap in our knowledge of hominin adaptations on a continental scale. Oxygen (δ18O), carbon (δ13C), and clumped (Δ47) isotope data on paleosols, hominins, and selected fauna elucidate an unexpected diversity in the Pleistocene hominin diet… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1722: Sex-specific phenotypes of histone H4 point mutants establish dosage compensation as the critical function of H4K16 acetylation in Drosophila [Genetics]

Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) modulates nucleosome–nucleosome interactions and directly affects nucleosome binding by certain proteins. In Drosophila, H4K16 acetylation by the dosage compensation complex subunit Mof is linked to increased transcription of genes on the single X chromosome in males. Here, we analyzed Drosophila containing different… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1723: Role of gene body methylation in acclimatization and adaptation in a basal metazoan [Genetics]

Gene body methylation (GBM) has been hypothesized to modulate responses to environmental change, including transgenerational plasticity, but the evidence thus far has been lacking. Here we show that coral fragments reciprocally transplanted between two distant reefs respond predominantly by increase or decrease in genome-wide GBM disparity: The range of methylation… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1724: Defective respiration and one-carbon metabolism contribute to impaired naive T cell activation in aged mice [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cell-mediated immune responses are compromised in aged individuals, leading to increased morbidity and reduced response to vaccination. While cellular metabolism tightly regulates T cell activation and function, metabolic reprogramming in aged T cells has not been thoroughly studied. Here, we report a systematic analysis of metabolism during young versus… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1725: Improving vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae using synthetic glycans [Medical Sciences]

Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a deadly disease in small children and the elderly even though conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines based on isolated capsular polysaccharides (CPS) are successful. The most common serotypes that cause infection are used in vaccines around the world, but differences in geographic and demographic serotype distribution compromises protection… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1726: HflXr, a homolog of a ribosome-splitting factor, mediates antibiotic resistance [Microbiology]

To overcome the action of antibiotics, bacteria have evolved a variety of different strategies, such as drug modification, target mutation, and efflux pumps. Recently, we performed a genome-wide analysis of Listeria monocytogenes gene expression after growth in the presence of antibiotics, identifying genes that are up-regulated upon antibiotic treatment. One… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1727: Baseplate variability of Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor arrays [Microbiology]

The chemoreceptor array, a remarkably ordered supramolecular complex, is composed of hexagonally packed trimers of receptor dimers networked by a histidine kinase and one or more coupling proteins. Even though the receptor packing is universal among chemotactic bacteria and archaea, the array architecture has been extensively studied only in selected… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1728: Symbiotic unicellular cyanobacteria fix nitrogen in the Arctic Ocean [Microbiology]

Biological dinitrogen (N2) fixation is an important source of nitrogen (N) in low-latitude open oceans. The unusual N2-fixing unicellular cyanobacteria (UCYN-A)/haptophyte symbiosis has been found in an increasing number of unexpected environments, including northern waters of the Danish Straight and Bering and Chukchi Seas. We used nanoscale secondary ion mass… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1729: Multilayer network switching rate predicts brain performance [Neuroscience]

Large-scale brain dynamics are characterized by repeating spatiotemporal connectivity patterns that reflect a range of putative different brain states that underlie the dynamic repertoire of brain functions. The role of transition between brain networks is poorly understood, and whether switching between these states is important for behavior has been little… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1730: Approaching the adiabatic timescale with machine learning [Physics]

The control and manipulation of quantum systems without excitation are challenging, due to the complexities in fully modeling such systems accurately and the difficulties in controlling these inherently fragile systems experimentally. For example, while protocols to decompress Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) faster than the adiabatic timescale (without excitation or loss) have… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1731: People use less information than they think to make up their minds [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

A world where information is abundant promises unprecedented opportunities for information exchange. Seven studies suggest these opportunities work better in theory than in practice: People fail to anticipate how quickly minds change, believing that they and others will evaluate more evidence before making up their minds than they and others… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1732: Persistence of false paradigms in low-power sciences [Social Sciences]

We develop a model describing how false paradigms may persist, hindering scientific progress. The model features two paradigms, one describing reality better than the other. Tenured scientists display homophily: They favor tenure candidates who adhere to their paradigm. As in statistics, power is the probability (absent any bias) of denying…


1733: Resource extraction and infrastructure threaten forest cover and community rights [Sustainability Science]

Mineral and hydrocarbon extraction and infrastructure are increasingly significant drivers of forest loss, greenhouse gas emissions, and threats to the rights of forest communities in forested areas of Amazonia, Indonesia, and Mesoamerica. Projected investments in these sectors suggest that future threats to forests and rights are substantial, particularly because resource… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1734: Correction for Kritee et al., Reply to Yan and Akiyama: Nitrous oxide emissions from rice and their mitigation potential depend on the nature of intermittent flooding [Correction]

LETTER Correction for “Reply to Yan and Akiyama: Nitrous oxide emissions from rice and their mitigation potential depend on the nature of intermittent flooding,” by Kritee Kritee, Joseph Rudek, Steven P. Hamburg, Tapan K. Adhya, Terrance Loecke, and Richie Ahuja, which was first published November 16, 2018 ; 10.1073/pnas.1816677115 (Proc Natl… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1735: Correction for Mann, Inner Workings: Hunting for microbial life throughout the solar system [Correction]

INNER WORKINGS Correction for “Inner Workings: Hunting for microbial life throughout the solar system,” by Adam Mann, which was first published November 6, 2018 ; 10.1073/pnas.1816535115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:11348–11350). The editors note that on page 11350, left column, last paragraph, line 6, “being developed by” should instead appear… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1736: Correction Rivas-Carrillo et al., Whole-genome comparison of endogenous retrovirus segregation across wild and domestic host species populations [Correction]

EVOLUTION Correction for “Whole-genome comparison of endogenous retrovirus segregation across wild and domestic host species populations,” by Salvador Daniel Rivas-Carrillo, Mats E. Pettersson, Carl-Johan Rubin, and Patric Jern, which was first published October 8, 2018 ; 10.1073/pnas.1815056115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:11012–11017). The authors wish to note: “It has come… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1737: In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Resource extraction, forest loss, and community rights Deforestation in Honduras. Amazonia, Indonesia, and Mesoamerica are home to much of the world’s remaining humid tropical forests. However, these regions also harbor mineral, oil, coal, and natural gas reserves, with planned projects for resource extraction and large-scale crop cultivation. In the Amazon… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1738: QnAs with David Baker [QnAs]

DNA is often dubbed life’s instruction manual, but life-sustaining functions in all living cells are largely carried out by proteins, which are composed of varying combinations of 20 basic building blocks, called amino acids. Whether they are Lilliputian snippets a few amino acids long or molecular leviathans made of multiple… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1739: Moving beyond forensic monitoring to understand and manage impacts of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas development [Environmental Sciences]

In PNAS, Woda et al. (1) present the results of a multidimensional investigation of the impacts of several hydraulically fractured shale gas wells on an aquifer and a hydrologically connected stream in a particular area in central Pennsylvania. The stream, Sugar Run, has been impacted by migration of methane into… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1740: Rethinking pneumonia: A paradigm shift with practical utility [Medical Sciences]

We associate the founders of germ theory, Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch, with a dusty, bygone age: gray beards, sepia tones, and antiquated techniques. However, in their own time, both Pasteur and Koch were what we would now call “early adopters,” embracing and advancing the leading edge of available technology… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1741: Regulating behavior with the flip of a translational switch [Neuroscience]

From the pioneering discovery of the first single-gene mutants that controlled circadian behavior by Konopka and Benzer (1), the quest to probe the fundamentally important relationship between gene expression and behavior has been ongoing. The ability to control cellular function and behavior with exquisite precision in vivo through genetic, optogenetic,… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1742: Subterranean clues to the future of our planetary magnetic shield [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid outer core, provides a shield from cosmic radiation that can cause damage to man-made satellites, electrical power grids, and the ozone layer (1). In the absence of this shield, the solar wind might gradually erode the atmosphere, eventually robbing the planet of its… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1743: Science and Culture: Journal entries, maps, and photos help ecologists reconstruct ecosystems of the past [Anthropology]

Ilka Feller has a penchant for mangrove hunting. Since the early 2000s, Feller, an ecologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, has periodically gone road-tripping in search of the northernmost mangrove tree in Florida. The red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, has draping roots that hold fast in the tide. But all… (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1744: Your home could be lit by jellyfish in the future

Imagine a future lit by bioluminescent LEDs that not only use fewer of Earth's resources to manufacture, but also improve your mood by mimicking the sun throughout the day. It could be closer than you think, according to Dr Rubén Costa, a young scientist who believes we're on the brink of a bio and nanotechnology revolution that could close the gap between nature and the man-made environment. "Wh


1745: Study yields new insight on how memory works

Two Veterans Affairs researchers have explored how memory is tied to the hippocampus, with findings that will expand scientists' understanding of how memory works and ideally aid in detection, prevention, and treatment of memory disorders. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1746: More CO2 messes up salmons’ life-or-death sense of smell

New research shows that the powerful sense of smell salmon have might be in trouble as oceans continue to absorb carbon emissions. The ability to smell is critical for salmon. They depend on scent to avoid predators, sniff out prey, and find their way home at the end of their lives when they return to the streams where they hatched to spawn and die. But ocean acidification is changing the water’s (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1747: Reluctant Psychonaut' Michael Pollan Embraces 'New Science' Of Psychedelics

Author Michael Pollan experimented with mushrooms, LSD and other psychedelics while researching his latest book, How to Change Your Mind. Originally broadcast May 15, 2018.


1748: Reduced Snow Pack Could Alter Crystal-Clear Mountain Lakes

Changes in phytoplankton growth, and nutrients, could affect famous mirror-like clarity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1749: 2018 is almost finished, so I'm celebrating all the gadgets I loved

Gadgets My favorite products of the year. I've been testing products for two years. Testing for the year has come to a close. Here are the items I loved. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1750: Fire Ants Know That in Unity There is Strength

Fire Ants Know That in Unity There is Strength Successful ants play like the Borg from Star Trek. FireAnts.jpg Image credits: D. Kucharski K. Kucharska/ Shutterstock Creature Wednesday, December 26, 2018 – 12:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — When an invasive species — plant or animal — invades an area, there usually is competition for space and food with the residents, but after (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1751: Opioid use and misuse following treatment for head and neck cancer

Six months after treatment ended, 7 percent of patients remained on opioid pain medications. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1752: Collecting clean water from air, inspired by desert life

A pair of new studies from researchers at The Ohio State University offers a possible solution to water scarcity, inspired by nature. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1753: Huawei is the world’s fastest-growing smartphone seller despite increasing global scrutiny


1754: Major Funding Pledges Won't Close the Clean Energy Investment Gap

A crucial strategy for fighting climate change continues to come up short — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1755: Top Retractions of 2018

From a self-sampling scientist to the downfall of a leading stem cell scientist, here's our naughty list.


1756: The Creepiest Movie Shot of the Year Came From Hereditary

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Ari Aster’s Hereditary . (Read our previous entries here .) Ari Aster has made no secret of the fact that Hereditary , his debut film and one of the best-reviewed pieces of horror this year , was inspired by


1757: Jerry Brown’s Greatest Legacy Is Proving California Is Governable

LOS ANGELES—When Jerry Brown first took the oath as governor of California on January 6, 1975, he succeeded Ronald Reagan, who was still six years away from the White House. Gerald Ford was president, Paul VI was pope, the Watergate conspirators John Mitchell, H. R. Haldeman, and John Ehrlichman had just been convicted, the Khmer Rouge was beginning its bloody rise to power in Cambodia, the Dow J


1758: UC San Diego researchers identify how skin ages, loses fat and immunity

Some dermal fibroblasts can convert into fat cells that reside under the dermis, giving skin a youthful look and producing peptides that fight infections. University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers and colleagues show how this happens and what causes it to stop as people age. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1759: Cell size and cell-cycle states play key decision-making role in HIV

Thanks to the development of antiretroviral drugs, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is considered a manageable chronic disease today. However, if left undiagnosed or untreated, HIV can develop into AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome), a disease which led to the deaths of nearly 1 million people worldwide in 2017. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1760: Losing neurons can sometimes not be that bad

Current thinking about Alzheimer's disease is that neuronal cell death in the brain is to blame for the cognitive havoc caused by the disease. But a new study suggests that neuronal death in Alzheimer's may actually be a protective reaction against the disease. This could lead to a complete rethinking of therapeutical approaches to Alzheimer's. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1761: Ancient Purebred Horse With Bronze-Plated Saddle Is Discovered in Pompeii

The horse is the latest treasure unearthed from the city buried by pumice and ash after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.


1762: Essay: One Giant Step for a Chess-Playing Machine

The stunning success of AlphaZero, a deep-learning algorithm, heralds a new age of insight — one that, for humans, may not last long.


1763: Buzzed flies reveal important step to intoxication

The alcohol in beverages acts much like an anesthetic. It creates a hyper 'buzzed' feeling first, and then sedation. But how? It turns out there is an important intermediate step that wasn't previously known. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1764: 2019 Preview: Teeth will reveal our species’ deep evolutionary past

We will start to learn what a host of ancient animal and early human remains really are, thanks to new techniques for analysing tiny fragments of fossil remains


1765: What’s next in Syria after the US withdraws?

On December 19, 2018 , President Trump announced he wants to pull troops out of Syria because the United States military had achieved its goal of defeating the Islamic State militant group there. In this Q&A, terrorism expert Martha Crenshaw, a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies’ Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, addresse (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1766: Farewell, Chevy Volt: An Oral History of the Plug-In Hybrid

The dealers didn’t get it, neither did most of the public. But people who loved them, really loved them.


1767: Simple Genetic Mutation Helped Humans Become Endurance Runners

Mice with the human version of a gene can run for longer without becoming fatigued — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1768: Deep learning turns mono recordings into immersive sound

We’ve had 3D images for decades, but effectively imitating 3D sound has always eluded researchers. Now a machine-learning algorithm can produce “2.5D” sound by watching a video.


1769: How much money would you charge to quit Facebook?

Facebook users would require an average of more than $1,000 to deactivate their account for one year, according to new research. How valuable is Facebook to its users and how can we measure its value when access is free? Researchers tried to answer these questions by assessing Facebook’s value to its users in contrast to its market value or its contribution to gross domestic product. Researchers (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1770: CBD makes glaucoma worse, researchers find

For decades, marijuana has been touted as providing glaucoma relief. A study out of Indiana University shows that while THC reduces eye pressure, CBD does the opposite. Of the 18 mice tested, females were less responsive to marijuana than males. None While glaucoma has been the butt of many well-intentioned, wink-wink weed jokes for decades, the disease is quit serious. In fact, glaucoma is the l


1771: How the Surprise Interactive 'Black Mirror' Came Together

'Bandersnatch', which hits the streaming service today, is Netflix's first salvo in a new era of storytelling. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1772: Kattegatbro uden tog: Hvad med en selvkørende superbus eller en monorail?


1773: Fik du det hele med? 10 mest debatterede artikler på Version2 i 2018


1774: Late frost gives UK magic mushroom hunters an extra high

Psychedelic fungi may still be in bloom on New Year’s Day due to climate change An unnaturally late first frost across the UK means magic mushroom hunters could be in line for a remarkable natural high this year. Psychedelic mushrooms may still be in bloom on New Year’s Day, as the subzero temperatures that would normally have appeared by this time of year are yet to arrive. Continue reading…


1775: Overset bensygdom, giftig olie og depression: Her er de 3 mest læste sundhedshistorier i år

På førstepladsen ligger en bensygdom, som rigtig mange danskere lider af, men få får behandling for. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1776: Vaping is 95% safer than smoking, claims Public Health England

As scepticism rises, PHE says e-cigarettes could help more people quit smoking The government is launching a new campaign to try to convince the UK’s smokers that vaping is safe and a good way to quit, in a bid to counter the scepticism generated by some scientific studies and media headlines. Public Health England (PHE), which maintains that vaping is 95% safer than tobacco, is releasing a short


1777: Cross Section: Hannah Fry – Science Weekly podcast

Dr Hannah Fry won the Christopher Zeeman medal in August for her contributions to the public understanding of the mathematical sciences. Ian Sample has invited her on the podcast to discuss her love of numbers. Plus, he asks, can we really use this discipline to predict human behaviour? Maths probably isn’t something you’re thinking about in the build-up to the new year. If anything, it’s the nth (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1778: The Trouble with Drug Development

Open a new tab, load up a science media site you know. What do you first see across the front page? You will almost certainly find a headline blaring “NEW FINDINGS SHOW AUTISM’S DAYS ARE NUMBERED” or “UNIVERSITY RESEARCHER CURES PARKINSON’S DISEASE”. Open the page up next week, and you will almost certainly see some […] (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1779: Geckos use slapping to ‘walk on water’

Geckos can scurry across the surface of water at impressive speeds, research finds. Geckos have a multitude of methods for moving around. They can run across rugged terrain, swim swiftly under water, and even swing their tails to perform acrobatic maneuvers in the air. If you’re an animal in a hurry, swimming is not an ideal mode of transportation. As a rule, bodies move through water much slower (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1780: The Atlantic Daily: The Best of 2018

“It’s harder than ever to hear music in a vacuum,” write Hannah Giorgis and Spencer Kornhaber. “In this info-swamped era, the sound coming out of the speakers will be processed in the context of broad stories ( uh oh, is this song about Robert Mueller? ) and personal ones ( uh oh, is this song about my ex? ).” The most indelible television shows, films, podcasts, and books of 2018 are colored wit (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1781: Producers of white colonies on kimchi surface, mistaken as molds, have been identified

Analyses of microbial community structures and whole genome sequencing were performed to the white colony-forming yeasts on kimchi surface. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1782: Breast cancer drugs could help treat resistant lung cancers

A class of drugs used to treat certain breast cancers could help to tackle lung cancers that have become resistant to targeted therapies, a new study suggests. The research found that lung tumors in mice caused by mutations in a gene called EGFR shrunk significantly when a certain protein was blocked. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1783: Post-natal depression in dads linked to depression in their teenage daughters

Fathers as well as mothers can experience post-natal depression — and it is linked to emotional problems for their teenage daughters, new research has found. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1784: How skin ages, loses fat and immunity

Some dermal fibroblasts can convert into fat cells that reside under the dermis, giving skin a youthful look and producing peptides that fight infections. Researchers show how this happens and what causes it to stop as people age. (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


1785: A tilt of the head facilitates social engagement

Every time we look at a face, we take in a flood of information effortlessly: age, gender, race, expression, the direction of our subject's gaze, perhaps even their mood. How the brain does this is a mystery. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1786: Speed up public health decisions on scabies by skipping full-body exams

For years, the diagnosis of scabies has relied on time-consuming and intrusive full-body examinations. Now, researchers have found that an exam of just a patient's hands, feet and lower legs may have the potential to catch more than 90 percent of all scabies cases, regardless of severity. These speedier exams may be useful in public health assessments on the prevalence of scabies. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1787: Contact with monkeys and apes puts populations at risk

Animal diseases that infect humans are a major threat to human health, and diseases often spillover to humans from nonhuman primates. Now, researchers have carried out an extensive social sciences evaluation of how populations in Cameroon interact with nonhuman primates, pointing toward behaviors that could put people at risk of infection with new diseases. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1788: Sleeping sickness parasite uses multiple metabolic pathways

Parasitic protozoa called trypanosomes synthesize sugars using an unexpected metabolic pathway called gluconeogenesis, according to a new study. The authors note that this metabolic flexibility may be essential for adaptation to environmental conditions and survival in mammalian host tissues. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1789: Trial supports use of topical antibiotics in NICU babies

A team of doctors has performed a clinical trial involving multiple hospitals that tested the effectiveness of applying a topical antibiotic known as mupirocin for prevention of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infection in babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1790: Trees' 'enemies' help tropical forests maintain their biodiversity

Scientists have long struggled to explain how tropical forests can maintain their staggering diversity of trees without having a handful of species take over — or having many other species die out. The answer, researchers say, lies in the soil found near individual trees, where natural 'enemies' of tree species reside. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1791: Sustainable 'plastics' are on the horizon

A new study describes a process to make bioplastic polymers that don't require land or fresh water — resources that are scarce in much of the world. The resulting material is biodegradable, produces zero toxic waste and recycles into organic waste. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1792: How neurons could disconnect from each other in Huntington's disease

Newly described mechanism called 'neuritosis' could play an important role in normal brain development, aging and neurodegenerative disease. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


1793: Five rad and random pieces of indoor exercise gear I found this week

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 59. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1794: Women — not men — are more willing to punish 'sexually-accessible' women, researchers find

It's commonly thought that the suppression of female sexuality is perpetuated by either men or women. In a new study, researchers used economics games to observe how both genders treat sexually-available women. The results suggests that both sexes punish female promiscuity, though for different reasons and different levels of intensity. None Researchers from the University of Warwick recently sou


1795: The Unregulated Terrain Of Gene-Editing Technology

A Chinese scientist's claim that he'd created the first gene-edited babies rocked the world this year, raising questions about the ethics of powerful new gene-editing techniques. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1796: Fresh Starts: Tales Of Renewal For A New Year

The turn of the year is a time when we set the old aside and welcomed the new into our lives. When one chapter ends, another begins. (Image credit: Courtesy of Maya Shankar) (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1797: 2018 Was A Milestone Year For Climate Science (If Not Politics)

2018 saw a string of more precise — and dire — assessments that a warming climate is affecting the weather. That didn't keep President Trump and others from questioning those scientific conclusions. (Image credit: Gerald Herbert/AP)


1798: Sugar-sweetened beverage pattern linked to higher kidney disease risk

In a study of African-American men and women with normal kidney function, a pattern of higher collective consumption of soda, sweetened fruit drinks, and water was associated with a higher risk of developing kidney disease. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1799: The Adrenaline Rush of Herding Reindeer in the North Pole

As winter approaches in Finnish Lapland, daylight rapidly retreats. The Sami—the estimated 80,000 people who are indigenous to the region and live in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia—prepare for winter by bringing their reindeer down from the mountains. More than 7,000 reindeer herders, known as boazovazzi , or “reindeer walkers,” work together to herd 500,000 reindeer from their grazing pastu (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1800: Spacewatch: new generation of GPS satellite lifts off

GPS III satellites to provide more precise locations and be more resilient against jamming The first of a new generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites was launched on Sunday . A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral air force station in Florida at 1351 GMT (05.51am PST) and the satellite was deployed into its intended orbit almost two hours later. Continue reading. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1801: Breaking down AGEs: Insight into how lifestyle drives ER-positive breast cancer

Consumption of processed foods high in sugar and fat increase levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Medical University of South Carolina researchers report that AGE levels are higher in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Addition of AGEs caused breast cancer cells, whose growth had previously been controlled by tamoxifen, to begin to grow agai (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1802: There was no relationship between obesity and poverty — until high-fructose corn syrup

Before 1990, there was no noticeable correlation between obesity and poverty. Within a quarter-century, impoverished regions showed a massive uptick in obesity and type 1 diabetes. Researchers chart the relationship between "food deserts" along with obesity levels. None In 1841, Orlando Jones patented alkali starch extraction , a process that separated corn starch from kernels in what is known as


1803: Corn’s ‘recycling’ system isn’t just for stressful times

A plant relies on cellular machinery to recycle materials during times of stress, but that same machinery has a remarkable influence on the plant’s metabolism even under healthy growing conditions, according to new research. Autophagy is a process that helps to break down damaged or unwanted pieces of a cell so that the building blocks can be used again. In humans, autophagy is connected to a num (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1804: Why not all uncivilized people are barbarians

We often imagine that civilization was formed when people agreed to from societies together and then attracted others out of the wildreness to join them. Some historians and anthropologists argue that a huge part of Asia is filled with people who did the opposite. If true, the idea could flip our understanding of how states and civilizations form on its head. If you can remember back to high scho


1805: Unravelling mystery of how, when DNA replicates

A team has unlocked a decades old mystery about how a critical cellular process called DNA replication is regulated. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1806: Reducing drinking could help with smoking cessation, research finds

New research has found that heavy drinkers who are trying to stop smoking may find that reducing their alcohol use can also help them quit their daily smoking habit. Heavy drinkers' nicotine metabolite ratio — a biomarker that indicates how quickly a person's body metabolizes nicotine — reduced as they cut back on their drinking. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1807: NASA's New Horizons will spend New Year's Eve staring at a very mysterious space ball

Space MU69 is far from your run-of-the-mill solar system object. Get ready to meet 2014 MU69 (unofficially known as Ultima Thule), an object a billion miles beyond Pluto and 4.1 billion from Earth itself.


1808: Frenchman trying to cross Atlantic in barrel capsule

A 71-year-old Frenchman has departed on a journey across the Atlantic in a specially constructed barrel capsule, designed to use ocean currents alone to propel him across the sea. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1809: Instagram blames 'bug' for design change that prompted backlash

Instagram said Thursday it accidentally rolled out a design change to a large number of users and quickly ended the test after complaints from users of the Facebook-owned social network.


1810: More policing alone can’t stop gun-related deaths

People in the US who die from gun injuries when they are young are much more often black, while their white counterparts are dying older, research finds. In 2016, the last year for which the CDC provides numbers, 35,353 people died from gun injuries. That’s 12 out of every 100,000 people living in the US that year. “But mortality rates don’t show you how much of your life is lost,” says Bindu Kal (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1811: Researchers discover kidney disease gene affects more populations than previously thought

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered that kidney disease risk variants of the gene APOL1, previously known to affect African and African American populations, are also found at appreciable frequencies in Caribbean and Latin American populations. Knowing that the APOL1 risk is present in these populations could help physicians tailor treatment more closely to t (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1812: 2018 Seen Through the Lens of Yasuyoshi Chiba

Yasuyoshi Chiba, a staff photographer with AFP, spent nearly the entire year of 2018 in Kenya, documenting an incredibly wide range of subjects, landscapes, and issues. Chiba has been on staff with AFP since 2011, winning multiple awards for his photojournalism, which is based mostly in Brazil and Kenya. This year, he captured the faces and stories of some of the 50 million people who live in Ken


1813: When you give to others, you get good feelings that last

While the happiness we feel after an activity diminishes each time we experience it, a phenomenon known as hedonic adaptation, giving to others may be the exception to this rule. New research finds that participants’ happiness did not decline, or declined much slower, if they repeatedly bestowed gifts on others versus repeatedly receiving those same gifts themselves. “If you want to sustain happi (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1814: Rotating Detonation Engines Could Propel Hypersonic Flight

It runs on an endless shockwave, but, sadly, it’s still in the prototype stage.


1815: Pluto Is Far in the Rearview. Next Stop: Ultima Thule

NASA’s New Horizons is poised to arrive at the most distant object ever seen up close—and there could be more to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1816: Megapixels: NASA snapped a shot of a holiday 'wreath' in space

Space It's actually more of a holiday yardstick. This season is full of stories about stars guiding travelers to far-off destinations, but new imagery from NASA shows off a stellar guide of a different sort.


1817: A tilt of the head facilitates social engagement, researchers say

Every time we look at a face, we take in a flood of information effortlessly: age, gender, race, expression, the direction of our subject's gaze, perhaps even their mood. How the brain does this is a mystery. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1818: Rerouting nerves during amputation reduces phantom limb pain before it starts

Doctors have found that a surgery to reroute amputated nerves, called targeted muscle reinnervation, or TMR, can reduce or prevent phantom or residual limb pain from ever occurring in amputee patients who receive the procedure at the time of amputation. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1819: US fossil fuel exports spur growth, climate worries

In South Korea's largest shipyard, thousands of workers in yellow hard hats move ceaselessly between towering cranes lifting hulks of steel. They look like a hive of bees scurrying over a massive circuit board as they weld together the latest additions to the rapidly growing fleet of tankers carrying super-chilled liquefied natural gas across the world's oceans. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1820: After scandal-filled year, what's next for Facebook?

Facebook is closing out 2018 the same way it began the year: in defense mode. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1821: Chasing Amazon: The store of the future is already here as retailers up their tech game

Robots roaming the aisles. Windows that allow you to tap and shop while the store is closed. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1822: Did neoliberalism in Chile erode trust in science?

Chile is an example of how neoliberal government can lead to the loss of the public’s trust in science, a new book argues. Why? Because of how the state uses scientific expertise to justify environmental projects that benefit wealthy interests. It’s a scenario that plays out in Western democracies all the time: A business proposes a construction project in an area that could be environmentally se (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1823: Our universe: An expanding bubble in an extra dimension

Uppsala University researchers have devised a new model for the universe – one that may solve the enigma of dark energy. Their new article, published in Physical Review Letters, proposes a new structural concept, including dark energy, for a universe that rides on an expanding bubble in an additional dimension. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1824: E.P.A. Proposes Rule Change That Would Let Power Plants Release More Toxic Pollution


1825: Dit indsamlede plastaffald bliver snart til diesel på fabrik i Skive

Den norske virksomhed Quantafuel vil omdanne 60 ton plastaffald om dagen til brændstof og andre produkter på dansk fabrik. Der er rejsegilde i næste måned.


1826: High cholesterol levels after Christmas

Large quantities of rich Christmas food appear to boost Danes' cholesterol levels. Right after the Christmas break, levels are 20 percent higher than in the summer. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1827: An Ancient Tradition Unfolds in New York

With a flash, the sky over New York City turned a mystical blue . The spectacle, which appeared without warning on Thursday night, stunned observers. They sensed something was wrong—because, obviously, would you look at the freaking sky?—and quickly formulated some possible explanations. The theories leaned heavily on science fiction. Maybe the glow signaled the end of a massive battle between su (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1828: We've wasted so much plastic, it's almost impossible to picture—these charts will help

Environment The most mind-boggling statistic of the year, visualized. Less than 10 percent of all the plastic we've made has been recycled, but the enormity of that quantity is hard to really grasp.


1829: The Family Weekly: Paying Kids to Do Chores Is a Very American Thing

This Week in Family Two writers took the time to remember loved ones who died this December. The Atlantic staff writer Franklin Foer wrote a tribute to his grandmother, Ethel, who as a teenager trekked 2,600 miles to flee Nazi persecution with nothing but a pair of scissors and a winter coat. He remembers her as a woman who loved life fiercely: “Survival, in the end, feels like an insufficient wo (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1830: Galapagos bans fireworks to protect unique wildlife

Fireworks have been banned on the Galapagos Islands to protect the archipelago's unique fauna, the local government said on Friday.


1831: Zuckerberg sees 'progress' for Facebook after tumultuous year

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg said Friday the world's biggest social network has "fundamentally" changed to focus on securing its systems against manipulation and misinformation.


1832: Ryanair cabin crew in Spain to strike in January

Unions for Ryanair's 1,800 cabin crew in Spain threatened Friday to strike in January unless the Irish low-cost airline agrees to improve work and pay conditions. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1833: Seabirds Abandon Eggs After Winter Without Ice

Seabirds Abandon Eggs After Winter Without Ice Record low levels of winter sea ice devastate seabirds already struggling with climate change. black-guillemot-closeup.jpg Image credits: óskar elías sigurðsson via Flickr Creature Friday, December 28, 2018 – 14:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Each winter, sleek seabirds known as Mandt's black guillemots descend on the ice that forms (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1834: The mystery of the ISS hole just got even weirder

Space The hole came from the inside. Earlier this week, a Russian cosmonaut who investigated the mysterious hole in the Soyuz capsule docked to the International Space Station revealed that the hole was…


1835: Marine debris study counts trash from Texas to Florida

Trash, particularly plastic, in the ocean and along the shoreline is an economic, environmental, human health, and aesthetic problem causing serious challenges to coastal communities around the world, including the Gulf of Mexico. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1836: How an Explosion (Not Aliens) Turned New York’s Night Sky an Electric Blue


1837: Photos of the Week: Vertical Dancers, Pagan Solstice, Panda Monitor

Strange blue lights in the night sky over New York, Christmas calls from the White House, a fox hunt in Ireland, icy weather in China, the Sahara Festival in Tunisia, Santa Claus on Copacabana Beach in Rio, recovery from a tsunami in Indonesia, an eruption of Mount Etna in Sicily, penguins in Italy and Antarctica, and much more. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1838: How a Guy With a Camera Outsmarted the United States

On the morning of December 26, Alan Meloy stood on the front porch of his home in northern England and noticed that “murky” early clouds were clearing into a crisp and sunny winter’s day. Meloy, a retired IT professional and a plane spotter of 45 years, decided to grab his best camera to see whether he could catch any interesting flyovers. Before long, he saw a “jumbo”—a Boeing VC-25A—and, knowin (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1839: NASA spaceship closes in on distant world

NASA's unmanned New Horizons spacecraft is closing in on its historic New Year's flyby target, the most distant world ever studied, a frozen relic of the solar system some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away.


1840: One-hour ER discharge rule is safe after naloxone

It’s safe for hospital emergency departments to discharge opioid overdose patients as early as one hour after receiving naloxone, a new study shows. According to the St. Paul’s Early Discharge Rule, that’s how long providers should observe patients after naloxone treatment, so long as their vital signs meet specific criteria and they are ambulatory. Researchers at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1841: Winter storms batter large swaths of US

Two deaths were attributed to severe weather in the US Midwest as heavy snow and high winds snarled air and ground transportation during a busy holiday travel period. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1842: ESA Tipsheet for January 2019

Get a sneak peek into these new scientific papers, publishing on January 3, 2019 in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1843: In 2018, Alaska's Bering Sea was all out of whack.

Environment It was an extreme year. In some regions, this was the first time in 37 years of water surveys that there was no cold pool.


1844: Trilobites: How to Recycle Your Christmas Tree

You don’t want your tree to end up in a landfill. Let it have a second life as compost, a barrier for erosion or food for goats.


1845: Super catalyst turns chemical ‘trash’ into treasure

Researchers have developed a catalyst that combines strength and finesse to make an inert carbon-hydrogen bond reactive—effectively turning chemical “trash” to “treasure.” For decades, chemists have aspired to do carefully controlled chemistry on carbon-hydrogen bonds. The challenge is staggering. It requires the power of a miniature wrecking ball to break these extremely strong bonds, combined w (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1846: Team Tea wins the rematch again!

Looks like any way you serve it, tea is Eyewire’s morning drink for good! Congratulations to everyone on a well played rematch. We’ll catch you again in 2019! Artwork by Rabbit Giraud (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1847: Government Shutdown Affects NSF, FDA, Other Science Agencies

The ongoing stalemate over the federal budget has forced one-quarter of the US government to begin a second week of closure. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1848: Finding a Way Through an Unspeakable Loss

I can’t write this story. I must write this story. My brain can’t process this story, though this story has been my brain’s main occupant since the morning of December 14th, when I heard the news. Where to begin? With the accident itself? With the sludge of hours and days that followed? With the snow, the patch of ice, the oncoming headlights, none of which I saw in real life but all of which I n (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1849: To pursue the science of happiness, try these 14 tips

There’s a science to happiness, says Tim Bono, the author of a recent book on the subject. In When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness (Grand Central Life & Style, 2018), Bono shows how the often-overlooked details of day-to-day life can have a sizable influence on our personal sense of well-being and happiness. Based on his own research and other scientific studies, B (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1850: Spotlight on role of automated trading amid Wall Street swoon

The recent tumult in financial markets has shined a light on the rising role of automated trading on Wall Street and whether it is exacerbating volatility. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1851: Acne medication changes the skin’s microbiome

Isotretinoin, a form of vitamin A that has been prescribed to treat acne for decades, changes the microbiome of the skin to more closely resemble the skin of people without acne, according to a new study. The study sheds light on how isotretinoin works and provides information that could lead to developing microbiome-based acne treatments, researchers say. There is a need for such alternatives be (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1852: These are the most-read Science News stories of 2018

From male birth control to wombat poop, Science News online readers had a wide variety of favorite stories on our website.


1853: The Girl Who Lived

There were the scissors that my grandmother somehow remembered to bring with her as she fled. She could hear the rumble of destruction in the distance. She could see the cloud of smoke that was the Nazi murder of her family and neighbors. Without forethought, she made the decision to run ahead, carrying with her the scissors and, despite the blossoms of spring, a winter coat. In the seasons that (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1854: Director of NIAMS Stephen Katz Dies

The head of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases was a leader in the study of skin-based immunology. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1855: Favorite Visual Stories Of 2018

NPR's list of memorable visual stories includes coverage of the 2018 midterm election, migrant caravans, Puerto Rico's hurricane recovery and, of course, a musical insect invasion. (Image credit: Claire Harbage, Skunk Bear, Mengwen Cao for NPR, Angela Hsieh, Sean McMinn and Jazz Night In America/NPR)


1856: Democrats Establish a New House ‘Climate Crisis’ Committee

It’s official. When Democrats take control of the House of Representatives next month, they will form a special new committee to examine climate change, Nancy Pelosi said in a statement on Friday . Pelosi, likely the next speaker of the House, also announced that the new committee will be named the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. It will be led by Kathy Castor, a seven-term congresswoman (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1857: Sexual/gender minority patients prefer written self-report for identity info collection

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital conducted a matched cohort trial to determine which of two different SOGI collection methods was associated with higher patient satisfaction with their emergency department (ED) visit. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1858: Adults with cerebral palsy at increased risk of depression, anxiety

While cerebral palsy is considered a pediatric condition because it develops and is diagnosed in early childhood, it is a lifelong condition with the majority of children living into adulthood. Little research exists on the mental health of adults with cerebral palsy. This study included 1,700 adults 18 years or older with cerebral palsy and 5,100 adults without cerebral palsy. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1859: Study examines development of physical aggression in children as they age

Children can exhibit physical aggression when they are very young but that behavior typically declines before and during elementary school. However, a small proportion of children have atypically high physical aggression problems into adolescence, which may put them at increased risk for violent crime, social maladjustment, and alcohol and drug abuse. This observational study of 2,223 boys and gir (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1860: Could drinking alcohol be associated with better survival in patients after heart failure diagnosis?

Having seven or fewer alcoholic drinks a week was associated with increased survival in older adults with newly diagnosed heart failure compared with patients who abstained from alcohol after accounting for other potential mitigating factors. Conflicting data exist about an association between alcohol consumption and heart failure but not much is known about the safety of alcohol consumption in pa (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1861: Patient preferences for collecting sexual, gender identity information

Emergency department patients who are sexual or gender minorities reported greater satisfaction when information on sexual and gender identity was collected on forms during registration instead of by nurses who asked about it during the visit. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1862: Wide variation in use of pain relievers during labor across US

Pain relief for pregnant women in labor is commonly given in the form of epidural, spinal or combined spinal-epidural blockade, which is collectively referred to as neuraxial analgesia. This study used birth certificate data and found wide variation in neuraxial analgesia use across the United States. Among 2.6 million pregnant women who underwent labor in 2015, neuraxial analgesia was used by 73 (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1863: Study details opioid poisoning deaths among children, teens over two decades

Nearly 9,000 children and adolescents died from opioid poisonings with prescription and illicit drugs between 1999 and 2016 based on an analysis of national data. The death rate almost tripled over that time to nearly 1 per 100,000 based on the data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prescription opioids were implicated in 73 percent of the deaths (6,561) and most of the de (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1864: Moderate drinking not harmful for older patients with heart failure

A new study suggests that people over age 65 who are newly diagnosed with heart failure can continue to drink moderate amounts of alcohol without worsening their condition. However, the findings do not suggest that nondrinkers should start imbibing after a heart failure diagnosis, the researchers emphasized. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1865: December's Sparkling Space Pictures

December's Sparkling Space Pictures An assortment of twinkling images of space, stars and spacecrafts. 4_crop_heic1820a.jpg The Abell S1063 galaxy cluster, located 4 billion light-years away. Image credits: NASA/ESA/M. Montes Space Friday, December 28, 2018 – 11:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — This December, we have selected a festive variety of astronomical delights. Thr (Fri, 21 Dec 2018)


1866: 2019 Preview: We will see the first ever picture of a black hole

We have never seen a picture of a black hole, but that will change when the Event Horizon Telescope reveals its first snap of the behemoth at the Milky Way's centre


1867: The Branching Horrors of Black Mirror’s ‘Bandersnatch’

This piece contains spoilers for the Black Mirror special “Bandersnatch.” For most of its existence, Netflix’s streaming television service has largely existed to pump out more and more content. Its never-ending feed is packed with new shows, revived classics, licensed hits from other countries, and big acquisitions such as Black Mirror , a cult hit from the U.K.’s Channel 4 that tells warped Twi (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1868: A brief history of black holes

Late in 2018, the gravitational wave observatory, LIGO, announced that they had detected the most distant and massive source of ripples of spacetime ever monitored: waves triggered by pairs of black holes colliding in deep space. Only since 2015 have we been able to observe these invisible astronomical bodies, which can be detected only by their gravitational attraction. The history of our hunt fo (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1869: Deep learning for electron microscopy

Finding defects in electron microscopy images takes months. Now, there's a faster way. It's called MENNDL, the Multinode Evolutionary Neural Networks for Deep Learning. It creates artificial neural networks—computational systems that loosely mimic the human brain—that tease defects out of dynamic data. It runs on all available nodes of the Summit supercomputer, performing 152 thousand million mill


1870: When you look up, how far back in time do you see?

Our senses are stuck in the past. There's a flash of lightning, and then seconds pass until we hear the rumble of distant thunder. We hear the past. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1871: Fail-safe, reconfigurable chips

Researchers at the Telecommunications and Multimedia Applications Institute (iTEAM) of Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) have taken a step toward creating an infallible chip. They have developed an advanced method for the analysis and à la cart configuration of photonic circuits, which makes it possible to pre-emptively deal with the possible faults that a chip may suffer and reduce their im (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1872: The science behind why our brains make us cooperate (or disagree)

Neuroscientists identify the parts of the brain that affect our social decision-making. Guilt has a large affect on social interactions, find the researchers. To find ways to cooperate, people need to let go of fear and anxiety, suggest studies None Why do we decide to work on a project or pursue a goal with someone? Or why do we treat some people like there's no way we can find any common langua (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1873: Scientists model Mercury's glaciers

The processes that led to glaciation at the cratered poles of Mercury, the planet closest to the sun, have been modeled by a University of Maine-led research team.


1874: Lidar accelerates hurricane recovery in the Carolinas

Hurricane Florence's slow trot over North and South Carolina in September led to inundating rain, record storm surges, and another major disaster for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to contend with. Facing damage over hundreds of square miles, FEMA again called upon MIT Lincoln Laboratory to use their state-of-the-art lidar system to image the destruction in the region. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1875: New epigenetic study: Guinea pig fathers pass on adaptive responses to environmental changes

Adaptations to environmental change are the most important asset for the persistence of any plant or animal species. This is usually achieved through genetic mutation and selection, a slow process driven by chance. Faster and more targeted are so called epigenetic modifications which do not alter the genetic code but promote specialisations during cell maturation. A new study carried out by scient (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1876: Facebook’s leaked moderation rules show why Big Tech can’t police hate speech


1877: Better mouse model built to enable precision-medicine research for Alzheimer's

Incorporating genetic diversity into a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease resulted in greater overlap with the genetic, molecular and clinical features of this pervasive human disease, according to a new study. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1878: Secondhand smoke and cardiac arrhythmia

Continuous indoor exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke triggers changes in the heart's electrical activity, known as cardiac alternans, that can predict cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death, a new study shows. The authors believe the study, conducted in mice, suggests that secondhand smoke exposure alters cells that regulate how the heart beats. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1879: Long-term memory encoding engram neurons are established by the transcriptional cycling

Long-term memory (LTM) is formed by repetitive training trials with rest intervals and LTM formation requires transcription factors, including CREB and c-Fos. Researchers found that ERK activity is increased during rest intervals to induce transcriptional cycling between c-Fos and CREB in a subset of mushroom body neurons. Significantly, LTM is encoded in these mushroom body neurons, and blocking (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1880: Producers of white colonies on kimchi surface, mistaken as molds, have been identified

The World Institute of Kimch (WiKim) has reported that the white colonies on the surface of kimchi are not formed by molds but by yeasts. The researchers also acquired genomic data regarding the hygienic safety of the yeast strains. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1881: The Books Briefing: ’Tis the Season for Parties

What better way to celebrate the remaining days of 2018 than by revisiting our favorite literary parties? There’s Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s take on Mrs. Dalloway and the dinner soirée, reimagined under the Donald Trump presidency. And, of course, who can forget Jay Gatsby’s infamous West Egg parties, which have inspired numerous high-school proms and costumed New Year’s shindigs. That being said (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1882: New hydraulic actuator will make robots tougher

Researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a hydraulic actuator that will allow tough robots to operate in disaster sites and other harsh environments. The Tokyo Tech Venture H-MUSCLE Corporation was established to pursue applications for the actuator, and shipping of product samples will begin in February 2019. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1883: How exercise reduces belly fat in humans

Some of you may have made a New Year's resolution to hit the gym to tackle that annoying belly fat. But have you ever wondered how physical activity produces this desired effect? A signaling molecule called interleukin-6 plays a critical role in this process, researchers report. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1884: Droplets don’t have to be round – here’s one squished into a square

Drops of liquid are usually round, but now we’ve found out how to make square droplets by squashing liquid between two elastic films stretched in different directions (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1885: Historic UK music retailer HMV collapses due to digital surge

British music retailer HMV, which was launched by English composer Edward Elgar in 1921 and helped propel the Beatles to fame, collapsed into administration on Friday as consumers switch to digital streaming in droves. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1886: The development of a hybrid micro mixer for biological and chemical experiments

An international team of scientists including an employee of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) has developed a device for mixing chemical and biological reaction feeds. The team managed to increase the mixing efficiency up to 90 percent. The new device will be used in biological and chemical experiments. The article was published in the RSC Advances journal. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1887: Don't waste your dog's poo – compost it

Australia has one of the highest rates of pet ownership in the world, with 38% of Australian households owning dogs. Dogs improve the quality of our lives, and studies show that exposure to dogs can even improve our immune system. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1888: Elon Musk Leads the Most-Read Transportation Stories of 2018

This year, our readers remained obsessed with self-driving and electric cars—and one of the most famous men making them.


1889: What's Changed Since My First Column for Scientific American

What’s changed since my first Scientific American column — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1890: AI, robotics, automation: The fourth industrial revolution is here

For Chinese guests at Marriott International hotels, the check-in process will soon get easier. The hotel giant announced last summer that it's developing facial recognition systems that will allow guests to check in at a kiosk in less than a minute via a quick scan of their facial features. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1891: 2 diabetes drugs spike heart attack risk

Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat Type 2 diabetes carry a high risk of cardiovascular events, including heart attack, stroke, heart failure, or amputation, a new study warns. “People should know if the medications they’re taking to treat their diabetes could lead to serious cardiovascular harm,” says lead author Matthew O’Brien, assistant professor of general internal medicine and geriatrics (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1892: Discovery of topological LC circuits transporting EM waves without backscattering

NIMS has succeeded in fabricating topological LC circuits arranged in a honeycomb pattern where electromagnetic (EM) waves can propagate without backscattering, even when pathways turn sharply. These circuits may be suitable for use as high-frequency electromagnetic waveguides, which would allow miniaturization and high integration in electronic devices such as mobile phones. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1893: Earliest records of three plant groups uncovered in the Permian of Jordan

A "hidden cradle of plant evolution" has been uncovered in Jordan. In Permian sedimentary rocks exposed along the east coast of the Dead Sea, a team led by palaeobotanists from the University of Münster discovered well-preserved fossils of plant groups bearing characteristics typical of younger periods of Earth history. The Permian began some 300 million years ago and ended around 250 million year


1894: Children's well-being not negatively affected by living in single-parent households, study shows

The experience of single parenthood is more common than typically reported – and children's well-being is not negatively affected by living in single-parent households – according to a study led by the University of Sheffield. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1895: Who is vulnerable to the impacts of tropical cyclones and why?

Tropical cyclones, and the torrential rains and strong winds these storms bring along with them, threaten coastal communities around the world and are expected to increase in intensity due to climate change. But not every tropical cyclone becomes a natural disaster and not every natural disaster results in human fatalities. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1896: Last Year in Tech 2018: Smartphone notches, data breaches, and sad CEOs

Technology A look back at 2018's big tech stories. Bring on 2019.


1897: Researchers develop 128Mb STT-MRAM with world's fastest write speed for embedded memory

A research team, led by Professor Tetsuo Endoh at Tohoku University, has successfully developed 128Mb-density STT-MRAM (spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory) with a write speed of 14 ns for use in embedded memory applications, such as cache in IOT and AI. This is currently the world's fastest write speed for embedded memory application with a density over 100Mb and will pave (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1898: Cell death mechanisms in stroke and novel molecular and cellular treatment options

As a result of ischemia or hemorrhage, blood supply to neurons is disrupted which subsequently promotes a cascade of pathophysiological responses resulting in cell loss. This review will explore the most updated cellular death mechanisms leading to neuronal loss in stroke. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1899: Systematic review of food addiction as measured with the Yale Food Addiction Scale

The aim of this paper was to review the clinical significance of food addiction diagnoses made with the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) and to discuss the results in light of the current debate on behavioral addictions. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1900: Record for decoding the longest DNA sequence is impressive – here's what to expect next

Like other professionals, scientists like to be the best at what they do, but they also like to have fun in their job. And in 2018, my colleagues managed just that in claiming a record for decoding the world's longest DNA sequence. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1901: Clouds with a chance of warming

Researchers from Argonne's Environmental Science division participated in one of the largest collaborative atmospheric measurement campaigns in Antarctica in recent decades.


1902: Researchers link realism to blockchain's promise

Depending on who you ask, blockchain technology is poised to revolutionize the world—from creating a universal currency to building a free and truly private internet. Or, the new technology, built with a combination of encryption and transparency, is a solution in search of a problem. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1903: Scientists learn how to predict space radiation levels

Experts from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia), the University of Oulu (Finland), and the St. Petersburg-based Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russia) have compared the effect of cosmic ray solar modulation as recorded by neutron monitors and the PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-Nuclei Astrophysics) satellite e (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1904: New research reveals how galaxies stay hot and bothered

It's relatively easy for galaxies to make stars. Start out with a bunch of random blobs of gas and dust. Typically those blobs will be pretty warm. To turn them into stars, you have to cool them off. By dumping all their heat in the form of radiation, they can compress. Dump more heat, compress more. Repeat for a million years or so. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1905: Russian researchers explore the prospects for creating photonic integrated circuits

The transition from electronic integrated circuits to faster, more energy-efficient and interference-free optical circuits is one of the most important goals in the development of photon technologies. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) are already used today for transmitting and processing signals in optical networks and communication systems, including, for example, I/O multiplexers of optical s (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1906: NUS study: Older adults care about strangers' welfare in financial decision-making

A study from the National University of Singapore found that older adults make the same financial decisions for themselves and others, while young adults take more risks when making financial decisions for others. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1907: Sound changes the way rodents sense touch

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report how the somatosensory cortex interprets tactile and auditory stimulation in mice and rats. They show that the barrel cortex response to auditory and tactile stimuli is additive, but also with different electrophysiological properties. The study provides new insights on how multimodal senses are interpreted by the brain. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1908: A boundary dance of amyloid-β stepping into dementia

Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. This aggregation is accelerated at a cell membrane surface. The research group at ExCELLS revealed the reason of this phenomenon by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments. The findings were published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry B. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1909: Hybrid qubits solve key hurdle to quantum computing

Researchers have crafted a new architecture for quantum computing. By constructing a hybrid device made from two different types of qubit — the fundamental computing element of quantum computers — they have created a device that can be quickly initialized and read out, and that simultaneously maintains high control fidelity. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


1910: Vietnam court orders ride-hailing app to compensate taxi firm

A Vietnam court Friday ordered ride-hailing app Grab to pay a cab company more than $200,000 for losses incurred due to competition—a judgement blasted by the firm as "a giant step backwards" for the country's tech community. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1911: Rings make Saturn shadier, bluer and less hazy in winter

On Saturn, changing seasons can mean changes in the haziness—and color—of the skies.


1912: How Do Wildfires Start?

More than 8.5 million acres of land in the U.S. burned this year. Here's how the raging flames get their start. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1913: This May Be Life's 'Missing Ingredient'

Billions of years ago, molecules on a lifeless and tumultuous Earth mixed, forming the first life-forms.


1914: Plants have a plan for all seasons

Many plants need to avoid flowering in the autumn – even if conditions are favourable – otherwise they would perish in winter.


1915: India to send three-person crew on landmark space mission

India will send a three-member team into orbit for up to a week when it launches its first manned space mission expected in 2022, the government announced Friday.


1916: Researchers investigate molecular gas emission from the galaxy NGC 3557

Using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), researchers have conducted interferometric observations of the elliptical galaxy NGC 3557 to investigate molecular gas emission from this source. Results of these observations, available in a paper published December 13 on arXiv.org, could be helpful for understanding the process of star formation in this galaxy.


1917: Tesla names two directors as part of Musk US fraud settlement

Tesla named two more independent directors on Friday and said it completed the requirements of a US settlement of fraud charges involving Chief Executive Elon Musk.


1918: Indonesia tsunami raises fears for endangered Javan rhino

Indonesia's tsunami has raised fears that another deadly wave could wipe out the few dozen Javan rhinos still living in the wild, conservation authorities said Friday. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1919: Special magnets make spin-based memory more efficient

A new magnetic device can manipulate digital information 20 times more efficiently and with 10 times more stability than commercial spintronic digital memories, say researchers. The spintronic memory device, which employs ferrimagnets, has the potential to accelerate the commercial growth of spin-based memory. “Our discovery could provide a new device platform to the spintronic industry, which at (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1920: The most eye-catching science and tech news stories of 2018

From advances in mind reading and medical procedures to AI law enforcement and CRISPR controversy, 2018 was a year of highs and lows. Here are our highlights (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1921: Edward Gorey and the Power of the Ineffable

“Everyday life is very discomfiting,” the American writer and illustrator Edward Gorey told The National Observer in 1976. “I guess I’m trying to convey that discomfiting texture in my books.” But Gorey’s art did not merely aim to discompose audiences with its macabre Victorian-Edwardian overlays and casual depictions of darkly comic cruelty. It also sought to unsettle by resisting definitive exp


1922: Letters: ‘The Puzzle of the Wealthy’

The Reason Many Ultrarich People Aren’t Satisfied With Their Wealth Recently, Joe Pinsker talked to a handful of experts about why many ultrarich people are motivated to accumulate more and more wealth. There are two central questions people ask themselves when determining whether they’re satisfied, one researcher explained: Am I doing better than I was before? and Am I doing better than other pe (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1923: Best PS4 Accessories (2019): Controllers, Headsets, and More

Own a PS4 or PS4 Pro? You're definitely going to want some of these lovely extras.


1924: A Blood Test for the Body's Clock

A new way to measure internal time could yield insight into sleep deprivation and disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1925: 9 Times Nature Was Totally Metal in 2018

Nature. Is. METAL.


1926: 2018's Science Superlatives: The Biggest, Oldest, Smelliest and Cutest

As 2018 draws to a close, we look back at some of the record-breaking discoveries of the year.


1927: Kronik: Genopliv de danske fragtskibe


1928: Why a Large Number of Americans Don’t Know All Their Grandparents’ First Names

One-third of Americans aren’t able to name all of their grandparents, according to the genealogy website Ancestry.com. That proportion seems very, very high—it represents more than 100 million people. Can that estimate really be right? Ancestry filled in some details when I inquired. The figure comes from a survey the company recently commissioned that polled 2,000 American adults who were “stati


1929: Pediatric leukemia ‘super drug’ may be within reach

When scientists stabilized a key protein responsible for leukemia, MLL, it slowed the progression of the disease in mice, according to a new study. The next step, researchers say, is to combine the treatments from the past two years of research into a pediatric leukemia “super drug” to test on humans in a clinical trial. “This is a monster cancer that we’ve been dealing with for many years in chi


1930: Whether the cold extends lifespan depends on genes

The extent to which temperature affects lifespan depends on an individual’s genes, according to new research. Temperature is a known factor in aging and many animal species live longer at lower temperature than they do at higher temperatures. As a result, “there are people out there who believe, strongly, that if you take a cold shower every day it will extend your lifespan,” says Kristin Gribble (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1931: Madagascar pochard: World's rarest bird gets new home

A species of duck thought to have been wiped out a decade ago is re-released at a lake in Madagascar.


1932: World's rarest bird gets new home in Madagascar

Conservationists hope to save a species of duck called the Madagascar pochard from extinction.


1933: Anak Krakatau: How a tsunami could wipe out the last Javan rhinos

There are only 67 Javan rhinos left in the world and they all live in sight of Anak Krakatau volcano.


1934: A Mission: Impossible Fake-Out for the Ages

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Christopher McQuarrie’s Mission: Impossible—Fallout . (Read our previous entries here .) The ludicrously dubbed “Impossible Mission Force,” the imaginary federal agency at the heart of the Mission: Impossibl (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1935: Here's how people jumped out of planes decades ago—and eject from them today

Aviation Exiting a speeding jet is no small feat. From parachutes for the balloon corps to the latest generation of high-speed ejection seats, here’s how we learned to make a swift aerial exit. From parachutes for the balloon corps to the latest generation of high-speed ejector seats, here’s how we learned to make a swift aerial exit.


1936: The Republican Reversal shows how the US party is like Soviet Russia

The Republicans used to be all for science. A new book analyses how the US conservative party turned against conservation for the fourth of our 12 Days of Culture (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1937: What a Newfound Kingdom Means for the Tree of Life

Neither animal, plant, fungus nor familiar protozoan, a strange microbe foretells incredible biodiversity yet to be discovered — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1938: How President Woodrow Wilson tried to end all wars once and for all

President Wilson proposed "Fourteen Points" at the end of World War I. He wanted an organization created – the League of Nations – to settle international disputes. The League was a precursor to the United Nations, but the U.S. never actually joined it. None Coming out of the horrendous calamity of World War I, Woodrow Wilson , the 28th President of the United States, developed a vision for an in (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1939: A virtual reality experience of being inside an exploded star

Cassiopeia A, the youngest known supernova remnant in the Milky Way, is the remains of a star that exploded almost 400 years ago. The star was approximately 15 to 20 times the mass of our sun and sat in the Cassiopeia constellation, almost 11,000 light-years from earth.


1940: An Elephant’s Personhood on Trial

Forty-seven years ago, the Asian elephant now known as Happy was one of seven calves captured—probably in Thailand, but details are hazy—and sent to the United States. She spent five years at a safari park in Florida, time that in the wild would have been spent by her mother’s side. Then she was moved to the Bronx Zoo in New York City. There Happy remains today, and since the death of an elephant


1941: Der er lang vej, til robotten overtager de kedelige opgaver i hjemmet

Selvom der i stor stil udvikles software og hardware til servicerobotter, der skal hjælpe mennesker med serviceopgaver i hjemmet, på restauranten eller i lufthavnen, så er der er lang vej, til de for alvor kan gøre hverdagen nemmere. Ny teknologi til selvkørende biler kan være med til at rykke u… (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1942: Reactive optical matter: Light-induced motion

Newton's third law dictates that forces between interacting particles are equal and opposite for closed systems. In a non-equilibrium environment, the third law can be defied, giving rise to "nonreciprocal" forces. Theoretically, this was shown when dissimilar, optically trapped particles were mediated by an external field. In a recent study, Yuval Yifat and colleagues measured the net nonreciproc


1943: Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1944: The mysterious demise of Europe’s massive cave bears

Once more common than brown bears, cave bears didn't survive the last ice age. Could their sad end be down to their diet, or just to being bears of very little brain?


1945: Laser diode detects counterfeit olive oil

Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) and the Scintillon Institute in the U.S. have designed a sensor that can detect counterfeit olive oil labeled as extra virgin or protected designation of origin. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1946: ESA sets clock by distant spinning stars

ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands has begun running a pulsar-based clock. The "PulChron' system measures the passing of time using millisecond-frequency radio pulses from multiple fast-spinning neutron stars. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1947: Mission accomplished for ESA's butane-propelled CubeSat

The cereal-box sized GomX-4B – ESA's biggest small CubeSat yet flown – has completed its mission for the Agency, testing out new miniaturised technologies including: intersatellite link communication with its GomX-4A twin, a hyperspectral imager, star tracker and butane-based propulsion system. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1948: We’re all Just Starting to Realize the Power of Personal Data

This year revealed consumers have a lot more to learn about what happens to their information online.


1949: Is This Photo Real? AI Gets Better at Faking Images

Progress on AI-generated visuals offers clues on how images, video, and art could power new forms of entertainment and disinformation.


1950: NASA's New Horizons Probe Prepares To Make History—Again

The intrepid spacecraft has traveled 13 years and 4 billion miles to glimpse Ultima Thule, a cold, dark world at the fringes of our solar system.


1951: The 10 most intriguing inventions of 2018

From programmable pills to power-generating boots, here are some of the most unusual technological innovations we covered this year.


1952: These are the five hottest gadget trends for 2019

From folding phones to 8K TVs, the cutting-edge advances you need to know about for next year.


1953: Tiny Computers Could Transform Our Lives

And they’re getting closer to the marketplace all the time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1954: Lotus Birth: No Benefit, Plenty of Risk

The practice of refusing to cut the umbilical cord after delivery of a newborn has no benefit and risks serious infection. A recent case series illustrates the risks of so-called Lotus birth. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1955: Huge reserves of iron in Western Siberia might originate from under an ancient sea

The world's largest Bakchar iron ore deposit is located in an ancient sea in West Siberia, Russia. Its proven reserves are over 28 billion tons. Scientists seek to explain the accumulation of such a huge amount of iron. Now, they have proposed the upward migration of a mixture of Fe-rich brine and hydrothermal fluid through marine sediments as the origin of the Bakchar ironstone deposit. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1956: Drones Used to Find Toy-Like "Butterfly" Land Mines

Quadcopters with thermal imagery cameras can help detect vicious mini-mines that often kill or maim children — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1957: Chilling discovery: ice house found under London street

Cavernous 18th-century store reveals link to lost trade in ice blocks from Norwegian fjord For the well to-do residents of Georgian London, serving chilled drinks at a festive party was a more complicated process than today. In the absence of electricity to make ice cubes and keep them frozen, they had to source their ice from elsewhere. For the most discerning hosts, that meant using blocks of p


1958: Jamal Khashoggi's Murder Remains a Mystery

The murder of Jamal Khashoggi is not a game of Clue, but it often resembles one. Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb, in the annex, with a syringe . Or was it Salah al-Tubaigy, in the consul’s office, with a bone saw ? About three months have passed since Khashoggi walked into the consulate in Istanbul, and nearly as much time has passed since Saudi Arabia confirmed—after a period of flailing attempts at deni


1959: The 18 Best Breakouts of 2018

Editor’s Note : Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2018” coverage here . Among the watershed cultural moments of 2018 (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1960: A New Book Describes Hunter S. Thompson’s Prescience

If Hunter S. Thompson were still alive—if the so-called Gonzo journalist hadn’t killed himself in 2005, his ashes subsequently propelled from a cannon in a ceremony financed by Johnny Depp—the odds are high that he’d be linking Donald Trump to “that dark, venal and incurably violent side of the American character,” and contending that Trump “speaks for the Werewolf in us.” That’s how Thompson rep


1961: What will be the big science stories of 2019? Here are our predictions

From black hole insights to the future of self-driving cars to figuring out what it means to be human, 2019 will be a big year in science.


1962: How to spot high-conflict people before it's too late

Here's a fast fact about high-conflict people: life is better when you avoid them. Bill Eddy, mediation expert and president of the High Conflict Institute, describes them not only as difficult but also potentially dangerous. So how can we avoid becoming a target in their path of destruction? First, you have to be able to recognize them, says Eddy. They tend to share these four key characteristic (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1963: Kæmpe Mars-krater er fyldt med to kilometer tyk is

ESA-sonden Mars Express har sendt unikke billeder hjem af det 82 kilometer brede Korolev-krater, der gemmer på et massivt islag, der fastholdes af kold luft.


1964: Første Boeing-737 færdiggjort på kinesisk fabrik

Nu har den amerikanske flyproducent Boeing ligesom sin europæiske konkurrent Airbus et produktionsanlæg i Kina.


1965: Ballade på Instagram: Kontroversiel opdatering var en fejl

Opdateringen, der ramte flere danskere, ændrede hele feedet på Instagram. Chefen for Instagram siger i tweet, at det var en fejl. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1966: Ny terrænmodel skal lette vedligeholdelsen af danske veje

Geodata over det danske motorvejsnet skal give Vejdirektoratet et praj om, hvor der er behov for rabatsanering. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1967: Weather hampers efforts to inspect Indonesia tsunami volcano

Bad weather and a massive ash column hampered efforts to assess whether Indonesia's Anak Krakatau volcano island could trigger another deadly tsunami as authorities said Friday the search for victims in the worst-affected province will continue into January. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1968: A high-carb diet may lead to brain inflammation, says Dr. David Perlmutter

The re-release of David Perlmutter's Grain Brain continues the doctor's plight against high-carbohydrate diets. Perlmutter believes excess carbohydrates and gluten can lead to anxiety, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. A half-decade of research on brain health and the microbiome backs up Perlmutter's argument. None Sustainability and prevention are counterintuitive to human biology, which like


1969: Top 5 Real UFO sightings 2018-Alien Disclosure?

(Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1970: Australia swelters in record-breaking heatwave

Australia's vast continent is sizzling through extreme heatwave conditions this week, with temperatures reaching record highs and emergency services on high alert for bushfires.


1971: Army looks for a few good robots, sparks industry battle

The Army is looking for a few good robots. Not to fight—not yet, at least—but to help the men and women who do. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1972: All lives matter': Indonesia saves tsunami-stranded turtles

Searching a debris-strewn beach for victims of Indonesia's deadly tsunami, a rescue team happened upon a giant sea turtle trapped in a pile of marine trash. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1973: Nancy Grace Roman, involved with Hubble telescope, dies

Nancy Grace Roman, the first woman to hold an executive position at NASA and who helped with development of the Hubble Space Telescope, has died.


1974: Fynsk pilotanlæg skal producere fremtidens grønne råstof fra biogas og brint

Projektet, som netop har fået 16,6 mio. kr. i støtte fra EUDP, skal booste overskydende CO2 fra biogasproduktionen med brint fra vindmøllestrøm ved hjælp af en ny, biologisk metode.


1975: Tysk virksomhed vil erstatte bilmotorens tændrør med mikrobølger

Ved at bruge mikrobølgeantænding i stedet for tændrør kan både brændstofforbrug og udledninger fra forbrændingsmotoren reduceres, mener et tysk virksomhed. Muligheden for integration i eksisterende motorer har fanget bilindustriens interesse. (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


1976: UK invests millions in micro-robots able to work in dangerous sites

Devices could be deployed in underground pipe networks, reducing need for roadworks The UK government is investing millions in the development of micro-robots designed to work in underground pipe networks and dangerous sites such as decommissioned nuclear facilities. The ambition is for the robots, developed in British universities, to mark the end of disruptive and expensive roadworks by carryin (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


1977: Stardust’s origins are more complex than we thought

New research brings scientists closer to solving a long-standing mystery about the origins of stardust. Everything around you—your desk, your laptop, your coffee cup—in fact, even you—is made of stardust, the stuff forged in the fiery furnaces of stars that died before our sun was born. When stars die, they seed the cosmos around them with the elements that go on to coalesce into new stars, plane (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


1978: How to Memorize the Largest Known Prime

It may seem daunting to memorize a 24-million digit number, but with these tips you'll be well on your way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


1979: Proportion of cancers associated with excess body weight varies considerably by state

A new study finds an at least 1.5-fold difference in the share of cancers related to obesity between states with the highest and lowest proportions. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1980: A boundary dance of amyloid-beta stepping into dementia

Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-beta peptides. This aggregation is accelerated at a cell membrane surface. The research group at ExCELLS revealed the reason of this phenomenon by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments. m (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


1981: Making Connections with the STEM Learning Ecosystems Initiative

Building a national community of practice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


1982: 2019 Preview: Experimental vaccine could let coeliacs eat gluten

A vaccine that teaches a person's immune system to see gluten as harmless could enable some people with coeliac disease to eat bread and pasta made from wheat


1983: Fra kedeligt til cool: Kødbakker med genanvendt plast

Den danske plastindustri er inde i en rivende udvikling med ønsket om at blive førende inden for cirkulær plastemballage. (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


1984: Letter: How to Stop Brain Drain on Indian Reservations

The Blackfeet Brain Drain After leaving to pursue an education, Sterling HolyWhiteMountain wrote in November , some Native Americans find themselves stuck between a longing to help their community and the lack of viable employment back home. “A ll too often,” he observed, “success for reservation Indians means leaving your heart in your homeland.” I would like to add to Sterling HolyWhiteMountain (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


1985: 100 Best Science Photos of 2018

Science can be stunning, and it did not disappoint in 2018.


1986: 10 Times Animals Behaved Oddly in 2018

Animals can get really weird. Here are our favorite examples from 2018.


1987: The animal economists that can wheel and deal as well as any human

From monkey markets to fishy business, we’re finding that many animals make rational trades. Even brainless fungi have a thing or two to teach us


1988: The Mysterious Conversation That Creates an Obsession in Burning

The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series delves into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Lee Chang-dong’s Burning . (Read our previous entries here .) “My father has an anger disorder. He has rage bottled up inside of him. It goes off like a bomb. Once it goes off, everything is destroyed.” So begins a confession of so (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


1989: Civil Discourse Exists in This Small Corner of the Internet

Imagine a place on the internet where a post that begins with “I’m not a feminist” is met with comments quoting Virginia Woolf and asking serious, clarifying questions. A place where a conversation about gun-control legislation unfurls into a thread of analogies, statistics, and self-reflection; where a discussion on the benefits and drawbacks of immigration is carried out in a series of building


1990: 2018 Was the Year of the Scooter. What Happens Now?

After the mania comes the grind.


1991: This Year SpaceX Made Us All Believe in Reusable Rockets

A few small glitches marred an otherwise stellar year as SpaceX honed its reusable rocket technology.


1992: Kender du disse nye ord fra 2018?

PLUS. Kan du definere ‘gig økonomi’, eller har du brug for en ‘digital detox’? Ellers kan du læse med her og få opdateret dit ordforråd med ni af årets buzzwords. (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


1993: Tarmen: 8 meter langt organ manipulerer dit helbred

Starter autisme i tarmen? Og kan man spise sig rask med donor-afføring? Nyere forskning viser, at tarmbakterier og helbred går hånd i hånd. Her får du fem eksempler.


1994: No Peace for Them and No Honor for Us

Nothing in the presidency of Donald Trump combines tragedy and farce so perfectly as his decision to withdraw the 2,000 American troops in Syria. “We have defeated ISIS in Syria, my only reason for being there during the Trump Presidency,” he tweeted on the morning of December 19. The claim was false on its face. The Islamic State has lost most of its territory, but it retains thousands of fighte


1995: How to get fit without busting a gut

Modern high-intensity workouts are seductively short – but do they offer the same life-extending benefits as established exercise regimes? Is it boom time for the fitness business? One in seven people in the UK is believed to be a member of a gym, 2018 saw the number of gyms exceed 7,000 for the first time, and by 2022 the private health and fitness club market alone is predicted to be worth a who


1996: Nasa's New Horizons: Final commands given to distant probe

Nasa's New Horizons spacecraft is all set for its dramatic encounter with a far-off icy world.


1997: A Journey Into the Solar System’s Outer Reaches, Seeking New Worlds to Explore

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will visit a tiny and mysterious object in the Kuiper belt on Tuesday, seeking clues to the formation of our cosmic neighborhood.


1998: Leder: Opture, nedture og alt for mange hedeture

(Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


1999: ‘For 30 years I’ve been obsessed by why children get leukaemia. Now we have an answer’

Newly knighted cancer scientist Mel Greaves explains why a cocktail of microbes could give protection against disease Mel Greaves has a simple goal in life. He is trying to create a yoghurt-like drink that would stop children from developing leukaemia. The idea might seem eccentric; cancers are not usually defeated so simply. However, Professor Greaves is confident and, given his experience in th


2000: China's top court to handle intellectual property appeals

China's top court will rule on intellectual property cases for the first time from January 1, the government said, elevating the handling of an issue that has become a key complaint in the trade war with the US. (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2001: Iran sees 'revival' of imperilled Lake Urmia

It is one of the worst ecological disasters of recent decades, but the shrinking of Iran's great Lake Urmia finally appears to be stabilising and officials see the start of a revival. (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2002: French start-up offers 'dark web' compass, but not for everyone

For years criminal websites shrouded in secrecy have thrived beyond the reach of traditional search engines, but a group of French engineers has found a way to navigate this dark web—a tool they don't want to fall into the wrong hands. (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2003: Bali's Agung volcano spews ash in fresh eruption

A volcano on the Indonesian holiday island of Bali erupted Sunday, belching ash high into the air and over nearby villages as officials warned tourists to keep clear of the area.


2004: Social media has made Gen Z less engaged in the classroom, says math lecturer Clio Cresswell

Mathematics lecturer noticed the changes in her students after returning to teaching after a five-year break. She says her students are noticeably less engaged, increasingly on their smartphones or computers, and ask more "stupid questions." A batch of results from an ongoing National Institutes of Health study recently showed alarming results about the impacts that screen use has on developing b


2005: Atjuiu! På med halstørklædet: Gør kulden dig syg?

Når det er koldt, skal du tage godt med tøj på, siger et gammelt råd. Men holder du influenzaen væk, når du pakker dig ind i varmt tøj? Videnskaben klær dig på til vinterens minusgrader.


2006: Intellectual activity and dementia: It's more of a help than a cure.

A remarkable seven-decade cognition studied 498 people from Scotland. People who test well as children retain that ranking through life. Study finds remaining engaged has no effect on the trajectory of dementia's "cognitive burden." All of them were born in Scotland in 1936. And according to the Scottish Council for Research in Education archives, all of them took the same intelligence test on Ju


2007: Why zombies represent a crisis of meaning in western culture. Based on the work of John Vervaeke, who lectures at the University Of Toronto, in the fields of Psychology, Cognitive Science, and Buddhist Psychology.

(Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2008: Turn Xmas Tree Into Food and Medicine

Pine needles can easily be broken down into sugars, as well as the building blocks of paint, adhesives and medicines. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


2009: Endangered Species Observers Have Spotted The First Right Whale Calf Of The Season

The sighting is a glimmer of hope for a species that has seen a hard few years: 19 right whales died in 2017 and 2018, and not a single North American right whale calf was seen last season. (Image credit: Michael Dwyer/AP)


2010: Fake news is everywhere. Even in places that were once legitimate.

The South China Morning Post is a respected paper with a long and noble history that has recently made more than a few missteps. Critics of the paper allege that it has fallen into the hands of Beijing and is now little more than a propaganda outlet. The use of a legitimate news source to peddle propaganda is nothing new, but it may be the shape of things to come. We are awash in fake news. It ju


2011: Through an encrypted digital ID, Estonians can access about 99% of public services online

A new report from The Associated Press outlines Estonia's most recent advancements in its digital government. Estonia allows its citizens to vote, obtains medical data and register business documents online. Given security concerns and other complications, it remains unclear whether nations like the U.S. could implement similar systems. None It's easier than ever to order goods and access informa


2012: The Treatment Gap: In Rehab, ‘Two Warring Factions’: Abstinence vs. Medication

A reluctant evolution is taking place in residential drug treatment for opioid addiction. Here’s a look at one center’s wary shift.


2013: Earthquake Off Philippine Coast Hits A Region Already On High Alert

U.S. Geological Survey says it was magnitude 7.0. No casualties have been reported. On Dec. 22, a tsunami, likely caused by the volcano Anak Krakatau, hit Indonesia and killed about 430 people. (Image credit: Fauzy Chaniago/AP)


2014: Astrobiology Highlights of 2018

A very incomplete list of contributions furthering our search for life elsewhere (and other stuff) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


2015: Right whale calf, mother spotted in Atlantic off Florida

Florida conservationists are reporting a right whale calf sighting off the state's Atlantic coast. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2016: 2019 Preview: Gravitational waves will be discovered every few weeks

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and other experiments will detect dozens more ripples in space time (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2017: Scientists think they've found a super-Earth exoplanet dripping with sapphires and rubies

Space The right kind of chemistry can lead to some strange sorts of worlds. The right kind of chemistry can lead to some strange sorts of worlds.


2018: How to talk to your children about sex

It’s no easy task for parents, but there are ways to start this crucial conversation “If you had a question about sex, where would you go?” I ask my 12-year-old daughter, Orla. She doesn’t look up from her phone. “I’d ask online,” she deadpans. “then delete my browser history.” “You wouldn’t come to me?” I venture, worried, hurt, amused and (a tiny part) relieved. “Mum, if I asked you about sex,


2019: Jocelyn Bell Burnell and the Discovery of Pulsars

Jocelyn Bell Burnell discovered pulsars (a specific type of neutron star) and got zero credit for it until recently. Here's her story — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2020: The Timeless Bliss of Eating Hometown Food

A four-hour wait is nothing in the face of nostalgia. When Matt Fligiel learned in 2013 that the future of Blimpyburger was in jeopardy, he knew he had to savor one last meal at the local institution before it closed. “They said they were going to reopen, but nobody actually believed them,” said the 24-year-old native of Ann Arbor, Michigan, who now lives in Chicago. “I waited with two of my frie (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2021: Readers Respond to the September 2018 Issue

Letters to the editor from the September 2018 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2022: Space Oddity: 10 Bizarre Things Earthlings Launched into Space in 2018

This past year, engineers launched many oddities into space, including a Tesla Roadster, a gold-plated canopic jar and a cosmic disco ball.


2023: 9 Times Nature Was Totes Adorbs in 2018

2018 was rough. You've earned a little cuteness, don't you think?


2024: Nature’s Nation: Art benefits from getting its hands dirty

Forty-eight years on from the first Earth Day, the 5th article in our 12 Days of Culture series examines the long-term impact of environmental art (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2025: Going Dumb: My Year With a Flip Phone

The upsides of a downgrade.


2026: Chinese firms offer subsidies on Huawei phones in show of support

Chinese firms are encouraging staff to buy Huawei smartphones following Canada's arrest of a top Huawei executive on a US extradition request, which has triggered an outpouring of nationalist support. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2027: How To Help Kids Overcome Their Fear Of Doctors And Shots

Half of the parents of young children in a recent survey said their kids fear going to the doctor. Some admit skipping vaccines and needed appointments. Here's how to nip medical anxiety in the bud. (Image credit: Ryan Johnson for NPR)


2028: A Star Is Born Finds Movie Magic in a Parking Lot

Over the next week, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Next up is Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born . (Read our previous entries here .) By the time Ally (played by Lady Gaga) and Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) are sitting together in an empty parking lot in the middle of th (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2029: The Bipartisan Group That’s Not Afraid of Partisanship

C ARY, N.C. —One Saturday morning this past fall, a handful of progressive voters were seated in a neat circle, pondering why more people don’t agree with their preferred policy solutions for the country. This kind of hand-wringing has been common among Democratic voters since the 2016 election, especially in liberal enclaves (like urban Wake County, where Cary is located) in red states (like Nor


2030: 2018 Tech in Memoriam: Goodbye to the iPhone SE, Google+, and More

Pour one out for this year's tech casualties.


2031: The Year in Robots (2018): Boston Dynamics, Baxter, and More

Look back on the biggest moments in robotics in 2018, from the continued ascendance of SpotMini to the rapid rise and fall of the home robot.


2032: All the reasons 2018 was a breakout year for DNA data

Gene information on millions of people is revolutionizing how we predict disease, catch criminals, and find new drugs.


2033: Bored at work? Your brain is trying to tell you something.

We've all been bored on the job at least once in our lives, but that boredom is actually very old human wiring. We constantly seek out new information to keep our minds sharp, and when tasks get repetitive we get bored and move on. But what if you can't move on? What if the tasks are your job and you have to repeat them day after day to keep a roof over your head? That, says London Business Schoo (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2034: A Troubling Pattern of Personal Diplomacy

President Donald Trump’s decision to quickly withdraw troops from Syria has sparked deep concern about an Islamic State revival, Iranian gains, and a Turkish attack on America’s Kurdish allies. For months, in both public and private, top aides—including Trump’s national-security adviser, his special envoy for the ISIS coalition, and his special representative for Syria—had all insisted that Ameri


2035: Fighting Nazis for a Living

In 1970, crosstown busing came to Richmond, Virginia. Richard Cohen, then only a teenager, persuaded his parents to let him attend an integrated public school instead of private school. He ended up leaving high school a year early to begin college at Columbia University, where he studied philosophy. Cohen, now the president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, worked in private law for seven years (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2036: Nasa spacecraft reached at the edge of solar system- icy world

(Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2037: Police diver adopts dog rescued from icy lake

A puppy was saved from a frozen lake by a police diver in Turkey.


2038: Disse artikler fik debattørerne op i det røde felt

Elvarme-afgift, FM-sluk, fjernvarme og ph-værdien i verdenshavene. Det var emner, der fik fyret godt op under debatten på ing.dk. Her er en top-20 over de artikler, der fik flest debattører til tasterne i det forløbne år. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2039: 10 vigtige opdagelser videnskaben stod bag i 2018

Hvert år bliver vi klogere. Og videnskaben har i år fundet svar på både skøre, mærkelige og virkelig vigtige dele af vores verden. DR Videnskab har samlet årets største bedrifter.


2040: The Atlantic Daily: Finding a Way to 2019

What We’re Following The partial U.S.-government shutdown continues, while the House Democrats push forward with the establishment of a Climate Crisis Committee—to the disappointment of some activists on the party’s left, who’d hoped for a more ambitious mandate. Still at loose ends is the fallout over the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s murder , the geopolitical impact—or lack thereof—of the (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


2041: Breaking down AGEs: Insight into how lifestyle drives ER-positive breast cancer

Consumption of processed foods high in sugar and fat increase levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Researchers report that AGE levels are higher in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Addition of AGEs caused breast cancer cells, whose growth had previously been controlled by tamoxifen, to begin to grow again. This suggests that patients with h


2042: After naloxone, when can opioid overdose patients be safely discharged?

Naloxone has saved thousands of lives. But can patients be safely discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) just an hour after they receive the medication that curtails drug overdoses? A new study is the first to clinically assess the one-hour rule. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


2043: These nine measures reveal how forests are controlled by climate

One of the first studies to examine how climate is influencing functional traits in forest communities on a global scale found evidence of major changes. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


2044: Pine needles from Christmas trees could be turned into paint and food sweeteners

Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


2045: Fish bones yield new tool for tracking coal ash contamination

A new study shows that trace elements found in fish ear bones can be used as biogenic tracers to track coal ash contamination. Strontium isotope ratios in the otoliths of fish collected from two lakes that received coal ash effluents matched strontium isotope ratios in contaminated pore water samples from the lakes' bottoms. This marks the first time strontium isotope ratios have been used as fing (Wed, 26 Dec 2018)


2046: New insight on how memory works

Researchers have explored how memory is tied to the hippocampus, with findings that will expand scientists' understanding of how memory works and ideally aid in detection, prevention, and treatment of memory disorders.


2047: Researchers use 'blacklist' computing concept as novel way to streamline genetic analysis

Researchers have discovered a new use for a long-standing computational concept known as 'blacklisting.' Using blacklisting as a filter to single out genetic variations in patient genomes and exomes that do not cause illness, researchers have successfully streamlined the identification of genetic drivers of disease. (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


2048: Tysk virksomhed vil erstatte bilmotorens tændrør med mikrobølger

Ved at bruge mikrobølgeantænding i stedet for tændrør kan både brændstofforbrug og udledninger fra forbrændingsmotoren reduceres, mener et tysk virksomhed. Muligheden for integration i eksisterende motorer har fanget bilindustriens interesse. (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2049: Ebola-fighting human protein offers hope for new drugs

A human protein that helps fight the Ebola virus could one day lead to an effective therapy against the deadly disease, researchers say. The newly discovered ability of the human protein RBBP6 to interfere with Ebola virus replication suggests new ways to fight the infection. As viruses develop and evolve proteins to bypass the body’s immune defenses, human cells in turn develop defense mechanism (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2050: Stardust’s origins are more complex than we thought

New research brings scientists closer to solving a long-standing mystery about the origins of stardust. Everything around you—your desk, your laptop, your coffee cup—in fact, even you—is made of stardust, the stuff forged in the fiery furnaces of stars that died before our sun was born. When stars die, they seed the cosmos around them with the elements that go on to coalesce into new stars, plane (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2051: Physicists puzzled by strange numbers that could explain reality

Physicists discover complex numbers called octonions that work in 8 dimensions. The numbers have been found linked to fundamental forces of reality. Understanding octonions can lead to a new model of physics. None Is our reality, including its forces and particles, based on the strange properties of numbers with eight dimensions called " octonions "? A physicist thinks so, having found a way to e (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2052: New global migration estimates show rates steady since 1990, high return migration

Scientists have unveiled a new statistical method for estimating migration flows between countries. Using the so-called pseudo-Bayes approach, they show that rates of migration are higher than previously thought, but also relatively stable, fluctuating between 1.1 and 1.3 percent of global population from 1990 to 2015. In addition, since 1990 approximately 45 percent of migrants have returned to t (Tue, 25 Dec 2018)


2053: How 'Dry January' is the secret to better sleep, saving money and losing weight

New research shows that taking part in Dry January sees people regaining control of their drinking, having more energy, better skin and losing weight. They also report drinking less months later. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


2054: The Best Tech Quotes of the Year

Fourteen memorable lines, from an ethicist ruing the use of CRISPR to edit a baby's genes, to Elon Musk's "plan" to take Tesla private.


2055: Going Viral: 6 New Findings about Viruses

Viruses were discovered in 1892, and yet even in 2018, researchers are still uncovering new secrets about these infectious invaders.


2056: In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2057: 83 Things That Blew Our Minds in 2018

Most “Himalayan” pink salt is from the Punjab area of Pakistan, not the actual Himalayas. Hippos poop so much that sometimes all the fish die . In addition to the supermassive black hole at its center, the Milky Way galaxy may be home to thousands of smaller black holes , invisible to even our finest scientific instruments. There’s a parasitic fungus that doses cicadas with the hallucinogen found


2058: Nancy Grace Roman, 'Mother Of Hubble' Space Telescope, Has Died, At Age 93

Roman was one of the first female executives at NASA, its first chief of astronomy and she played an instrumental role in making the Hubble Space Telescope a reality. She died on Dec. 25. (Image credit: Courtesy of NASA)


2059: The animal economists that can wheel and deal as well as any human

From monkey markets to fishy business, we’re finding that many animals make rational trades. Even brainless fungi have a thing or two to teach us


2060: The Most Dangerous People on the Internet in 2018: Trump, Zuck and More

From Donald Trump to Russian hackers, these are the most dangerous characters we've been watching online in 2018.


2061: Michio Kaku: Let’s not advertise our existence to aliens

If advanced alien civilizations do exist, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku asks: Why would they want anything to do with us? It would be like an academic talking to a squirrel, he suggests, and he has a great point. Hollywood and science fiction novels have conditioned us for years to believe that aliens either want to hang out on our intellectual level and learn from us… or destroy us. If ali (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2062: Reflections on a Year of Outrage

As New Year’s Day approaches, I’ve been looking back and pondering the almost constant expressions of outrage that characterized another year. “The same cycle occurs regardless of the gravity of the offense, which can make each outrage feel forgettable, replaceable,” the former Slate editor Julia Turner declared . “The bottomlessness of our rage has a numbing effect … It’s fascinating to look at


2063: Get live updates on New Horizons’ flyby of a distant Kuiper Belt object

The New Horizons spacecraft is ready for the most distant close flyby of a rocky object in the solar system, a rocky body called MU69 or Ultima Thule.


2064: Elon Musk wants testers for Tesla’s long-awaited ‘full self-driving’ A.I. chip

Elon Musk is looking for a few hundred more people to test and provide feedback about Tesla's long-awaited Hardware 3 update, according to an internal company message. Hardware 3, first announced in August, will likely expand the autonomous abilities of Tesla cars. It's still unclear just what those expanded capabilities will be, however. None Tesla CEO Elon Musk wants "a few hundred" more people


2065: ‘For 30 years I’ve been obsessed by why children get leukaemia. Now we have an answer’

Newly knighted cancer scientist Mel Greaves explains why a cocktail of microbes could give protection against disease Mel Greaves has a simple goal in life. He is trying to create a yoghurt-like drink that would stop children from developing leukaemia. The idea might seem eccentric; cancers are not usually defeated so simply. However, Professor Greaves is confident and, given his experience in th


2066: Computer virus hits Tribune Publishing, Los Angeles Times

A computer virus hit newspaper printing plants in Los Angeles and at Tribune Publishing newspapers across the country. (Sun, 30 Dec 2018)


2067: Capt Lou Rudd is first Briton to cross Antarctic unaided

A British Army officer has become the second person ever to trek unaided across Antarctica.


2068: Earthquake Off Philippine Coast Hits A Region Already On High Alert

U.S. Geological Survey says it was magnitude 7.0. No casualties have been reported. On Dec. 22, a tsunami, likely caused by the volcano Anak Krakatau, hit Indonesia and killed about 430 people. (Image credit: Fauzy Chaniago/AP)


2069: All about Ultima: New Horizons flyby target is unlike anything explored in space

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is set to fly by a target nicknamed 'Ultima Thule,' 4 billion miles from the Sun, on New Year's Day 2019. No spacecraft has ever explored such a distant world. (Thu, 27 Dec 2018)


2070: Best Space Photos of 2018, From Penguins to Selfies on Mars

We’re paying homage to the year’s highlights, especially the InSight Mars landing.


2071: What happens in the minds of free climbers

Science Studying the brains of daredevils like Alex Honnold. Neuroscientist Jane Joseph was using MRI scans to study thrill-seekers' brains. Then a journalist suggested she look at free-solo climber Alex Honnold. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2072: George R. R. Martin Didn't Work on 'Nightflyers.' It Shows

Syfy's new series doesn't reflect the influence of the man who wrote the novella on which it's based.


2073: The Real Fake News: Top Scientific Retractions of 2018

From unintentional irony to flat-out fraud, it has been another banner year for scientific retractions. Here are five notable ones. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2074: How Environmental Policies Fared In Trump's Cross Hairs In 2018

NPR's Debbie Elliott asks Bloomberg energy reporter Jennifer Dlouhy about the Trump administration's moves to weaken environmental regulations this past year. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2075: DNA fra fortidens mennesker skal afsløre hemmelighederne bag psykiske lidelser

Nyt forskningsprojekt skal kortlægge DNA fra tusindvis af gamle skeletter for at skaffe ny viden om lidelser som Alzheimers og skizofreni.


2076: The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending December 29, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2077: Bell’s V-280 Valor Tiltrotor Flies Through a Year of Testing

The V-22 Osprey-inspired aircraft, bidding to replace the Army's Black Hawk helicopter, has spent the past 12 months bagging a series of milestones.


2078: Austria to press ahead with digital tax: chancellor

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz vowed Saturday to press ahead with a tax on large internet and technology companies, following France's example, as the European Union struggles to finalise a new EU-wide levy. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2079: Death rays: How the dream of an ultimate weapon became a dark farce

The quest for the ultimate destructive weapon is a convoluted story of egos, charlatanry and deception – with a starring role for mercurial genius Nikola Tesla (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2080: The Making of a Trade Warrior

At his confirmation hearing s for the position of U.S. trade representative, Robert Lighthizer, the nation’s chief trade negotiator, promised to fight for all of America’s great industries. Yes, he acknowledged, he had built his three-decade career by lobbying for the steel industry. But he was ready, he said, to make the world safe again for good old-fashioned American capitalism, in all its for


2081: California Could Soon Have Its Own Version of the Internet

In 2018, the state reimposed net neutrality, established a privacy regime, and set bot rules. Will the moves splinter the net, or will others follow?


2082: Nasa spacecraft reached at the edge of solar system- icy world

(Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2083: Strong quake off Philippines prompts panic, tsunami warning (Update)

A powerful undersea earthquake struck off the southern Philippines on Saturday, prompting people to scramble out of shopping malls and buildings and authorities to warn villagers to stay away from beaches in case of a tsunami. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2084: US investigating CenturyLink internet outage, 911 failures

U.S. officials and at least one state said Friday that they have started investigations into a nationwide CenturyLink internet outage that has disrupted 911 service. (Sat, 29 Dec 2018)


2085: Indonesian tsunami volcano lost two-thirds of its height

The Indonesian volcano which caused a tsunami that killed more than 400 people last week lost more than two-thirds of its height following the eruption which triggered the killer waves.


2086: Researchers develop 128Mb STT-MRAM with world's fastest write speed for embedded memory

A research team has successfully developed 128Mb-density STT-MRAM (spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory) with a write speed of 14 ns for use in embedded memory applications, such as cache in IOT and AI. This is currently the world's fastest write speed for embedded memory application with a density over 100Mb and will pave the way for the mass-production of large capacity STT (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


2087: Marine debris study counts trash from Texas to Florida

Trash, particularly plastic, in the ocean and along the shoreline is an economic, environmental, human health, and aesthetic problem causing serious challenges to coastal communities around the world, including the Gulf of Mexico. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


2088: Reliable tropical weather pattern to change in a warming climate

As human activities cause the Earth's temperature to increase, reliable, well-studied weather patterns like the Madden-Julian Oscillation will change too, say researchers. (Fri, 28 Dec 2018)


2089: New Horizons Spacecraft Completes Flyby of Ultima Thule, the Most Distant Object Ever Visited

Now, scientists await confirmation that the visit succeeded, and a bounty of new data about a small, mysterious icy body four billion miles from Earth. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2090: Watch live as NASA spends New Year's Eve exploring the mysterious outer regions of our solar system

Space It's time to meet 2014 MU69. Tonight, scientists around the world are spending the holiday waiting to hear news of a historic space event.


2091: Space probe Osiris-Rex makes closest ever orbit of smallest ever object

Nasa sampling mission skims a mile above tiny asteroid Bennu where it will try to land and collect samples The Nasa spacecraft Osiris-Rex has gone into orbit around an ancient asteroid, setting a pair of records. Osiris-Rex spacecraft entered orbit on Monday around Bennu, 70m miles (110m kilometres) from Earth. It is the smallest celestial body ever to be orbited by a spacecraft, at just 500 metr (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2092: Rocket Launches, Trips to the Moon and More Space and Astronomy Events in 2019

A busy year in space just ended, and this one will be full of new highlights in orbit and beyond. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2093: James Watson Won’t Stop Talking About Race

The Nobel-winning biologist has drawn global criticism with unfounded pronouncements on genetics, race and intelligence. He still thinks he’s right, a new documentary finds. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2094: Autism Revisited

Is there an autism epidemic? Why was autism rare in the past? This book tries to answer those questions with a historical and sociological approach and suggests deinstitutionalization was a key factor. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2095: Paleoart

See an update from Chicago's Field Museum about the works of Charles R. Knight and other paleoartists who pioneered the depiction of ancient life. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2096: The Search for a Hangover Cure

(Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2097: Like a Sturgeon

Watch scenes from the Maumee River in Ohio, where researchers are stocking an ancient fish species that is struggling against extinction (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2098: January 2019 Crossword Puzzle Answers

See how well you did. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2099: Frogs Have a Bioelectric Mirror

Amputation of one limb triggers a rapid electric response that reflects the injury in the opposite one, researchers find. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2100: Competition and Cooperation of Cheese Rind Microbes Exposed

Transposon mutagenesis give scientists a rare look at the most important interactions within microbial communities. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2101: Mitochondria Play an Unexpected Role in Killing Bacteria

The energy-producing organelles also send out parcels with antimicrobial compounds to help destroy pathogen invaders in macrophages. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2102: Taming the Transposon Hordes

Researchers repurpose the CRISPR machinery to turn whole classes of transposable elements on or off. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2103: Infographic: How Cities Influence Evolution

Urban environments are driving genetic changes in resident species through multiple mechanisms, from establishing gene flow barriers to exerting novel selection pressures. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2104: Infographic: How Exposure to Cannabis in Utero Affects Development

Rodent and human studies have revealed a multitude of effects starting during gestation and lasting into adulthood. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2105: January 2019 Crossword

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2106: T-cell Tracker: A Profile of Wendy Havran

By uncovering novel properties of a unique population of T cells, the Scripps Research Institute immunologist has helped to redefine the immune cells, uncovering their role in wound healing. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2107: The "Science" of Hangovers

As advanced as humans are, we still don't have a handle on how to tame our response to a night of drinking. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2108: Researchers Aim to Reestablish an Ancient Fish in an Ohio River

The sturgeon restoration study's outcome won't be known for decades. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2109: The Open Data Explosion

Scientists are working to maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of sharing. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2110: Genome Editing on Board

closed with hubbub surrounding the purported birth of babies whose genomes had been edited using CRISPR. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2111: Infographic: Controlling Transposons En Masse

Researchers repurpose the CRISPR machinery to turn whole classes of transposable elements on or off. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2112: Researchers Engineer Epigenome Editors to Study How Gene Expression Affects Disease

Using CRISPR and other tools, scientists are modifying DNA methylation, histone marks, and other modifiers of gene expression to understand how they affect health and disease. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2113: Researchers Track Sharks and Whales Using DNA in Seawater Samples

In addition to detecting unseen organisms in the ocean, studies of environmental DNA can shed light on the genetic structure of marine populations. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2114: Researchers Explore the Genetics of Eating Disorders

Large-scale genomic studies of anorexia and bulimia are turning up clues about the conditions’ development and persistence. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2115: Prenatal Exposure to Cannabis Affects the Developing Brain

Children born to moms who smoked or ingested marijuana during pregnancy suffer higher rates of depression, hyperactivity, and inattention. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2116: Science Happens: Pioneering DIY Discoveries

Where would we be without flow cytometry? With this poster, learn about some of the "aha!" moments that came about thanks to researchers having access to a flow cytometer at the right time! (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2117: Cities Can Serve as Cauldrons of Evolution

From changes in gene flow to adaptation, the effects of urbanization are shaping the evolutionary trajectories of plants and animals. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2118: The Mystery of Sleep

The reason we need sleep has long mystified scientists, but it’s crystal clear that we do need it. In fact, the more we learn about what happens while we snooze, the more we discover new… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2119: Science News from around the Planet

A few brief reports about international science and technology from Germany to Rwanda, including one on the discovery of the world's oldest known brewery, discovered in Israel. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2120: The Atlantic Daily: She’s Running

(Photo by David Goldman / AP) What We’re Following 10 new factors that will shape the Democratic primar y ( Edward-Isaac Dovere ) A pundit president, impeachment fever, grappling with the Obama legacy, and more. → Read on. Elizabeth Warren doesn’t want to be Hillary 2.0 ( Edward-Isaac Dovere ) “Operatives working for several other Democratic candidates about to make their own announcements have i (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2121: In Screening for Suicide Risk, Facebook Takes On Tricky Public Health Role

Some doctors warn that Facebook is becoming an arbiter of users’ mental distress without proving that its efforts are accurate, effective or safe.


2122: 2018 Was a Year to Forget. Really.

Our memory for the details of real-life events is poor, according to a recent study . Seven MIT students took a one hour walk through Cambridge, MA. A day later, they were presented with one second video clips they may or may not have seen during their walk (the “ foils ” were taken from another person's recording). Mean recognition accuracy was 55.7%, barely better than guessing. 1 Minimal recog (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2123: I built a sniffing machine to protect dogs

Science Canines can detect poachers' contraband, but the job puts them in danger. To find illegal animal products, customs officials rely on trained dogs at ports. To keep the pooches out of harm's way, I built a smell-sucking machine so they can…


2124: Nonfiction: A Book That Will Make You Terrified of Your Own House

Rob Dunn’s “Never Home Alone” catalogs the world of microbial beings that share our living space and inhabit our showerheads and pillowcases.


2125: The Leaked Louis C.K. Set Is Tragedy Masked as Comedy

A little over a year ago, Louis C.K. published a statement in The New York Times , after several women had come forward to confirm the rumors that had, for years, been swirling around him . “These stories are true,” he wrote, expressing regret for several instances of sexual misconduct and suggesting that the acts being made public would be a turning point for him. His confession concluded with c


2126: Young people’s blood is being tested as a treatment for Parkinson’s

The Californian firm Alkahest has begun a trial to see if injections of an extract of younger adults’ blood can improve Parkinson’s symptoms in older people


2127: American Health Care Worker Monitored for Ebola Symptoms

The person, whose identity has not been revealed, may have been exposed to the virus in Democratic Republic of Congo and is now at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2128: Happy new year! Count down to our #1 story of 2018

Happy new year and thanks for reading! To close out 2018, here are the 10 most popular stories we published in 2018 (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2129: News 008: NSI-189, Ritalin, Levodopa, Russian device, Neurofeedback, Near-Death Exp and more updates [all links in comment]

(Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2130: Did you solve it? 2019 in numbers

The solutions to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set you the following puzzles about the number 2019 1) Date jam Continue reading… (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2131: Remembering Riccardo Giacconi: A Titan of the Heroic Age of Astronomy

On the occasion of his passing, we honor a man for all seasons and an astronomer for all wavelengths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


2132: Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Season of Turmoil

One of the nation’s top cancer hospitals has grappled with how to bring breakthrough treatments to market while remaining true to its mission.


2133: Unmuting large silent genes lets bacteria produce new molecules, potential drug candidates

By enticing away the repressors dampening unexpressed, silent genes in Streptomyces bacteria, researchers at the University of Illinois have unlocked several large gene clusters for new natural products. Since many antibiotics, anti-cancer agents and other drugs have been derived from genes readily expressed in Streptomyces, the researchers hope that unsilencing genes that have not previously been (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2134: 7 exercises to master in 2019

Diversity in exercise is an essential component of a good fitness diet. Constantly pushing your physical boundaries provides equally valuable neurological benefits. These seven exercises and tools are worth integrating into your regimen in 2019. None There are two responses when seeing a new exercise: "No" and "I'll give it a shot." I've watched both play out often. Sometimes the "no" is justifie


2135: 10 Buddhist koans, and why understanding them is pointless

Koans are one of the most meaningful practices in Zen Buddhism. Usually translated as "nonsensical," the sentences have much greater purpose. Breaking beyond concepts in meditation is a driving factor of the koan. None Humans like to know what a sentence means. Sometimes we'll go to great lengths to derive meaning from a group of words. More often than not, however, we'll take the easiest possibl


2136: Scientists: 'Time is ripe' to use big data for planet-sized plant questions

A group of Florida Museum of Natural History scientists has issued a 'call to action' to use big data to tackle longstanding questions about plant diversity and evolution and forecast how plant life will fare on an increasingly human-dominated planet. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2137: Macaques take turns while chattering

Japanese monkeys take turns while communicating. Adjusting response times while chattering, macaques intentionally pause like humans do when chatting.


2138: You can do it! 4 tips to keep your resolutions

In order to keep your resolutions in 2019, consider these tips from Tim Bono, author of When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness (Grand Central Life & Style, 2018 (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2139: Ultracold atoms can make strange and beautiful quantum fireworks

Feed enough energy into a gas of ultracold atoms and it will create waves that produce a burst of quantum fireworks


2140: Why the sight of blood knocks us out

Head Trip Do you pass out when you get your blood drawn? You're not the only one. Why some folks faint at the sight of blood and others don’t isn’t entirely clear, but prior fear of blood and needles often increases the chances of passing out.


2141: Does curiosity make kids better at math and reading?

Characteristics related to openness, such as intellectual curiosity and confidence, may make children more adept at math and reading than characteristics that describe conscientiousness, such as diligence and perseverance, a new study shows. “Our findings provide additional knowledge on the complex set of skills that interact and give rise to differences in academic achievement between children, (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2142: T cell photos make data encryption truly random

A new encryption method uses T cells to protect data from hackers and malware. The biological encryption key approach is unclonable and not reverse-engineerable, protecting information even as computers become faster and nimbler, researchers say. “Currently, encryption is done with mathematical algorithms that are called one-way functions,” says Saptarshi Das, assistant professor of engineering s (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2143: Video: Rørposten lever!

Ingeniøren har besøgt en mindre dansk produktionsvirksomhed i Herlev, hvor et godt, gammeldags rørpostsystem stadig er i daglig brug. Systemet er pålideligt og sparer de ansatte for mange gåture mellem etagerne i virksomheden. Se systemet demonstreret her.


2144: The immune system's fountain of youth

Helping the immune system clear away old cells in aging mice helped restore youthful characteristics.


2145: US winter storms kill seven: media

Parts of the United States were digging out Saturday from winter storms that media reports said led to at least seven deaths, while warmer regions braced for potential flooding during the New Year's travel period. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2146: Volunteers strive to stave off shutdown chaos at US parks

Sabra Purdy is just back from Joshua Tree National Park in southern California, which was crammed with tourists. It is high season, and to prevent chaos from the partial shutdown of the US federal government, she put on her gloves, cleaned toilets and picked up trash. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2147: 10 New Factors That Will Shape the 2020 Democratic Primary

The economy can only go down from here. The number of revelations from Robert Mueller can only go up. But that doesn’t mean a Democratic candidate is a shoo-in for 2020—everyone thought Donald Trump faced too many hurdles to win in the first place, too. The Democrats who are about to launch presidential campaigns can tell themselves Trump looks weak now, but this could be just the midpoint in his


2148: NASA spaceship zooms toward farthest world ever photographed

A NASA spaceship is zooming toward the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever photographed by humankind, a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away.


2149: The Top WIRED Photo Stories of 2018

Want to give your eyes a break from the news cycle? Start here.


2150: The 2018 Internet Moments That Made Being Online Worth It

'A Star Is Born' birthed great memes and Zendaya was Meechee.


2151: A skin test after a traumatic event may identify those at risk of PTSD

A simple skin test appears to predict those most at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder – a finding that may help them get the support they need (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2152: Some tensions are good for life

In a recent study, Joseph Jose Thottacherry, along with his collaborators from other Indian and Spanish institutes, has tried to understand how cells maintain their shapes in spite of expelling material from their membrane. The study found that the answer to what makes the cell stay stable lies in a force called membrane tension. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2153: Study points to increased risk of harm from cannabis across Europe

A significant new study shows that cannabis potency has doubled across Europe in the past 11 years. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2154: Scientists produce 'designer triacylglycerols' in industrial microalgae

A research team led by Prof. XU Jian from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), has discovered two novel diacylglyceryl transferases (DGAT2s) that preferentially attach LA and EPA, respectively, to the glycerol backbone to form TAGs. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2155: Ghosn's detention extended to Jan 11

Former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn will be spending the beginning of 2019 behind bars after a Tokyo court on Monday extended his detention through to January 11. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2156: Climate change takes toll on French oyster farmers

Gulping down oysters has long been a favourite New Year's Eve ritual for the French, but as winters get warmer and summers get drier many growers worry there will soon be fewer of the prized mollusks to go around. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2157: Was that a bed bug on my couch? This app has the answer

Just the thought of a bed bug infestation is enough to make you start scratching and tossing out furniture. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2158: 2018's Weirdest Google Earth Apparitions

Live Science has gathered all the weird Google Earth sightings of the year, mixing the false alarms with authentic surprises. Can you guess which is which?


2159: Woman Develops Donor's Peanut Allergy After Lung Transplant

Sometimes, you just really want a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. And, as long as you're not allergic to the ingredients, that's totally fine. At least, that's what one woman thought.


2160: Ghost Particles and Singing Ice: 11 Wild Antarctic Stories from 2018

What's the deal, Antarctica?


2161: Vaguer goals may help you stick to your new exercise routine

If you’re thinking of taking up a new pursuit, vague, open goals may be better to help you do it than setting hard targets, we find on the seventh of our 12 Days of Culture


2162: The Year in Science–and What Americans Thought about It

Pew polls reveal a public divided on climate, supportive of NASA and wary of AI and genetic engineering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


2163: The mummified penguins that hold the secrets of Antarctica’s past

Antarctica’s Adélie penguins nest on the well-preserved remains of their ancestors. All it takes is a trowel and a strong stomach to dig into their climate history


2164: Dear Therapist: My Mother-In-Law Didn’t Mean to Ruin My Wedding, but I’m Still Angry With Her

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I recently got married, and have not been able to move past feelings of anger and resentment toward my mother-in-law that surfaced during the wedding weekend. Before the wedding, she and I had a close and very (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2165: The Blunt-Force Power of Widows, in One Scene

The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series delves into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Today: Steve McQueen’s Widows . This will be the year’s final installment of the “And, Scene” series, which can be found in its entirety here . There are heists happening at every layer of Widows . The central story follows Veronica Rawlings (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2166: Big Tech Is Here to Help You Fight Excessive Phone Use—Kinda

How Google, Apple, and Facebook turned "digital wellness" into a Goopified trend that gives them a new way to market themselves.


2167: How to Follow New Horizons' Historic Flyby of Ultima Thule

On New Year's Eve, NASA's probe will reach Ultima Thule, an icy body at the edge of our solar system. Here's its timeline.


2168: The Worst Hacks of 2018: Marriott, Atlanta, Quora, and More

From the Marriott and Facebook meltdowns to state-sponsored assaults, 2018 was an eventful year for cybercrime.


2169: Seven New Year’s resolutions for Big Tech in 2019

2018 was a no good, very bad year for Silicon Valley. Here’s some of the things tech giants should commit to do next year to avoid a repeat performance.


2170: Snifferteknologi fra Danmark skal hjælpe i international kamp mod skibsforurening

Langdistancedroner skal snuse til røg fra skibe i europæisk farvand. 'Næserne' leveres af dansk virksomhed. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2171: A Shutdown Reveals the Transformation of the GOP

Republicans used to shut down the government in the name of fiscal restraint. Now they’re digging in for the sake of a boondoggle. This Trump-era shutdown could well become the longest ever, eclipsing the Clinton-era 26-day standoff over Medicare spending, and the Obama-era 16-day standoff over Obamacare. GOP tactics in the past may have been misguided, but at least the party was in theory fighti


2172: Teddy Roosevelt’s Critique of Ostrich Science

Between breaking news developments, 2018 has marked out a number of momentous anniversaries. Fifty years since the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy. One hundred years since the end of the fighting in World War I. One hundred and fifty years since Andrew Johnson’s impeachment. Looking backward from this moment of uncertainty and upheaval often means finding others, some o


2173: Follow NASA’s New Horizons Mission as It Heads for New Year’s Flyby With Ultima Thule

The probe that visited Pluto will study a mysterious icy world just after midnight. Ultima Thule will be the most distant object ever visited by a spacecraft.


2174: The New Health Care: Congratulations on the Promotion. But Did Science Get a Demotion?

The incentives of grant funding and career advancement, even the potential for fame, can influence researchers.


2175: Superhumans: The remarkable brain waves of high-level meditators

People who have meditated for thousands of hours exhibit a remarkable difference in their gamma brainwaves. "All of us get gamma for a very short period when we solve a problem we've been grappling with, even if it's something that's vexed us for months. We get about half second of gamma; it's the strongest wave in the EEG spectrum," explains Goleman. In high-level mediators, gamma is a lasting s


2176: Techtopia #85: Fiskenet genanvendes til 3D print

Mød to af de danske virksomheder, der deltager i FNs SDG Accelerator. Det kommer til at handle om genbrug af fiskenet til 3D print og om effektiv logistik, når byggematerialer skal genanvendes. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2177: Mother of the Hubble: Tributes paid to Nasa scientist

Dr Nancy Grace Roman, the first woman to hold a senior leadership position at Nasa, has died at 93.


2178: How Sen. Orrin Hatch Shaped America's Health Care In Controversial Ways

Republican Orrin Hatch is leaving the Senate after 42 years. He led bipartisan efforts to get health care for more kids and AIDS patients. He also thrived on donations from the drug industry. (Image credit: Bloomberg/Getty Images)


2179: When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

Adorable babies and cute puppies can make us happy. But researchers say their cuteness can be so overwhelming that it unleashes some ugly thoughts. (Image credit: Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images)


2180: Skyen ligger på en dansk mark – og den æder strøm

PLUS. Vores glæde ved at glo på kattevideoer og ­alskens anden underholdning giver de i forvejen store datacentre vokseværk. Og udbygningen af kapaciteten vil kun accelerere i takt med den ventede eksplosion i IoT-tjenester, strea­ming, VR, AI og selvkørende biler. Men hvordan kommer datacentrene til a… (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2181: Podcast-special: Videoforbrug giver boom i strømslugende datacentre

Vi streamer og downloader som aldrig før, og den globale it-trafik spås at blive tredoblet frem mod 2021. De store datamængder lagres blandt andet i de enorme og energislugende datacentre, der skyder op rundt omkring i Danmark. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2182: Måneformørkelse, Merkur-tur og stjerneskud på himlen i 2019

Se stjerneskud og total måneformørkelse i januar. Og i november er planeten Merkur på vandring over solskiven.


2183: Science-Based Medicine in the New Year

As 2018 ends, the managing editor of Science-Based Medicine comments on the future of SBM. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2184: Nasa probe believed to have performed most distant space flyby

New Horizons expected to have encountered Ultima Thule space rock on edge of solar system A Nasa probe is believed to have performed the most distant flyby in history in the early hours of New Year’s Day, barrelling past a space rock called Ultima Thule on the outer edge of the solar system. Unless gremlins intervene, the New Horizons spacecraft will have zoomed by the cosmic body at 5.33am GMT a


2185: Can you solve it? 2019 in numbers

Calculations to kick-start the new year UPDATE: To read the solutions click here. To welcome the New Year, we’re going to celebrate the number 2019. Here’s one numerical factoid readers may find charming: 2019 is the smallest number that can be written in 6 ways as the sum of the squares of 3 primes: 7² + 11² + 43² = 2019 7² + 17² + 41² = 2019 13² + 13² + 41² = 2019 11² + 23² + 37² = 2019 17² + 1


2186: Tumors backfire on chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is an effective treatment for breast cancer, yet some patients develop metastasis in spite of it. Researchers at EPFL have discovered that chemotherapy-treated mammary tumors produce small vesicles that may help them spread to other organs. The study is published in Nature Cell Biology. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2187: Judith Rich Harris, Who Played Down the Role of Parents, Dies at 80

It’s not that parents don’t matter in how their child turns out, she said, but genes and their peer groups play a greater role.


2188: Leafcutter ants have their own landfill sites that emit greenhouse gas

Ants that grow fungi inside their nests also make their own landfills – and these release significant amounts of nitrous oxide (Wed, 02 Jan 2019)


2189: A NASA spacecraft just did a fly-by of the most distant object we’ve ever visited


2190: Intel’s quest to build the world’s first true quantum computer

James Clarke, of Intel’s quantum computing research team, tells New Scientist about his ambitions to make the first device with a million qubits (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2191: NASA spacecraft opens new year 4 billion miles from Earth

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has survived the most distant exploration of another world, a tiny, icy object 4 billion miles away that looks to be shaped like a peanut or bowling pin.


2192: New Horizons successfully explores Ultima Thule


2193: We have a healthy spacecraft': NASA succeeds in historic flyby of faraway world


2194: Take Your Pills When Your Genes Are Most Active

Drugs could be more effective if taken when the genetic proteins they target are most active — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2195: It's official: NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has made history


2196: NASA Hits Its New Year’s Target at the Edge of the Solar System

After Pluto was discovered, in 1930, astronomers wondered whether the solar system stopped there. For decades, they peered through their best telescopes, searching for hints of more objects in the darkness. In the early 1990s, when telescope technology became powerful enough, they found one . The object was thousands of times fainter than Pluto, but it was there. A few months later, they found an


2197: New Horizons: Nasa probe survives flyby of Ultima Thule

The New Horizons spacecraft confirms its "healthy" status after a historic encounter with an icy world.


2198: How Physical Activity and Gut–Brain Connections Combine to Make Us Healthier

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2199: Biggest archaeological dig in Europe will uncover UK’s buried history

The construction of a high-speed train line, HS2, is allowing archaeologists to search for Romans, plague victims and even mammoths


2200: Books are good for your brain. These techniques will help you read more.

DIY Turn yourself into a bookworm. Want to kick off the New Year with a new habit? Reading is a great way to relax, strengthen your brain, and improve your health. Here’s how to fit more books into your…


2201: NYUAD study suggests that 'Actin' is critical in genome regulation during nerve cell formation

One of the most fascinating questions in biology is how genes are regulated during development and differentiation when cells acquire a specific identity. This research suggests for the first time that Actin is critical in regulating the genome during 'neurogenesis' — which involves the formation of 'neurons' or nerve cells. The methodology employed in this study will enable researchers to model (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2202: Thriving on teamwork: new research shows how brain cells filter information in groups

For decades, scientists studying the visual system thought that individual brain cells, called neurons, operate as filters. Some neurons would prefer coarse details of the visual scene and ignore fine details, while others would do the opposite. Every neuron was thought to do its own filtering. A new study led by Salk Institute researchers reveals that the same neurons that prefer coarse details c (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2203: Researchers discover a metamaterial with inherently robust sound transport

Researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and at the City College of New York (CCNY) have developed a metamaterial that can transport sound in unusually robust ways along its edges and localize it at its corners. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2204: Community-based HIV testing effective in reaching undiagnosed populations, new study finds

Results from a PATH-led evaluation study in Vietnam demonstrate that HIV testing by lay providers is an effective approach to reach people at risk of HIV who have never been tested or test infrequently. Key at-risk populations include people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men, female sex workers, and first-time HIV testers. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2205: A new 'atlas' of genetic influences on osteoporosis

A ground-breaking new study led by researchers from the Lady Davis Institute (LDI) at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) has succeeded in compiling an atlas of genetic factors associated with estimated bone mineral density (BMD), one of the most clinically relevant factors in diagnosing osteoporosis. The paper, published in Nature Genetics, identifies 518 genome-wide loci, of which 301 are newly di (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2206: Physicists record 'lifetime' of graphene qubits

Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, quantum coherence of a graphene-based superconducting qubit, meaning how long it stays in superposition to compute with two logical states simultaneously. The work is a key step forward for practical quantum computing. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2207: Wireless 'pacemaker for the brain' could offer new treatment for neurological disorders

A new neurostimulator developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2208: Don't go breaking my heart

For the first time, engineers have demonstrated an electronic device to closely monitor beating heart cells without affecting their behavior. A collaboration between the University of Tokyo, Tokyo Women’s Medical University and RIKEN in Japan produced a functional sample of heart cells with a soft nanomesh sensor in direct contact with the tissue. This device could aid study of other cells, organs (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2209: Canagliflozin not associated with increased risk for fracture

Compared with a glucagon-line peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, canagliflozin was not associated with an increased risk for fracture in patients with type 2 diabetes at relatively low risk for fracture. Findings from a multidatabase cohort study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2210: New Horizons spacecraft homing in on Kuiper Belt target


2211: The Best Comics of 2018: 'Sabrina', 'Crowded', and More

They're not all books about superheroes, by the way.


2212: 4 Dark Matter Searches to Watch in 2019

As 2019 nears, physicists are hard at work on the next generation of dark matter detectors, and on parsing confusing data from detectors that already exist.


2213: Archaeology Discoveries to Watch for in 2019

We may find what’s hiding inside the Great Pyramid. And also tablets from a lost city in Iraq, and lost Faberge eggs from the Russian royal family. Stay tuned.


2214: Everything you've ever wanted to know about muscles

Health Building them, tearing them, repairing them, eating them. Welcome to PopSci’s Muscle Month! We’re kicking off the season with an FAQ on all things muscle-related.


2215: Editorial: A proposal to correct minority underrepresentation in clinical trials

In an editorial in CNS Spectrums, a neurologists takes the research community to task for its lack of minority representation in Phase III clinical trials for drugs to treat Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and proposes changes to the system. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2216: Children Are Using Emoji for Digital-Age Language Learning

When preliterate kids type strings of emoji, it may seem like a random act. But when exposed to the rhythm of texts, kids discover how to communicate.


2217: It’s very bad news that common viruses are affected by climate change

No one knew climate change would affect viruses that spread from person to person, but it does. For the eighth of our 12 Days of Culture we look at how disease may change


2218: ‘Genesis 2.0’ Review: How to Clone a Mammoth

Is it possible to bring back the mammoth? The documentary “Genesis 2.0” investigates.


2219: Tor Is Easier Than Ever. Time to Give It a Try

Been curious about Tor but worried it's too complicated to use? Good news: The anonymity service is more accessible than ever.


2220: NASA rings in New Year with historic flyby of faraway world


2221: Ondt i håret? Det sker der i din krop, når du har tømmermænd

Dit hoved, din lever og din mavesæk er på overarbejde, når du har tømmermænd.


2222: Study suggests that 'actin' is critical in genome regulation during nerve cell formation

A new NYU Abu Dhabi study suggests for the first time that actin, which is a cytoskeleton protein found in the cell, is critical to regulating the genome—the genetic material of an organism—during the formation of "neurons" or nerve cells. The study was published today in PLOS Genetics. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2223: Unmuting large silent genes lets bacteria produce new molecules, potential drug candidates

By enticing away the repressors dampening unexpressed, silent genes in Streptomyces bacteria, researchers at the University of Illinois have unlocked several large gene clusters for new natural products, according to a study published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology.


2224: America, Meet Your (Acting) Secretary of Defense

It hasn’t received much attention, what with Donald Trump suddenly declaring victory against ISIS , ordering U.S. troops out of Syria, and provoking James Mattis to resign in protest. But the man who is now the president’s principal adviser on the nation’s defense, tasked with leading the largest employer in the world and managing the fallout from Trump’s military retrenchment, has less experienc


2225: How Trump Can Challenge China

President Donald Trump has good reason to denounce China’s tolerance of intellectual-property theft and various other trade abuses, as even his harshest critics will acknowledge. And there are tentative signs that U.S. negotiators are securing concessions from Beijing on market access for U.S. firms and the protection of their intellectual property. But a face-saving deal along these lines won’t


2226: What the Believers Are Denying

For two years, they formed a community of experts, about 1,000 in all, including 300 leading climate scientists inside and outside 13 federal agencies. For two years, they volunteered their time and expertise to produce the Fourth National Climate Assessment. There is no parallel process to tackle the questions I study; there is no ongoing national racial assessment mandated by a law summarizing


2227: The Modern Dignity of an Uncontacted Tribe

By some estimates , there are more than 100 “uncontacted tribes” in Brazil, mostly in the western reaches of the Amazon rainforest. These are indigenous peoples who live beyond the direct control, and sometimes knowledge, of the Brazilian state. Their groups vary in size but are, in many cases, quite small. Researchers from FUNAI —the Brazilian government agency that upholds indigenous rights— re


2228: Genanvendt plast: 2019 kommer til at rykke på fødevareområdet

Materialeskift i fødevareemballage bliver vejen til cirkulær økonomi for plastindustrien, men samtidig skal markedet også støttes politisk, mener Færch Plast A/S og Plastindustrien.


2229: Jordan Peterson: The fatal flaw lurking in American leftist politics

What is political extremism? Professor of psychology Jordan Peterson points out that America knows what right-wing radicalism looks like: white nationalism. "What's interesting is that on the conservative side of the spectrum, we've figured out how to box-in the radicals and say, 'No, you're outside the domain of acceptable opinion,'" says Peterson. But where's that line for the Left? There is no


2230: Could Exercising In Frigid Temperatures Make Us Healthier?

As a freezing winter drives many of us indoors, some extreme athletes embrace the cold as a great way to burn calories and retrain the immune system while working out. Not so fast, physiologists say. (Image credit: NurPhoto/Getty Images)


2231: China's Lunar Lander To Explore Moon's Far Side

Early in 2019, China hopes to land a rover — the first soft landing on the moon's far side. The mission is exploratory, and will lay groundwork for a trip by Chinese astronauts to the lunar surface. (Image credit: NASA/Goddard)


2232: Den store tømmermændsguide: Sådan overlever du 1. januar

Ligger du på langs med ondt i hovedet? Så er der her gode råd til, hvordan du kan lindre de frygtelige tømmermænd.


2233: Vietnam's draconian cybersecurity bill comes into effect

A law requiring internet companies in Vietnam to remove content communist authorities deem to be against the state came into effect Tuesday, in a move critics called "a totalitarian model of information control". (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2234: NASA spacecraft opens new year at tiny, icy world past Pluto


2235: Spørg Fagfolket: Skøjter man langsommere tæt ved havoverfladen?

En læser undrer sig over en udtalelse ved et vinter-OL, hvor det blev konstateret, at hastighedsrekorder blev slået i bjergene. Er det sandt? Det svarer speedskater på. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2236: James Watson Won’t Stop Talking About Race

The Nobel-winning biologist has drawn global criticism with unfounded pronouncements on genetics, race and intelligence. He still thinks he’s right, a new documentary finds.


2237: A Rising Threat to Wildlife: Electrocution

Power lines and electrified fences are killing birds, monkeys, pangolins and even elephants in surprising numbers.


2238: Autism Revisited

Is there an autism epidemic? Why was autism rare in the past? This book tries to answer those questions with a historical and sociological approach and suggests deinstitutionalization was a key factor.


2239: The Search for a Hangover Cure

(Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2240: Competition and Cooperation of Cheese Rind Microbes Exposed

Transposon mutagenesis give scientists a rare look at the most important interactions within microbial communities. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2241: Infographic: How Cities Influence Evolution

Urban environments are driving genetic changes in resident species through multiple mechanisms, from establishing gene flow barriers to exerting novel selection pressures. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2242: Jorge Henao-Mejia Explores the Immune System’s Controls

By tying together his understanding of the microbiome and nucleic acids, the UPenn immunologist is decoding the underlying causes of inflammation and disease. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2243: Infographic: How Macrophage Mitochondria Help Destroy Pathogens

Researchers have uncovered a mechanism whereby macrophages employ their energy-generating organelles to aid in bacterial killing. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2244: Serotonin Neurons Implicated in SIDS

Inhibiting nerve cells that produce the neurotransmitter made it harder for baby mice to recover from bouts of slowed breathing. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2245: Painting Dinosaurs, early 20th century

Charles R. Knight's illustrations shaped the public's view of prehistoric life. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2246: Can Viruses in the Genome Cause Disease?

Clinical trials that target human endogenous retroviruses to treat multiple sclerosis, ALS, and other ailments are underway, but many questions remain about how these sequences may disrupt our biology. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2247: Cities Can Serve as Cauldrons of Evolution

From changes in gene flow to adaptation, the effects of urbanization are shaping the evolutionary trajectories of plants and animals. (Tue, 01 Jan 2019)


2248: NASA’s New Horizons Spacecraft Signals Successful Flyby of Ultima Thule, the Most Distant Object Ever Visited


2249: Recycling: Where is the plastic waste mountain?

A year ago China imposed a ban on waste imports, so what's happened to the UK's plastic?


2250: Known as the ‘mother of Hubble,’ astronomer Nancy Roman dies at 93

Astronomer Nancy Roman, the “mother of Hubble,” has died.


2251: 2018 Was a Year to Forget. Really.

Our memory for the details of real-life events is poor, according to a recent study . Seven MIT students took a one hour walk through Cambridge, MA. A day later, they were presented with one second video clips they may or may not have seen during their walk (the “ foils ” were taken from another person's recording). Mean recognition accuracy was 55.7%, barely better than guessing. 1 Minimal recog (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2252: Happy new year! Count down to our #1 story of 2018

Happy new year and thanks for reading! To close out 2018, here are the 10 most popular stories we published in 2018 (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2253: Bats in Sierra Leone Carry Marburg Virus

It's the first time the deadly pathogen has been found in West Africa. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2254: When Doctors Serve on Company Boards

Some hospital executives and cancer researchers sit on the boards of publicly traded companies, raising questions about whether their dual roles create a conflict of interest.


2255: Patients now living a median 6.8 years after stage IV ALK+ lung cancer diagnosis

Stage IV ALK+ lung cancer patients treated at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital between 2009 and 2017 had median overall survival of 6.8 years.


2256: 10 Buddhist koans, and why understanding them is pointless

Koans are one of the most meaningful practices in Zen Buddhism. Usually translated as "nonsensical," the sentences have much greater purpose. Breaking beyond concepts in meditation is a driving factor of the koan. None Humans like to know what a sentence means. Sometimes we'll go to great lengths to derive meaning from a group of words. More often than not, however, we'll take the easiest possibl


2257: A Year of Miseducation

T hat word, miseducation , has been in the air. All year long, essayists, musicians, podcasters, and others have been revisiting Lauryn Hill ’s masterpiece, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill , on the occasion of its 20th anniversary. A sudden burst of cinema about conversion therapy began in early August with the premiere of Desiree Akhavan’s film, The Miseducation of Cameron Post . ProPublica publ


2258: Does curiosity make kids better at math and reading?

Characteristics related to openness, such as intellectual curiosity and confidence, may make children more adept at math and reading than characteristics that describe conscientiousness, such as diligence and perseverance, a new study shows. “Our findings provide additional knowledge on the complex set of skills that interact and give rise to differences in academic achievement between children, (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2259: T cell photos make data encryption truly random

A new encryption method uses T cells to protect data from hackers and malware. The biological encryption key approach is unclonable and not reverse-engineerable, protecting information even as computers become faster and nimbler, researchers say. “Currently, encryption is done with mathematical algorithms that are called one-way functions,” says Saptarshi Das, assistant professor of engineering s (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2260: Volunteers strive to stave off shutdown chaos at US parks

Sabra Purdy is just back from Joshua Tree National Park in southern California, which was crammed with tourists. It is high season, and to prevent chaos from the partial shutdown of the US federal government, she put on her gloves, cleaned toilets and picked up trash. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2261: 10 New Factors That Will Shape the 2020 Democratic Primary

The economy can only go down from here. The number of revelations from Robert Mueller can only go up. But that doesn’t mean a Democratic candidate is a shoo-in for 2020—everyone thought Donald Trump faced too many hurdles to win in the first place, too. The Democrats who are about to launch presidential campaigns can tell themselves Trump looks weak now, but this could be just the midpoint in his


2262: Some tensions are good for life

In a recent study, Joseph Jose Thottacherry, along with his collaborators from other Indian and Spanish institutes, has tried to understand how cells maintain their shapes in spite of expelling material from their membrane. The study found that the answer to what makes the cell stay stable lies in a force called membrane tension. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2263: Meteor Showers That Will Light Up Night Skies in 2019

All year long, Earth passes through streams of cosmic debris. Here’s our list of major meteor showers and how to spot one.


2264: NASA undersøger nu det fjerneste hjørne af vores solsystem

Mennesket har aldrig før undersøgt et objekt så langt væk fra Jorden.


2265: The mummified penguins that hold the secrets of Antarctica’s past

Antarctica’s Adélie penguins nest on the well-preserved remains of their ancestors. All it takes is a trowel and a strong stomach to dig into their climate history


2266: The Blunt-Force Power of Widows, in One Scene

The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series delves into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy cinematic moment from 2018. Today: Steve McQueen’s Widows . This will be the year’s final installment of the “And, Scene” series, which can be found in its entirety here . There are heists happening at every layer of Widows . The central story follows Veronica Rawlings (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2267: Pete Tong NYE 'balloon drop' cancelled after protests

Organisers had planned to release 130,000 balloons at a Manila nightclub to ring in the new year.


2268: How ancient DNA may rewrite prehistory in India

Aryans are not the earliest or only source of Indian civilisation, suggests new research on genetic ancestry.


2269: The Media’s Post-Advertising Future Is Also Its Past

I t’s my holiday tradition to bring tidings of discomfort and sorrow to my colleagues in the news business. One year ago, I described the media apocalypse coming for both digital upstarts and legacy brands. Vice and BuzzFeed had slashed their revenue projections by hundreds of millions of dollars, while The New York Times had announced a steep decline in advertising . Twelve months later, it’s en


2270: From a molecule of natural origin new therapeutic opportunities against hypertension

Spirulina is celebrated as a 'superfood' because of its possible beneficial properties, albeit its mechanism of action is still subjected to investigation. Sometimes classified as a 'blue algae,' it was supposedly used as a food by the Aztecs. Now a research from I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, in Italy, shows that one of its extracts may counteract arterial hypertension by dilating blood vessels. (Mon, 31 Dec 2018)


2271: Guide: Sådan hjælper du din hund nytårsaften

Hunde kan opleve frygt og angst, når der skydes fyrværkeri af. Men der er heldigvis flere ting du kan gøre for at hjælpe din hund.


2272: Det offentlige har svært ved at få hul på ML: Kræver andet mindset

Potentialet er stort, men erfaringerne er få, når det handler om at bruge machine learning i det offentlige. (Thu, 03 Jan 2019)


2273: Fik du det hele med? 10 mest læste blogs på Version2 i 2018

Version2 er beriget af dygtige og kloge bloggere. Herunder finder du listen over de mest læste i det forgangne år. (Thu, 03 Jan 2019)


2274: Rumsonde er for første gang landet på Månens bagside

Kinesisk rumsonde er landet på den side af Månen, der vender væk fra Jorden.


2275: Legislative Alchemy 2018: Acupuncturists seek practice expansion and competition elimination

Acupuncturists want to expand their scope of practice far beyond sticking needles in people. Too many states are allowing them to treat pretty much anything with unproven and potentially dangerous remedies. (Thu, 03 Jan 2019)


2276: Could gulls' wings inspire smarter airplane design?

Flexing a single elbow joint enables gulls to adapt their wing shape to gusty conditions, according to new University of British Columbia (UBC) research–a relatively simple mechanism that could inspire improved aircraft design. (Thu, 03 Jan 2019)


2277: Can a video game-based 'digital medicine' help children with autism and co-occurring ADHD?

Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) evaluated a digital medicine tool designed as an investigational treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and co-occurring attention/deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (Thu, 03 Jan 2019)


2278: The Far Side of the Moon: What China and the World Hope to Find

The side of the moon we never see from Earth contains secrets about our solar system’s early days, and it could help astronomers see the universe more clearly.


2279: Kun biler med støttehjul kan køre i Musk-tunnel

Elon Musk har inviteret de første journalister på tur i sin underjordiske tunnel til biler. Men kun hurtige og delvist førerløse elbiler med støttehjul har adgang.


2280: Facebook Users Value the Service More Than Investors Do

Users of the social network said they'd require payment of more than $1,000 to quit the platform for one year. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


2281: Chang'e 4 landing: China probe makes historic touchdown on far side of the moon

Lander and rover will explore the South Pole-Aitken basin for the first time A Chinese spacecraft has become the first ever to land on the far side of the moon, according to state-run media, in a giant leap for human space exploration. The China National Space Administration (CNSA) landed the robotic probe Chang’e 4 in the unexplored South Pole-Aitken basin, the largest, oldest, deepest, crater o


2282: New Horizons beams home close-ups of Ultima Thule – video

Nasa’s New Horizons spacecraft has beamed home its first close-up images of Ultima Thule , a lump of rock the shape of an unfinished snowman that lies 4bn miles away on the edge of the solar system. The excited scientists of the New Horizons team led by principal investigator Alan Stern discuss their findings so far. 'We could not be happier,' he said. Continue reading…


2283: Anak Krakatau volcano: Satellites get clear view of collapse

New images of Anak Krakatau, which erupted last month and caused a deadly tsunami, are revealed.


2284: ‘New Chapter’ in Space Exploration as China Reaches Far Side of the Moon

It was China’s second moon landing, and the first spacecraft to touch down on the side of the moon that always faces away from Earth.


2285: Medicare's bundled payment experiment for joint replacements shows moderate savings

Medicare's randomized trial of a new bundled payment model for hip and knee replacement surgeries led to $812 in savings per procedure, or a 3.1 percent reduction in costs, when compared with traditional means of paying for care, according to new research. (Thu, 03 Jan 2019)


2286: The Silver Lining in Apple’s Very Bad iPhone News

Turns out people are upgrading their iPhones less frequently. That’s not good for Apple’s revenue—but it's great for everyone else.


2287: The FCC Faces the Government Shutdown: What You Need to Know

The FCC has remained open while much of the government is shut down. That changes Thursday.


2288: Poverty, lack of health insurance among female health care workers

A new study finds that low wages and poor benefits leave many female health care workers living below the poverty line.


2289: Metabolic syndrome patients need more vitamin C to break cycle of antioxidant depletion

A higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems, a researcher says.


2290: Climate change: LED lights making dent in UK energy demand

Energy efficiency is more important in the battle against climate change than wind and solar power, research shows


2291: The Atlantic Daily: New Horizons

What We’re Following New Names: The Washington State governor and Democrat Jay Inslee also has his eye on a run for U.S. president in 2020, with a single-minded focus on the threat of climate change and its radiating impacts on the environment and national security. The relatively obscure entrant tries to give his pitch to Edward-Isaac Dovere. In the foreign-policy space, meet the new (acting) se (Thu, 03 Jan 2019)


2292: Birth doesn’t protect against breast cancer right away

Younger women who have recently had a child may have a higher risk of breast cancer than their peers of the same age who do not have children, according to new research. The findings, which appear in the Annals of Internal Medicine , may seem contrary to conventional wisdom that childbirth is protective against breast cancer. Researchers say childbirth still does become protective, but it can tak (Thu, 03 Jan 2019)


2293: UK scientists test breathalyser for detecting early cancers

Major study at Addenbrooke’s hospital could lead to cancer detectors in GPs’ surgeries A breathalyser test that could revolutionise cancer diagnosis is being tested in the UK. The Breath Biopsy device is designed to detect cancer hallmarks in molecules exhaled by patients. Scientists hope it will lead to a simpler, cheaper method of spotting cancers early. The breathalyser has the potential to sa


2294: A Trump County Confronts the Administration Amid a Rash of Child Cancers

Parents in Indiana are demanding the clean-up of a toxic site and questioning environmental rollbacks that could prevent future chemical disasters like the one they face.


2295: NASA Unveils Image of the Most Distant Object Ever Visited

NASA scientists revealed images of Ultima Thule, an object 4 billion miles from the sun. Pictures of the so-called contact binary were captured by the New Horizons mission on Jan. 1.


2296: To reproduce, new rice plant clones itself

Plant biologists have discovered a way to make crop plants replicate through seeds as clones. The discovery, which plant breeders and geneticists have long sought, could make it easier to propagate high-yielding, disease-resistant, or climate-tolerant crops and make them available to the world’s farmers. Since the 1920s, many crops have been grown from hybrid seeds created by crossing two varieti


2297: Tesla's $7,500 Tax Credit Goes Poof, but Buyers May Benefit

To offset the phase-out of a federal tax credit, Tesla cut the price of its cars by $2,000—which might be better for some buyers.


2298: Five Ways to Look at Apple’s Surprise Bad News

In an ugly New Year’s surprise Wednesday afternoon, Apple announced unexpectedly that it was cutting its first-quarter revenue guidance from $91.5 billion to $84 billion. The move is highly unusual. Apple reportedly last revised a projection like this in 2002. CEO Tim Cook sent a letter to investors that attempted to explain what had changed so much over the past 60 days. An economic slowdown in


2299: Like your grandparents, monarch butterflies are now wintering in Florida

Science Understanding where the insects travel will help biologists better track their overall population levels. A new study out today in the journal Animal Migration contradicts prevailing wisdom about where at least some migratory monarchs go in the winter—and what they do when…


2300: A Close Look at the Most Distant Object NASA Has Ever Explored

The most distant object that NASA has ever investigated up close, 2014 MU69, orbits near the edge of the solar system, well beyond Pluto. Because of the desolate conditions out there, it’s remained virtually unchanged since the beginning of the solar system. Less than five years ago, astronomers didn’t even know it existed. Now they know what it looks like, thanks to images captured by a passing


2301: The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Starting the Year With 2020 Vision

What We’re Following Today Welcome to 2019. The government is in its 12th day of the partial shutdown, on the eve of the 116th Congress, and already scrambling with the beginnings of the 2020 presidential cycle. Here’s what we’ve been keeping an eye on: They’re Running: Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren announced she’s entering the 2020 presidential race , and The Atlantic ’s Edward-Isaac Do (Wed, 02 Jan 2019)


2302: Child deaths from opioids rising, say Yale researchers

In the mist of all the news on the opioid epidemic, details of how children are affected can be buried. A new report from Yale shows us the scope of the problem, and little we are doing about it. While the study is grim, it does show us that progress is possible and offers a few solutions. The United States is in the middle of one of the worst drug crises on record. In 2017 alone, 72,000 adults d


2303: Mexican experts discover first temple of god depicted as skinned human corpse

Two skull-like stone carvings and a stone trunk depicting the Flayed Lord were found during excavation in Puebla state Mexican experts say they have found the first temple of the Flayed Lord, a pre-Hispanic fertility god depicted as a skinned human corpse. Related: Conquistadors sacrificed