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Nyheder2018december01

20181201 2018december01


Scientific American
20 *** 3000
More Than a Third of Female Suicides Are Committed by Indian Women. The disturbingly high rate may arise from a disconnect between women's ambitions and societal expectations, experts say
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
17 *** 1000
Light triggers gold in unexpected way. Rice University researchers have discovered a fundamentally different form of light-matter interaction in their experiments with gold nanoparticles.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


New York Times
14 *** 51000
A Famous Alpha Wolf's Daughter, Spitfire, Is Killed by a Hunter. The shooting of another Lamar Canyon pack member has renewed calls for a buffer between Yellowstone and nearby lands, to protect roaming wolves.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
12 *** 24
How you respond to drama depends on if you are a holistic or analytical thinker. Aalto University researchers showed volunteers the film My Sister's Keeper on a screen while the research subjects were lying down in an MRI scanner. The study compared the volunteers' brain activity, and concluded that holistic thinkers saw the film more similarly with each other than analytical thinkers. In addition, holistic thinkers processed the film's moral issues and factual connections wit
Published: 30 Nov 2018


NPR
11 *** 65000
Trump Administration Says Companies Can 'Incidentally Harass' Marine Mammals. It's a decision opposed by environmental groups, who say the blasts could harm marine animals, and some coastal communities, who fear it could be a precursor to offshore drilling. (Image credit: Eva Hambach/AFP/Getty Images)
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
9 *** 43000
A Kindler, Gentler Republican President Is Dead. He was the last of his kind-the sort who could hold his office without embarrassment or apology, who wore his wartime heroism lightly, who took his duty seriously, but never himself. In contrast to the incumbent of the Oval Office, he looms in memory as the valiant remnant of a Periclean age. So people can be forgiven if they forget that, in his prime, George Herbert Walker Bush was mocked as a s
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
8 *** 250
NASA's Martian quake sensor InSight lands at slight angle. NASA's unmanned Martian quake sensor, InSight, has landed at a slight angle on the Red Planet, and experts are hopeful the spacecraft will work as planned, the US space agency said Friday.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Big Think
7 *** 2000
Scientists plan to spray the sky with light-reflecting particles to dim the sun. Scientists hope to launch the world's first solar geoengineering project next year. The project involves spraying calcium carbonate into the stratosphere. The team hopes to get people thinking more seriously about bioengineering. If all the pieces can be put together by then, a trio of researchers from Harvard hope to begin the testing phase of their plan to reduce the amount of sunshine the Eart
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
7 *** 550
The Democrats Who Adored George H. W. Bush. George H. W. Bush exemplified the traditional expectations of an American president: dignified, gracious, restrained, resolute. Though voters gave him only one term in the White House, he commanded bipartisan respect, as leading Democrats' tributes have shown Saturday following his death in Houston at 94. His passing leaves the country without a unifying figure who transcends tribal political dis
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
7 *** 450
Study witnesses first moments of star dying in finest detail. An international research team including The Australian National University (ANU) has used the Kepler space telescope in coordination with ground-based telescopes to witness the first moments of a star dying in unprecedented detail.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
5 *** 11
Altered microbiome after caesarean section impacts baby's immune system. Together with colleagues from Sweden and Luxembourg, scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have observed that, during a natural vaginal birth, specific bacteria from the mother's gut are passed on to the baby and stimulate the baby's immune responses. This transmission is impacted in children born by caesarean section.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Popular Science
4 *** 2000
The nightmarish Asian longhorned tick has invaded the U.S.-and it can reproduce without mating. Health It's in at least eight states already, and no one is sure how long it's been here. When officials from the CDC first encountered longhorned ticks, there were so many crawling in the grass that they infiltrated investigators' pants within minutes.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
4 *** 1000
6 essential books on existentialist philosophy. Existentialism deals with the search to find meaning through free will and choice, among other things. Philosophers considered are existentialists who hailed mostly from Europe in the 19th and 20th century. Many existentialists believe that humans should make their own worth regardless of rules, laws or tradition. There is a wide variety of diverse ideologies that makes up the existentialist scho
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Live Science
4 *** 1000
Vaping Marijuana Gets You Way, Way Higher Than Smoking It, Study Finds. 17 willing participants got very, very high for science – and they found vaping weed is way stronger than smoking it.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
4 *** 550
The Term "Anthropocene" Is Popular–and Problematic. A popular name for our era perpetuates misperceptions about humans and nature
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
4 *** 250
Probing quantum physics on a macroscopic scale. Why does quantum mechanics work so well for microscopic objects, yet macroscopic objects are described by classical physics? This question has bothered physicists since the development of quantum theory more than 100 years ago. Researchers at Delft University of Technology and the University of Vienna have now devised a macroscopic system that exhibits entanglement between mechanical phonons and o
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
4 *** 150
Planet Earth working on 3 Mars landers to follow InSight. As Mars' newest resident settles in, Planet Earth is working on three more landers and at least two orbiters to join the scientific Martian brigade.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


EurekAlert!
4 *** 4
Snowpack declines may stunt tree growth and forests' ability to store carbon emissions. Researchers conducting a 5-year-long study examining snow cover in a northern hardwood forest region found that projected changes in climate could lead to a 95 percent reduction of deep-insulating snowpack in forest areas across the northeastern United States by the end of the 21st century. The loss of snowpack would likely result in a steep reduction of forests' ability to store climate-changing
Published: 01 Dec 2018


NPR
3 *** 18000
Changes In Brain Scans Seen After A Single Season Of Football For Young Players. MRI scans of the brains of young football players suggest that repeated blows to the head can change the shape of nerve fibers in the corpus callosum, which connects the two halves of the brain. (Image credit: groveb/Getty Images)
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
3 *** 1000
McDonald's touchscreens test positive for feces, dangerous bacteria. The Metro newspaper conducted a semi-scientific test of touchscreen kiosks in eight McDonald's restaurants in the U.K. All of them tested positive for various kinds of bacteria that can cause infection. Public touchscreens are known to harbor high amounts of bacteria, though tests also suggest the average smartphone isn't much cleaner. None A new test suggests you should strive to avoid public to
Published: 29 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3 *** 250
Scientists reveal substantial water loss in global landlocked regions. Along with a warming climate and intensified human activities, recent water storage in global landlocked basins has undergone a widespread decline. A new study reveals this decline has aggravated local water stress and caused potential sea level rise.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
3 *** 150
Newly discovered supernova complicates origin story theories. A supernova discovered by an international group of astronomers provides an unprecedented look at the first moments of a violent stellar explosion. The light from the explosion's first hours showed an unexpected pattern, which astronomers analyzed to reveal that the genesis of these phenomena is even more mysterious than previously thought.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
3 *** 150
Black hole 'donuts' are actually 'fountains'. Based on computer simulations and new observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), researchers have found that the rings of gas surrounding active supermassive black holes are not simple donut shapes. Instead, gas expelled from the center interacts with infalling gas to create a dynamic circulation pattern, similar to a water fountain in a city park.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3 *** 150
Greenhouse gas 'detergent' recycles itself in atmosphere. A simple molecule in the atmosphere that acts as a "detergent" to breakdown methane and other greenhouse gases has been found to recycle itself to maintain a steady global presence in the face of rising emissions, according to new NASA research. Understanding its role in the atmosphere is critical for determining the lifetime of methane, a powerful contributor to climate change.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Scientist
3 *** 68
2018 Top 10 Innovations. Biology happens on many levels, from ecosystems to electron transport chains. These tools may help spur discoveries at all of life's scales.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
3 *** 58
Prachee Avasthi Explores How Cells Build and Maintain Cilia. The University of Kansas professor is also known for her leadership among early-career researchers.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


NPR
2 *** 11000
Dead Sea Lions With Gunshot Wounds Wash Up On Washington State Shores. At least eight dead sea lions with bullet holes have been found since September. It's illegal to shoot marine mammals, but that hasn't stopped some fishermen from going after them. (Image credit: Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images)
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Live Science
2 *** 1000
A 7.0-Magnitude Earthquake Just Shook Alaska. The earthquake struck 8 miles (13 kilometers) north of Anchorage, prompting a tsunami warning.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Live Science
2 *** 550
Archaeologists Are Looking for Dead Sea Scrolls Inside 2 Newfound Qumran Caves. The caves are in just the right spot to hold these biblical-era manuscripts.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
2 *** 550
A close-up look at the 7.0-magnitude earthquake that struck Alaska today. The first earthquake measured 7.0, and the subsequent aftershock measured 5.7. No serious injuries or deaths have been reported so far. People immediately took to social media to post images and videos of the earthquakes' aftermath. None Two earthquakes measuring 7.0 and 5.7 rumbled Anchorage, Alaska on Friday morning, causing roads to split open and people to take cover under whatever shelter th
Published: 30 Nov 2018


New Scientist
2 *** 450
Hung over: What science says about why you feel so rough. Hair of the dog? Wine before beer? Why everything you know about hangovers, and how to cure them, is wrong – or unproven
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
2 *** 150
Study discovers over 6,000 antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteria that inhabit the human gut. A study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2 *** 150
How microscopic machines can fail in the blink of an eye. How long can tiny gears and other microscopic moving parts last before they wear out? What are the warning signs that these components are about to fail, which can happen in just a few tenths of a second? Striving to provide clear answers to these questions, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for more quickly tracking microelectromechan
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Inside Science
2 *** 23
How Artificial Intelligence is Making Inroads in the Music Industry. How Artificial Intelligence is Making Inroads in the Music Industry Algorithms for mixing and mastering audio are having a growing impact on what we hear. 45988388711_a00393b6a6_o.jpg Image credits: Ilmicrofono Oggiono via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Friday, November 30, 2018 – 16:30 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — When a song plays on the radio, there are invis
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Blog » Languages » English
2 *** 11
The neuron formerly known as 5to is now named Arachne!. The results are in and Arachne is the name of our third newly discovered ganglion cell type! This name was nominated by Eyewirer kinryuu. In mythology, Arachne was a master weaver who challenged Athena, the goddess of wisdom and crafts, to a weaving contest. Arachne wove a feisty message that called out the gods for misleading humans. She did so well that she enraged Athena, who turned her into a
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2 *** 5
A bastard seal from the past reveals the potential for human hybrids. If discovered as fossils, grey and ringed seals are so different that they could be classified as belonging to different families. Yet, a seal pup born in 1929 was found to be an almost perfect intermediate between the species. Compared to Neanderthals and modern humans, grey and ringed seals are genetically and dentally at least twice as different, suggesting that there may be more fossil human h
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2 *** 5
Trees for bees. Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues.And researchers suggest artificial intelligence could be used as a tool to design our landscapes so that trees, hedgerows and wildflowers are planted in the right place and the right numbers to ensure our pollinators have enough food.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2 *** 5
Ambulance response times are worse for low-income people. In what is believed to be the first national study evaluating disparities in 911 responses for cardiac arrest in high-income and low-income neighborhoods, a team led by researchers at UC San Francisco examined whether socioeconomic disparities were associated with longer ambulance responses and transport times for cardiac arrests occurring outside hospital premises.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2 *** 5
To image leaky atmosphere, NASA rocket team heads north. Earth's atmosphere is leaking-but how does oxygen get the energy to escape to space? NASA's VISIONS-2 rocket will soon launch into the unique magnetic environment near the North Pole in pursuit of an answer.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


BBC News
16000
New Zealand beached whales: Why are so many getting stranded?. Illness, warmer waters and the fact that pilot whales travel in sociable groups could all play a role.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


BBC News
14000
Brexit: Sam Gyimah resigns over Theresa May's 'naive' deal. Sam Gyimah says the row over the EU's Galileo system shows how the UK will be "hammered" in any deal.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


New York Times
5000
Matter: Yes, the Octopus Is Smart as Heck. But Why?. It has eight arms, three hearts – and a plan. Scientists aren't sure how the cephalopods got to be so intelligent.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
5000
The Over-celebration of Life Events. Earlier this week, news outlets published the results of a public-records investigation into what caused a massive wildfire in Arizona's Santa Rita foothills last year. The video footage procured by Arizona Daily Star reporters confirms what those who'd been following the case feared: The blaze began with a giant eruption of blue powder. A U.S. Border Patrol agent and then-expecting father was at
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
4000
George H. W. Bush Is Dead. Had George Herbert Walker Bush never become the 41st president of the United States, he'd still be remembered as one of the great Americans of the 20th century. Bush, who died Friday at the age of 94, according to his spokesman, began his public service more than six decades ago, at age 18, as a naval aviator during World War II. Over the ensuing decades, he founded a successful oil company, serv
Published: 01 Dec 2018


TED Talks
3000
Me Too is a movement, not a moment | Tarana Burke. In 2006, Tarana Burke was consumed by a desire to do something about the sexual violence she saw in her community. She took out a piece of paper, wrote "Me Too" across the top and laid out an action plan for a movement centered on the power of empathy between survivors. More than a decade later, she reflects on what has since become a global movement — and makes a powerful call to dismantle the p
Published: 30 Nov 2018


MIT Technology Review
2000
Despite CRISPR baby controversy, Harvard University will begin gene-editing sperm. Even as a furious debate broke out in China over gene-edited babies, some scientists in the US are also hoping to improve tomorrow's children.
Published: 29 Nov 2018


New York Times
1000
Knickers the Steer Really Is Big. But Most of Us Don't Know a Cow's Normal Size.. If you thought Knickers was a once-in-a-lifetime giant, you may not be spending enough time with cattle.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Atlantic
1000
The Controversy Over Parents Who Eat Lunch With Their Children at School. The grade-school lunchroom has long acted as a microcosm of social life. It's where kids choose whom to sit with, develop friendships, and resolve conflicts. And lunch is one of the few less-supervised periods in most kids' school days. Over the past several years, however, some school cafeterias have become invaded by a new group: parents. Twenty years ago, when I was in elementary school, havin
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Atlantic
1000
Reality Isn't 'Real'. Many people assume that they perceive the world as it actually is-as if eyes and ears were windows that allow us to access an objective reality. But perception is not an accurate reflection of an externally existing world. "In fact," the neuroscientist Anil Seth says, "perception and hallucination have a lot in common. You could say that we're all hallucinating all of the time, and when we agree
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Guardian
1000
UK may never recover £1.2bn invested in EU Galileo satellite system. British armed forces will not get access to Galileo, a rival to the US GPS system, after Brexit The UK may never claw back £1.2bn of investment in Galileo, the EU's satellite navigation system, as Theresa May officially pulled the plug on UK defence and security participation in the system after Brexit. Galileo, developed as a rival to the US GPS system, is due to be launched in 2020 with civilia
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
550
The Marriott Hack: How to Protect Yourself


Popular Science
550
Cannabis gets its high-inducing power from ancient viruses. Health A new genome map reveals that the genes for THC and CBD production probably came from viral DNA. In the latest issue of Genome Research, a group of North American scientists have, for the first time ever, published a full map of the cannabis genome. Among the myriad…
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Guardian
550
'Magma shift' may have caused mysterious seismic wave event. Vibrations off Madagascar baffled experts but now they believe they have the answer It is the kind of mystery scientists relish. On 11 November, something stirred near the French island of Mayotte off the west coast of Madagascar and sent a rumble around the world. Travelling at 9,000mph, the deep hum hurtled past earthquake detection systems unnoticed. No one appears to have felt a thing. The ev
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Guardian
550
Hope for male 'pill' breakthrough after huge cash injection. Dundee University researchers receive $1m funding boost from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Researchers at a Scottish university hope to make a breakthrough in the long hunt for a male pill, thanks to a grant of more than $900,000 that will allow them to screen thousands of existing drugs to see if they have potential. Related: Male pill could be on horizon as trials yield positive results Con
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
550
Does Your Language Influence How You Think?. Would it be harder for people who speak a highly gendered language to create a more gender-neutral society?
Published: 30 Nov 2018


BBC News
450
Climate change: How slag can remove CO2 from the air. Scientists in Wales are looking at how slag heaps can be used to remove CO2 from the air in the fight against climate change.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


BBC News
450
Nation's botanical treasure troves 'under huge threat'. The UK's herbaria are great scientific collections that must be safeguarded for the future, say scientists.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
450
Awesome Ears: The Weird World of Insect Hearing. Evolution made insect ears many times over, resulting in a dazzling variety of forms found in spots all over the body
Published: 30 Nov 2018


NPR
450
With New Leadership, Planned Parenthood Plots The Path Forward. The organization reportedly saw a surge of interest in IUDs after President Trump's election, but it's not just for birth control, or for women. What does Dr. Leana Wen have planned for the organization? (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Published: 29 Nov 2018


Big Think
450
How introducing microbial life to Mars can make it livable for humans. Humanity dreams of becoming an interplanetary species, but no other planet in our solar system can currently support complex life. In order to make a planet like Mars hospitable for us, we'll have to engage in a massive, decades-long terraforming effort. Much of what makes Earth livable, such as breathable air, tolerable temperatures, and so on, are the result of microbial activity from Earth's e
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
450
The Saudis' Reputation: A Tale Told in Three Acts. The big question ahead of the G20 summit in Argentina was how world leaders would greet Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman amid the fallout over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi. We now have the answer: He was embraced by Russian President Vladimir Putin, apparently admonished by French President Emmanuel Macron, and mostly ignored by President Donald Trump. U.S. intelligence agencies say the S
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Popular Science
450
Anchorage suffered a 7.0 magnitude earthquake, but was spared a tsunami. Science No injuries have been reported. A magnitude 7.0 earthquake hit Alaska today, causing a short-lived tsunami warning and substantial structural damage.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


BBC News
350
TEDWomen: Vibrations offer new way to track elephants. A technique used to study earthquakes have been adapted to track elephants in the wild.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Wired
350
These Professional Portraits of Animals Evoke Human Emotion. Photographer Randal Ford spent two years taking studio photographs for 'The Animal Kingdom'.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
350
Apple Music Lands on Amazon Echo, as Apple Branches Out. Two bitter tech rivals get along for a change, making your streaming life a lot less complicated.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Guardian
250
Trump officials argue climate change warnings based on 'worst-case scenario'. Official minimize warnings and say government report considers only the highest possible levels of greenhouse gas emissions The Trump administration has a new strategy for deflecting concerns about the warming planet. Related: Why no US region is safe from climate change Continue reading…
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Atlantic
250
Presidents Need to Visit the Troops. Battlefield tourism is the sour term occasionally used by soldiers when some group of distinguished visitors shows up in the deserts of Iraq or the mountains of Afghanistan. From the soldiers' point of view, the itinerant pundits or officials are a nuisance. They require special care and handling, they ask dumb questions, they take up the time of harried commanders and sleep-deprived intelligence
Published: 01 Dec 2018


MIT Technology Review
250
Inside the world of AI that forges beautiful art and terrifying deepfakes. Generative adversarial networks, or GANs, are fueling creativity-and controversy. Here's how they work.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
250
Detecting Fog Using Signals from Cell-Phone Towers. A novel technique can predict foggy conditions an hour before they appear
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
250
Rolling Under the Sea: Scientists Gave Octopuses Ecstasy to Study Social Behavior. Cephalopods on the recreational drug behave much like humans do, even touching and hugging their peers
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
250
Unraveling the Mathematics of Smell. Scientists have created a "map" of odor molecules, which could ultimately be used to predict new scent combinations
Published: 01 Dec 2018


New York Times
250
Global Health: 'From Nothing to Gangbusters': A Treatment for Sickle-Cell Disease Proves Effective in Africa. Already used in Western countries, hydroxyurea eased painful episodes in African children with the condition. It also reduced the risk of malaria infection.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Live Science
250
Babies Create a Mental Map of Their Body Before They Ever Leave the Womb. Those kicks and jabs help your baby build an information superhighway while still in the womb.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


NPR
250
Amid Layoffs, An American Automotive Institution Tries To Change. America's largest automaker, General Motors, says it wants to eliminate costs and concentrate on electric and self-driving vehicles. (Image credit: LARS HAGBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Published: 27 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
250
A Crisis of Conscience in Fake News. Once upon a time, an economically depressed and largely forgotten town in the Balkans experienced a digital gold rush. The average monthly salary in Veles, Macedonia, had been $371; now young denizens were earning up to $16,000. The year was 2016, and the gold was fake news. The idea that fake news most likely helped Donald Trump get elected is, well, old news. An Ohio University study published
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Live Science
250
Ancient Hominins May Have Lived Alongside Modern Humans in Arabia. Ancient human relatives lived on the Arabian Peninsula for an astonishingly long time – from about 240,000 to 190,000 years ago – and spread into the heart of the region by following its blue rivers and lakes, a new study found.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Science News
250
Around the world, reported measles cases jumped 31 percent in 2017. While the number of reported measles cases has dropped 80 percent from 2000 to 2017, high profile outbreaks pushed the 2017 total up from 2016.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
250
Millennials buy the things their parents did – but they're much poorer. Millennials earn less, own fewer assets and have more debt than previous generations. The fact that Millennials' spending habits differ from previous generations is best explained by lower earnings and less wealth, rather than changing tastes. Some Millennials might be too optimistic about their ability to retire early – or on time. None A study published this month from the Federal Reserve sugge
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
250
Solar Industry's Future Lies in Lightweight Technology. Scientists are developing flexible, thin-films that will be more resilient and have wider uses than current solar technology
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
250
US Biotech Firms Made China's Gene-Edited Babies Possible. Even Crispr babies have a global supply chain.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


New York Times
250
The American Citizen's Guide to Clean Air. Unsure if the government is looking out for them, a guerrilla network of "breathers" has turned to personal pollution monitors.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Popular Science
250
Black truffles are in trouble. Nexus Media News Climate change is threatening to muffle the truffle shuffle. Researchers gathered data on more than three decades of truffle production and compared it with data on temperature and precipitation to predict the future impact of…
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
250
Why a Hacker Exploited Printers to Make PewDiePie Propaganda. An anonymous hacker has claimed credit for the prank, which is part of an ongoing YouTube subscriber feud.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Popular Science
150
The Marriott data breach exposed millions of passports. Here's what thieves can do with them.


Scientific American
150
Kids Today Are Being Socialized to Think They're Fragile Snowflakes. A looming crisis and how to avert it
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
150
Spooky Quantum Action Passes Test. Recent experiments quash the hope that the unsettling phenomenon of quantum entanglement can be explained away
Published: 01 Dec 2018


MIT Technology Review
150
How to check if you're affected by the Marriott mega data breach


The Atlantic
150
What It Really Means to Be the Adult in the Room. Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's chief operating officer, often has been called the company's "adult in the room." A former Clinton administration chief of staff, Sandberg ran both sales and philanthropic divisions at Google before joining Facebook. Her 2013 book Lean In made her a feminist business icon, of a certain stripe . And so it was particularly devastating when a New York Times report earlier
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Atlantic
150
2018 Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar. It's that time of year again, time for one of my favorite holiday traditions: the 11th annual Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar. Every day until Tuesday, December 25, this page will present one new incredible image of our universe from NASA's Hubble telescope. Be sure to bookmark this calendar and come back every day until the 25th, or follow on Twitter ( @ TheAtlPhoto ), Facebook , or Tumbl
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Wired
150
Watch SpaceX Attempt Its Wickedly Complex Satellite Launch. With more than 60 satellites jammed in for the ride, a Falcon 9 rocket will get used a third time, fulfilling one of Elon Musk's standing promises.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Wired
150
Everything WIRED Editors Loved This Month: Phones, Drones, and RoboVacs. Plus: Samsung's bendy phone, Apple's MacBook Air, and Microsoft's Surface Headphones.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
150
A Possible 'Fallout 76' Lawsuit Leads the Week in Game News. If one law firm has its way, publisher Bethesda may need to pay for its alleged practices.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
150
What Would It Take to Shoot a Cannonball Into Orbit?. We did the math on a famous thought experiment by Isaac Newton involving a very tall mountain, a wicked fast cannonball, and good old gravity.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Popular Science
150
How to keep a Christmas tree fresh for as long as possible. DIY Help your conifer thrive through the holidays. Nobody wants a drooping, brown-needled Christmas tree in the corner. Keep your living decoration green and happy with these tips.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
150
Asteroid-Sampling Mission Zeroes in on Tiny Space Rock. U.S. spacecraft aims to return the largest trove of space dirt to Earth since NASA's final Apollo mission in the 1970s
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
150
This amazing map of Lake Michigan was made entirely by typewriter. An old Royal Safari II typewriter was used to make this effective and attractive map Although they're relatively easy to make, typewriter maps are rare The mapmaker has received numerous commissions; will typewritten maps be the cartographic hype of 2019? To anyone familiar with North America's geography, the shape on this map is instantly recognisable. This lookalike of Sweden (1), similarly dro
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
150
America's Love-Hate Relationship with Science. Our leaders want the benefits of science while denying its inconvenient findings
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
150
'The Journal of Controversial Ideas' will launch in 2019. Is it dangerous?. A trio of respected philosophers have decided to launch a peer reviewed journal that would allow for anonymous submissions. If successful, the journal could allow for important ideas that might lead to threats or harm to the author to join the debate and promote discussion. Critics ask if this is needed, and warn of giving dangerous people a safe space to publish horrific ideas. Three very famous
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Science News
150
Stone Age people conquered the Tibetan Plateau's thin air. Stone tools that are at least 30,000 years old suggest that people settled the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau earlier than scientists thought.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
150
The Trump Administration Debates a Cold War With China. The president was furious. A member of his own cabinet had just blatantly contradicted him by giving a speech in which he argued that the U.S. should compromise, cooperate, and coexist peacefully with the world's ascendant superpower. "Getting tough" doesn't work in the long run "for schoolyard bullies or businessmen or world powers," the renegade official had noted, proposing that the two countr
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Popular Science
150
We finally know how bright the universe is. Space Astrophysicists measured all of the lights. The darkness of the sky hides a history of the cosmos, and astrophysicists are working to decode it.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
150
A Quiet War Rages Over Who Can Make Money Online. As social media companies and payment processors crack down on offensive speech, people and groups are using the tools to harass their enemies.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
150
How to Measure All the Starlight in the Universe. Until the 20th century, astronomers were stuck on a question that seems as if it should have an easy answer: Why is the night sky dark? If the infinite universe has an infinite numbers of stars, as they assumed, our evening view should be awash in their glow. Astronomers eventually got the answer to this question, known as Olbers' paradox, when they worked out that the universe doesn't go on fore
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
150
Photos of the Week: Foggy Skies, Wayward Boar, Mars Landing. The Knife Angel in England; tree-canopy tours in Ghana; soldiers on patrol in Ukraine; Christmas displays across Europe and the United States; wildfires in Australia; protests in Colombia, Turkey, and Belgium; and much more
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
150
Shoplifters Is a Brilliant Dickensian Tale for a Modern Age. Shoplifters is, very quietly, a film about a crisis. The Shibata family comprises three generations crammed together into a small home-the adults earn low wages; work menial jobs; and struggle to feed, clothe, and educate the kids. This family, and their lives, could easily be framed in the dreariest way possible, and the writer and director Hirokazu Kore-eda has been up front about wanting to us
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
150
GM's Dan Ammann to Lead Cruise, Its Self-Driving Car Effort. The automaker's president is leaving his role in Detroit to head up Cruise, while founder and current CEO Kyle Vogt will become CTO.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Popular Science
150
This new bike helmet can automatically call for help if you crash. Technology Like the Apple Watch, it keeps an eye out for spills. The potentially life-saving gadget is called ANGI.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Live Science
94
Here's What Photosynthesis Sounds Like Underwater. If you listen closely, you can hear little plants harnessing the sun's energy. All you have to do is dive underwater and listen for the faint but distinctive "ping!" that red algae make while carrying out photosynthesis, a new study finds.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
93
Exploring the watery remains of France's sunken Roman port of Olbia. Stretching over four sandy kilometres Almanarre beach in southern France is a mecca for sun lovers and kite surfers. But its greatest treasure-a 2,000-year-old underwater archaeological site-lies just a few feet offshore.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


New Scientist
92
14 great science and tech books to give as presents this Christmas. From the true nature of time to the world's most extraordinary brains to why you should ditchg social media, Culture picks the best books to give this year
Published: 01 Dec 2018


MIT Technology Review
92
A mass ride-sharing launch will put cremated remains, satellites, and art into space. Artists and space entrepreneurs are among those with something on board a SpaceX rocket intended to launch more than 60 satellites.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
84
The whole of Africa was the cradle of humankind. A team of scientists led by Mohamed Sahnouni, archaeologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just published a paper in the journal Science that breaks with the paradigm that the cradle of Humankind lies in East Africa, based on archaeological remains found at sites in the region of Ain Hanech (Algeria), the oldest currently known in the north of Afric
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
84
This amazing map of Lake Michigan was made entirely by typewriter. An old Royal Safari II typewriter was used to make this effective and attractive map. Although they're relatively easy to make, typewriter maps are rare. The mapmaker has received numerous commissions; will typewritten maps be the cartographic hype of 2019? None To anyone familiar with North America's geography, the shape on this map is instantly recognisable. This lookalike of Sweden (1), simila
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
84
To image leaky atmosphere, NASA rocket team heads north. On a frigid morning in early December, a team of NASA rocket scientists will huddle in the control room in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, a remote archipelago off the northern coast of Norway. Here at the world's northernmost rocket range, operated by Norway's Andøya Space Center, the clock may read 8 a.m., but the Sun won't be up-by that time, it won't have peeked over the horizon in more than a month.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
83
Marriott security breach exposed data of up to 500M guests (Update)


Live Science
77
Hodor! Deep-Sea Worms Get 'Game of Thrones' Names. Arya Stark and Hodor from "Game of Thrones" inspired the scientific names of newfound deep-sea worms.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Scientist
76
Rapid DNA Analysis Steps In to Identify Remains of Wildfire Victims. Investigators have the victims' samples in hand, but face a range of obstacles before they can finally ID them.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
74
What Utah Voters Really Want From Mitt Romney. The question has followed him ever since he first launched his bid for the United States Senate: Is Mitt Romney coming to Washington as a friend or foe of Donald Trump? Thanks to new polling data from the Associated Press , at least one thing is clear: Romney's constituents back in Utah don't want another presidential lapdog. According to the poll, 64 percent of Utah voters want to see Romney sta
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Wired
73
Gift Ideas for Dogs and Dog-Lovers: Chewy, Furbo, and More. Treat your pup with one of these fetching presents, from treat dispensers to ball launchers.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
73
Trump said to advance seismic tests for oil in Atlantic waters. The Trump administration is taking a major step toward allowing a first-in-a-generation seismic search for oil and gas under Atlantic waters, despite protests that the geological tests involve loud air gun blasts that will harm whales, dolphins and other animals.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
69
How Google Keeps Its Power-Hungry Operations Carbon Neutral. At TEDWomen 2018, sustainability office Kate Brandt urges others to embrace the "circular economy."
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
66
A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices. A team of scientists from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany have published in Science Advances online today an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work one thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Live Science
65
This Gene Can Make Viruses Invisible to the Immune System – Up to a Point. One gene, which protects the body from autoimmune disorders also helps secretly usher in some viruses by changing their look.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
64
Best Tech and Gaming Deals this Weekend: Dyson, Apple, God of War. Cyber Week is ending, but there are still some killer holiday deals this weekend.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
64
'Chemputer' promises app-controlled revolution for drug production. A radical new method of producing drug molecules, which uses downloadable blueprints to easily and reliably synthesise organic chemicals via a programmable 'chemputer', could be set to democratise the pharmaceutical industry, scientists say.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
64
Indigenous protected areas are the next generation of conservation. The Horn Plateau, with its myriad of lakes, rivers and wetlands, has been a spiritual home for local Dehcho Dene peoples for millennia. In October, the Dehcho First Nations Assembly designated these lands and waters, called Edéhzhíe (eh-day-shae), as an Indigenous protected area (IPA), designed and managed or co-managed by Indigenous communities.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Guardian
63
Week in Wildlife – in pictures. Red fody, beached whales and wildlife rescued from an Australian heatwave in this week's gallery Continue reading…
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
62
Creating Synthetic Silk from Microbes. Engineered bacteria produce silk-like fibers that are as strong as natural ones
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Wired
60
Top Stories in November: Another Chapter in Robert Mueller's Report. The special counsel's end game is in sight. Plus: The pricey war over your Instagram feed, and the best online shopping deals.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
56
Gift Ideas for Cats and Cat-Lovers: Litter Boxes, Toys, Grooming, Treats. Treat your own cat-or your cat-loving friend-with one of these presents from Chewy, Modkat, and more. Then maybe take a nap?
Published: 01 Dec 2018


New Scientist
55
Millions of passport and credit card details exposed in Marriott hack


Scientific American
54
Plants That Lived on Mount Everest Rediscovered in Forgotten Lab Collection. The specimens, which went unstudied for nearly seven decades, show adaptations to high elevation
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Science News
52
Half the world's annual rain falls in just 12 days. Climate change could shorten the time it talks for the world's to receive half its annual precipitation from 12 days to 11 by 2100.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
51
Is being a night owl bad for your health?. In the first ever international review of studies analysing whether being an early riser or a night owl can influence your health, researchers have uncovered a growing body of evidence indicating an increased risk of ill health in people with an evening preference as they have more erratic eating patterns and consume more unhealthy foods.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
49
Brilliant iron molecule could provide cheaper solar energy. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating an iron molecule that can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity. The results indicate that the iron molecule could replace the more expensive and rarer metals used today.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Popular Science
47
How to delete your old email address without regretting it later. DIY Make sure to save your information first. Your old email account is a security risk. But before you delete it, make sure to take these steps.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Big Think
46
Musical training improves vision, researchers say. Drummers and brass players have stronger visual timing sensitivity than flag spinners in the Color Guard. The three groups took part in over 67,000 temporal order judgment (TOJ) trials. The finding, while counterintuitive, fits into the complex nature of sensory perception. None "Seeing is believing" is not only a metaphor for discerning truth, but also a visual reality for many. Watching someone
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
45
Marriott data breach hits 500 million guests. Here's what to do if you're one of them.


The Atlantic
45
Letters: 'Graduate School Offers Ever-Increasing Pressures That Compound'. Graduate School Can Have Terrible Effects on People's Mental Health This week, Alia Wong wrote about a new study showing that Ph.D. candidates suffer from anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation at astonishingly high rates. I found your article to expose the naked truth of grad school: an intellectual perversion that relies on its own unsatisfactory teleological reasoning. Compounding the inhe
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
45
Babies kicking in the womb are creating a map of their bodies. The kicks a mother feels from her unborn child may allow the baby to 'map' their own body and enable them to eventually explore their surroundings, suggests new research. For the study, researchers measured brainwaves produced when newborns kick their limbs during rapid eye movement sleep, finding that fast brainwaves — a brainwave pattern typically seen in neonates — fire in the corresponding h
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
43
COP24: Tree planting is essential to the UK's commitments on climate change. Humans have cut down half the trees on Earth since the dawn of agriculture – over 3 trillion of them. This huge loss holds the potential for massive reforestation today, which would protect local environments from soil loss, flash flooding and desertification and take up large quantities of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Despite these advantages, reforestation gets very little attention in our fight
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
42
How to Cultivate a Warm Computer-Side Manner. There's a right way for doctors to integrate technology into patient care
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Wired
42
Gadget Lab Podcast: Andrew Mason on Descript and Life, Post-Groupon. Andrew Mason, the founder of Groupon who was fired as CEO in 2013 and has since gone on to launch new startups, proves he's still a one-of-a-kind entrepreneur.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
41
Altered microbiome after caesarean section impacts baby's immune system. Scientists have observed that, during a natural vaginal birth, specific bacteria from the mother's gut are passed on to the baby and stimulate the baby's immune responses. This transmission is impacted in children born by caesarean section.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
40
US approves seismic tests despite dolphin, whale concerns. The US government Friday took a big step toward opening oil and gas drilling in the Atlantic ocean by approving seismic airgun tests that experts warn are harmful to dolphins and whales.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


New Scientist
39
Space art could be so much more than a shiny satellite in the sky. Orbital Reflector, a giant balloon that will inflate in Earth's orbit and reflect the sun's light, is the latest attempt at large-scale art in space. But space art should do more than mimic the stars
Published: 30 Nov 2018


New York Times
38
600 Million Years Ago, the First Scavengers Lurked in Dark Ocean Gardens. The bizarre organisms of the Ediacaran Period have long puzzled researchers. Fossil discoveries suggest these ecosystems may have been more complicated than once thought.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
35
Molecular Microscope Lets Scientists Peer inside Single Cells. The new technology can identify proteins that distinguish healthy cells from diseased ones
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
35
Sacred Groves: An Ancient Tradition of Nature Conservation. Indian villagers are reviving an ancient tradition to enjoy the ecological benefits it confers
Published: 01 Dec 2018


New York Times
31
Aaron Klug, 92, Dies; His 3-D Images of Bodily Molecules Won a Nobel. Born in Lithuania, raised in South Africa and working in Britain, he made large strides in understanding the structure of proteins, DNA and more.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
31
Clues to brain changes in depression. In new pre-clinical research, scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), led by Scott Thompson, PhD, Professor of Physiology, have identified changes in brain activity linked to the pleasure and reward system.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
30
A Dunkin' Donuts Hack, a Fake FedEx Site, and More Security News This Week. Scam centers, exposed massage company data, and more of the week's top security news.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Atlantic
30
The G20 Communiqué Bookends the George H.W. Bush Era. It is somewhat fitting that G20 leaders agreed on a statement hours after the death of George H. W. Bush. In normal times, Saturday's announcement in Argentina would hardly be unusual. Diplomats negotiate the agendas and communiqué of such meetings for weeks and months before national leaders affix their signatures to them. The Trump administration has been loath to support statements in favor of
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
30
Students at every grade need to learn climate science, expert says. The National Climate Assessment, released the day after Thanksgiving, offers motivation and opportunity to bring climate topics into the classroom at every grade level.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


New Scientist
30
Almost everything we know about social media and health could be wrong. Many studies about social media use and health have a fundamental flaw – they use unreliable self-reports about how much people use technology
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
29
Project Troy: How Scientists Helped Refine Cold War Psychological Warfare. The phrase Cold War didn't always refer to a time period. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the very years that the battle lines between the United States and the Soviet Union were being drawn, U.S. foreign-policy strategists used the phrase to invoke a specific kind of conflict, one carried out by "means short of war." If, as NSC-68 , a key document of U.S. strategy, asserted in 1950, the Unite
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
29
Polluters in the room: big energy 'undermining' UN climate talks. Oil and coal giants are exploiting a lack of conflict-of-interest protection at UN climate talks to push for continued fossil fuel use despite its contribution to harmful climate change, several sources have told AFP.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Ingeniøren
28
Dansk ingeniørvirksomhed hædres for sin kamp mod korruption i Ukraine. Ingeniørvirksomhed BIIR har netop modtaget prisen som årets mest samvittighedsfulde skatteyder i det korruptionsplagede land. Tidligere i år satte firmaet en runesten ved sit hovedkvarter for at markere sejren i en langstrakt sag om korruption.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
28
Switch for the regeneration of nerve cell insulation. An international research team has discovered a mechanism that regulates the regeneration of the insulating layer of neurites. This insulation coating, also referred to as myelin sheath, is crucial for rapid signal transmission among cells. Damages to the myelin sheath, such as are caused by multiple sclerosis, can considerably inhibit the function of the nervous system.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
28
'Juul's a Business, and They're Behaving Like a Business'. Juul Labs' Instagram account was once a repository of images of attractive young adults hanging out in sunny locales while puffing away at the brand's popular vapes. Now it's more like a digital grave. Everything is buried, save for one post, a lone marker explaining the void. Earlier this month, the e-cigarette giant pulled a highly publicized corporate-responsibility move on social media, delet
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
27
Catching Whisky Fakers. Scientists are developing new techniques for detecting food and beverage fraud
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
26
Ingenious Method Reveals Precious Human Remains Hidden in Fossil "Junk". A new technique for identifying tiny fragments of fossilized bone is helping to answer key questions about when, where and how human species interacted with one another
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
26
Scientists reveal substantial water loss in global landlocked regions. A new study reveals that water storage declines in global landlocked basins has aggravated local water stress and caused potential sea level rise.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
25
Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2018. Disruptive solutions that are poised to change the world
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
25
Great strides for carbon capture using earth-abundant elements as photocatalytic system. Researchers at Tokyo Tech have designed a CO2 reduction method based only on commonly occurring elements. Achieving a 57 percent overall quantum yield of CO2 reduction products, it is the highest performing system of its kind reported to date, raising prospects for cost-effective carbon capture solutions.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Ingeniøren
24
Gratis værktøj viser, hvor vandet løber hen ved oversvømmelser. Ved at benytte både gratis højdekort for Danmark og kombinere det med en gratis software udviklet på Københavns Universitet, kan man se, hvornår oversvømmelsen rammer helt lokalt.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
24
Table-top experiment flips current understanding of solutal convection. When Yu "Alex" Liang started graduate school at The University of Texas at Austin, he was tasked with running a straight-forward experiment to collect data on a well-understood phenomenon in fluid mechanics: how density differences influence fluid flow in a porous medium.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
24
Light pollution may cause insomnia in older adults. A new study is the first population-based investigation to report a significant association between artificial, outdoor light exposure at night and insomnia, as indicated by older adults' use of hypnotic drugs.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
24
The future of fighting cancer: Zapping tumors in less than a second. New accelerator-based technology aims to reduce the side effects of cancer radiation therapy by shrinking its duration from minutes to under a second. Built into future compact medical devices, technology developed for high-energy physics could also help make radiation therapy more accessible around the world.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
24
New approach to assess sustainability of reef fish. A new study helping to improve how sustainability is measured for popular reef fish could help better assess the eco-friendly seafood options at the dinner table.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
23
Space Photos of the Week: Packing for Mars. The InSight lander takes a long trip, the Martian south pole looks like metal, and Abel 1033 looks like the starship *Enterprise.*
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
22
Greenhouse gas 'detergent' recycles itself in atmosphere. A simple molecule in the atmosphere that acts as a 'detergent' to breakdown methane and other greenhouse gases has been found to recycle itself to maintain a steady global presence in the face of rising emissions, according to new research. Understanding its role in the atmosphere is critical for determining the lifetime of methane, a powerful contributor to climate change.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
21
Planting more hedgerows and trees could help bees thrive once again. Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues. And researchers suggest artificial intelligence could be used as a tool to design our landscapes so that trees, hedgerows and wildflowers are planted in the right place and the right numbers to ensure our pollinators have enough food.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Wired
20
Does 'Chilling Adventures of Sabrina' Make Satanists Look Bad?. The Satanic Temple took issue with the Netflix series.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
20
Why battery-powered vehicles stack up better than hydrogen. Low energy efficiency is already a major problem for petrol and diesel vehicles. Typically, only 20% of the overall well-to-wheel energy is actually used to power these vehicles. The other 80% is lost through oil extraction, refinement, transport, evaporation, and engine heat. This low energy efficiency is the primary reason why fossil fuel vehicles are emissions-intensive, and relatively expensiv
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
19
Rare woodland wildlife at risk because of 50-year-old tree felling rules. In the UK it is illegal to deliberately kill or injure red squirrels, disturb them while they are using a nest, or destroy their nests. Yet, although the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act provides these protections, there is a legal anomaly in England and Wales – one that can potentially undermine the conservation of the red squirrel, along with every other rare and endangered forest plant or anim
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
18
Alaska surveys damage from major earthquakes. Chris Riekena was driving his 7-year-old son to school when his car started acting up. As he pulled over, he realized the problem wasn't his car-it was a huge earthquake.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
18
Fix Facebook, whether it wants to or not: whistleblower. Eight months after revealing the links between Facebook and Cambridge Analytica (CA), whistleblower Christopher Wylie is pushing for the internet giant to be regulated-whether it wants to or not.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
18
Virtual reality could serve as powerful environmental education tool. Researchers took a virtual reality experience into a variety of educational settings, including high school classrooms, to test the impact on awareness and understanding of ocean acidification.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Ingeniøren
17
Ugens debat: Dumt med hvilken faktor?. Da Aalborg Universitet i sidste uge meldte ud, at en række grønne tekniske studier lukker, fordi de foregår på engelsk, kaldte IDA's formand det »dobbelt dumt«. Den bedømmelse mente flere af debattørerne på ing.dk godt kunne få en tand til.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Live Science
15
Ice Age 'Unicorn' May Have Lived Alongside Modern Humans. A burly "unicorn" once roamed the Eurasian steppes.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Guardian
15
Sound advice: why rockstars are my guiding light. Therapy helps in a crisis. But when it comes to lessons in life, music has most of the answers When my marriage dissolved a decade ago, I went to a cognitive therapist to see if I could make sense of it. I sat in a small room with a kindly old lady who was not my mother, but who may as well have been, as we discussed love and sex as best we could. Although delivering my opinion about what had hap
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
15
Coal is still king in global power production. Coal remains the most widely used means of electricity production in the world. It also happens to be the biggest emitter of climate-changing carbon dioxide of any fuel.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
15
Force Push VR brings Jedi powers to life. Force Push provides a more physical, nuanced experience than traditional hand controllers allow in VR. It responds to the speed and magnitude of hand gestures to accelerate or decelerate objects in a way that users can understand intuitively.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
15
A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices. A team of scientists now has an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work one thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
14
Fabrication of powerful telescope begins. Fabrication of the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope-prime (CCAT-p), a powerful telescope capable of mapping the sky at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths, has now begun, marking a major milestone in the project.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
14
How you respond to drama depends on if you are a holistic or analytical thinker. Researchers showed volunteers the film My Sister's Keeper on a screen while the research subjects were lying down in an MRI scanner. The study compared the volunteers' brain activity, and concluded that holistic thinkers saw the film more similarly with each other than analytical thinkers. In addition, holistic thinkers processed the film's moral issues and factual connections within the film more
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
14
African-American mothers rate boys higher for ADHD. African-American children often are reported by parents and teachers to display behaviors of ADHD at a higher rate than children from other racial and ethnic groups. For the first time, researchers have found that African-American mothers in a study rated boys as displaying more frequent ADHD symptoms than Caucasian mothers did, regardless of child race.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Live Science
13
Soar Over NASA's InSight Landing Site on Mars in This Stunning Video. A new video gives a bird's-eye view of the patch of Mars that NASA's InSight lander now calls home.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
13
Cosmic Termites. Insects can make topographical biosignatures that are visible from space
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
13
Mischievous responders taint LGBQ health estimates in national survey. Many research studies have reported on the elevated health risk and deviance of youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) but a new study using national data suggests that many of those estimates may be overstated and that LGBQ youth risk and deviance is not as different from heterosexual youth as many studies claim.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Ingeniøren
13
Flere transportløsninger samles i MinRejseplan. Flere transportmuligheder kan findes i samme app. MinRejseplan indeholder nu deleelbiler fra DriveNow og GreenMobility samt delecykler fra Donkey Republic og Københavns bycykel.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
13
The Books Briefing: The People Behind the Books We Love. We're working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Who are the people behind the books we love, and where exactly does their writing draw or diverge from their lives? The work of the pseudonymous superstar Elena Ferrante may contain a trail of clues to her true
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Guardian
13
Ensuring a good standard of therapy | Letters. The three leading regulatory bodies for the counselling and psychotherapy profession have created a new competence framework as a response to the mental health crisis Suzanne Moore is right ( We can talk about self-care, but this mental health crisis is political , 26 November) that counselling and psychotherapy is about talking and that "it is better to talk about things rather than not". Address
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
12
Blue Whales Have Changed Their Tune. In the last few decades, blue whale calls have been getting lower in pitch-and a rebound in their numbers may be the reason. Christopher Intagliata reports.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
12
Why patients lie to their doctors. Up to 80 percent of those surveyed have lied to their doctor about information that could impact their health, including accurately describing their diet and how often they exercise. When survey participants explained their reasoning for doing so, they said that they wanted to avoid being judged and didn't want to be lectured about how bad certain behaviors were.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
12
To image leaky atmosphere, NASA rocket team heads north. Earth's atmosphere is leaking, but how does oxygen get the energy to escape to space? NASA's VISIONS-2 rocket will soon launch into the unique magnetic environment near the North Pole in pursuit of an answer.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
12
In vitro cell culture findings could lead to novel interventions for Schizophrenia. A recent study has shown how using cultured cells from patients with psychotic disorders to investigate abnormalities in nerve connections in the brain could lead to new treatments.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
12
The Atlantic Daily: Tension, Not Anger. What We're Following We're working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? G20: World leaders are performing their own delicate dances at the annual G20 meeting in Buenos Aires. With converging controversies hanging over Saudi Arabia, the country's crown prince, M
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Ingeniøren
11
Sådan virker en torpedo. I de første torpedoer anvendte man almindeligt sortkrudt som sprængladning, siden gik man over til dynamit og våd skydebomuld. I 1915 kunne torpedoer skyde en fart af op til 36 knob, fremdrevet af en trecylindret motor og en tank med 35 atm. luft.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
11
Grim tidings from science on climate change. Scientists monitoring the Earth's climate and environment have delivered a cascade of grim news this year, adding a sense of urgency to UN talks starting next week in Poland on how best to draw down the greenhouse gases that drive global warming.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Live Science
11
Fox, 'Cosmos' Producers Investigate Sexual Misconduct Claims Against Host Neil deGrasse Tyson. The Fox Broadcasting Company and the producers of the science-based series "Cosmos," are investigating host Neil deGrasse Tyson following claims of sexual misconduct by three women.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
11
NASA chief says Elon Musk won't be smoking joints publicly again. NASA chief Jim Bridenstine elaborated this week on the reasons why the US space agency launched a safety review of SpaceX and Boeing, which are building spaceships for astronauts, including their workplace culture and drug-free policies.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
11
Cellular gene signatures for heart muscle regeneration. A research team has used a transcriptomic approach — studying what genes are expressed — to identify gene signatures of cell subpopulations identified as atrial-like or ventricular-like. This understanding could lead to regenerative therapy discoveries for the millions of people living with damaged heart muscle caused by heart attacks or other chronic heart conditions.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
11
Bigger brains are smarter, but not by much. Using a large dataset and controlling for a variety of factors, including sex, age, height, socioeconomic status, and genetic ancestry, scientists found that people with larger brains rated higher on measures of intelligence and educational attainment. Size was far from everything, however, explaining only about two percent of the variation in smarts.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
10
Snowpack declines may stunt tree growth and forests' ability to store carbon emissions. Researchers conducting a 5-year-long study examining snow cover in a northern hardwood forest region found that projected changes in climate could lead to a 95 percent reduction of deep-insulating snowpack in forest areas across the northeastern United States by the end of the 21st century. The loss of snowpack would likely result in a steep reduction of forests' ability to store climate-changing
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
10
Gene Therapy Tackles a Common Birth Defect: Deafness. After false starts, researchers are making progress toward treating deafness with gene therapy
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
10
'Sudoku' X-Ray uncovers movements within opaque materials. Researchers have developed a new X-ray method which involves solving a giant 3D Sudoku problem to better understand these granular movements — and the findings could have a big impact on various industries.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
10
More sensitive MRI diagnostics thanks to innovative 'elastic' contrast media. Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have found a new method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods. It is made possible by using an "elastic" protein structure that can absorb dissolved xenon in a self-regulating way: The greater the amount of this noble gas
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Inside Science
10
The American Gut Project. The American Gut Project Scientists want your poop to give you more information on your gut. The American Gut Project Video of The American Gut Project Human Friday, November 30, 2018 – 11:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Imagine if you had an extra organ with 10 times as many cells as the rest of your body, and that organ affected everything from your digestion to your mood. It t
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
9
How mainstream media helps weaponize far-right conspiracy theories. Once an anti-Semitic rumor moved from fringe to the mainstream, it took less than two weeks for violence to erupt. The false allegation that liberal philanthropist George Soros was funding or supporting a caravan of Honduran refugees heading to the U.S. spread wildly from a single tweet posted on Oct. 14.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
9
Robots in the field: farms embracing autonomous technology. Faced with seesawing commodity prices and the pressure to be more efficient and environmentally friendly, farmer Jamie Butler is trying out a new worker on his 450-acre farm in England's Hampshire countryside.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Viden (Danmarks Radio)
8
Efter 30 års forskning: Hiv er stadig et mysterium. En vaccine er det ultimative våben, siger forsker. Men på den 30. internationale Aids-dag kæmper forskerne stadig med at vinde kampen mod den mikroskopiske virus.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
8
Technologies That Shape the World: 2018 Edition.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
8
Green finance blooms as investors look beyond profits. Environment-friendly finance is blooming thanks to investors willing to weigh profits against ecology, but decisions about meaningful investments can be complex.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
8
Yes, Knickers the steer is really, really big. But he's far short of true genetic freak status. The story of Knickers the giant steer has gone viral on social media over the past week. Admittedly, the pictures show him towering over a herd of young Wagyu steers, with Wagyu being one of the smaller cattle breeds, which even enhances his size.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
8
Focus on resistance to HIV offers insight into how to fight the virus. Of the 40 million people around the world infected with HIV, less than one per cent have immune systems strong enough to suppress the virus for extended periods of time. These special immune systems are known as "elite controllers." But how do they actually fight HIV? Scientists now think they've found an important clue.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
8
Searching an artificial bee colony for real-world results. The artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is widely applied in many fields, but it suffers from slow convergence, so its solutions perform well in exploration but poorly in exploitation. Researchers proposed a scale-free mechanism to guide the search of the ABC algorithm. They verified that scale-free networks improve the algorithm's optimization performance and enhance the search ability of other
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
8
Amazon wants to get Alexa into your car. The floor of the sprawling Los Angeles Auto Show is filled with fancy vehicles showing off their ultra-flashy, state-of-the-art infotainment systems, with giant screens that drivers really shouldn't be looking at while driving.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
8
More than 6,000 antibiotic resistance genes discovered in the bacteria that inhabit the human gut. Researchers have used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
8
A study of almost 2600 IAU members shows that astronomers have a remarkable drive for public engagement. Because of the ubiquitous nature of its questions and the stunning insights into the nature of the Universe, astronomy has often been thought of as appealing and the natural science with the most far-reaching popularisation efforts. A recently published study of the outreach activities of IAU members, Bustling public communication by astronomers around the world driven by personal and contextual f
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
7
So you stayed at a Starwood hotel: Tips on data breach


ScienceDaily
7
Snowpack declines may stunt tree growth and forests' ability to store carbon emissions. Researchers conducting a 5-year-long study examining snow cover in a northern hardwood forest region found that projected changes in climate could lead to a 95 percent reduction of deep-insulating snowpack in forest areas across the northeastern United States by the end of the 21st century. The loss of snowpack would likely result in a steep reduction of forests' ability to store climate-changing
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
7
Many African countries are flooding, risking decades of development if they do not adapt. Most African countries have made strong progress in achieving major development goals in the last few years. Despite this much needed progress, the past decade has seen flooding damage or destroy much of this same infrastructure, affecting millions and killing hundreds every year. In 2018 alone – up to September 15 – based on conservative estimates, flooding across Sub-Saharan Africa has destroyed
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
7
Lift off for pioneering nanosats. The first 'Pioneer' mission lifted off early this morning from Sriharikota, India, with the two inventive little nanosatellites now circling the Earth, ready for action.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
7
'Polar wander' may be behind Earth's most recent ice age. Changes deep inside the planet may have caused Earth's most recent ice age, according to new research. Based on evidence from the Pacific Ocean, including the position of the Hawaiian Islands, researchers have determined Earth shifted relative to its spin axis within the past 12 million years, which caused Greenland to move far enough toward the north pole to kick off the ice age that began about
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
7
Researchers alleviate Schizophrenia symptoms in new mouse models. Does all the tinkering in young mice hamper their brain development, causing schizophrenia-like symptoms? Or, do their brain cells develop normally, but in adulthood struggle to communicate? Researchers need to know whether to focus their efforts on brain cell development or communication, or both, because the answer to these questions implies different therapeutic approaches.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
7
When mental illness isn't a medical issue, homeless people suffer. A new case study involving a homeless man with schizophrenia highlights what happens when mental illness is "demedicalized," or seen as falling outside the scope of medical care. The article, which appears in the New England Journal of Medicine , discusses the case of a homeless California man who was a frequent visitor to a local emergency room. Six times over the course of a few months the man,
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
6
What Is Escape at Dannemora, Really?. The final episode of Showtime's Escape at Dannemora , which runs an astonishing one hour and 38 minutes long, is actually a pretty dazzling movie. Ben Stiller, its director (yes, that Ben Stiller), crafts a tight, poetically beautiful narrative of escape in the misty blue mountains of the North Country-the kind of tense, thoughtful, slightly surreal drama that contrasts America's most stunning la
Published: 01 Dec 2018


MIT Technology Review
6
The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending December 1, 2018). This week's most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


ScienceDaily
6
Global trial shows CAR T therapy can lead to durable remissions in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In an update to a global clinical trial stretching from Philadelphia to four continents, the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy Kymriah® (tisagenlecleucel, formerly CTL019) led to long-lasting remissions in patients with relapsed/refractory (r/r) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
6
China's coal project in Serbia raises climate change worries. A foul smell permeates the air in this gray mining town. People rarely open their windows as thick smoke billows from the huge chimneys of Serbia's main coal-fired power station.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
6
First high-resolution look at the quiet Sun with ALMA at 3 mm. Observations of the radio continuum at millimeter (mm) wavelengths provide a unique chromospheric diagnostic. The quiet sun mm-wavelength emission mechanism is free-free and electrons are almost always in local thermodynamic equilibrium (e.g. Shibasaki et al. 2011 and Wedemeyer et al. 2016). The availability of mm-wavelength solar observations with ALMA can advance our knowledge on the chromospher
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
6
Using hydrogen ions to manipulate magnetism on the molecular scale. A team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has determined how to use hydrogen ions, "pumped" from water in the air at room temperature, to electrically control magnetism within a very thin sample of a magnetic material. This approach for manipulating magnetic properties could speed up advances
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
6
Historical climate important for soil responses to future climate change. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Amsterdam, examined how 18 years of drought affect the billions of vital bacteria that are hidden in the soil beneath our feet. The results show that this type of extreme weather determines how soils respond to future climate change.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
6
Madrid launches drastic traffic limits to ease pollution. Madrid on Friday launched an ambitious traffic restriction scheme in the city centre with which it hopes to reduce gas emissions by 40 percent, drawing mixed reactions.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Ingeniøren
6
Rederi hælder fritureolie i tanken for at redde klimaet. I stedet for tung bunkerolie har rederiet Norden testet et CO2-neutralt brændstof udvundet af brugt fritureolie. Testen viste, at bioolien fungerer lige så godt som bunkerolie, mens både CO2- og svovludledningen er i bund.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
6
Towards a treatment for gluten intolerance. Celiac disease is a severe autoimmune disorder of the intestine. It occurs when people develop sensitivity to gluten, a substance found in wheat, rye, and barley. Medical researchers have now uncovered a new molecular player in the development of gluten intolerance. Their discovery suggests potential targets for the development of therapeutic approaches for the disease.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
6
A new way to see stress — using supercomputers. Supercomputer simulations show that at the atomic level, material stress doesn't behave symmetrically. Widely-used atomic stress formulae significantly underestimate stress near stress concentrators such as dislocation core, crack tip, or interface, in a material under deformation. Supercomputers simulate force interactions of Lennard-Jones perfect single crystal of 240,000 atoms. Study findings c
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
6
Forcing kids to say 'I'm sorry' doesn't fool anybody. Don't force an unremorseful kid to apologize until they're truly sorry, new research suggests. The point of an apology-to express remorse and repair relationships-is lost because children may dislike the apologizer even more after the insincere apology than before. The new study looks at whether children distinguish between willingly given and coerced expressions of remorse-and they do. The findi
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
5
The Ocean's Wilderness Areas Are Smaller Than You Think–and They're Disappearing Fast. Just 13 percent of the ocean remains largely untouched by human activity
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
5
Magnetic fields found in a jet from a baby star. An international research team led by Chin-Fei Lee in the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA) has made a breakthrough observation with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), confirming the presence of magnetic fields in a jet from a protostar. Jets are believed to play an important role in star formation, enabling the protostar to accrete mass from an
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
5
Where the ocean meets the sky, chemists look for clues to our climate. Hidden in the salt spray from waves crashing on the beach are clues to our planet's future.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
5
Probe killers in deep space. In the cold reaches of deep space, something is making us kill our probes.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
5
The German Bundesliga: Are the players worth the money?. Does the talent of footballers dictate their market value? Economists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) investigated this question in a new study. They calculated the relationship between the performance and market value of 493 players in the first and second divisions of the German Bundesliga for the 2015/16 season. The study revealed that star players tend to be overvalued, wh
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
5
Early-life stress changes brain development in mice. Stress early in the life of female mice leads to fewer "tuning" neurons in the part of the brain responsible for making sense of emotions and following rules, a new study shows. Women are roughly twice as likely as men to develop depression, anxiety, and other stress-related problems, including difficulty with attention. The new study, which appears in Cell Reports , sheds light on the biological
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
5
Historical climate important for soil responses to future climate change. Researchers examined how 18 years of drought affect the billions of vital bacteria that are hidden in the soil beneath our feet. The results show that this type of extreme weather determines how soils respond to future climate change.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
5
Immune checkpoints could be key to treating autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. The PD-1 immune checkpoint is essential for self-recognition by the immune system, with disruption of the pathway associated with several autoimmune disorders. However, the involvement of PD-1 and its ligand PD-L1 in muscle-weakening autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis is unclear. Now, researchers have linked increased PD-L1 expression in the muscles of myasthenia gravis patients with disease sev
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
5
Cancer drug may help treat human papillomavirus infections. Preclinical experiments suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. Highly efficacious vaccines against HPV infection exist — including the recently approved Gardasil 9, which immunizes against nine genotypes of HPV known to cause cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. But the vaccine need
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Scientific American
4
A Supervolcano with a Cold Heart May Be Brewing in Chile. A supervolcano may be brewing underneath Chile, with a cold interior that is upending ideas about triggers of huge eruptions
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
4
Sponge Cities Can Limit Urban Floods and Droughts. Restoring natural water flows in cities can lessen the impacts of floods and droughts
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
4
X-rays of rocks show their super-fluid past, and reveal mineral deposits vital for batteries. New X-ray technologies reveal some of the incredible processes that took place in Earth's geological history – and should help us identify new high value ores.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
4
Warty hammer orchids are sexual deceivers. Orchids are famed for their beautiful and alluring flowers – and the great lengths to which people will go to experience them in the wild. Among Australian orchids, evocative names such as The Butterfly Orchid, The Queen of Sheeba, and Cleopatra's Needles conjure up images of rare and beautiful flowers.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
4
High-contrast imaging for cancer therapy with protons. Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. This opens up new opportunities for targeted, heal
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
4
China AIDS group 'really regrets' role in gene-editing. The head of a Chinese AIDS support group expressed deep regret Friday for helping a scientist recruit participants for a controversial experiment claiming to have created the world's first genetically-edited babies.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
4
More sensitive MRI diagnostics thanks to innovative 'elastic' contrast media. Researchers have found a new method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
4
Table-top experiment flips current understanding of solutal convection. Findings from a table-top experiment have revealed that the primary driver of a type of fluid flow called solutal convection has been overlooked. What's more, once this driver is accounted for, it completely flips the expected flow outcomes.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
4
New information about infant brain structure. Infant brain development is still poorly understood. Thus, research on the topic is vital as developing brains are sensitive to early environmental factors.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
4
Many diseases increase the risks of hip fracture surgery. Parkinson's disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatic diseases, alcoholism and mental health disorders increase the risk of surgical complications after a hip fracture surgery, a new study analyzing nationwide registers finds. 4.6 percent of all hip surgery patients and 10 percent of total hip replacement surgery patients experienced surgical complications within three months following their surgery.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
4
The physics of extracting gas from shale formations. Extracting gas from new sources is vital in order to supplement dwindling conventional supplies. Shale reservoirs host gas trapped in the pores of mudstone, which consists of a mixture of silt mineral particles ranging from 4 to 60 microns in size, and clay elements smaller than 4 microns. Surprisingly, the oil and gas industry still lacks a firm understanding of how the pore space and geological
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Big Think
3
Wesley Yang – The Souls of Yellow Folk. What if Asian American cultural "invisibility" is the key to saving America? Are liberalism and democracy too tame to survive identity politics? "One risks being a pariah…just by saying the things that need to be said." None Such and such "doesn't suffer fools gladly". That phrase has always bugged me a bit. It's like someone has just squeezed a pillow infused with an admiration-scented vapor t
Published: 01 Dec 2018


EurekAlert!
3
Why patients lie to their doctors. Up to 80 percent of those surveyed have lied to their doctor about information that could impact their health, including accurately describing their diet and how often they exercise. When survey participants explained their reasoning for doing so, they said that they wanted to avoid being judged and didn't want to be lectured about how bad certain behaviors were. The research was led by scientists
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
Researcher discusses tackling global climate change at the regional scale. Global climate change is a serious concern for the future of our entire planet. However, the regional impacts of climate change are often overlooked. Catherine Nikiel, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is studying the impact of climate change on different aspects of the hydrological cycle as part of her research in the lab of Breene M. Kerr Professor Elfatih
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
Study looks at ecological traps to minimize human risk of mosquito-borne pathogens. Ecological traps have the potential to effectively control pest species and inhibit the spread of infectious diseases, according to a University of Maine researcher.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
Elon Musk's Boring Company nixes one L.A. tunnel, moves onto next project. Elon Musk's Boring Company is dropping one of its Los Angeles underground tunnel plans after some residents' concerns.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
Who owns and farms land can create barriers to conservation. As stewards of vast swaths of land, farmers are important allies in U.S. conservation efforts, but there is evidence to suggest those farming on rented land adopt conservation practices at a lower rate.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
World's first video game music and sound research journal. The world's first academic journal devoted to the presentation of peer-reviewed, high-quality research into video game music and sound, is to be hosted by the Department of Creative Digital Technologies at the University of Chichester, based at the Tech Park on its Bognor Regis campus.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
Alexa can now connect to Big Mouth Billy Bass, along with twerking Christmas toys. Remember Big Mouth Billy Bass? That strange wall-mounted fish from the '90s that sings "Take Me to the River?"
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
ESA's 25 years of telecom: Today's challenges and opportunities. As ESA's umbrella programme for telecom, ARTES, celebrates its 25th year, we will be examining why it was set up, how it and the European satcom environment have evolved, the opportunities and challenges that both face today, and what the future holds.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
Researchers discover for the first time how a specific cell gene affects the transformation of others. An international team of seven institutions from Spain and the US including the University of Valencia has discovered for the first time that the biological activity of the c-MYC gene is necessary for cell reprogramming, the process by which a specialised cell such as a neuron is transformed into a different cell type. According to the results published in Stem Cell Reports, internal cellular acti
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
3
The physics of extracting gas from shale formations. Scientists have distilled the current state of knowledge regarding the multi-scale flow processes occurring during shale gas extraction. This know-how is deemed essential for improving gas recovery and lowering production costs.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
3
Light triggers gold in unexpected way. Researchers have discovered a fundamentally different form of light-matter interaction in their experiments with gold nanoparticles. The discovery may become useful in the development of next-generation, ultrasmall optical components for computers and antennas.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
3
New research questions fish stocking obligations. Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study. The study focuses on ecological flows from the viewpoints of law and biology.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
3
Falls are more likely when you've had a bad night sleep. Disturbances during sleep decreases capability to control posture and balance according to researchers.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
3
How microscopic machines can fail in the blink of an eye. NIST researchers have developed a method for more quickly tracking microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as they work and, just as importantly, as they stop working.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
A new way to see stress-using supercomputers. It's easy to take a lot for granted. Scientists do this when they study stress, the force per unit area on an object. Scientists handle stress mathematically by assuming it to have symmetry. That means the components of stress are identical if you transform the stressed object with something like a turn or a flip. Supercomputer simulations show that at the atomic level, material stress doesn't beh
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
Latest Facebook controversy puts heat on number two Sandberg. Facebook's number two executive Sheryl Sandberg, long seen as the "adult" at the youthfully-managed firm, has found herself the center of controversy over her role in pushing back at a growing chorus of criticism of the social media giant.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
3
Cotton biofuel cell could one day power pacemakers. A glucose-powered biofuel cell with electrodes made from cotton fiber could someday help power medical implants such as pacemakers and sensors. The new fuel cell, which provides twice as much power as conventional biofuel cells, could pair with batteries or super-capacitors to provide a hybrid power source for the medical devices. Researchers used gold nanoparticles assembled on the cotton to cre
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
US image abroad: It's the message not the messenger. Today's political climate in the U.S. is often peppered with animosity from the U.S. president towards other countries but how has the U.S. image fared? A Dartmouth study finds that the U.S. image abroad appears to be influenced more by policy content than by the person delivering the message, even if it is the U.S. president. The results are published in Political Behavior.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
3
Hawk native to South America wows crowd in Maine park. A hawk that is native to Central and South America drew a lot of attention from Maine's birding community Friday after appearing in a park, where it brawled with a fellow raptor and dined on a squirrel.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Discovery
3
Rick Tries to Jump a Ditch | Gold Rush. After clearing the cut to help drain rain water, Rick needs to get on the other side of the ditch. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Scientist
2
These Organelles Have No Membranes. From making ribosomes to protecting the integrity of the genome, these membraneless compartments play important roles in the cell. Their behavior is rooted in basic physics.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
2
France, Japan uphold auto alliance amid Ghosn crisis. The leaders of France and Japan on Friday stood by the Renault-Nissan auto alliance despite ructions from the arrest of its chief executive, officials said.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Big Think
2
How the marketplace of ideas went rogue. The marketplace of ideas is a better metaphor than it's intended to be, notes Eli Pariser. As any good economist will tell you, the best product doesn't always rise to the top. The institutional gatekeepers and experts who once kept checks and balances on the marketplace of ideas have been replaced by social media algorithms that reward emotion and outrage over expertise and truth. How can media
Published: 01 Dec 2018


New Scientist
2
NASA spacecraft OSIRIS-REx set to start mission at asteroid Bennu. The OSIRIS-REx mission is set to arrive at its destination, the asteroid Bennu, which gets dangerously close to Earth and may tell us about the early solar system
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
2
Bad First Impressions Are Not Set in Stone. People are more willing to change their mind about people they initially deem "nasty" versus those they deem "nice"
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
2
Why Do We Put Telescopes in Space?. Putting a telescope in space has its limitations. It can't be too big, it's difficult to repair, and it costs a lot of money. So why do we even do it?
Published: 01 Dec 2018


EurekAlert!
2
Searching an artificial bee colony for real-world results. The artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is widely applied in many fields, but it suffers from slow convergence, so its solutions perform well in exploration but poorly in exploitation. Researchers from Kanazawa University and the University of Toyama proposed a scale-free mechanism to guide the search of the ABC algorithm. They verified that scale-free networks improve the algorithm's optimizati
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2
Table-top experiment flips current understanding of solutal convection. Findings from a table-top experiment have revealed that the primary driver of a type of fluid flow called solutal convection has been overlooked. What's more, once this driver is accounted for, it completely flips the expected flow outcomes.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2
Great strides for carbon capture using earth-abundant elements as photocatalytic system. Researchers at Tokyo Tech have designed a CO2 reduction method based only on commonly occurring elements. Achieving a 57 percent overall quantum yield of CO2 reduction products, it is the highest performing system of its kind reported to date, raising prospects for cost-effective carbon capture solutions.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2
Brilliant iron molecule could provide cheaper solar energy. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating an iron molecule that can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity. The results indicate that the iron molecule could replace the more expensive and rarer metals used today.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2
Study shows rising rates of hospitalization in the homeless. Hospitalization rates among homeless adults have increased sharply in recent years, with a very different set of causes from those in non-homeless individuals, reports a study in the January issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2
Towards a treatment for gluten intolerance. Celiac disease is a severe autoimmune disorder of the intestine. It occurs when people develop sensitivity to gluten, a substance found in wheat, rye, and barley. An international research team from Italy and France has now uncovered a new molecular player in the development of gluten intolerance. Their discovery, published in The EMBO Journal, suggests potential targets for the development of the
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2
Researchers alleviate Schizophrenia symptoms in new mouse models. In a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Lin Mei, MD, PhD, asked, does all the tinkering in young mice hamper their brain development, causing schizophrenia-like symptoms? Or, do their brain cells develop normally, but in adulthood struggle to communicate? Researchers need to know whether to focus their efforts on brain cell development or communication, or both, b
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
2
System can rapidly and accurately detect tumor margins during breast cancer surgery. Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR), Osaka University, and collaborators have developed a new rapid and inexpensive way to accurately detect the margins between cancer and non-cancerous tissue during breast surgery. Their system is noteworthy in that it can detect the morphology of the cells, differentiating between cells that are more or less dangerous.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Helping computers to see 3-D structures. If you can recognize structures around you while walking down a city street, you have your eyes to thank. Humans can automatically perceive 3-D structure in the world by identifying lines, shapes, symmetries and the patterns and relationships between them in things like buildings, sidewalks and everyday objects. But can a computer be taught to do the same?
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Researchers grow functional network of blood vessels at centimeter scale for the first time. When someone has a deadly disease or sustains a life-threatening injury, a transplant or graft of new tissue may be the best-or only-treatment option. Transplanted organs, skin grafts and other parts need blood vessels to bring oxygen-rich blood their way, but for tissue engineers and regenerative medicine experts, making a functional blood vessel network within large tissues in the laboratory has
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Apple says iPhone XR is 'best-selling' iPhone, as it promotes RED model to help fight AIDS. The iPhone XR has been the "best-selling iPhone each and every day since it became available for sale" on Oct. 26, Apple vice president of product marketing Greg Joswiak said Wednesday.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Researchers bring Jedi powers to life with Force Push. In the interim, stalwart practitioners of Jedi ways and other Force-sensitive beings can look to the small screen and thank Virginia Tech researchers for a recently developed virtual reality technique called Force Push.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
A multiscreen experience of motorcycle racing. A new prototype allows motor sport fans to personalise their TV viewing experience with synchronised content on their mobile devices.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
2
Barfing kid? Don't waste your money on probiotics. It's increasingly common to give children with stomach viruses some probiotics to ease their symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea. But research now shows that a common probiotic doesn't make them feel better any faster. While rarely fatal in the United States, gastroenteritis-frequently yet inaccurately called "stomach flu"-accounts for 1.7 million pediatric emergency room visits and more than 70,00
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Responding to sexual violence in schools: What can educators learn?. As news about alleged gang sexual assault at St. Michael's College in Toronto dominated headlines in Canada and even globally in the past two weeks, some parents and educators posed a familiar question: What can educators do to prevent sexual violence among youth?
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Google Fi mobile phone service now works with iPhone and more Android devices-with limits. Fi meet iPhone. iPhone meet Fi.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
New research questions fish stocking obligations. Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Water International, the study focuses on ecological flows from the viewpoints of law and biology.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Why companies should help pay for the biodiversity that's good for their bottom line. In the "The Lorax," an entrepreneur regrets wiping out all the make-believe truffala trees by chopping them down to maximize his short-term gains. As the Dr. Seuss tale ends, the Once-ler – the man responsible for this environmental tragedy – tells a young child that "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not."
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Apple Music comes to Amazon's Alexa devices. Apple Music is coming to Amazon's Alexa-powered speakers, in a rare move by the iPhone maker to broaden its service offerings to users of rival devices.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues. Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
2
New knowledge of pubertal growth. In monitoring and prediction of children's growth, the spurt in puberty is often considered too variable to be predictable. However, new findings and methods enable a better picture of how children and adolescents grow, especially during puberty.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


ScienceDaily
2
A bastard seal from the past reveals the potential for human hybrids. If discovered as fossils, grey and ringed seals are so different that they could be classified as belonging to different families. Yet, a seal pup born in 1929 was found to be an almost perfect intermediate between the species. Compared to Neanderthals and modern humans, grey and ringed seals are genetically and dentally at least twice as different, suggesting that there may be more fossil human h
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
2
The Marriott breach compared with past security breakdowns. Marriott's revelation that as many as 500 million guests may have been affected by a data breach at Starwood hotels, which it bought two years ago, ranks among the largest hacks ever. It is not clear if some of those included in the final tally are individuals who were counted during every stay.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Inside Science
2
Hospitals, Hacks, Malware and Medical Safety. Hospitals, Hacks, Malware and Medical Safety We may be vulnerable, researchers warn after demonstrating a cyberattack on a CT scanner, highlighting the need for better security. CT_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Alpa Prod via Shutterstock Human Friday, November 30, 2018 – 14:00 Claire Cleveland, Contributor (Inside Science) — Last year, a malicious piece of blackmail software called WannaCry swep
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Blog » Languages » English
2
Eyewire Release Report 11/30/2018. Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. Marathon cells' SC bonuses are now automatically doubled (rather than admin-doubled) and will thus be reflected properly in the points that Scythes see in their marathon cell completion notifications. Cell completion notifications should now also correctly di
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Atlantic
2
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: It's Fun to Stay at the USMCA. Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ). We're working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Today in 5 Lines Gathered in Buenos Aires for the annual G20 Summit, President Donald Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and outgoing Mexican President
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Scientist
1
Diverse Forests Are Better at Accumulating Carbon. A higher species richness could boost plant communities' ability to mitigate climate change, a study suggests.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
1
Brain Rhythms Guide How Humans Pay Attention. A perception of sustained focus may actually be the result of cycles of fluctuating rather than continuous neural activity, according to new behavioral and neurological data from studies in humans and macaques.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Viden (Danmarks Radio)
1
Google-ansatte protesterer mod chefer: "I vil hjælpe Kina med at undertrykke". Et hemmeligt projekt om en kinesisk søgemaskine har udløst en moralsk skyttegravskrig hos Google.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
1
Study offers new approach to assess sustainability of reef fish. A new study helping to improve how sustainability is measured for popular reef fish could help better assess the eco-friendly seafood options at the dinner table.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Atlantic
1
The Family Weekly: How Americans Started Throwing Parties for Everything. This Week in Family We're working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? If it feels like there's a party for everything these days-gender reveals, post-wedding receptions, even divorce parties-it's not just your imagination. While many milestones in early adulth
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
1
Venice Anti-Flood Gates Could Wreck Lagoon Ecosystem. Instead, researchers suggest injecting fluid cement or water below ground to lift the entire city
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
1
Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Keyboard Shortcuts. They were Apple's brilliant innovation, and they usually make sense
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
1
In Case You Missed It. Top news from around the world
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Discovery
1
Slucifer is Shut Down | Gold Rush. Until Parker finds some dryer pay-dirt, Slucifer will not be able to run. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Insta
Published: 01 Dec 2018


EurekAlert!
1
Newly discovered supernova complicates origin story theories. A supernova discovered by an international group of astronomers including Carnegie's Tom Holoien andMaria Drout, and led by University of Hawaii's Ben Shappee, provides an unprecedented look at the first moments of a violent stellar explosion. The light from the explosion's first hours showed an unexpected pattern, which Carnegie's Anthony Piro analyzed to reveal that the genesis of these phenomen
Published: 29 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
Falls are more likely when you've had a bad night sleep. Disturbances during sleep decreases capability to control posture and balance according to researchers from the Department of Engineering and Warwick Medical School at the University of Warwick who have an article published today in Scientific Reports.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
Switch for the regeneration of nerve cell insulation. An international research team has discovered a mechanism that regulates the regeneration of the insulating layer of neurites. This insulation coating, also referred to as myelin sheath, is crucial for rapid signal transmission among cells. Damages to the myelin sheath, such as are caused by multiple sclerosis, can considerably inhibit the function of the nervous system.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
Light triggers gold in unexpected way. Rice University researchers have discovered a fundamentally different form of light-matter interaction in their experiments with gold nanoparticles. The discovery may become useful in the development of next-generation, ultrasmall optical components for computers and antennas.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
Is being a night owl bad for your health?. In the first ever international review of studies analysing whether being an early riser or a night owl can influence your health, researchers have uncovered a growing body of evidence indicating an increased risk of ill health in people with an evening preference as they have more erratic eating patterns and consume more unhealthy foods.The findings have been reported in Advances in Nutrition tod
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
A new way to see stress — using supercomputers. Supercomputer simulations show that at the atomic level, material stress doesn't behave symmetrically. Widely-used atomic stress formulae significantly underestimate stress near stress concentrators such as dislocation core, crack tip, or interface, in a material under deformation. NSF-funded XSEDE-allocated Jetstream and Comet supercomputers simulate force interactions of Lennard-Jones perfect si
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
IAU astronomers show exceptional involvement in outreach activities. A study of outreach activities published in the journal Nature Astronomy has presented the results of a survey gathered from 2587 IAU members. The survey is the largest systematic study of astronomers' outreach activities. Astronomers were found to show an exceptional internal drive to organise and participate in science communication activities.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
How microscopic machines can fail in the blink of an eye. NIST researchers have developed a method for more quickly tracking microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as they work and, just as importantly, as they stop working.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
Force Push VR brings Jedi powers to life. Force Push provides a more physical, nuanced experience than traditional hand controllers allow in VR. It responds to the speed and magnitude of hand gestures to accelerate or decelerate objects in a way that users can understand intuitively.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
US image abroad: It's the message not the messenger. Today's political climate in the US is often peppered with animosity from the US president towards other countries but how has the US image fared? A Dartmouth study finds that the US image abroad appears to be influenced more by policy content than by the person delivering the message, even if it is the US president. The results are published in Political Behavior.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
Scientists reveal substantial water loss in global landlocked regions. A new study involving Kansas State University researchers reveals that water storage declines in global landlocked basins has aggravated local water stress and caused potential sea level rise.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
1
Study: Immunotherapy better than chemotherapy for subtype of head and neck cancer. A randomized clinical trial involving 97 medical centers in 20 countries, including Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, found that treating patients with head and neck cancer with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab is more effective and less toxic than standard chemotherapy.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
1
Scientists develop new system to study emerging tickborne disease. Tickborne diseases are on the rise, and one in particular is emerging in the United States and Canada. Human babesiosis is an infection that can cause a range of symptoms and even death. Little is known about one of the parasites that cause human babesiosis but a team of Yale-led researchers have developed a novel system for studying it. Their research holds promise of leading to more effective di
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
1
A novel solver for approximate marginal map inference. There is a deep connection between planning and inference, and over the last decade, multiple researchers have introduced explicit reductions showing how stochastic planning can be solved using probabilistic inference with applications in robotics, scheduling, and environmental problems. However, heuristic methods and search are still the best-performing approaches for planning in large combinator
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
1
What does a wet spring mean for bushfire season?. A recent wet spell as we head into summer has left some Victorians wondering if we might be able to look forward to a less dangerous fire season this year; particularly in light of California's recent devastating fatal wildfires.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
1
Interfacial electronic state improving hydrogen storage capacity in Pd-MOF materials. NIMS, Kyushu University and Kyoto University jointly identified a mechanism by which a hybrid material composed of palladium (Pd) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is capable of storing approximately twice as much hydrogen as a material composed solely of Pd. The greater hydrogen storage capacity of the hybrid material is associated with a slight change in its electronic state caused by the tran
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
1
Paradise regained? Sharks return to Thai bay popularised by 'The Beach'. Thai conservationists have welcomed footage of reef sharks gliding through the azure waters of Maya Bay as a "positive sign" of recovery six months after the closure of a tourist hot-spot made famous by the movie "The Beach".
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
1
Sunken 'beaches' offer vision of Catalina's undersea future. While most islands in southern California are inching upward, Santa Catalina Island is sinking, according to a new study. One of the most striking features of Catalina, southwest of Los Angeles, is an absence. Unlike much of the California coast and its closest islands, Catalina lacks cliffs stepping up and back from the sea-remnants of shorelines carved when the Pacific sloshed higher than it do
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
1
Malaria drug shows promise for treating Ebola. Derivatives of amodiaquine, a medication doctors typically use to treat malaria, could provide a new therapeutic approach to treating patients infected with Ebola virus disease, a new study shows. Observations from the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic that swept through West Africa, infecting more than 28,000 people and killing more than 11,000 in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone alone inspired the new
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Phys.org
1
Searching an artificial bee colony for real-world results. Honeybees are not only vitally important pollinators of food crops, their hunt for rich food sources has also proved to be an excellent model for optimizing numerical problems. Now, researchers from Kanazawa University and the University of Toyama have used the intelligent behavior of bees to improve optimization performance in real-world problems.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Futurity.org
1
Missing muskrat 'houses' warn of habitat loss. Although Indigenous communities have used muskrat fur to make clothing for generations and the animal's meat is a seasonal delicacy, decades of trapping are not primarily responsible for the animal's decline across North America. Instead, 46 years of satellite imagery show Canada's Peace-Athabasca Delta has been drying out since the 1970s, significantly reducing muskrat habitat. "The ecological i
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Scientist
Discovery's Crest: A Profile of Marianne Bronner. Studying how neural crest cells journey through the embryo, this Caltech developmental biologist has revealed how they form major cell types, including peripheral neurons, bone, and smooth muscle.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Fat Cells Shrink to Make Room for Milk in Breastfeeding Mouse Moms. Adipocytes lose their lipids and reprogram themselves into stem cells during lactation, then turn back into fat cells after pups wean.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Infographic: Shaken Loose. How acoustic waves let researchers measure whether, and how firmly, cells are bound to a substrate.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Ten-Minute Sabbatical. Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Goats Prefer Happy Human Faces. Like dogs and horses, goats can discern happy from angry facial expressions. But whether these animals possess empathy remains unclear.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Cheese Helped Fuel Early Farmers in Europe. Scientists have found traces of the dairy product in 7,200-year-old pottery in Croatia.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Sounding Out Cell Stickiness. Acoustic forces can be used to differentiate adherent from non-adherent cells.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Hindsight. Looking back at a year filled with discoveries and challenges.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
December 2018 Crossword Puzzle Answers. See how well you did.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Caught on Camera. Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
How One Wild Dolphins Trick Became a Fad. After release from rehab, bottlenose Billie started walking on water with her tail. Studying how the behavior spread could offer clues about how animals learn from each other.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Infographic: Bacterial Microcompartments Basics. These icosahedral structures are composed of proteins with unique geometric properties, which enable bacteria to employ them in a variety of situations.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Contributors. [no content]
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Infographic: The Fate of Fat Cells During Breastfeeding. See how the cells accommodate milk production in mouse mammary tissue.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Rethinking Raw Milk, 1918. Bacteriologist Alice Evans identified the pathogen that causes undulant fever, leading her to push for the pasteurization of milk.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Bacteria Harbor Geometric "Organelles". Microbes, traditionally thought to lack organelles, get a metabolic boost from geometric compartments that act as cauldrons for chemical reactions. Bioengineers are eager to harness the compartments for their own purposes.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
December Crossword. Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Leukemia Relapses May Arise From Specialized Cells. Targeting the transient group of cells could prevent recurrence of the disease.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


The Scientist
Imaging chromatin to deduce function from form. Researchers describe their tools for probing how the physical shape of the genome affects genes' function.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 1. december. Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med præmier.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


EurekAlert!
Sickle cell anemia treatment safely lowers disease burden in African children. A daily hydroxyurea pill may bring relief for children living with the painful and deadly blood disease sickle cell anemia (SCA) in resource-challenged sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is prevalent and health care is suboptimal. This is what a multinational clinical trial called REACH discovered when it tested daily hydroxyurea treatment in 606 children between the ages of 1 and 10 years old.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


EurekAlert!
CAR-T cell update: Therapy improves outcomes for patients with B-cell lymphoma. An international phase-2 trial of a CAR-T cell therapy–to be published on-line Dec. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine (and presented at the ASH annual meeting in San Diego)–found that 52 percent of patients responded favorably to the therapy; 40 percent had a complete response and 12 percent had a partial response. One year later, 65 percent percent of those patients were relapse-free, in
Published: 01 Dec 2018


EurekAlert!
Global trial shows CAR T therapy can lead to durable remissions in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In an update to a global clinical trial stretching from Philadelphia to four continents, the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy Kymriah® (tisagenlecleucel, formerly CTL019) led to long-lasting remissions in patients with relapsed/refractory (r/r) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Dagens Medicin
ASH er så godt i år at det er svært at få plads til det hele. Programmet for årets største hæmatologikongres er for professor Torben Plesner fra Vejle Sygehus en ren gavebod af spændende sessioner, som han meget nødig vil undvære. Han priser sig lykkelig for sin dygtige sekretær, der har sammenstykket en fyldestgørende plan.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Dagens Medicin
Store forventninger til banebrydende nye former for antistoffer mod B-celle-lymfom. Martin Hutchings glæder sig ekstraordinært meget til dette års store hæmatologikongres ASH, hvor han skal præsentere data for en helt ny type immunterapi – et såkaldt bispecifikt antistof, der i fase I viser særdeles lovende resultater mod B-celle-lymfomer.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Dagens Medicin
Forskere tuner ind på målrettet behandling. Linjebehandlinger træder ifølge overlæge og professor Niels Abildgaard fra Odense Universitetshospital mere og mere i baggrunden på ASH, der i større og større grad fokuserer på behandling tilpasset til den enkelte patients særlige kombinationer af gener.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Dagens Medicin
På vej mod klarhed over sikkert stop for CML-behandling. Udfordringen ved behandling af Kronisk Myeloid Leukæmi (CML) er sjældent at få sygdommen slået ned, men at navigere i bivirkninger og finde ud af, hvornår man med sikkerhed kan stoppe behandlingen igen. Det fortæller dansk hæmatolog, der håber på, at dette års ASH kan gøre det klarere.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Dagens Medicin
Nye kombinationsbehandlinger mod myelomatose i pipeline. ASH præsenterer helt nye kombinationer med tre-fire stoffer mod myelomatose, bl.a. med et nyt og endnu ikke godkendt lægemiddel, Venetoclax. Konferencen fremlægger bl.a. data fra studier, hvor Venetoclax er afprøvet sammen med Carfilzomib-Dexamethason.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Dagens Medicin
Late breaking abstracts om CLL kan afsløre mekanismer bag resistens. Hæmatologikongressen ASH kommer i år bl.a. til at løfte sløret for mekanismer bag udvikling af resistens mod kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi (CLL). Det fortæller overlæge Carsten Niemann fra Rigshospitalet med henvisning til to late breaking abstracts.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Dagens Medicin
ASH viser nye perspektiver ved CAR-T behandling. Nye landvindinger med CAR-T fylder behørigt i programmet for dette års ASH. Dem ser ledende overlæge i hæmatologi Paw Jensen fra Aalborg sig til at lade sig inspirere af. Medicinrådet overvejer lige nu, om det vil godkende proceduren herhjemme.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Viden (Danmarks Radio)
Tør du kysse en hiv-smittet? Vi frygter stadig hiv og aids. Hiv smitter aldrig gennem spyt, og smitter heller ikke gennem sex, hvis man er i behandling. Alligevel bliver hiv-smittede stadig stigmatiseret i Danmark.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
1968: J. B. Gurdon on Pluripotent Cells; 1918: Sending the Army Back Home. Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Scientific American
Readers Respond to the August 2018 Issue. Letters to the editor from the August 2018 issue of Scientific American
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Viden (Danmarks Radio)
VIDEO TV-vært stjæler fra supermarked – men bliver opdaget af kunstig intelligens. So ein Ding-vært Nikolaj Sonne tester Amazons kunstigt intelligente supermarked, hvor kasser, kassepersonale og betalingsterminaler er noget fra en fjern fortid.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


Phys.org
Visually impaired sea lions join group at New Orleans zoo. A pair of visually impaired 2-year-old sea lions has joined the four sea lions already at the zoo in New Orleans.
Published: 01 Dec 2018


EurekAlert!
More sensitive MRI diagnostics thanks to innovative 'elastic' contrast media. Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have found a new method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Focus on resistance to HIV offers insight into how to fight the virus. Researchers have found that genetic mutations affecting the capsid, the structure surrounding the HIV genome, make it possible for a protein called TRIM5a to trigger the immune system of elite controllers.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Black hole 'donuts' are actually 'fountains'. Based on computer simulations and new observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), researchers have found that the rings of gas surrounding active supermassive black holes are not simple donut shapes. Instead, gas expelled from the center interacts with infalling gas to create a dynamic circulation pattern, similar to a water fountain in a city park.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Immune checkpoints could be key to treating autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. The PD-1 immune checkpoint is essential for self-recognition by the immune system, with disruption of the pathway associated with several autoimmune disorders. However, the involvement of PD-1 and its ligand PD-L1 in muscle-weakening autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis is unclear. Now, researchers at Kanazawa University have linked increased PD-L1 expression in the muscles of myasthenia gravis pa
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Can a smart app encourage HIV-self testing in Canada?. HIV self-testing strategies have been recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 2016, as they empower people to find out HIV their status at their convenience. Home-based testing kits have yet to be approved for sale in Canada. However, a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), evaluated an unsupervised HIV self-testing program via a smartp
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Historical climate important for soil responses to future climate change. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Amsterdam, examined how 18 years of drought affect the billions of vital bacteria that are hidden in the soil beneath our feet. The results show that this type of extreme weather determines how soils respond to future climate change.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Mischievous responders taint LGBQ health estimates in national survey. Many research studies have reported on the elevated health risk and deviance of youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) but a new study using national data suggests that many of those estimates may be overstated and that LGBQ youth risk and deviance is not as different from heterosexual youth as many studies claim.
Published: 29 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Tracing iron in the North Pacific. A new Chinese project (2018–2022) will explore the sources and transport of biologically available Fe in the high-nutrient and low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. The results can give scientific advice to stakeholders on the feasibility of conducting ocean Fe fertilization.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Many diseases increase the risks of hip fracture surgery. Parkinson's disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatic diseases, alcoholism and mental health disorders increase the risk of surgical complications after a hip fracture surgery, a new Finnish study analysing nationwide registers finds. 4.6 percent of all hip surgery patients and 10 percent of total hip replacement surgery patients experienced surgical complications within three months following their surg
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
New research questions fish stocking obligations. Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Water International, the study focuses on ecological flows from the viewpoints of law and biology.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Study reveals new information about infant brain structure. Infant brain development is still poorly understood. Thus, research on the topic is vital as developing brains are sensitive to early environmental factors. Recognising this, the FinnBrain imaging study conducted in Turku explores brain structure in newborns.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Study discovers over 6,000 antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteria that inhabit the human gut. A study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
The physics of extracting gas from shale formations. In a recent article published in EPJ E, Natalia Kovalchuk and Constantinos Hadjistassou from the University of Nicosia, Cyprus, have distilled the current state of knowledge regarding the multi-scale flow processes occurring during shale gas extraction. This know-how is deemed essential for improving gas recovery and lowering production costs.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Rates of chronic kidney disease, deaths outpace other diseases. An abundance of high-sugar, high-salt foods in many American diets and obesity-related health problems such as diabetes are likely driving an increase in kidney disease cases, including in young adults, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Polio-like illness mostly of children is focus of 3 JAMA Pediatrics articles. Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a poorly understood polio-like illness mostly of children characterized by weakness of muscles and limbs and the presence of a spinal cord lesion. An increase in cases was first suspected in 2012 and some epidemiologic evidence suggests viruses may be associated with AFM outbreaks in the United States in the late summer and fall of 2014, 2016 and 2018. Much still ne
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
What are effects of smoked, vaporized marijuana in infrequent adult users?. Researchers compared the effects of smoked versus vaporized cannabis at two different doses and a placebo dose in a small study of 17 healthy adults who weren't regular cannabis users. Participants felt the effects of smoked and vaporized cannabis at a 10-mg dose of the psychoactive component THC, including modest cognitive impairment, while a 25-mg dose of THC produced more pronounced drug effect
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Do poorer neighborhoods experience longer ambulance times?. Patients from the poorest neighborhoods who had cardiac arrest had longer total ambulance times than those from the wealthiest neighborhoods.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Study sheds light on alcohol misuse among never-deployed reservists. In a study of 174 Army Reserve and National Guard soldiers who hadn't been deployed, University at Buffalo researchers found that more negative non-deployment emotions were associated with a range of alcohol use outcomes.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Light pollution may cause insomnia in older adults. A new study is the first population-based investigation to report a significant association between artificial, outdoor light exposure at night and insomnia, as indicated by older adults' use of hypnotic drugs.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Patients with cancer are more at risk of complications following heart procedure. Research led by Keele University suggests that patients with cancer who undergo a common heart procedure have worse short-term clinical outcomes compared to non-cancer patients, in the largest study undertaken to date.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
UA scientist identifies cellular gene signatures for heart muscle regeneration. A research team led by Jared Churko, PhD, director of the University of Arizona iPSC Core in the UA Sarver Heart Center, used a transcriptomic approach — studying what genes are expressed — to identify gene signatures of cell subpopulations identified as atrial-like or ventricular-like. This understanding could lead to regenerative therapy discoveries for the millions of people living with damag
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
St. Jude research into leukemia, sickle cell and other blood disorders presented at ASH. The 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology will feature research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital on topics ranging from the genomic basis and vulnerabilities of leukemia to an update on gene therapy for hemophilia B to advances in sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Experts present new recommendations on 'overlapping' type of leukemia. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a rare disease with overlapping features of two categories of bone marrow and blood cell disorders that poses challenges in clinical management. Joint recommendations on diagnosis and treatment of CMML from two European specialty societies were published today in HemaSphere, the official journal of the European Hematology Association (EHA). The journal is
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
African-American mothers rate boys higher for ADHD. African-American children often are reported by parents and teachers to display behaviors of ADHD at a higher rate than children from other racial and ethnic groups. For the first time, researchers have found that African-American mothers in a study rated boys as displaying more frequent ADHD symptoms than Caucasian mothers did, regardless of child race. The findings mean that racial differences f
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Bigger brains are smarter, but not by much. Using a large dataset and controlling for a variety of factors, including sex, age, height, socioeconomic status, and genetic ancestry, Gideon Nave of the Wharton School and Philipp Koellinger of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam found that people with larger brains rated higher on measures of intelligence and educational attainment. Size was far from everything, however, explaining only about two perc
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices. A team of scientists from ASU's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany have published in Science Advances online today an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work one thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Greenhouse gas 'detergent' recycles itself in atmosphere: NASA study. A simple molecule in the atmosphere that acts as a 'detergent' to breakdown methane and other greenhouse gases has been found to recycle itself to maintain a steady global presence in the face of rising emissions, according to new NASA research. Understanding its role in the atmosphere is critical for determining the lifetime of methane, a powerful contributor to climate change.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
A cancer drug may help treat human papillomavirus infections. Preclinical experiments suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. Highly efficacious vaccines against HPV infection exist — including the recently approved Gardasil 9, which immunizes against nine genotypes of HPV known to cause cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. But the vaccine need
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
App helps breast cancer survivors improve health after treatment. Breast cancer survivors who used a smartphone app created at Houston Methodist consistently lost weight, largely due to daily, real-time interactions with their health care team via the mobile app.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Study offers new approach to assess sustainability of reef fish. A new study helping to improve how sustainability is measured for popular reef fish could help better assess the eco-friendly seafood options at the dinner table.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
In vitro cell culture findings could lead to novel interventions for Schizophrenia. A recent study has shown how using cultured cells from patients with psychotic disorders to investigate abnormalities in nerve connections in the brain could lead to new treatments.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Immunotherapy keeps some advanced head and neck cancer patients alive for over three years. A new immunotherapy can greatly extend the lives of a proportion of people with advanced head and neck cancer, with some living for three years or more, a major new clinical trial reports.Overall, the drug pembrolizumab had significant benefits for patients, with 37 per cent of patients who received it surviving for a year or more, compared with only 26.5 per cent of those on standard care.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


EurekAlert!
Risk factors like smoking, high BP common among younger patients with repeat heart attacks. Heart attacks reoccurred more frequently in younger patients with several modifiable risk factors, including smoking and high blood pressure. Researchers on the new study, presented at the American College of Cardiology Asia Conference 2018 in Shanghai, suggested secondary preventive programs for younger patients should target modifiable risk factors.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Dagens Medicin
Mangel på kirurger i Region Sjælland går ud over behandling af brystkræft. Kun 22 pct. af kvinder med brystkræft blev opereret til tiden i 3. kvartal 2018 i Region Sjælland. Helt uacceptabel situation, lyder det fra vicedirektør på Sjællands Universitetshospital.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


cognitive science
Elitist and sexist gatekeeping of basic coding skills is why women in psychology can't program.. submitted by /u/DevFRus [link] [comments]
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Dagens Medicin
Regioner vil tilbyde forebyggende medicin mod hiv-smitte. Regioner vil nedbringe antallet af hiv-smittede ved at give en særligt udvalgt målgruppe et tilbud om forebyggende behandling.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


The Scientist
No Ban on Gene Drives: UN Convention. United Nations members agree to some restrictions on the technology, but not a total suspension of its use.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


Inside Science
November's Stellar Space Pictures. November's Stellar Space Pictures View new pictures of Mars, the last picture of the dwarf planet Ceres and images of the brightest galaxy in the universe. 5_crop_PIA22575_hires.jpg One of the first pictures that the Insight lander sent of the Martian surface, soon after its successful touchdown on Mars. Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Space Friday, November 30, 2018 – 11:45 Abigail Malate, Staff
Published: 30 Nov 2018


New Scientist
Darkfield's Flight: an immersive experience that leaves you half dead. In the sylvan surroundings of Dartington Hall, the pioneers of immersive theatre are exploring the many-world interpretation of quantum mechanics, one air crash at a time
Published: 28 Nov 2018


Viden (Danmarks Radio)
Årtiers fremkridt er under pres: 30 procent flere får mæslinger. Manglende vaccinationer får mæslinger til at brede sig i flere lande, viser nye tal. Vi risikerer at spilde årtiers kamp mod sygdommen, lyder advarsel.
Published: 30 Nov 2018


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Bladet bringer aktuelle,spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.


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More Than a Third of Female Suicides Are Committed by Indian Women

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Alaska surveys damage from major earthquakes

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A Kindler, Gentler Republican President Is Dead

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11h

Google-ansatte protesterer mod chefer: "I vil hjælpe Kina med at undertrykke"

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12h

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Store forventninger til banebrydende nye former for antistoffer mod B-celle-lymfom

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Hung over: What science says about why you feel so rough

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Efter 30 års forskning: Hiv er stadig et mysterium

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14h

Trump officials argue climate change warnings based on ‘worst-case scenario'

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14h

George H. W. Bush Is Dead

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15h

Snowpack declines may stunt tree growth and forests' ability to store carbon emissions

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Imaging chromatin to deduce function from form

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Prachee Avasthi Explores How Cells Build and Maintain Cilia

The University of Kansas professor is also known for her leadership among early-career researchers.

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Leukemia Relapses May Arise From Specialized Cells

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December Crossword

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Bacteria Harbor Geometric "Organelles"

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Rethinking Raw Milk, 1918

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15h

Brain Rhythms Guide How Humans Pay Attention

A perception of sustained focus may actually be the result of cycles of fluctuating rather than continuous neural activity, according to new behavioral and neurological data from studies in humans and macaques.

15h

Infographic: The Fate of Fat Cells During Breastfeeding

See how the cells accommodate milk production in mouse mammary tissue.

15h

Infographic: Bacterial Microcompartments Basics

These icosahedral structures are composed of proteins with unique geometric properties, which enable bacteria to employ them in a variety of situations.

15h

Contributors

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15h

Diverse Forests Are Better at Accumulating Carbon

A higher species richness could boost plant communities' ability to mitigate climate change, a study suggests.

15h

How One Wild Dolphins Trick Became a Fad

After release from rehab, bottlenose Billie started walking on water with her tail. Studying how the behavior spread could offer clues about how animals learn from each other.

15h

15h

Caught on Camera

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

15h

Hindsight

Looking back at a year filled with discoveries and challenges.

15h

Sounding Out Cell Stickiness

Acoustic forces can be used to differentiate adherent from non-adherent cells.

15h

Cheese Helped Fuel Early Farmers in Europe

Scientists have found traces of the dairy product in 7,200-year-old pottery in Croatia.

15h

Goats Prefer Happy Human Faces

Like dogs and horses, goats can discern happy from angry facial expressions. But whether these animals possess empathy remains unclear.

15h

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

15h

Infographic: Shaken Loose

How acoustic waves let researchers measure whether, and how firmly, cells are bound to a substrate.

15h

Discovery's Crest: A Profile of Marianne Bronner

Studying how neural crest cells journey through the embryo, this Caltech developmental biologist has revealed how they form major cell types, including peripheral neurons, bone, and smooth muscle.

15h

Fat Cells Shrink to Make Room for Milk in Breastfeeding Mouse Moms

Adipocytes lose their lipids and reprogram themselves into stem cells during lactation, then turn back into fat cells after pups wean.

15h

2018 Top 10 Innovations

Biology happens on many levels, from ecosystems to electron transport chains. These tools may help spur discoveries at all of life's scales.

16h

These Organelles Have No Membranes

From making ribosomes to protecting the integrity of the genome, these membraneless compartments play important roles in the cell. Their behavior is rooted in basic physics.

16h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 1. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med præmier.

17h

How Artificial Intelligence is Making Inroads in the Music Industry

How Artificial Intelligence is Making Inroads in the Music Industry Algorithms for mixing and mastering audio are having a growing impact on what we hear. 45988388711_a00393b6a6_o.jpg Image credits: Ilmicrofono Oggiono via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Friday, November 30, 2018 – 16:30 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — When a song plays on the radio, there are invis

17h

Nation's botanical treasure troves 'under huge threat'

The UK's herbaria are great scientific collections that must be safeguarded for the future, say scientists.

18h

Climate change: How slag can remove CO2 from the air

Scientists in Wales are looking at how slag heaps can be used to remove CO2 from the air in the fight against climate change.

18h

6 essential books on existentialist philosophy

Existentialism deals with the search to find meaning through free will and choice, among other things. Philosophers considered are existentialists who hailed mostly from Europe in the 19th and 20th century. Many existentialists believe that humans should make their own worth regardless of rules, laws or tradition. There is a wide variety of diverse ideologies that makes up the existentialist scho

19h

Knickers the Steer Really Is Big. But Most of Us Don’t Know a Cow’s Normal Size.

If you thought Knickers was a once-in-a-lifetime giant, you may not be spending enough time with cattle.

19h

TEDWomen: Vibrations offer new way to track elephants

A technique used to study earthquakes have been adapted to track elephants in the wild.

19h

Blue Whales Have Changed Their Tune

In the last few decades, blue whale calls have been getting lower in pitch—and a rebound in their numbers may be the reason. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Risk factors like smoking, high BP common among younger patients with repeat heart attacks

Heart attacks reoccurred more frequently in younger patients with several modifiable risk factors, including smoking and high blood pressure. Researchers on the new study, presented at the American College of Cardiology Asia Conference 2018 in Shanghai, suggested secondary preventive programs for younger patients should target modifiable risk factors.

20h

The Atlantic Daily: Tension, Not Anger

What We’re Following We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? G20: World leaders are performing their own delicate dances at the annual G20 meeting in Buenos Aires. With converging controversies hanging over Saudi Arabia, the country’s crown prince, M

21h

Study: Immunotherapy better than chemotherapy for subtype of head and neck cancer

A randomized clinical trial involving 97 medical centers in 20 countries, including Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, found that treating patients with head and neck cancer with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab is more effective and less toxic than standard chemotherapy.

21h

Immunotherapy keeps some advanced head and neck cancer patients alive for over three years

A new immunotherapy can greatly extend the lives of a proportion of people with advanced head and neck cancer, with some living for three years or more, a major new clinical trial reports.Overall, the drug pembrolizumab had significant benefits for patients, with 37 per cent of patients who received it surviving for a year or more, compared with only 26.5 per cent of those on standard care.

21h

System can rapidly and accurately detect tumor margins during breast cancer surgery

Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR), Osaka University, and collaborators have developed a new rapid and inexpensive way to accurately detect the margins between cancer and non-cancerous tissue during breast surgery. Their system is noteworthy in that it can detect the morphology of the cells, differentiating between cells that are more or less dangerous.

21h

Why a Hacker Exploited Printers to Make PewDiePie Propaganda

An anonymous hacker has claimed credit for the prank, which is part of an ongoing YouTube subscriber feud.

21h

Clues to brain changes in depression

In new pre-clinical research, scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), led by Scott Thompson, PhD, Professor of Physiology, have identified changes in brain activity linked to the pleasure and reward system.

21h

A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices

A team of scientists now has an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work one thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes.

21h

New approach to assess sustainability of reef fish

A new study helping to improve how sustainability is measured for popular reef fish could help better assess the eco-friendly seafood options at the dinner table.

21h

The future of fighting cancer: Zapping tumors in less than a second

New accelerator-based technology aims to reduce the side effects of cancer radiation therapy by shrinking its duration from minutes to under a second. Built into future compact medical devices, technology developed for high-energy physics could also help make radiation therapy more accessible around the world.

21h

Aaron Klug, 92, Dies; His 3-D Images of Bodily Molecules Won a Nobel

Born in Lithuania, raised in South Africa and working in Britain, he made large strides in understanding the structure of proteins, DNA and more.

21h

Musical training improves vision, researchers say

Drummers and brass players have stronger visual timing sensitivity than flag spinners in the Color Guard. The three groups took part in over 67,000 temporal order judgment (TOJ) trials. The finding, while counterintuitive, fits into the complex nature of sensory perception. None "Seeing is believing" is not only a metaphor for discerning truth, but also a visual reality for many. Watching someone

22h

In vitro cell culture findings could lead to novel interventions for Schizophrenia

A recent study has shown how using cultured cells from patients with psychotic disorders to investigate abnormalities in nerve connections in the brain could lead to new treatments.

22h

Scientists reveal substantial water loss in global landlocked regions

A new study reveals that water storage declines in global landlocked basins has aggravated local water stress and caused potential sea level rise.

22h

Cellular gene signatures for heart muscle regeneration

A research team has used a transcriptomic approach — studying what genes are expressed — to identify gene signatures of cell subpopulations identified as atrial-like or ventricular-like. This understanding could lead to regenerative therapy discoveries for the millions of people living with damaged heart muscle caused by heart attacks or other chronic heart conditions.

22h

Force Push VR brings Jedi powers to life

Force Push provides a more physical, nuanced experience than traditional hand controllers allow in VR. It responds to the speed and magnitude of hand gestures to accelerate or decelerate objects in a way that users can understand intuitively.

22h

Brilliant iron molecule could provide cheaper solar energy

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating an iron molecule that can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity. The results indicate that the iron molecule could replace the more expensive and rarer metals used today.

22h

New knowledge of pubertal growth

In monitoring and prediction of children's growth, the spurt in puberty is often considered too variable to be predictable. However, new findings and methods enable a better picture of how children and adolescents grow, especially during puberty.

22h

Planting more hedgerows and trees could help bees thrive once again

Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues. And researchers suggest artificial intelligence could be used as a tool to design our landscapes so that trees, hedgerows and wildflowers are planted in the right place and the right numbers to ensure our pollinators have enough food.

22h

New research questions fish stocking obligations

Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study. The study focuses on ecological flows from the viewpoints of law and biology.

22h

New information about infant brain structure

Infant brain development is still poorly understood. Thus, research on the topic is vital as developing brains are sensitive to early environmental factors.

22h

Light triggers gold in unexpected way

Researchers have discovered a fundamentally different form of light-matter interaction in their experiments with gold nanoparticles. The discovery may become useful in the development of next-generation, ultrasmall optical components for computers and antennas.

22h

Anchorage suffered a 7.0 magnitude earthquake, but was spared a tsunami

Science No injuries have been reported. A magnitude 7.0 earthquake hit Alaska today, causing a short-lived tsunami warning and substantial structural damage.

22h

Great strides for carbon capture using earth-abundant elements as photocatalytic system

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have designed a CO2 reduction method based only on commonly occurring elements. Achieving a 57 percent overall quantum yield of CO2 reduction products, it is the highest performing system of its kind reported to date, raising prospects for cost-effective carbon capture solutions.

22h

Falls are more likely when you've had a bad night sleep

Disturbances during sleep decreases capability to control posture and balance according to researchers.

22h

A bastard seal from the past reveals the potential for human hybrids

If discovered as fossils, grey and ringed seals are so different that they could be classified as belonging to different families. Yet, a seal pup born in 1929 was found to be an almost perfect intermediate between the species. Compared to Neanderthals and modern humans, grey and ringed seals are genetically and dentally at least twice as different, suggesting that there may be more fossil human h

22h

Is being a night owl bad for your health?

In the first ever international review of studies analysing whether being an early riser or a night owl can influence your health, researchers have uncovered a growing body of evidence indicating an increased risk of ill health in people with an evening preference as they have more erratic eating patterns and consume more unhealthy foods.

22h

UK may never recover £1.2bn invested in EU Galileo satellite system

British armed forces will not get access to Galileo, a rival to the US GPS system, after Brexit The UK may never claw back £1.2bn of investment in Galileo, the EU’s satellite navigation system, as Theresa May officially pulled the plug on UK defence and security participation in the system after Brexit. Galileo, developed as a rival to the US GPS system, is due to be launched in 2020 with civilia

22h

Brexit: Sam Gyimah resigns over Theresa May's 'naive' deal

Sam Gyimah says the row over the EU's Galileo system shows how the UK will be "hammered" in any deal.

22h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: It’s Fun to Stay at the USMCA

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ). We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Today in 5 Lines Gathered in Buenos Aires for the annual G20 Summit, President Donald Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and outgoing Mexican President

22h

This new bike helmet can automatically call for help if you crash

Technology Like the Apple Watch, it keeps an eye out for spills. The potentially life-saving gadget is called ANGI.

22h

In vitro cell culture findings could lead to novel interventions for Schizophrenia

A recent study has shown how using cultured cells from patients with psychotic disorders to investigate abnormalities in nerve connections in the brain could lead to new treatments.

22h

'The Journal of Controversial Ideas' will launch in 2019. Is it dangerous?

A trio of respected philosophers have decided to launch a peer reviewed journal that would allow for anonymous submissions. If successful, the journal could allow for important ideas that might lead to threats or harm to the author to join the debate and promote discussion. Critics ask if this is needed, and warn of giving dangerous people a safe space to publish horrific ideas. Three very famous

22h

African-American mothers rate boys higher for ADHD

African-American children often are reported by parents and teachers to display behaviors of ADHD at a higher rate than children from other racial and ethnic groups. For the first time, researchers have found that African-American mothers in a study rated boys as displaying more frequent ADHD symptoms than Caucasian mothers did, regardless of child race.

22h

Greenhouse gas 'detergent' recycles itself in atmosphere

A simple molecule in the atmosphere that acts as a 'detergent' to breakdown methane and other greenhouse gases has been found to recycle itself to maintain a steady global presence in the face of rising emissions, according to new research. Understanding its role in the atmosphere is critical for determining the lifetime of methane, a powerful contributor to climate change.

22h

Bigger brains are smarter, but not by much

Using a large dataset and controlling for a variety of factors, including sex, age, height, socioeconomic status, and genetic ancestry, scientists found that people with larger brains rated higher on measures of intelligence and educational attainment. Size was far from everything, however, explaining only about two percent of the variation in smarts.

22h

Cancer drug may help treat human papillomavirus infections

Preclinical experiments suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. Highly efficacious vaccines against HPV infection exist — including the recently approved Gardasil 9, which immunizes against nine genotypes of HPV known to cause cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. But the vaccine need

22h

How microscopic machines can fail in the blink of an eye

NIST researchers have developed a method for more quickly tracking microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as they work and, just as importantly, as they stop working.

22h

Light pollution may cause insomnia in older adults

A new study is the first population-based investigation to report a significant association between artificial, outdoor light exposure at night and insomnia, as indicated by older adults' use of hypnotic drugs.

22h

Researchers alleviate Schizophrenia symptoms in new mouse models

Does all the tinkering in young mice hamper their brain development, causing schizophrenia-like symptoms? Or, do their brain cells develop normally, but in adulthood struggle to communicate? Researchers need to know whether to focus their efforts on brain cell development or communication, or both, because the answer to these questions implies different therapeutic approaches.

22h

Many diseases increase the risks of hip fracture surgery

Parkinson's disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatic diseases, alcoholism and mental health disorders increase the risk of surgical complications after a hip fracture surgery, a new study analyzing nationwide registers finds. 4.6 percent of all hip surgery patients and 10 percent of total hip replacement surgery patients experienced surgical complications within three months following their surgery.

22h

How you respond to drama depends on if you are a holistic or analytical thinker

Researchers showed volunteers the film My Sister's Keeper on a screen while the research subjects were lying down in an MRI scanner. The study compared the volunteers' brain activity, and concluded that holistic thinkers saw the film more similarly with each other than analytical thinkers. In addition, holistic thinkers processed the film's moral issues and factual connections within the film more

22h

Trump Administration Says Companies Can 'Incidentally Harass' Marine Mammals

It's a decision opposed by environmental groups, who say the blasts could harm marine animals, and some coastal communities, who fear it could be a precursor to offshore drilling. (Image credit: Eva Hambach/AFP/Getty Images)

22h

Reality Isn’t ‘Real’

Many people assume that they perceive the world as it actually is—as if eyes and ears were windows that allow us to access an objective reality. But perception is not an accurate reflection of an externally existing world. “In fact,” the neuroscientist Anil Seth says, “perception and hallucination have a lot in common. You could say that we’re all hallucinating all of the time, and when we agree

22h

To image leaky atmosphere, NASA rocket team heads north

Earth's atmosphere is leaking, but how does oxygen get the energy to escape to space? NASA's VISIONS-2 rocket will soon launch into the unique magnetic environment near the North Pole in pursuit of an answer.

23h

More than 6,000 antibiotic resistance genes discovered in the bacteria that inhabit the human gut

Researchers have used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut.

23h

Study offers new approach to assess sustainability of reef fish

A new study helping to improve how sustainability is measured for popular reef fish could help better assess the eco-friendly seafood options at the dinner table.

23h

A close-up look at the 7.0-magnitude earthquake that struck Alaska today

The first earthquake measured 7.0, and the subsequent aftershock measured 5.7. No serious injuries or deaths have been reported so far. People immediately took to social media to post images and videos of the earthquakes' aftermath. None Two earthquakes measuring 7.0 and 5.7 rumbled Anchorage, Alaska on Friday morning, causing roads to split open and people to take cover under whatever shelter th

23h

GM's Dan Ammann to Lead Cruise, Its Self-Driving Car Effort

The automaker's president is leaving his role in Detroit to head up Cruise, while founder and current CEO Kyle Vogt will become CTO.

23h

Apple Music Lands on Amazon Echo, as Apple Branches Out

Two bitter tech rivals get along for a change, making your streaming life a lot less complicated.

23h

600 Million Years Ago, the First Scavengers Lurked in Dark Ocean Gardens

The bizarre organisms of the Ediacaran Period have long puzzled researchers. Fossil discoveries suggest these ecosystems may have been more complicated than once thought.

23h

App helps breast cancer survivors improve health after treatment

Breast cancer survivors who used a smartphone app created at Houston Methodist consistently lost weight, largely due to daily, real-time interactions with their health care team via the mobile app.

23h

Scientists plan to spray the sky with light-reflecting particles to dim the sun

Scientists hope to launch the world's first solar geoengineering project next year. The project involves spraying calcium carbonate into the stratosphere. The team hopes to get people thinking more seriously about bioengineering. If all the pieces can be put together by then, a trio of researchers from Harvard hope to begin the testing phase of their plan to reduce the amount of sunshine the Eart

23h

How introducing microbial life to Mars can make it livable for humans

Humanity dreams of becoming an interplanetary species, but no other planet in our solar system can currently support complex life. In order to make a planet like Mars hospitable for us, we'll have to engage in a massive, decades-long terraforming effort. Much of what makes Earth livable, such as breathable air, tolerable temperatures, and so on, are the result of microbial activity from Earth's e

23h

The neuron formerly known as 5to is now named Arachne!

The results are in and Arachne is the name of our third newly discovered ganglion cell type! This name was nominated by Eyewirer kinryuu. In mythology, Arachne was a master weaver who challenged Athena, the goddess of wisdom and crafts, to a weaving contest. Arachne wove a feisty message that called out the gods for misleading humans. She did so well that she enraged Athena, who turned her into a

23h

Why patients lie to their doctors

Up to 80 percent of those surveyed have lied to their doctor about information that could impact their health, including accurately describing their diet and how often they exercise. When survey participants explained their reasoning for doing so, they said that they wanted to avoid being judged and didn't want to be lectured about how bad certain behaviors were.

23h

A new way to see stress — using supercomputers

Supercomputer simulations show that at the atomic level, material stress doesn't behave symmetrically. Widely-used atomic stress formulae significantly underestimate stress near stress concentrators such as dislocation core, crack tip, or interface, in a material under deformation. Supercomputers simulate force interactions of Lennard-Jones perfect single crystal of 240,000 atoms. Study findings c

23h

Towards a treatment for gluten intolerance

Celiac disease is a severe autoimmune disorder of the intestine. It occurs when people develop sensitivity to gluten, a substance found in wheat, rye, and barley. Medical researchers have now uncovered a new molecular player in the development of gluten intolerance. Their discovery suggests potential targets for the development of therapeutic approaches for the disease.

23h

The physics of extracting gas from shale formations

Scientists have distilled the current state of knowledge regarding the multi-scale flow processes occurring during shale gas extraction. This know-how is deemed essential for improving gas recovery and lowering production costs.

23h

Eyewire Release Report 11/30/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. Marathon cells’ SC bonuses are now automatically doubled (rather than admin-doubled) and will thus be reflected properly in the points that Scythes see in their marathon cell completion notifications. Cell completion notifications should now also correctly di

1d

Black truffles are in trouble

Nexus Media News Climate change is threatening to muffle the truffle shuffle. Researchers gathered data on more than three decades of truffle production and compared it with data on temperature and precipitation to predict the future impact of…

1d

No Ban on Gene Drives: UN Convention

United Nations members agree to some restrictions on the technology, but not a total suspension of its use.

1d

Marriott data breach hits 500 million guests. Here’s what to do if you’re one of them.Marriott Starwood Breach

The breach dates back to 2014 and potentially affected 500 million customers. Millions of guests potentially had credit card information stolen. It's likely the second largest data breach in corporate history. None Have you recently stayed at a Starwood hotel such as a Westin or a St. Regis? If so, you should probably change your Starwood passwords and check your credit card accounts because Marr

1d

Matter: Yes, the Octopus Is Smart as Heck. But Why?

It has eight arms, three hearts — and a plan. Scientists aren’t sure how the cephalopods got to be so intelligent.

1d

Hospitals, Hacks, Malware and Medical Safety

Hospitals, Hacks, Malware and Medical Safety We may be vulnerable, researchers warn after demonstrating a cyberattack on a CT scanner, highlighting the need for better security. CT_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Alpa Prod via Shutterstock Human Friday, November 30, 2018 – 14:00 Claire Cleveland, Contributor (Inside Science) — Last year, a malicious piece of blackmail software called WannaCry swep

1d

The Saudis’ Reputation: A Tale Told in Three Acts

The big question ahead of the G20 summit in Argentina was how world leaders would greet Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman amid the fallout over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi. We now have the answer: He was embraced by Russian President Vladimir Putin, apparently admonished by French President Emmanuel Macron, and mostly ignored by President Donald Trump. U.S. intelligence agencies say the S

1d

Rick Tries to Jump a Ditch | Gold Rush

After clearing the cut to help drain rain water, Rick needs to get on the other side of the ditch. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com

1d

A cancer drug may help treat human papillomavirus infections

Preclinical experiments suggest the cancer drugs vorinostat, belinostat and panobinostat might be repurposed to treat infections caused by human papillomaviruses, or HPVs. Highly efficacious vaccines against HPV infection exist — including the recently approved Gardasil 9, which immunizes against nine genotypes of HPV known to cause cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. But the vaccine need

1d

Dead Sea Lions With Gunshot Wounds Wash Up On Washington State Shores

At least eight dead sea lions with bullet holes have been found since September. It's illegal to shoot marine mammals, but that hasn't stopped some fishermen from going after them. (Image credit: Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images)

1d

So you stayed at a Starwood hotel: Tips on data breachMarriott Starwood Breach

If you stayed at one of Marriott's Starwood hotels in recent years, hackers might have information on your address, credit card and even your passport. Some of this can be used for identity theft, as hackers create bank and other accounts under your name.

1d

Hawk native to South America wows crowd in Maine park

A hawk that is native to Central and South America drew a lot of attention from Maine's birding community Friday after appearing in a park, where it brawled with a fellow raptor and dined on a squirrel.

1d

Greenhouse gas 'detergent' recycles itself in atmosphere

A simple molecule in the atmosphere that acts as a "detergent" to breakdown methane and other greenhouse gases has been found to recycle itself to maintain a steady global presence in the face of rising emissions, according to new NASA research. Understanding its role in the atmosphere is critical for determining the lifetime of methane, a powerful contributor to climate change.

1d

Scientists reveal substantial water loss in global landlocked regions

Along with a warming climate and intensified human activities, recent water storage in global landlocked basins has undergone a widespread decline. A new study reveals this decline has aggravated local water stress and caused potential sea level rise.

1d

This Gene Can Make Viruses Invisible to the Immune System — Up to a Point

One gene, which protects the body from autoimmune disorders also helps secretly usher in some viruses by changing their look.

1d

Millennials buy the things their parents did – but they're much poorer

Millennials earn less, own fewer assets and have more debt than previous generations. The fact that Millennials' spending habits differ from previous generations is best explained by lower earnings and less wealth, rather than changing tastes. Some Millennials might be too optimistic about their ability to retire early — or on time. None A study published this month from the Federal Reserve sugge

1d

A Quiet War Rages Over Who Can Make Money Online

As social media companies and payment processors crack down on offensive speech, people and groups are using the tools to harass their enemies.

1d

Shoplifters Is a Brilliant Dickensian Tale for a Modern Age

Shoplifters is, very quietly, a film about a crisis. The Shibata family comprises three generations crammed together into a small home—the adults earn low wages; work menial jobs; and struggle to feed, clothe, and educate the kids. This family, and their lives, could easily be framed in the dreariest way possible, and the writer and director Hirokazu Kore-eda has been up front about wanting to us

1d

Photos of the Week: Foggy Skies, Wayward Boar, Mars Landing

The Knife Angel in England; tree-canopy tours in Ghana; soldiers on patrol in Ukraine; Christmas displays across Europe and the United States; wildfires in Australia; protests in Colombia, Turkey, and Belgium; and much more

1d

What It Really Means to Be the Adult in the Room

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, often has been called the company’s “adult in the room.” A former Clinton administration chief of staff, Sandberg ran both sales and philanthropic divisions at Google before joining Facebook. Her 2013 book Lean In made her a feminist business icon, of a certain stripe . And so it was particularly devastating when a New York Times report earlier

1d

Gadget Lab Podcast: Andrew Mason on Descript and Life, Post-Groupon

Andrew Mason, the founder of Groupon who was fired as CEO in 2013 and has since gone on to launch new startups, proves he’s still a one-of-a-kind entrepreneur.

1d

We finally know how bright the universe is

Space Astrophysicists measured all of the lights. The darkness of the sky hides a history of the cosmos, and astrophysicists are working to decode it.

1d

Scientists reveal substantial water loss in global landlocked regions

A new study involving Kansas State University researchers reveals that water storage declines in global landlocked basins has aggravated local water stress and caused potential sea level rise.

1d

Greenhouse gas 'detergent' recycles itself in atmosphere: NASA study

A simple molecule in the atmosphere that acts as a 'detergent' to breakdown methane and other greenhouse gases has been found to recycle itself to maintain a steady global presence in the face of rising emissions, according to new NASA research. Understanding its role in the atmosphere is critical for determining the lifetime of methane, a powerful contributor to climate change.

1d

Does Your Language Influence How You Think?

Would it be harder for people who speak a highly gendered language to create a more gender-neutral society? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Bigger brains are smarter, but not by much

Using a large dataset and controlling for a variety of factors, including sex, age, height, socioeconomic status, and genetic ancestry, Gideon Nave of the Wharton School and Philipp Koellinger of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam found that people with larger brains rated higher on measures of intelligence and educational attainment. Size was far from everything, however, explaining only about two perc

1d

A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices

A team of scientists from ASU's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany have published in Science Advances online today an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work one thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes.

1d

Here's What Photosynthesis Sounds Like Underwater

If you listen closely, you can hear little plants harnessing the sun's energy. All you have to do is dive underwater and listen for the faint but distinctive "ping!" that red algae make while carrying out photosynthesis, a new study finds.

1d

Experts present new recommendations on 'overlapping' type of leukemia

Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a rare disease with overlapping features of two categories of bone marrow and blood cell disorders that poses challenges in clinical management. Joint recommendations on diagnosis and treatment of CMML from two European specialty societies were published today in HemaSphere, the official journal of the European Hematology Association (EHA). The journal is

1d

African-American mothers rate boys higher for ADHD

African-American children often are reported by parents and teachers to display behaviors of ADHD at a higher rate than children from other racial and ethnic groups. For the first time, researchers have found that African-American mothers in a study rated boys as displaying more frequent ADHD symptoms than Caucasian mothers did, regardless of child race. The findings mean that racial differences f

1d

A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices

A team of scientists from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany have published in Science Advances online today an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work one thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes.

1d

The Marriott breach compared with past security breakdowns

Marriott's revelation that as many as 500 million guests may have been affected by a data breach at Starwood hotels, which it bought two years ago, ranks among the largest hacks ever. It is not clear if some of those included in the final tally are individuals who were counted during every stay.

1d

Half the world’s annual rain falls in just 12 days

Climate change could shorten the time it talks for the world’s to receive half its annual precipitation from 12 days to 11 by 2100.

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Missing muskrat ‘houses’ warn of habitat loss

Although Indigenous communities have used muskrat fur to make clothing for generations and the animal’s meat is a seasonal delicacy, decades of trapping are not primarily responsible for the animal’s decline across North America. Instead, 46 years of satellite imagery show Canada’s Peace-Athabasca Delta has been drying out since the 1970s, significantly reducing muskrat habitat. “The ecological i

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New Zealand beached whales: Why are so many getting stranded?

Illness, warmer waters and the fact that pilot whales travel in sociable groups could all play a role.

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How to Measure All the Starlight in the Universe

Until the 20th century, astronomers were stuck on a question that seems as if it should have an easy answer: Why is the night sky dark? If the infinite universe has an infinite numbers of stars, as they assumed, our evening view should be awash in their glow. Astronomers eventually got the answer to this question, known as Olbers’ paradox, when they worked out that the universe doesn’t go on fore

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Top Stories in November: Another Chapter in Robert Mueller's Report

The special counsel's end game is in sight. Plus: The pricey war over your Instagram feed, and the best online shopping deals.

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A 7.0-Magnitude Earthquake Just Shook Alaska

The earthquake struck 8 miles (13 kilometers) north of Anchorage, prompting a tsunami warning.

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Changes In Brain Scans Seen After A Single Season Of Football For Young Players

MRI scans of the brains of young football players suggest that repeated blows to the head can change the shape of nerve fibers in the corpus callosum, which connects the two halves of the brain. (Image credit: groveb/Getty Images)

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The American Citizen’s Guide to Clean Air

Unsure if the government is looking out for them, a guerrilla network of “breathers” has turned to personal pollution monitors.

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US image abroad: It's the message not the messenger

Today's political climate in the U.S. is often peppered with animosity from the U.S. president towards other countries but how has the U.S. image fared? A Dartmouth study finds that the U.S. image abroad appears to be influenced more by policy content than by the person delivering the message, even if it is the U.S. president. The results are published in Political Behavior.

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Cotton biofuel cell could one day power pacemakers

A glucose-powered biofuel cell with electrodes made from cotton fiber could someday help power medical implants such as pacemakers and sensors. The new fuel cell, which provides twice as much power as conventional biofuel cells, could pair with batteries or super-capacitors to provide a hybrid power source for the medical devices. Researchers used gold nanoparticles assembled on the cotton to cre

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Polluters in the room: big energy 'undermining' UN climate talks

Oil and coal giants are exploiting a lack of conflict-of-interest protection at UN climate talks to push for continued fossil fuel use despite its contribution to harmful climate change, several sources have told AFP.

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NASA chief says Elon Musk won't be smoking joints publicly again

NASA chief Jim Bridenstine elaborated this week on the reasons why the US space agency launched a safety review of SpaceX and Boeing, which are building spaceships for astronauts, including their workplace culture and drug-free policies.

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US image abroad: It's the message not the messenger

Today's political climate in the US is often peppered with animosity from the US president towards other countries but how has the US image fared? A Dartmouth study finds that the US image abroad appears to be influenced more by policy content than by the person delivering the message, even if it is the US president. The results are published in Political Behavior.

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Babies Create a Mental Map of Their Body Before They Ever Leave the Womb

Those kicks and jabs help your baby build an information superhighway while still in the womb.

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Latest Facebook controversy puts heat on number two Sandberg

Facebook's number two executive Sheryl Sandberg, long seen as the "adult" at the youthfully-managed firm, has found herself the center of controversy over her role in pushing back at a growing chorus of criticism of the social media giant.

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When mental illness isn’t a medical issue, homeless people suffer

A new case study involving a homeless man with schizophrenia highlights what happens when mental illness is “demedicalized,” or seen as falling outside the scope of medical care. The article, which appears in the New England Journal of Medicine , discusses the case of a homeless California man who was a frequent visitor to a local emergency room. Six times over the course of a few months the man,

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US Biotech Firms Made China's Gene-Edited Babies Possible

Even Crispr babies have a global supply chain.

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The physics of extracting gas from shale formations

Extracting gas from new sources is vital in order to supplement dwindling conventional supplies. Shale reservoirs host gas trapped in the pores of mudstone, which consists of a mixture of silt mineral particles ranging from 4 to 60 microns in size, and clay elements smaller than 4 microns. Surprisingly, the oil and gas industry still lacks a firm understanding of how the pore space and geological

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Stone Age people conquered the Tibetan Plateau’s thin air

Stone tools that are at least 30,000 years old suggest that people settled the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau earlier than scientists thought.

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'Magma shift' may have caused mysterious seismic wave event

Vibrations off Madagascar baffled experts but now they believe they have the answer It is the kind of mystery scientists relish. On 11 November, something stirred near the French island of Mayotte off the west coast of Madagascar and sent a rumble around the world. Travelling at 9,000mph, the deep hum hurtled past earthquake detection systems unnoticed. No one appears to have felt a thing. The ev

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How microscopic machines can fail in the blink of an eye

How long can tiny gears and other microscopic moving parts last before they wear out? What are the warning signs that these components are about to fail, which can happen in just a few tenths of a second? Striving to provide clear answers to these questions, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for more quickly tracking microelectromechan

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To image leaky atmosphere, NASA rocket team heads north

On a frigid morning in early December, a team of NASA rocket scientists will huddle in the control room in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, a remote archipelago off the northern coast of Norway. Here at the world's northernmost rocket range, operated by Norway's Andøya Space Center, the clock may read 8 a.m., but the Sun won't be up—by that time, it won't have peeked over the horizon in more than a month.

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A study of almost 2600 IAU members shows that astronomers have a remarkable drive for public engagement

Because of the ubiquitous nature of its questions and the stunning insights into the nature of the Universe, astronomy has often been thought of as appealing and the natural science with the most far-reaching popularisation efforts. A recently published study of the outreach activities of IAU members, Bustling public communication by astronomers around the world driven by personal and contextual f

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Force Push VR brings Jedi powers to life

Force Push provides a more physical, nuanced experience than traditional hand controllers allow in VR. It responds to the speed and magnitude of hand gestures to accelerate or decelerate objects in a way that users can understand intuitively.

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St. Jude research into leukemia, sickle cell and other blood disorders presented at ASH

The 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology will feature research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital on topics ranging from the genomic basis and vulnerabilities of leukemia to an update on gene therapy for hemophilia B to advances in sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia.

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A new way to see stress—using supercomputers

It's easy to take a lot for granted. Scientists do this when they study stress, the force per unit area on an object. Scientists handle stress mathematically by assuming it to have symmetry. That means the components of stress are identical if you transform the stressed object with something like a turn or a flip. Supercomputer simulations show that at the atomic level, material stress doesn't beh

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A mass ride-sharing launch will put cremated remains, satellites, and art into space

Artists and space entrepreneurs are among those with something on board a SpaceX rocket intended to launch more than 60 satellites.

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The Over-celebration of Life Events

Earlier this week, news outlets published the results of a public-records investigation into what caused a massive wildfire in Arizona’s Santa Rita foothills last year. The video footage procured by Arizona Daily Star reporters confirms what those who’d been following the case feared: The blaze began with a giant eruption of blue powder. A U.S. Border Patrol agent and then-expecting father was at

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Solar Industry's Future Lies in Lightweight Technology

Scientists are developing flexible, thin-films that will be more resilient and have wider uses than current solar technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Around the world, reported measles cases jumped 31 percent in 2017

While the number of reported measles cases has dropped 80 percent from 2000 to 2017, high profile outbreaks pushed the 2017 total up from 2016.

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Switch for the regeneration of nerve cell insulation

An international research team has discovered a mechanism that regulates the regeneration of the insulating layer of neurites. This insulation coating, also referred to as myelin sheath, is crucial for rapid signal transmission among cells. Damages to the myelin sheath, such as are caused by multiple sclerosis, can considerably inhibit the function of the nervous system.

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The nightmarish Asian longhorned tick has invaded the U.S.—and it can reproduce without mating

Health It's in at least eight states already, and no one is sure how long it's been here. When officials from the CDC first encountered longhorned ticks, there were so many crawling in the grass that they infiltrated investigators' pants within minutes.

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UA scientist identifies cellular gene signatures for heart muscle regeneration

A research team led by Jared Churko, PhD, director of the University of Arizona iPSC Core in the UA Sarver Heart Center, used a transcriptomic approach — studying what genes are expressed — to identify gene signatures of cell subpopulations identified as atrial-like or ventricular-like. This understanding could lead to regenerative therapy discoveries for the millions of people living with damag

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Årtiers fremkridt er under pres: 30 procent flere får mæslinger

Manglende vaccinationer får mæslinger til at brede sig i flere lande, viser nye tal. Vi risikerer at spilde årtiers kamp mod sygdommen, lyder advarsel.

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Forcing kids to say ‘I’m sorry’ doesn’t fool anybody

Don’t force an unremorseful kid to apologize until they’re truly sorry, new research suggests. The point of an apology—to express remorse and repair relationships—is lost because children may dislike the apologizer even more after the insincere apology than before. The new study looks at whether children distinguish between willingly given and coerced expressions of remorse—and they do. The findi

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‘Juul’s a Business, and They’re Behaving Like a Business’

Juul Labs’ Instagram account was once a repository of images of attractive young adults hanging out in sunny locales while puffing away at the brand’s popular vapes. Now it’s more like a digital grave. Everything is buried, save for one post, a lone marker explaining the void. Earlier this month, the e-cigarette giant pulled a highly publicized corporate-responsibility move on social media, delet

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‘Polar wander’ may be behind Earth’s most recent ice age

Changes deep inside the planet may have caused Earth’s most recent ice age, according to new research. Based on evidence from the Pacific Ocean, including the position of the Hawaiian Islands, researchers have determined Earth shifted relative to its spin axis within the past 12 million years, which caused Greenland to move far enough toward the north pole to kick off the ice age that began about

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November's Stellar Space Pictures

November's Stellar Space Pictures View new pictures of Mars, the last picture of the dwarf planet Ceres and images of the brightest galaxy in the universe. 5_crop_PIA22575_hires.jpg One of the first pictures that the Insight lander sent of the Martian surface, soon after its successful touchdown on Mars. Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Space Friday, November 30, 2018 – 11:45 Abigail Malate, Staff

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Week in Wildlife – in pictures

Red fody, beached whales and wildlife rescued from an Australian heatwave in this week’s gallery Continue reading…

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The Marriott Hack: How to Protect YourselfMarriott Starwood Breach

Up to 500 people's personal information has been stolen in a Marriott hack that lasted four years, one of the biggest breaches yet.

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Almost everything we know about social media and health could be wrong

Many studies about social media use and health have a fundamental flaw – they use unreliable self-reports about how much people use technology

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Space art could be so much more than a shiny satellite in the sky

Orbital Reflector, a giant balloon that will inflate in Earth’s orbit and reflect the sun’s light, is the latest attempt at large-scale art in space. But space art should do more than mimic the stars

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Millions of passport and credit card details exposed in Marriott hackMarriott Starwood Breach

Half a billion people who've stayed at Marriott hotels may have had their data exposed, including passport numbers and credit card details

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Darkfield’s Flight: an immersive experience that leaves you half dead

In the sylvan surroundings of Dartington Hall, the pioneers of immersive theatre are exploring the many-world interpretation of quantum mechanics, one air crash at a time

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America's Love–Hate Relationship with Science

Our leaders want the benefits of science while denying its inconvenient findings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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With New Leadership, Planned Parenthood Plots The Path Forward

The organization reportedly saw a surge of interest in IUDs after President Trump's election, but it's not just for birth control, or for women. What does Dr. Leana Wen have planned for the organization? (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Amid Layoffs, An American Automotive Institution Tries To Change

America's largest automaker, General Motors, says it wants to eliminate costs and concentrate on electric and self-driving vehicles. (Image credit: LARS HAGBERG/AFP/Getty Images)

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Hope for male 'pill' breakthrough after huge cash injection

Dundee University researchers receive $1m funding boost from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Researchers at a Scottish university hope to make a breakthrough in the long hunt for a male pill, thanks to a grant of more than $900,000 that will allow them to screen thousands of existing drugs to see if they have potential. Related: Male pill could be on horizon as trials yield positive results Con

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Study sheds light on alcohol misuse among never-deployed reservists

In a study of 174 Army Reserve and National Guard soldiers who hadn't been deployed, University at Buffalo researchers found that more negative non-deployment emotions were associated with a range of alcohol use outcomes.

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To image leaky atmosphere, NASA rocket team heads north

Earth's atmosphere is leaking-but how does oxygen get the energy to escape to space? NASA's VISIONS-2 rocket will soon launch into the unique magnetic environment near the North Pole in pursuit of an answer.

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Researchers alleviate Schizophrenia symptoms in new mouse models

In a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Lin Mei, MD, PhD, asked, does all the tinkering in young mice hamper their brain development, causing schizophrenia-like symptoms? Or, do their brain cells develop normally, but in adulthood struggle to communicate? Researchers need to know whether to focus their efforts on brain cell development or communication, or both, b

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Light pollution may cause insomnia in older adults

A new study is the first population-based investigation to report a significant association between artificial, outdoor light exposure at night and insomnia, as indicated by older adults' use of hypnotic drugs.

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IAU astronomers show exceptional involvement in outreach activities

A study of outreach activities published in the journal Nature Astronomy has presented the results of a survey gathered from 2587 IAU members. The survey is the largest systematic study of astronomers' outreach activities. Astronomers were found to show an exceptional internal drive to organise and participate in science communication activities.

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How microscopic machines can fail in the blink of an eye

NIST researchers have developed a method for more quickly tracking microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as they work and, just as importantly, as they stop working.

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Patients with cancer are more at risk of complications following heart procedure

Research led by Keele University suggests that patients with cancer who undergo a common heart procedure have worse short-term clinical outcomes compared to non-cancer patients, in the largest study undertaken to date.

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The American Gut Project

The American Gut Project Scientists want your poop to give you more information on your gut. The American Gut Project Video of The American Gut Project Human Friday, November 30, 2018 – 11:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Imagine if you had an extra organ with 10 times as many cells as the rest of your body, and that organ affected everything from your digestion to your mood. It t

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The physics of extracting gas from shale formations

In a recent article published in EPJ E, Natalia Kovalchuk and Constantinos Hadjistassou from the University of Nicosia, Cyprus, have distilled the current state of knowledge regarding the multi-scale flow processes occurring during shale gas extraction. This know-how is deemed essential for improving gas recovery and lowering production costs.

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Towards a treatment for gluten intolerance

Celiac disease is a severe autoimmune disorder of the intestine. It occurs when people develop sensitivity to gluten, a substance found in wheat, rye, and barley. An international research team from Italy and France has now uncovered a new molecular player in the development of gluten intolerance. Their discovery, published in The EMBO Journal, suggests potential targets for the development of the

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A new way to see stress — using supercomputers

Supercomputer simulations show that at the atomic level, material stress doesn't behave symmetrically. Widely-used atomic stress formulae significantly underestimate stress near stress concentrators such as dislocation core, crack tip, or interface, in a material under deformation. NSF-funded XSEDE-allocated Jetstream and Comet supercomputers simulate force interactions of Lennard-Jones perfect si

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Rates of chronic kidney disease, deaths outpace other diseases

An abundance of high-sugar, high-salt foods in many American diets and obesity-related health problems such as diabetes are likely driving an increase in kidney disease cases, including in young adults, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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Polio-like illness mostly of children is focus of 3 JAMA Pediatrics articles

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a poorly understood polio-like illness mostly of children characterized by weakness of muscles and limbs and the presence of a spinal cord lesion. An increase in cases was first suspected in 2012 and some epidemiologic evidence suggests viruses may be associated with AFM outbreaks in the United States in the late summer and fall of 2014, 2016 and 2018. Much still ne

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Ambulance response times are worse for low-income people

In what is believed to be the first national study evaluating disparities in 911 responses for cardiac arrest in high-income and low-income neighborhoods, a team led by researchers at UC San Francisco examined whether socioeconomic disparities were associated with longer ambulance responses and transport times for cardiac arrests occurring outside hospital premises.

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What are effects of smoked, vaporized marijuana in infrequent adult users?

Researchers compared the effects of smoked versus vaporized cannabis at two different doses and a placebo dose in a small study of 17 healthy adults who weren't regular cannabis users. Participants felt the effects of smoked and vaporized cannabis at a 10-mg dose of the psychoactive component THC, including modest cognitive impairment, while a 25-mg dose of THC produced more pronounced drug effect

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Do poorer neighborhoods experience longer ambulance times?

Patients from the poorest neighborhoods who had cardiac arrest had longer total ambulance times than those from the wealthiest neighborhoods.

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Why patients lie to their doctors

Up to 80 percent of those surveyed have lied to their doctor about information that could impact their health, including accurately describing their diet and how often they exercise. When survey participants explained their reasoning for doing so, they said that they wanted to avoid being judged and didn't want to be lectured about how bad certain behaviors were. The research was led by scientists

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Ancient Hominins May Have Lived Alongside Modern Humans in Arabia

Ancient human relatives lived on the Arabian Peninsula for an astonishingly long time — from about 240,000 to 190,000 years ago — and spread into the heart of the region by following its blue rivers and lakes, a new study found.

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More sensitive MRI diagnostics thanks to innovative 'elastic' contrast media

Researchers have found a new method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods.

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Newly discovered supernova complicates origin story theories

A supernova discovered by an international group of astronomers provides an unprecedented look at the first moments of a violent stellar explosion. The light from the explosion's first hours showed an unexpected pattern, which astronomers analyzed to reveal that the genesis of these phenomena is even more mysterious than previously thought.

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Vaping Marijuana Gets You Way, Way Higher Than Smoking It, Study Finds

17 willing participants got very, very high for science — and they found vaping weed is way stronger than smoking it.

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Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues

Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues.

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Ensuring a good standard of therapy | Letters

The three leading regulatory bodies for the counselling and psychotherapy profession have created a new competence framework as a response to the mental health crisis Suzanne Moore is right ( We can talk about self-care, but this mental health crisis is political , 26 November) that counselling and psychotherapy is about talking and that “it is better to talk about things rather than not”. Address

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A Crisis of Conscience in Fake News

Once upon a time, an economically depressed and largely forgotten town in the Balkans experienced a digital gold rush. The average monthly salary in Veles, Macedonia, had been $371; now young denizens were earning up to $16,000. The year was 2016, and the gold was fake news. The idea that fake news most likely helped Donald Trump get elected is, well, old news. An Ohio University study published

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Despite CRISPR baby controversy, Harvard University will begin gene-editing sperm

Even as a furious debate broke out in China over gene-edited babies, some scientists in the US are also hoping to improve tomorrow’s children.

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Amazon wants to get Alexa into your car

The floor of the sprawling Los Angeles Auto Show is filled with fancy vehicles showing off their ultra-flashy, state-of-the-art infotainment systems, with giant screens that drivers really shouldn't be looking at while driving.

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Robots in the field: farms embracing autonomous technology

Faced with seesawing commodity prices and the pressure to be more efficient and environmentally friendly, farmer Jamie Butler is trying out a new worker on his 450-acre farm in England's Hampshire countryside.

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Rederi hælder fritureolie i tanken for at redde klimaet

I stedet for tung bunkerolie har rederiet Norden testet et CO2-neutralt brændstof udvundet af brugt fritureolie. Testen viste, at bioolien fungerer lige så godt som bunkerolie, mens både CO2- og svovludledningen er i bund.

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Trees for bees

Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues.And researchers suggest artificial intelligence could be used as a tool to design our landscapes so that trees, hedgerows and wildflowers are planted in the right place and the right numbers to ensure our pollinators have enough food.

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Is being a night owl bad for your health?

In the first ever international review of studies analysing whether being an early riser or a night owl can influence your health, researchers have uncovered a growing body of evidence indicating an increased risk of ill health in people with an evening preference as they have more erratic eating patterns and consume more unhealthy foods.The findings have been reported in Advances in Nutrition tod

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This amazing map of Lake Michigan was made entirely by typewriter

An old Royal Safari II typewriter was used to make this effective and attractive map. Although they're relatively easy to make, typewriter maps are rare. The mapmaker has received numerous commissions; will typewritten maps be the cartographic hype of 2019? None To anyone familiar with North America's geography, the shape on this map is instantly recognisable. This lookalike of Sweden (1), simila

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Me Too is a movement, not a moment | Tarana Burke

In 2006, Tarana Burke was consumed by a desire to do something about the sexual violence she saw in her community. She took out a piece of paper, wrote "Me Too" across the top and laid out an action plan for a movement centered on the power of empathy between survivors. More than a decade later, she reflects on what has since become a global movement — and makes a powerful call to dismantle the p

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Light triggers gold in unexpected way

Rice University researchers have discovered a fundamentally different form of light-matter interaction in their experiments with gold nanoparticles.

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Study discovers over 6,000 antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteria that inhabit the human gut

A study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut.

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Historical climate important for soil responses to future climate change

Researchers examined how 18 years of drought affect the billions of vital bacteria that are hidden in the soil beneath our feet. The results show that this type of extreme weather determines how soils respond to future climate change.

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Focus on resistance to HIV offers insight into how to fight the virus

Of the 40 million people around the world infected with HIV, less than one per cent have immune systems strong enough to suppress the virus for extended periods of time. These special immune systems are known as "elite controllers." But how do they actually fight HIV? Scientists now think they've found an important clue.

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New research questions fish stocking obligations

Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Water International, the study focuses on ecological flows from the viewpoints of law and biology.

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Study reveals new information about infant brain structure

Infant brain development is still poorly understood. Thus, research on the topic is vital as developing brains are sensitive to early environmental factors. Recognising this, the FinnBrain imaging study conducted in Turku explores brain structure in newborns.

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Study shows rising rates of hospitalization in the homeless

Hospitalization rates among homeless adults have increased sharply in recent years, with a very different set of causes from those in non-homeless individuals, reports a study in the January issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Study discovers over 6,000 antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteria that inhabit the human gut

A study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut.

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Light triggers gold in unexpected way

Rice University researchers have discovered a fundamentally different form of light-matter interaction in their experiments with gold nanoparticles. The discovery may become useful in the development of next-generation, ultrasmall optical components for computers and antennas.

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Researchers discover for the first time how a specific cell gene affects the transformation of others

An international team of seven institutions from Spain and the US including the University of Valencia has discovered for the first time that the biological activity of the c-MYC gene is necessary for cell reprogramming, the process by which a specialised cell such as a neuron is transformed into a different cell type. According to the results published in Stem Cell Reports, internal cellular acti

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The Books Briefing: The People Behind the Books We Love

We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Who are the people behind the books we love, and where exactly does their writing draw or diverge from their lives? The work of the pseudonymous superstar Elena Ferrante may contain a trail of clues to her true

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Lift off for pioneering nanosats

The first 'Pioneer' mission lifted off early this morning from Sriharikota, India, with the two inventive little nanosatellites now circling the Earth, ready for action.

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ESA's 25 years of telecom: Today's challenges and opportunities

As ESA's umbrella programme for telecom, ARTES, celebrates its 25th year, we will be examining why it was set up, how it and the European satcom environment have evolved, the opportunities and challenges that both face today, and what the future holds.

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Flere transportløsninger samles i MinRejseplan

Flere transportmuligheder kan findes i samme app. MinRejseplan indeholder nu deleelbiler fra DriveNow og GreenMobility samt delecykler fra Donkey Republic og Københavns bycykel.

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Searching an artificial bee colony for real-world results

The artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is widely applied in many fields, but it suffers from slow convergence, so its solutions perform well in exploration but poorly in exploitation. Researchers proposed a scale-free mechanism to guide the search of the ABC algorithm. They verified that scale-free networks improve the algorithm's optimization performance and enhance the search ability of other

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Black hole 'donuts' are actually 'fountains'

Based on computer simulations and new observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), researchers have found that the rings of gas surrounding active supermassive black holes are not simple donut shapes. Instead, gas expelled from the center interacts with infalling gas to create a dynamic circulation pattern, similar to a water fountain in a city park.

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Mischievous responders taint LGBQ health estimates in national survey

Many research studies have reported on the elevated health risk and deviance of youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) but a new study using national data suggests that many of those estimates may be overstated and that LGBQ youth risk and deviance is not as different from heterosexual youth as many studies claim.

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Table-top experiment flips current understanding of solutal convection

Findings from a table-top experiment have revealed that the primary driver of a type of fluid flow called solutal convection has been overlooked. What's more, once this driver is accounted for, it completely flips the expected flow outcomes.

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Tracing iron in the North Pacific

A new Chinese project (2018–2022) will explore the sources and transport of biologically available Fe in the high-nutrient and low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. The results can give scientific advice to stakeholders on the feasibility of conducting ocean Fe fertilization.

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Switch for the regeneration of nerve cell insulation

An international research team has discovered a mechanism that regulates the regeneration of the insulating layer of neurites. This insulation coating, also referred to as myelin sheath, is crucial for rapid signal transmission among cells. Damages to the myelin sheath, such as are caused by multiple sclerosis, can considerably inhibit the function of the nervous system.

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Many diseases increase the risks of hip fracture surgery

Parkinson's disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatic diseases, alcoholism and mental health disorders increase the risk of surgical complications after a hip fracture surgery, a new Finnish study analysing nationwide registers finds. 4.6 percent of all hip surgery patients and 10 percent of total hip replacement surgery patients experienced surgical complications within three months following their surg

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How you respond to drama depends on if you are a holistic or analytical thinker

Aalto University researchers showed volunteers the film My Sister's Keeper on a screen while the research subjects were lying down in an MRI scanner. The study compared the volunteers' brain activity, and concluded that holistic thinkers saw the film more similarly with each other than analytical thinkers. In addition, holistic thinkers processed the film's moral issues and factual connections wit

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Brilliant iron molecule could provide cheaper solar energy

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating an iron molecule that can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity. The results indicate that the iron molecule could replace the more expensive and rarer metals used today.

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Students at every grade need to learn climate science, expert says

The National Climate Assessment, released the day after Thanksgiving, offers motivation and opportunity to bring climate topics into the classroom at every grade level.

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Fabrication of powerful telescope begins

Fabrication of the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope-prime (CCAT-p), a powerful telescope capable of mapping the sky at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths, has now begun, marking a major milestone in the project.

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Alexa can now connect to Big Mouth Billy Bass, along with twerking Christmas toys

Remember Big Mouth Billy Bass? That strange wall-mounted fish from the '90s that sings "Take Me to the River?"

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Exploring the watery remains of France's sunken Roman port of Olbia

Stretching over four sandy kilometres Almanarre beach in southern France is a mecca for sun lovers and kite surfers. But its greatest treasure—a 2,000-year-old underwater archaeological site—lies just a few feet offshore.

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Apple Music comes to Amazon's Alexa devices

Apple Music is coming to Amazon's Alexa-powered speakers, in a rare move by the iPhone maker to broaden its service offerings to users of rival devices.

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The Trump Administration Debates a Cold War With China

The president was furious. A member of his own cabinet had just blatantly contradicted him by giving a speech in which he argued that the U.S. should compromise, cooperate, and coexist peacefully with the world’s ascendant superpower. “Getting tough” doesn’t work in the long run “for schoolyard bullies or businessmen or world powers,” the renegade official had noted, proposing that the two countr

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This amazing map of Lake Michigan was made entirely by typewriter

An old Royal Safari II typewriter was used to make this effective and attractive map Although they're relatively easy to make, typewriter maps are rare The mapmaker has received numerous commissions; will typewritten maps be the cartographic hype of 2019? To anyone familiar with North America's geography, the shape on this map is instantly recognisable. This lookalike of Sweden (1), similarly dro

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McDonald's touchscreens test positive for feces, dangerous bacteria

The Metro newspaper conducted a semi-scientific test of touchscreen kiosks in eight McDonald's restaurants in the U.K. All of them tested positive for various kinds of bacteria that can cause infection. Public touchscreens are known to harbor high amounts of bacteria, though tests also suggest the average smartphone isn't much cleaner. None A new test suggests you should strive to avoid public to

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Great strides for carbon capture using earth-abundant elements as photocatalytic system

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have designed a CO2 reduction method based only on commonly occurring elements. Achieving a 57 percent overall quantum yield of CO2 reduction products, it is the highest performing system of its kind reported to date, raising prospects for cost-effective carbon capture solutions.

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Falls are more likely when you've had a bad night sleep

Disturbances during sleep decreases capability to control posture and balance according to researchers from the Department of Engineering and Warwick Medical School at the University of Warwick who have an article published today in Scientific Reports.

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A bastard seal from the past reveals the potential for human hybrids

If discovered as fossils, grey and ringed seals are so different that they could be classified as belonging to different families. Yet, a seal pup born in 1929 was found to be an almost perfect intermediate between the species. Compared to Neanderthals and modern humans, grey and ringed seals are genetically and dentally at least twice as different, suggesting that there may be more fossil human h

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Searching an artificial bee colony for real-world results

Honeybees are not only vitally important pollinators of food crops, their hunt for rich food sources has also proved to be an excellent model for optimizing numerical problems. Now, researchers from Kanazawa University and the University of Toyama have used the intelligent behavior of bees to improve optimization performance in real-world problems.

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COP24: Tree planting is essential to the UK's commitments on climate change

Humans have cut down half the trees on Earth since the dawn of agriculture – over 3 trillion of them. This huge loss holds the potential for massive reforestation today, which would protect local environments from soil loss, flash flooding and desertification and take up large quantities of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Despite these advantages, reforestation gets very little attention in our fight

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Madrid launches drastic traffic limits to ease pollution

Madrid on Friday launched an ambitious traffic restriction scheme in the city centre with which it hopes to reduce gas emissions by 40 percent, drawing mixed reactions.

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Marriott security breach exposed data of up to 500M guests (Update)Marriott Starwood Breach

A security breach inside the Marriott hotel empire compromised the information of as many as 500 million guests worldwide, exposing their credit card numbers, passport numbers and birth dates for as long as four years, the company said Friday.

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Historical climate important for soil responses to future climate change

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Amsterdam, examined how 18 years of drought affect the billions of vital bacteria that are hidden in the soil beneath our feet. The results show that this type of extreme weather determines how soils respond to future climate change.

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Gratis værktøj viser, hvor vandet løber hen ved oversvømmelser

Ved at benytte både gratis højdekort for Danmark og kombinere det med en gratis software udviklet på Københavns Universitet, kan man se, hvornår oversvømmelsen rammer helt lokalt.

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Asteroid-Sampling Mission Zeroes in on Tiny Space Rock

U.S. spacecraft aims to return the largest trove of space dirt to Earth since NASA’s final Apollo mission in the 1970s — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Altered microbiome after caesarean section impacts baby's immune system

Scientists have observed that, during a natural vaginal birth, specific bacteria from the mother's gut are passed on to the baby and stimulate the baby's immune responses. This transmission is impacted in children born by caesarean section.

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Immune checkpoints could be key to treating autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis

The PD-1 immune checkpoint is essential for self-recognition by the immune system, with disruption of the pathway associated with several autoimmune disorders. However, the involvement of PD-1 and its ligand PD-L1 in muscle-weakening autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis is unclear. Now, researchers have linked increased PD-L1 expression in the muscles of myasthenia gravis patients with disease sev

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Table-top experiment flips current understanding of solutal convection

When Yu "Alex" Liang started graduate school at The University of Texas at Austin, he was tasked with running a straight-forward experiment to collect data on a well-understood phenomenon in fluid mechanics: how density differences influence fluid flow in a porous medium.

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Trump said to advance seismic tests for oil in Atlantic waters

The Trump administration is taking a major step toward allowing a first-in-a-generation seismic search for oil and gas under Atlantic waters, despite protests that the geological tests involve loud air gun blasts that will harm whales, dolphins and other animals.

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Rare woodland wildlife at risk because of 50-year-old tree felling rules

In the UK it is illegal to deliberately kill or injure red squirrels, disturb them while they are using a nest, or destroy their nests. Yet, although the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act provides these protections, there is a legal anomaly in England and Wales – one that can potentially undermine the conservation of the red squirrel, along with every other rare and endangered forest plant or anim

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Why companies should help pay for the biodiversity that's good for their bottom line

In the "The Lorax," an entrepreneur regrets wiping out all the make-believe truffala trees by chopping them down to maximize his short-term gains. As the Dr. Seuss tale ends, the Once-ler – the man responsible for this environmental tragedy – tells a young child that "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not."

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How mainstream media helps weaponize far-right conspiracy theories

Once an anti-Semitic rumor moved from fringe to the mainstream, it took less than two weeks for violence to erupt. The false allegation that liberal philanthropist George Soros was funding or supporting a caravan of Honduran refugees heading to the U.S. spread wildly from a single tweet posted on Oct. 14.

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Hodor! Deep-Sea Worms Get 'Game of Thrones' Names

Arya Stark and Hodor from "Game of Thrones" inspired the scientific names of newfound deep-sea worms.

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Regioner vil tilbyde forebyggende medicin mod hiv-smitte

Regioner vil nedbringe antallet af hiv-smittede ved at give en særligt udvalgt målgruppe et tilbud om forebyggende behandling.

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New research questions fish stocking obligations

Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Water International, the study focuses on ecological flows from the viewpoints of law and biology.

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Using hydrogen ions to manipulate magnetism on the molecular scale

A team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has determined how to use hydrogen ions, "pumped" from water in the air at room temperature, to electrically control magnetism within a very thin sample of a magnetic material. This approach for manipulating magnetic properties could speed up advances

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How to keep a Christmas tree fresh for as long as possible

DIY Help your conifer thrive through the holidays. Nobody wants a drooping, brown-needled Christmas tree in the corner. Keep your living decoration green and happy with these tips.

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Altered microbiome after caesarean section impacts baby's immune system

Together with colleagues from Sweden and Luxembourg, scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have observed that, during a natural vaginal birth, specific bacteria from the mother's gut are passed on to the baby and stimulate the baby's immune responses. This transmission is impacted in children born by caesarean section.

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Historical climate important for soil responses to future climate change

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Amsterdam, examined how 18 years of drought affect the billions of vital bacteria that are hidden in the soil beneath our feet. The results show that this type of extreme weather determines how soils respond to future climate change.

1d

Table-top experiment flips current understanding of solutal convection

Findings from a table-top experiment have revealed that the primary driver of a type of fluid flow called solutal convection has been overlooked. What's more, once this driver is accounted for, it completely flips the expected flow outcomes.

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Mischievous responders taint LGBQ health estimates in national survey

Many research studies have reported on the elevated health risk and deviance of youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) but a new study using national data suggests that many of those estimates may be overstated and that LGBQ youth risk and deviance is not as different from heterosexual youth as many studies claim.

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Rapid DNA Analysis Steps In to Identify Remains of Wildfire Victims

Investigators have the victims' samples in hand, but face a range of obstacles before they can finally ID them.

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Study witnesses first moments of star dying in finest detail

An international research team including The Australian National University (ANU) has used the Kepler space telescope in coordination with ground-based telescopes to witness the first moments of a star dying in unprecedented detail.

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Many African countries are flooding, risking decades of development if they do not adapt

Most African countries have made strong progress in achieving major development goals in the last few years. Despite this much needed progress, the past decade has seen flooding damage or destroy much of this same infrastructure, affecting millions and killing hundreds every year. In 2018 alone – up to September 15 – based on conservative estimates, flooding across Sub-Saharan Africa has destroyed

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Malaria drug shows promise for treating Ebola

Derivatives of amodiaquine, a medication doctors typically use to treat malaria, could provide a new therapeutic approach to treating patients infected with Ebola virus disease, a new study shows. Observations from the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic that swept through West Africa, infecting more than 28,000 people and killing more than 11,000 in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone alone inspired the new

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Responding to sexual violence in schools: What can educators learn?

As news about alleged gang sexual assault at St. Michael's College in Toronto dominated headlines in Canada and even globally in the past two weeks, some parents and educators posed a familiar question: What can educators do to prevent sexual violence among youth?

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Black hole 'donuts' are actually 'fountains'

Based on computer simulations and new observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), researchers have found that the rings of gas surrounding active supermassive black holes are not simple donut shapes. Instead, gas expelled from the center interacts with infalling gas to create a dynamic circulation pattern, similar to a water fountain in a city park.

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Immune checkpoints could be key to treating autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis

The PD-1 immune checkpoint is essential for self-recognition by the immune system, with disruption of the pathway associated with several autoimmune disorders. However, the involvement of PD-1 and its ligand PD-L1 in muscle-weakening autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis is unclear. Now, researchers at Kanazawa University have linked increased PD-L1 expression in the muscles of myasthenia gravis pa

1d

Searching an artificial bee colony for real-world results

The artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is widely applied in many fields, but it suffers from slow convergence, so its solutions perform well in exploration but poorly in exploitation. Researchers from Kanazawa University and the University of Toyama proposed a scale-free mechanism to guide the search of the ABC algorithm. They verified that scale-free networks improve the algorithm's optimizati

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Can a smart app encourage HIV-self testing in Canada?

HIV self-testing strategies have been recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 2016, as they empower people to find out HIV their status at their convenience. Home-based testing kits have yet to be approved for sale in Canada. However, a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), evaluated an unsupervised HIV self-testing program via a smartp

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Newly discovered supernova complicates origin story theories

A supernova discovered by an international group of astronomers including Carnegie's Tom Holoien andMaria Drout, and led by University of Hawaii's Ben Shappee, provides an unprecedented look at the first moments of a violent stellar explosion. The light from the explosion's first hours showed an unexpected pattern, which Carnegie's Anthony Piro analyzed to reveal that the genesis of these phenomen

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Barfing kid? Don’t waste your money on probiotics

It’s increasingly common to give children with stomach viruses some probiotics to ease their symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea. But research now shows that a common probiotic doesn’t make them feel better any faster. While rarely fatal in the United States, gastroenteritis—frequently yet inaccurately called “stomach flu”—accounts for 1.7 million pediatric emergency room visits and more than 70,00

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A multiscreen experience of motorcycle racing

A new prototype allows motor sport fans to personalise their TV viewing experience with synchronised content on their mobile devices.

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Indigenous protected areas are the next generation of conservation

The Horn Plateau, with its myriad of lakes, rivers and wetlands, has been a spiritual home for local Dehcho Dene peoples for millennia. In October, the Dehcho First Nations Assembly designated these lands and waters, called Edéhzhíe (eh-day-shae), as an Indigenous protected area (IPA), designed and managed or co-managed by Indigenous communities.

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Researchers bring Jedi powers to life with Force Push

In the interim, stalwart practitioners of Jedi ways and other Force-sensitive beings can look to the small screen and thank Virginia Tech researchers for a recently developed virtual reality technique called Force Push.

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Everything WIRED Editors Loved This Month: Phones, Drones, and RoboVacs

Plus: Samsung's bendy phone, Apple's MacBook Air, and Microsoft's Surface Headphones.

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What Would It Take to Shoot a Cannonball Into Orbit?

We did the math on a famous thought experiment by Isaac Newton involving a very tall mountain, a wicked fast cannonball, and good old gravity.

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These Professional Portraits of Animals Evoke Human Emotion

Photographer Randal Ford spent two years taking studio photographs for 'The Animal Kingdom'.

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A Possible 'Fallout 76' Lawsuit Leads the Week in Game News

If one law firm has its way, publisher Bethesda may need to pay for its alleged practices.

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First high-resolution look at the quiet Sun with ALMA at 3 mm

Observations of the radio continuum at millimeter (mm) wavelengths provide a unique chromospheric diagnostic. The quiet sun mm-wavelength emission mechanism is free-free and electrons are almost always in local thermodynamic equilibrium (e.g. Shibasaki et al. 2011 and Wedemeyer et al. 2016). The availability of mm-wavelength solar observations with ALMA can advance our knowledge on the chromospher

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Why battery-powered vehicles stack up better than hydrogen

Low energy efficiency is already a major problem for petrol and diesel vehicles. Typically, only 20% of the overall well-to-wheel energy is actually used to power these vehicles. The other 80% is lost through oil extraction, refinement, transport, evaporation, and engine heat. This low energy efficiency is the primary reason why fossil fuel vehicles are emissions-intensive, and relatively expensiv

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Apple says iPhone XR is 'best-selling' iPhone, as it promotes RED model to help fight AIDS

The iPhone XR has been the "best-selling iPhone each and every day since it became available for sale" on Oct. 26, Apple vice president of product marketing Greg Joswiak said Wednesday.

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Early-life stress changes brain development in mice

Stress early in the life of female mice leads to fewer “tuning” neurons in the part of the brain responsible for making sense of emotions and following rules, a new study shows. Women are roughly twice as likely as men to develop depression, anxiety, and other stress-related problems, including difficulty with attention. The new study, which appears in Cell Reports , sheds light on the biological

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Sunken ‘beaches’ offer vision of Catalina’s undersea future

While most islands in southern California are inching upward, Santa Catalina Island is sinking, according to a new study. One of the most striking features of Catalina, southwest of Los Angeles, is an absence. Unlike much of the California coast and its closest islands, Catalina lacks cliffs stepping up and back from the sea—remnants of shorelines carved when the Pacific sloshed higher than it do

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More sensitive MRI diagnostics thanks to innovative 'elastic' contrast media

Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have found a new method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods.

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Focus on resistance to HIV offers insight into how to fight the virus

Researchers have found that genetic mutations affecting the capsid, the structure surrounding the HIV genome, make it possible for a protein called TRIM5α to trigger the immune system of elite controllers.

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Awesome Ears: The Weird World of Insect Hearing

Evolution made insect ears many times over, resulting in a dazzling variety of forms found in spots all over the body — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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World's first video game music and sound research journal

The world's first academic journal devoted to the presentation of peer-reviewed, high-quality research into video game music and sound, is to be hosted by the Department of Creative Digital Technologies at the University of Chichester, based at the Tech Park on its Bognor Regis campus.

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The German Bundesliga: Are the players worth the money?

Does the talent of footballers dictate their market value? Economists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) investigated this question in a new study. They calculated the relationship between the performance and market value of 493 players in the first and second divisions of the German Bundesliga for the 2015/16 season. The study revealed that star players tend to be overvalued, wh

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Coal is still king in global power production

Coal remains the most widely used means of electricity production in the world. It also happens to be the biggest emitter of climate-changing carbon dioxide of any fuel.

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China AIDS group 'really regrets' role in gene-editing

The head of a Chinese AIDS support group expressed deep regret Friday for helping a scientist recruit participants for a controversial experiment claiming to have created the world's first genetically-edited babies.

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Paradise regained? Sharks return to Thai bay popularised by 'The Beach'

Thai conservationists have welcomed footage of reef sharks gliding through the azure waters of Maya Bay as a "positive sign" of recovery six months after the closure of a tourist hot-spot made famous by the movie "The Beach".

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China's coal project in Serbia raises climate change worries

A foul smell permeates the air in this gray mining town. People rarely open their windows as thick smoke billows from the huge chimneys of Serbia's main coal-fired power station.

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Yes, Knickers the steer is really, really big. But he's far short of true genetic freak status

The story of Knickers the giant steer has gone viral on social media over the past week. Admittedly, the pictures show him towering over a herd of young Wagyu steers, with Wagyu being one of the smaller cattle breeds, which even enhances his size.

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Who owns and farms land can create barriers to conservation

As stewards of vast swaths of land, farmers are important allies in U.S. conservation efforts, but there is evidence to suggest those farming on rented land adopt conservation practices at a lower rate.

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Researchers grow functional network of blood vessels at centimeter scale for the first time

When someone has a deadly disease or sustains a life-threatening injury, a transplant or graft of new tissue may be the best—or only—treatment option. Transplanted organs, skin grafts and other parts need blood vessels to bring oxygen-rich blood their way, but for tissue engineers and regenerative medicine experts, making a functional blood vessel network within large tissues in the laboratory has

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Mangel på kirurger i Region Sjælland går ud over behandling af brystkræft

Kun 22 pct. af kvinder med brystkræft blev opereret til tiden i 3. kvartal 2018 i Region Sjælland. Helt uacceptabel situation, lyder det fra vicedirektør på Sjællands Universitetshospital.

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Elon Musk's Boring Company nixes one L.A. tunnel, moves onto next project

Elon Musk's Boring Company is dropping one of its Los Angeles underground tunnel plans after some residents' concerns.

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Probe killers in deep space

In the cold reaches of deep space, something is making us kill our probes.

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Where the ocean meets the sky, chemists look for clues to our climate

Hidden in the salt spray from waves crashing on the beach are clues to our planet's future.

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Babies kicking in the womb are creating a map of their bodies

The kicks a mother feels from her unborn child may allow the baby to 'map' their own body and enable them to eventually explore their surroundings, suggests new research. For the study, researchers measured brainwaves produced when newborns kick their limbs during rapid eye movement sleep, finding that fast brainwaves — a brainwave pattern typically seen in neonates — fire in the corresponding h

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Virtual reality could serve as powerful environmental education tool

Researchers took a virtual reality experience into a variety of educational settings, including high school classrooms, to test the impact on awareness and understanding of ocean acidification.

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Archaeologists Are Looking for Dead Sea Scrolls Inside 2 Newfound Qumran Caves

The caves are in just the right spot to hold these biblical-era manuscripts.

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High-contrast imaging for cancer therapy with protons

Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology—OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. This opens up new opportunities for targeted, heal

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Interfacial electronic state improving hydrogen storage capacity in Pd-MOF materials

NIMS, Kyushu University and Kyoto University jointly identified a mechanism by which a hybrid material composed of palladium (Pd) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is capable of storing approximately twice as much hydrogen as a material composed solely of Pd. The greater hydrogen storage capacity of the hybrid material is associated with a slight change in its electronic state caused by the tran

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Probing quantum physics on a macroscopic scale

Why does quantum mechanics work so well for microscopic objects, yet macroscopic objects are described by classical physics? This question has bothered physicists since the development of quantum theory more than 100 years ago. Researchers at Delft University of Technology and the University of Vienna have now devised a macroscopic system that exhibits entanglement between mechanical phonons and o

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Warty hammer orchids are sexual deceivers

Orchids are famed for their beautiful and alluring flowers – and the great lengths to which people will go to experience them in the wild. Among Australian orchids, evocative names such as The Butterfly Orchid, The Queen of Sheeba, and Cleopatra's Needles conjure up images of rare and beautiful flowers.

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'Chemputer' promises app-controlled revolution for drug production

A radical new method of producing drug molecules, which uses downloadable blueprints to easily and reliably synthesise organic chemicals via a programmable 'chemputer', could be set to democratise the pharmaceutical industry, scientists say.

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What does a wet spring mean for bushfire season?

A recent wet spell as we head into summer has left some Victorians wondering if we might be able to look forward to a less dangerous fire season this year; particularly in light of California's recent devastating fatal wildfires.

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A novel solver for approximate marginal map inference

There is a deep connection between planning and inference, and over the last decade, multiple researchers have introduced explicit reductions showing how stochastic planning can be solved using probabilistic inference with applications in robotics, scheduling, and environmental problems. However, heuristic methods and search are still the best-performing approaches for planning in large combinator

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Study looks at ecological traps to minimize human risk of mosquito-borne pathogens

Ecological traps have the potential to effectively control pest species and inhibit the spread of infectious diseases, according to a University of Maine researcher.

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'Sudoku' X-Ray uncovers movements within opaque materials

Researchers have developed a new X-ray method which involves solving a giant 3D Sudoku problem to better understand these granular movements — and the findings could have a big impact on various industries.

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Researcher discusses tackling global climate change at the regional scale

Global climate change is a serious concern for the future of our entire planet. However, the regional impacts of climate change are often overlooked. Catherine Nikiel, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is studying the impact of climate change on different aspects of the hydrological cycle as part of her research in the lab of Breene M. Kerr Professor Elfatih

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Helping computers to see 3-D structures

If you can recognize structures around you while walking down a city street, you have your eyes to thank. Humans can automatically perceive 3-D structure in the world by identifying lines, shapes, symmetries and the patterns and relationships between them in things like buildings, sidewalks and everyday objects. But can a computer be taught to do the same?

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Magnetic fields found in a jet from a baby star

An international research team led by Chin-Fei Lee in the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA) has made a breakthrough observation with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), confirming the presence of magnetic fields in a jet from a protostar. Jets are believed to play an important role in star formation, enabling the protostar to accrete mass from an

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Scientists develop new system to study emerging tickborne disease

Tickborne diseases are on the rise, and one in particular is emerging in the United States and Canada. Human babesiosis is an infection that can cause a range of symptoms and even death. Little is known about one of the parasites that cause human babesiosis but a team of Yale-led researchers have developed a novel system for studying it. Their research holds promise of leading to more effective di

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X-rays of rocks show their super-fluid past, and reveal mineral deposits vital for batteries

New X-ray technologies reveal some of the incredible processes that took place in Earth's geological history – and should help us identify new high value ores.

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The whole of Africa was the cradle of humankind

A team of scientists led by Mohamed Sahnouni, archaeologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just published a paper in the journal Science that breaks with the paradigm that the cradle of Humankind lies in East Africa, based on archaeological remains found at sites in the region of Ain Hanech (Algeria), the oldest currently known in the north of Afric

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Cannabis gets its high-inducing power from ancient viruses

Health A new genome map reveals that the genes for THC and CBD production probably came from viral DNA. In the latest issue of Genome Research, a group of North American scientists have, for the first time ever, published a full map of the cannabis genome. Among the myriad…

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More sensitive MRI diagnostics thanks to innovative 'elastic' contrast media

Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have found a new method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods. It is made possible by using an "elastic" protein structure that can absorb dissolved xenon in a self-regulating way: The greater the amount of this noble gas

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