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Nyheder2018december03

 

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Scientists detect biggest known black-hole collisionLIGO Virgo Black Hole

An international team of scientists have detected ripples in space and time, known as gravitational waves, from the biggest known black-hole collision that formed a new black hole about 80 times larger than the Sun – and from another three black-hole mergers.

5h

Deep Brain Stimulation of Orbitofrontal Cortex Relieves Depression

The result of a study among patients with epilepsy strengthens the case for the importance of this brain region in determining mood.

7h

Overset miljøproblem? Mikroplast spredes især på landjord og i ferskvand

EU’s kemikalieagentur Echa er ved at undersøge, om EU bør forbyde produkter, der har tilsat mikroplast.

14h

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Simultaneous Blazes, Like California's Camp and Woolsey Fires, Have Become the New Normal

Simultaneous Blazes, Like California's Camp and Woolsey Fires, Have Become the New Normal It’s now more common to see multiple giant wildfires burning at once, straining firefighting resources, scientists say. WoolseyFireAerial.jpg Aerial view of Woolsey Fire, November 9, 2018 Image credits: US Forest Service/Public Domain (Homepage photo credit is also USFS and Public Domain ) Earth Monday, Dece

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Series Combats Disorders: First Up, Epilepsy

People with epilepsy were once thought to be possessed by demons or evil spirits. Dubbed “the sacred disease,” epilepsy was profoundly misunderstood for centuries, even after the disorder was explained to be of human origin. So why is it, so many years later, that epilepsy is still not fully understood? And why is there still so much stigma attached to a disorder which affects approximately one i

6min

Shingles: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Shingles, also called herpes zoster, is a viral disease that can cause a painful, blistering rash, which usually appears on one side of the body. It's caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox.

10min

High childhood BMI linked to obesity at age 24 in women

Girls who gain weight more rapidly between the ages of 5 and 15 are more likely to be obese at age 24, according to researchers.

20min

New Scam Apps Take Advantage of iPhone Touch ID

Touch ID is seamless, which makes it great for unlocking your phone—and for App Store scammers.

26min

Multitasking actually does boost performance. Wait, what?

Multitasking may have some value after all — as a useful illusion A new study shows that simply believing you're multitasking helps performance Try this for yourself and see what happens Remember the days when you'd meet someone who'd humble-brag about their multitasking abilities? And remember the satisfying feeling of schadenfreude when studies came out saying that doing a bunch of things at on

46min

CRISPR has many promising applications—but the gene-edited twins represent something more troubling

Health Editing human embryos makes far more permanent changes than tweaks to adult DNA. Last week Chinese researchers rocked the world with reports that twin babies whose genes the scientists’ edited prior to birth had been born, the product of secret…

49min

Study shows that social media makes you lonely and depressed

Prior research has shown that social media usage can negatively impact our mental health, but until now, very few studies have shown this experimentally. A study from the University of Pennsylvania asked study participants to limit their social media usage so their resulting mental health could be measured. The results tell us how to regulate our social media usage to improve our well-being. None

57min

6 ways blockchain is revolutionizing online gaming

Blockchain is already revolutionizing many industries across the board, and the gaming sector is no exception The gaming industry is a massive market on the rise with huge potential for growth, and blockchain is already looking for ways to innovate this up and coming sector Blockchain projects are already focusing on solving specific pain points and issues currently found in the gaming world whic

57min

Can a party drug stop the increasing rate of suicide?

The popular party drug has shown promise in stopping suicidal thoughts in a number of small clinical studies. First synthesized in 1962, the anesthetic was used to treat Vietnam War soldiers in the early seventies. Though the accompanying hallucinations are a roadblock to widespread therapy, innovations in psychiatry are necessary. None The dirtiest drug I ever tried was ketamine. Besides having

57min

Why the Dalai Lama's reincarnation is up for debate

Tibetan monks from all over the world are scheduled to visit India to discuss the issues related to the next reincarnation of the Dalai Lama. Some, including the Dalai Lama himself, have questioned if the institution should be continued. The final decision will have far reaching effects, since China is unlikely to let the monks have the last word on the matter. The world's most famous Buddhist, T

57min

GlaxoSmithKline to Acquire Cancer Biotech TESARO for $5.1 Billion

The purchase aims to build GSK's oncology pipeline.

57min

Researchers develop accurate, non-invasive method to detect bladder cancer

A research team has developed a non-invasive method for detecting bladder cancer that might make screening easier and more accurate than current invasive clinical tests involving visual inspection of bladder. In the first successful use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for clinical diagnostic purposes, the researchers have been able to identify signature features of cancerous cells found in patien

1h

A sobering conclusion: Adult hearts contain no stem cells

A detailed cell-by-cell map of all dividing cells in the adult murine heart before and after myocardial infarction was created using advanced molecular and genetic technologies in a combined research effort led by Hans Clevers from the Hubrecht Institute (Netherlands). The authors conclude that the adult heart does not contain heart stem cells. Cells identified as heart stem cells in previous stud

1h

Uneven rates of sea level rise tied to climate change

The pattern of uneven sea level rise over the last quarter century has been driven in part by human-caused climate change, not just natural variability, according to a new study.

1h

New machine learning method predicts additions to global list of threatened plant species

A new method uses machine learning and open-access data to predict whether species are eligible for at-risk status on the IUCN Red List. The researchers trained a machine learning algorithm to assess more than 150,000 plant species worldwide and found that more than 10 percent of these species are highly likely to qualify for at-risk classification. The algorithm can be applied at any scale, from

1h

Life has a new ingredient

Our prehistoric Earth, bombarded with asteroids and lightening, rife with bubbling geothermal pools, may not seem hospitable today. But somewhere in the chemical chaos of our early planet, life did form. How? For decades, scientists have created miniature replicas of infant Earth in the lab in order to hunt for life's essential ingredients. Now, one of those replicas points to a possible new ingre

1h

Study finds bad bosses could turn you into a great boss

A new study suggests abuse and mistreatment by those at the top of an organization do not necessarily lead to abusive behavior by lower-level leaders. When offered leadership opportunities, prior victims of workplace abuse are more likely to treat their own subordinates better by learning from the bad behavior of their bosses.

1h

Free, publicly available health data proves to be research gold mine

Immunotherapy has become a popular treatment for some cancers. Researchers discover how a set of genes, those associated with the extracellular matrix, had a direct connection to how cancer patients respond to immunotherapy.

1h

Sir David Attenborough Predicts the ‘Collapse of Civilization’ at UN Climate Summit

The people (and Sir David Attenborough) have spoken: Climate change is scary as heck.

1h

Thousands of Unstudied Plants May Be at Risk of Extinction

Plants often get short shrift in conservation circles, but machine learning could help botanists save tens of thousands of species.

1h

Trilobites: All the Light There is to See? 4 x 10⁸⁴ Photons.

Astronomers have calculated all the light ever produced by all the stars in the cosmos. It’s a lot, but on the cosmic whole, not that much.

1h

Inosine could be a potential route to the first RNA and the origin of life on Earth

Our prehistoric Earth, bombarded with asteroids and lightening, rife with bubbling geothermal pools, may not seem hospitable today. But somewhere in the chemical chaos of our early planet, life did form. How? For decades, scientists have attempted to create miniature replicas of infant Earth in the lab. There, they hunt for the primordial ingredients that created the essential building blocks for

1h

Uneven rates of sea level rise tied to climate change

The pattern of uneven sea level rise over the last quarter century has been driven in part by human-caused climate change, not just natural variability, according to a new study.

1h

New machine learning method predicts additions to global list of threatened plant species

The International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species is a powerful tool for researchers and policymakers working to stem the tide of species loss across the globe. But adding even a single species to the list is no small task, demanding countless hours of expensive, rigorous and highly specialized research.

1h

Study finds bad bosses could turn you into a great boss

A new University of Central Florida study suggests abuse and mistreatment by those at the top of an organization do not necessarily lead to abusive behavior by lower-level leaders. When offered leadership opportunities, prior victims of workplace abuse are more likely to treat their own subordinates better by learning from the bad behavior of their bosses.

1h

Rural youth with mild head injuries face higher medical costs but get less care

Families of rural children with mild head injuries pay more for medical care and get less of it, a Washington State University analysis has found.

1h

Neil deGrasse Tyson Under Investigation for Sexual Misconduct

Two new allegations surfaced last week, following an earlier accusation of rape.

1h

A New 'Captain Marvel' Trailer Is Coming Tonight

Plus: 'Ralph' has broken the box office once again.

1h

This Ring Bears the Name of the Man Who Condemned Jesus to Death. Who Really Wore It?

This ring bears the name Pilatus. But experts think it probably doesn't belong to Pontius Pilate, who ordered the execution of Jesus in the Bible.

1h

The CRISPR Baby Scandal Gets Worse by the Day

Before last week, few people had heard the name He Jiankui. But on November 25, the young Chinese researcher became the center of a global firestorm, when it emerged that he had allegedly made the first CRISPR -edited babies, twin girls named Lulu and Nana. Antonio Regalado broke the story for MIT Technology Review , and He himself described the experiment at an international gene-editing summit

1h

Listening In Between Earl Sweatshirt’s Words

“Closed lips make the mouth breathers frown,” goes one of the rare lines that are immediately understandable on Earl Sweatshirt’s strange new album Some Rap Songs . It’s a quintessential lyric for the 24-year-old Thebe Neruda Kgositsile, partly because its wordplay is less about punch lines than about associative thinking, and partly because it’s explaining his entire approach of late. In a cultu

1h

The STEAM Team kids learn how historic sailors navigated the globe

Science Cassie and Jessie set sail. The STEAM Team is back! In this episode, Cassie and Jesse learn about using the moon, sun, and stars to navigate along the coast of Alaska.

1h

Study puts the Neotropics on the map of the world's food production centers in antiquity

Sambaqui societies had sophisticated diet. Study suggests that hunter-gatherer communities living in coastal Atlantic Forest areas between 8,000 and 1,000 years ago consumed a range of plants and more carbohydrates than expected for the period and region.

1h

Combination immunotherapy shows high activity against recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma

A new combination of three drugs that harness the body's immune system is safe and effective, destroying most cancer cells in 95 percent of patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma, according to new results.

1h

Tackling the challenge of undergraduate retention in computing

ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, has released the highly anticipated report. Among its key recommendations, the report calls for additional research to provide a more nuanced understanding of the dynamics of attrition and retention, and encourages higher education institutions to provide proactive advising to ensure that students are exposed to career opportunities and pathways early

1h

Alcohol intake may be key to long-term weight loss for people with Diabetes

A new study suggests that alcohol consumption may attenuate long-term weight loss in adults with Type 2 diabetes.

1h

Sports: Joint past successes increase the chances of winning

Joint successes in the past increase the chances of winning. This has now been statistically proven in a variety of different team sports.

1h

A change in marital status affects the number of daily steps

Changes in relationships have links to physical activity. The total number of non-exercise steps was reduced during a four-year follow-up study for men who divorced. For women who found a new spouse between the measurement points, the total steps decreased significantly when compared to women married throughout the period.

1h

Women reveal the reasons they reject a preventive drug for breast cancer

Only around a fifth of women at higher risk of developing breast cancer think they need to take a drug proven to help prevent the disease, according to new research.

1h

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has finally arrived at asteroid Bennu

Planetary scientists hope the probe will reveal if such carbon-rich asteroids helped kick-start life on Earth.

1h

What are constellations?

Space Stars tell stories, guide explorers, and help scientists talk about the galaxy. Stars tell stories, guide explorers, and help scientists talk about the galaxy.

1h

Here’s the case for mandatory voting in the U.S.

Elections play a distinctive role in strengthening democracy, and voting is a pivotal part of that process. That’s why new research makes the case for universal participation through mandatory voting. Despite an increase in voter turnout during the 2018 United States midterm election, about half of all eligible voters didn’t cast their ballot on election day. To increase voter turnout in election

1h

The Untold Labor That Helped Make Charlie Chaplin’s Film Scores

To work with the great Charlie Chaplin meant suffering some of the most traumatic creative pains imaginable. One of the most pivotal filmmakers of the early Hollywood era, Chaplin developed a reputation for perfectionism. He worked some of his actors and crew into the ground until they quit, were fired for less-than-perfect quality, or collapsed from mental exhaustion. The opening scene of City L

1h

Why Countries Aren’t Sanctioning the Saudi Government Over Khashoggi

First the sanctions came from the United States . Then Germany . France soon followed. And now, Canada. Last week, the Canadian government announced it too would impose targeted sanctions against 17 Saudi nationals over the killing of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Such was the latest international reprisal aimed at ensuring that those responsible for the death of Khashoggi are “ held to account

1h

Study puts the Neotropics on the map of the world's food production centers in antiquity

Sambaqui societies had sophisticated diet. Study suggests that hunter-gatherer communities living in coastal Atlantic Forest areas between 8,000 and 1,000 years ago consumed a range of plants and more carbohydrates than expected for the period and region.

1h

Can predictive analytics help banks, consumers avoid overdraft issues? New study says, yes

In 2012, consumers paid $32 billion in overdraft fees, which represented the single largest source of revenue for banks from demand deposit accounts, while leading to significant levels of consumer dissatisfaction and attracting attention from government regulators.In a recent study, researchers have found that it may be possible to help correct this problem through the application of sophisticate

1h

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Can predictive analytics help banks, consumers avoid overdraft issues? New study says, yes

In 2012, consumers paid $32 billion in overdraft fees, which represented the single largest source of revenue for banks from demand deposit accounts, while leading to significant levels of consumer dissatisfaction and attracting attention from government regulators. In a recent study, researchers have found that it may be possible to help correct this problem through the application of sophisticat

2h

Boys with social difficulties most susceptible to early substance use

Boys who enter sixth-grade with co-occurring social skills, anxiety, learning and conduct problems are at the greatest risk of developing aggressive behavior and using tobacco, alcohol and marijuana by the end of eighth grade, a new study found.

2h

Utility customers overestimate cost savings with energy-conservation plans

When deciding whether to participate in programs designed to conserve energy during peak hours, consumers appear to rely more on their intuition about how much money they're saving rather than on proof their bills are smaller, a new study has found.

2h

The 'best prospect' for ensuring success in demanding roles

Building on their past work, researchers discovered that Special Operations Forces who participated in a month-long mindfulness course could improve their attention and working memory. These are both mental capacities necessary to tone down emotional reactivity and boost problem solving skills.

2h

Study takes stand on true health benefits of getting up out of your chair

A new health study provides fresh insights on the energy cost of sitting versus standing for sedentary workers.

2h

Borophene advances as 2D materials platform

Physicists synthesized 2D atom-thin sheets of boron with large crystal domains, which are needed to make next-gen electronics.

2h

Targeting sepsis, the leading cause of ICU deaths, with a nanocarrier-delivered microRNA

One obstacle to therapeutic use of microRNAs (miRNA), which are in clinical trial for a number of diseases, are ribonucleases, whose job it is to destroy them. Researchers report that an miRNA (miR-126) protective against sepsis can be delivered effectively via a nanocarrier. Almost 67 percent of mice treated with one of the nanocarrier/miR-126 complexes were still alive at seven days vs. just 25

2h

Colloidal quantum dots make LEDs shine bright in the infrared

A group of researchers report on the development of a colloidal quantum-dot light emitting diode with unprecedented quantum and power conversion efficiencies in the infrared range. The study has proven that these devices can also be integrated in inorganic solar cells and may lead to even higher efficiencies.

2h

Shortcut strategy for screening compounds with clinical potentials for drug development

The journey of developing a new drug often takes years and needs hundreds of millions of dollars. A 'shortcut' has now been found which can potentially reduce the time and costs of developing new drugs by sorting out the high potential candidates out of a long list of chemical compounds.

2h

Study discovers 40 new genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk

The most comprehensive genome-wide association study, or GWAS, of colorectal cancer risk to date has discovered 40 new genetic variants and validated 55 previously identified variants that signal an increased risk of colon cancer.

2h

New material, black silver, discovered

Researchers have discovered a new material that could lead to highly sensitive biomolecule detectors and more efficient solar cells.

2h

Teens don’t have to be underweight to have anorexia

A study finds that 31 percent of patients with anorexia nervosa had all the cognitive features and physical complications of the disease without being underweight. Dietitian Melissa Whitelaw of the University of Melbourne is calling for a change to anorexia nervosa’s diagnostic criteria after finding that patients with “atypical anorexia” suffer serious health concerns despite being within or abo

2h

Top 25 News Photos of 2018

We near the end of another eventful year. Wildfires raged across California, the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy toward immigrants led to family separations, relations between North and South Korea eased a bit, a horrific school shooting in Florida touched off a nationwide gun-control protest and debate, France won the World Cup in Moscow, Britain’s Prince Harry wed Meghan Markle,

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One in four patients say they've skimped on insulin because of high cost

For patients with diabetes, insulin is a life-saving medicine and an essential component of diabetes management, yet in the past decade alone, the out-of-pocket costs for insulin have doubled in the United States. One-quarter of patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes have reported using less insulin than prescribed due to these high costs, researchers say, and over a third of those patients experienci

2h

Pulses of sinking carbon reaching the deep sea are not captured in global climate models

A new study shows that pulses of sinking debris carry large amounts of carbon to the deep seafloor, but are poorly represented in global climate models.

2h

Plant cells inherit knowledge of where's up and where's down from mother cell

Knowing which way is up and which way is down is important for all living beings. For plants, which grow roots into the soil and flowers above ground, getting this polarization wrong would cause a whole host of problems. How polarity is reestablished after cell division was unknown — until now.

2h

Scientists use EEG to decode how people navigate complex sequences

To perform a song, a dance or write computer code, people need to call upon the basic elements of their craft and then order and recombine them in creative ways. How the brain builds such complex sequences have been captured with the use of EEG.

2h

New quantum materials could take computing devices beyond the semiconductor era

Scientists in industry and academia are looking for new materials to succeed highly successful semiconductor transistors. Scientists have hit on a very promising post-transistor technology: multiferroics, which use magnetic spin states instead of electron charge to store binary data. They have shown that these MESO (magneto-electric spin-orbit) devices can greatly improve energy efficiency and pac

2h

Alcohol trouble more likely for some never-deployed soldiers

US Army Reserve and National Guard soldiers who feel more guilt or other negative emotions about never having been deployed are more likely to misuse alcohol, a new study shows. “A greater degree of non-deployment emotions—such as guilt, less value, less camaraderie, and less connectedness—was associated with greater frequency and amount of alcohol drinking among never-deployed Army Reserve and N

2h

Last week in tech: Best of What's New, DJI's new camera, and a huge hack

Technology Catch up on everything you missed in your Cyber Monday hangover The bad news is that your personal data might be hacked. The good news is, um, new DJI camera?

2h

New drug combination could be more effective against melanoma

A new study suggests that combining kinase inhibitors with experimental drugs known as ribonucleases could lead to better results. In tests with human cancer cells, the researchers found that the two drugs given together kill cells much more effectively than either drug does on its own. The combination could also help to prevent tumors from developing drug resistance.

2h

New laboratory system allows researchers to probe the secret lives of queen bees

A group of researchers has established a laboratory-based method for tracking the fertility of honey bee queens, using a laboratory set-up that would mimic the key aspects of the hive environment and allow detection of egg-laying by honey bee queens living with small groups of worker bees. The resulting system allowed them to explore the relationship between worker nutrition and queen fertility.

2h

Genetic background of autistic spectrum disorders with stem cell dysfunction

A recently completed study provides new information on functional changes in the brain connected with autistic spectrum disorders. The findings help identify factors related to the individual manifestation of autistic spectrum disorders and associated diseases.

2h

Nanoscale tweezers can perform single-molecule 'biopsies' on individual cells

Using electrical impulses, the 'tweezers' can extract single DNA, proteins and organelles from living cells without destroying them.

2h

Global warming increases frost damage on trees in Central Europe

Global warming increases frost damage on trees in large areas of Central Europe, according to a new study. Late frost damages are economically important in agriculture and forestry. In certain years, they are known to have caused losses amounting to up to hundreds of millions of euros.

2h

A Mediterranean diet in pregnancy is associated with lower risk of accelerated growth

Over 2,700 women and their children participated in this study that highlights the benefits of a healthy diet.

2h

Macroscopic phenomena governed by microscopic physics

Researchers have observed a magnetic reconnection driven by electron dynamics in laser-produced plasmas. Magnetic reconnections are often observed in the magnetic flux on the Sun and the Earth's magnetosphere. It has been highly challenging to reveal the electron scale, microscopic information in the vast universe. Applying a weak magnetic field, where only electrons are directly coupled with the

2h

The Large Hadron Collider is shutting down for 2 years

The world’s largest particle accelerator will restart in 2021 at higher energy.

2h

Mayo researchers say oral apixaban safe and effective for treating blood clots in cancer patients

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an oral drug, apixaban, used to treat blood clots in patients undergoing cancer therapy, is safe and effective. The drug was associated with fewer major bleeding events and fewer recurrent blood clots, compared to low-molecular- weight heparin. Their findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology by Robert McBane II M.D.,

2h

Combination immunotherapy shows high activity against recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma

A new combination of three drugs that harness the body's immune system is safe and effective, destroying most cancer cells in 95 percent of patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma, according to the results of an early-phase study.

2h

Silent Sam Survives

When Silent Sam, the statue of a Confederate soldier that stood sentinel at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill until he was yanked from his station in August, was being dedicated in 1913, Julian Carr, a philanthropist and white supremacist, took a moment to brag. “I horse-whipped a negro wench until her skirts hung in shreds,” he said in his speech , adding that he performed the “ple

2h

Bitcoin and blockchain jobs are booming — and they pay well

A study by Glassdoor found that demand for blockchain work has risen 300% since last year. Glassdoor reported the median starting salary for blockchain job openings was over $32,000 higher than the median US salary, an increase of 61.8%. Despite the issues in the current crypto market, blockchain technology appears to have a bright future. None For those in the United States, the economy continue

2h

China Set to Launch First-Ever Spacecraft to the Far Side of the Moon

Chang’e 4 mission will test plant growth on the moon, and listen for radio emissions normally blocked by Earth’s atmosphere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

We have all we need to beat the HIV epidemic – except political will

The latest figures show that preventative efforts are working, if only governments are willing to put them into action, says Deborah Gold

2h

Investigators discover compounds that block reactivation of latent HIV-1

A team of investigators from the University of Pittsburgh has identified compounds that block the reactivation of latent HIV-1 in a human cell line containing the latent virus. The research is published Dec. 3 in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

3h

Reproductive cycle may foreshadow Alzheimer's disease

Female mice destined to develop Alzheimer's-like pathology and related cognitive impairments display a unique pattern of fluctuation in sex hormones during the ovarian cycle, finds new research published in eNeuro. This study suggests the natural reproductive cycle may provide a new window into Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk among young women.

3h

What makes rats relapse

Activation of the anterior insular cortex — a brain region implicated in drug abuse — rather than drinking history or motivation for alcohol predicts relapse after a month of abstinence, reports a study of male rats published in JNeurosci. The results may explain why some individuals are more likely than others to relapse.

3h

Timing could mean everything after spinal cord injury

Moderate damage to the thoracic spinal cord causes widespread disruption to the timing of the body's daily activities, according to a study of male and female rats published in eNeuro. If this also occurs in humans, transitioning patients back to the normal rhythms of their daily life after a spinal cord injury could help prevent further dysregulation of essential biological processes.

3h

The irrational consumer: Decision making based on feelings rather than facts

It has been suggested that, due to resource restraints, consumers' perceptions are frequently formed based on heuristics and biases, or other factors such as trust or affect. While some consumer behaviors may seem irrational, their actions are actually quite predictable based on heuristics.

3h

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The Last Chess Shop in New York City

“I came here to get a Ph.D. in American literature, and here I am, with pictures of American writers on the wall—a chess vendor.” That’s Imad Khachan, the owner of Chess Forum, the only remaining chess shop in New York City. A Palestinian refugee with no family of his own, Khachan has become “the father of everybody” to a community of chess enthusiasts, those curious to learn more about the game,

3h

David Attenborough: Extinction of the natural world is ‘on the horizon’

David Attenborough spoke Monday at the 24th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, also known as COP24. The annual summit is designed to help the international community reach agreements on how to curb climate change. The U.S. pulled out of the Paris accord in 2017 and President Donald Trump will not attend the summit, though reports suggest he's s

3h

Television holds ground for news, as print fades: US study

Television remains the biggest source of news for Americans, with print losing further ground to digital services, a survey showed Monday.

3h

New quantum materials could take computing devices beyond the semiconductor era

Researchers from Intel Corp. and the University of California, Berkeley, are looking beyond current transistor technology and preparing the way for a new type of memory and logic circuit that could someday be in every computer on the planet.

3h

Borophene advances as 2D materials platform

Physicists synthesized 2D atom-thin sheets of boron with large crystal domains, which are needed to make next-gen electronics.

3h

New quantum materials could take computing devices beyond the semiconductor era

Scientists in industry and academia are looking for new materials to succeed highly successful semiconductor transistors, now represented by CMOS. Intel and UC Berkeley scientists have hit on a very promising post-transistor technology: multiferroics, which use magnetic spin states instead of electron charge to store binary data. They have shown that these MESO (magneto-electric spin-orbit) device

3h

Dana Carvey’s George H. W. Bush Was an All-Time Great SNL Impression

“The way to do the president is to start out with Mister Rogers,” Dana Carvey told White House staffers in 1992 , making a surprise appearance at their Christmas party as George H. W. Bush prepared to leave office. “Then you add a little John Wayne … you put ’em together, you’ve got George Herbert Walker Bush.” It was the beginning of a friendship between the comedian and Bush, whom Carvey impers

3h

Leak site's launch shows dilemma of radical transparency

A new leak website is wrestling with what to make available to the public, an illustration of the difficulty of balancing full transparency with respect for privacy in an age of mass disclosures.

3h

Pulses of sinking carbon reaching the deep sea are not captured in global climate models

More than two miles below the ocean's surface, microbes, worms, fishes, and other creatures great and small thrive. They rely on the transport of dead and decaying matter from the surface (marine snow) for food at these dark depths.

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NASA spacecraft arrives at ancient asteroid, its first visitorNASA Bennu OSIRIS-REx

After a two-year chase, a NASA spacecraft arrived Monday at the ancient asteroid Bennu, its first visitor in billions of years.

3h

900-year-old gold coins found in Israel

Rare gold coins and a golden earring have been discovered in the ancient Mediterranean port of Caesarea in northern Israel—possibly left and never recovered as Crusaders conquered the area 900 years ago.

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Faster 3-D imaging could aid diagnosis of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal disease

Researchers have developed a faster way to acquire 3-D endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. With further development, the new approach could be useful for early detection and classification of a wide range of diseases.

3h

Women in hospital medicine face major obstacles

Women in hospital medicine face major obstacles during pregnancy, parental leave and returning to work, prompting a discussion about gender equity in medicine, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

3h

Oregon scientists use EEG to decode how people navigate complex sequences

To perform a song, a dance or write computer code, people need to call upon the basic elements of their craft and then order and recombine them in creative ways. How the brain builds such complex sequences have been captured with the use of EEG by University of Oregon scientists.

3h

Plant cells inherit knowledge of where's up and where's down from mother cell

Knowing which way is up and which way is down is important for all living beings. For plants, which grow roots into the soil and flowers above ground, getting this polarization wrong would cause a whole host of problems. How polarity is reestablished after cell division was unknown — until now. Researchers at IST Austria have solved one piece of the puzzle

3h

Pulses of sinking carbon reaching the deep sea are not captured in global climate models

A new study by MBARI scientists shows that pulses of sinking debris carry large amounts of carbon to the deep seafloor, but are poorly represented in global climate models.

3h

For older adults with heart failure: Can taking too many medications reduce abilities?

In a new study, researchers examined whether limitations in older adults' abilities to perform their routine daily activities were linked to taking multiple medications for heart failure. They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

3h

Study takes stand on true health benefits of getting up out of your chair

A new health study provides fresh insights on the energy cost of sitting versus standing for sedentary workers.

3h

National rheumatology and psoriasis organizations release joint guideline for psoriatic arthritis

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) have released a joint treatment guideline for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) that provides evidence-based pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic recommendations on caring for treatment-naïve patients with active PsA and patients who continue to have active PsA despite treatment.

3h

Antidepressant foods: Study discovers which foods help fight depression

Leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and oysters top the list of depression-fighting foods. Organ meats are also near the top of nutrient-dense food sources that should be included in your diet. Researchers focus more on what to eat rather than what to remove from the standard diet. None Michael Pollan was onto something when he added two words to conventional wisdom, writing , "You are what wha

3h

New dataset expands understanding of Arctic Spring Bloom

Understanding how the ocean works is like putting together a million-piece puzzle. There are many questions; finding answers takes time, resources, and opportunity. But even when scientists believe they know how the pieces fit together, new knowledge can change the shape of the puzzle. A new article adds another piece to the puzzle in understanding the impact of diatoms on the Arctic Spring Bloom.

3h

In death, Lonesome George reveals why giant tortoises live so long

Genetic analysis of DNA from Lonesome George and samples from other giant tortoises of the Galapagos — which can live more than 100 years in captivity — found they possessed a number of gene variants linked to DNA repair, immune response, and cancer suppression not possessed by shorter-lived vertebrates.

3h

Epigenetic map may pave way for new therapeutic solutions to hearing loss

Epigenetics is the expression and control of genes. The epigenetics involved in the inner ear is a critical part of the mystery of hearing. A team has now created the first map of "methylation" — one of the body's main epigenetic signals — that reflects the functioning of the inner ear in its entirety.

3h

People who prefer casual sex still desire intimacy: study

Casual sex among emerging adults can be a source of intimacy, and often is, according to a new study conducted by an interdisciplinary team of researchers including Binghamton University faculty and researchers at Indiana University's Kinsey Institute.

3h

Clever repurposing of biological tool gives researchers new clues as to how the flu remains so successful

Scientists have known for decades that a flu virus in a human body can be a lot different than viruses grown in a lab. As opposed to the uniform, spherical, textbook-style viruses in a petri dish, in humans they vary in shape and composition—particularly the abundance of certain proteins—even if they are genetically very similar.

3h

Osiris-Rex: Nasa probe arrives at Asteroid BennuNASA Bennu OSIRIS-REx

Nasa's Osiris-Rex spacecraft moves alongside the 500m-wide rock from which it hopes to grab a sample.

3h

Kød-debatten får os op i det røde felt, fordi det handler om hvem vi er

Når folketinget diskuterer kødafgift starter en steppebrand i debatten på de sociale medier. Og det er de helt store følelser, der er på spil.

3h

Lonesome George's genes could reveal the secrets of longevity

Animals Hopefully we can all look this good when we're 101. We were too late to save George’s species, but geneticists are still trying to piece together an understanding of these giants by looking at Lonesome George’s DNA.

3h

New dataset expands understanding of Arctic Spring Bloom

Understanding how the ocean works is like putting together a million-piece puzzle. There are many questions; finding answers takes time, resources, and opportunity. But even when scientists believe they know how the pieces fit together, new knowledge can change the shape of the puzzle.

3h

New laboratory system allows researchers to probe the secret lives of queen bees

More than a decade after the identification of colony collapse disorder, a phenomenon marked by widespread loss of honey bee colonies, scientists are still working to untangle the ecologically complex problem of how to mitigate ongoing losses of honey bees and other pollinating species. One much-needed aid in this effort is more efficient ways to track specific impacts on bee health. To address th

3h

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: November 2018

Wow! 2018 is nearly over, and Eyewirers have kept knocking it out of the park every month. In November we completed 81 cells, including 2 marathon cells (8 hrs 59 mins & 10 hrs 14 mins respectively!). We also got several new millionaires, even multi-millionaires. How will the year conclude, we wonder? For now, check out the following stats! New Scouts: Rubygirl22 New Millionaire Milestones: 10M –

3h

Bush Had a Lasting Impact on Climate and Air Policy

The late 41st president started the national climate assessment and enacted policies to target acid rain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Your smartphone’s AI algorithms could tell if you are depressed

Smartphones that are used to track our faces and voices could also help lower the barrier to mental-health diagnosis and treatment.

3h

Hundreds of unrecognized halogenated contaminants discovered in polar bear serum

Using a new approach to measure chemical contaminants in polar bears, scientists from Canada and the United States found a large variety of new chlorinated and fluorinated substances, including many new polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites. Worryingly, these previously unrecognized contaminants have not declined in the past decades, and many long-chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonic acids have been in

3h

Tackling the challenge of undergraduate retention in computing

ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, has released the highly anticipated report "Retention in Computer Science Undergraduate Programs in the US: Data Challenges and Promising Interventions." Among its key recommendations, the report calls for additional research to provide a more nuanced understanding of the dynamics of attrition and retention, and encourages higher education institutions

4h

The 'best prospect' for ensuring success in demanding roles

Building on their past work, University of Miami Associate Professor Amishi Jha and Scott Rogers, discovered that Special Operations Forces who participated in a month-long mindfulness course could improve their attention and working memory. These are both mental capacities necessary to tone down emotional reactivity and boost problem solving skills.

4h

Utility customers overestimate cost savings with energy-conservation plans

When deciding whether to participate in programs designed to conserve energy during peak hours, consumers appear to rely more on their intuition about how much money they're saving rather than on proof their bills are smaller, a new study has found.

4h

Boys with social difficulties most susceptible to early substance use, study finds

Boys who enter sixth-grade with co-occurring social skills, anxiety, learning and conduct problems are at the greatest risk of developing aggressive behavior and using tobacco, alcohol and marijuana by the end of eighth grade, a new study found.'While substance use among all boys in the study population increased over time, it increased the fastest among boys who had the greatest social skills nee

4h

Did you solve it? An Aboriginal family puzzle

The solution to today’s puzzle Earlier today I set you the following puzzle: Aboriginal groups are divided into subgroups, called “skins.” Your skin is determined at birth, based on your parents’ skins, and it does not change in your lifetime. Your skin will determine certain social rules, such as who you are allowed to marry. The Warlpiri, who live northwest of Alice Springs, divide themselves i

4h

Linguistic study finds 'the I's have it' when it comes to education rates

"I learn", "you learn", "she learns", "they learn", yet, according to a surprising new linguistic study, in countries where the dominant language allows personal pronouns such as 'I' to be omitted, learning suffers.

4h

A new approach to studying the flu

A clever repurposing of a biological tool gives researchers new clues as to how the flu remains so successful.

4h

Essential oils from garlic and other herbs kill 'persister' Lyme disease bacteria

Oils from garlic and several other common herbs and medicinal plants show strong activity against the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, according to a new study.

4h

First jellyfish genome reveals ancient beginnings of complex body plan

The first in-depth look at the genome of a jellyfish — the moon jelly Aurelia aurita — shows that early jellyfish recycled existing genes to gain the ability to morph from polyp to medusa.

4h

The secret contamination of polar bears

Using a new approach to measure chemical contaminants in polar bears, scientists found a large variety of new chlorinated and fluorinated substances, including many new polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites. Worryingly, these previously unrecognized contaminants have not declined in the past decades, and many long-chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonic acids have been increasing over time, says the study

4h

Will light be the basis for quantum computing?

Using a compact optical platform that exploits the quantum characteristics of light, scientists are one step closer to realizing the first powerful photonic quantum computer. The researchers revealed to have generated a particular class of quantum states – d-level cluster states, robust and powerful than any other such states demonstrated thus far -, as well as to have used them to implement novel

4h

Victoria’s Secret Has a Mean-Girl Problem

When Victoria’s Secret deigns to speak at all, it speaks in a British accent. The lingerie store, the largest division of the retail giant L Brands, is based in Ohio, but in its commercials and videos, an unseen woman’s voice always speaks the Queen’s as models pose in incongruous settings, strutting in thigh-highs and silk robes through Roman ruins or a remote Colorado ranch. Victoria’s Secret d

4h

The Hot Duck That Won’t Go Away

Serious birders have reservations about the frenzy over the Mandarin duck of Central Park, the inspiration for many memes and news articles like this one.

4h

Q&A: The Way the Wind Blows

The rotation of the Earth forces winds into clockwise and counterclockwise motions, depending on air pressure.

4h

New drug combination could be more effective against melanoma

A new study from MIT suggests that combining kinase inhibitors with experimental drugs known as ribonucleases could lead to better results. In tests with human cancer cells, the researchers found that the two drugs given together kill cells much more effectively than either drug does on its own. The combination could also help to prevent tumors from developing drug resistance, says Ronald Raines,

4h

New laboratory system allows researchers to probe the secret lives of queen bees

A group of researchers at the University of Illinois has established a laboratory-based method for tracking the fertility of honey bee queens, using a laboratory set-up that would mimic the key aspects of the hive environment and allow detection of egg-laying by honey bee queens living with small groups of worker bees. The resulting system allowed them to explore the relationship between worker nu

4h

One in four patients say they've skimped on insulin because of high cost

For patients with diabetes, insulin is a life-saving medicine and an essential component of diabetes management, yet in the past decade alone, the out-of-pocket costs for insulin have doubled in the United States. One-quarter of patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes have reported using less insulin than prescribed due to these high costs, Yale researchers write in JAMA Internal Medicine, and over a t

4h

Essential oils from garlic and other herbs kill 'persister' Lyme disease bacteria

Oils from garlic and several other common herbs and medicinal plants show strong activity against the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

4h

A new approach to studying the flu

A clever repurposing of a biological tool gives researchers new clues as to how the flu remains so successful.

4h

Alcohol intake may be key to long-term weight loss for people with Diabetes

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) suggests that alcohol consumption may attenuate long-term weight loss in adults with Type 2 diabetes.

4h

Prescribed burning not as damaging as previously thought

New research has found that prescribed burning, a controversial technique where fires are intentionally used to manage vegetation, is not as damaging to peat growth as previously thought if carried out on a sensible rotation, and can produce several positive outcomes.

4h

Combination of space-based and ground-based telescopes reveals more than 100 exoplanets

Astronomers using a combination of ground and space based telescopes have reported more than 100 extrasolar planets (exoplanets) in only three months. These planets are quite diverse and expected to play a large role in developing the research field of exoplanets and life in the Universe.

4h

Artificial intelligence for studying the ancient human populations of Patagonia

Researchers have used statistical techniques of automatic learning to analyze mobility patterns and technology of the hunter-gatherer groups that inhabited the Southern Cone of America, from the time they arrived about 12,000 years ago until the end of the 19th century. Big data from archaeological sites located in the extreme south of Patagonia have been used for this study.

4h

Why Smart People Are Vulnerable to Putting Tribe Before Truth

Science literacy is important, but without the parallel trait of "science curiosity," it can lead us astray — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Graphene unlocks new potential for 'smart textiles'

The quest to create affordable, durable and mass-produced 'smart textiles' has been given fresh impetus through the use of the wonder material graphene.

4h

Linguistic study finds 'the I's have it' when it comes to education rates

"I learn," "you learn," "she learns," "they learn," yet, according to a surprising new linguistic study, in countries where the dominant language allows personal pronouns such as 'I' to be omitted, learning suffers.

4h

LIGO and Virgo announce four new gravitational-wave detectionsLIGO Virgo Black Hole

The LIGO and Virgo collaborations have now confidently detected gravitational waves from a total of 10 stellar-mass binary black hole mergers and one merger of neutron stars, which are the dense, spherical remains of stellar explosions. Six of the black hole merger events had been reported before, while four are newly announced.

4h

There’s a good reason fish never quit wiggling

The seemingly random constant movements of fish are actually precisely calculated to provide, at any moment, the sensory feedback they need to navigate their world, research suggests. The finding, which appears in Current Biology , enhances our understanding of active sensing behaviors performed by all animals, including humans, such as whisking, touching, and sniffing. It also demonstrates how r

4h

CNIO and Hospital 12 de Octubre extend effectiveness of immunotherapy to more lung cancer patients

Combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma 'significantly increases' the survival of patients.Squamous cell carcinoma represents 20 percent to 30 percent of all cases of lung cancer and has a worse prognosis than other variants. It has the least amount of progress in terms of treatment.Patients who received chemotherapy and immunotherapy extended

4h

Aluminum nitride to extend life of solar power plants

NUST MISIS scientists together with their colleagues from the Central Metallurgical R&D Institute (Cairo, Egypt) have developed a composite material which will extend the life of solar towers — installations for collecting Solar thermal energy — from 2-3 to 5 years. The research article has been published in the Renewable Energy journal.

4h

People who prefer casual sex still desire intimacy

Casual sex among emerging adults can be a source of intimacy, and often is, according to a new study conducted by an interdisciplinary team of researchers including Binghamton University faculty and researchers at Indiana University's Kinsey Institute.

4h

Hoosier firefighters face higher risk of dying from cancer than non-firefighters

Hoosier firefighters face a significantly higher risk of dying from cancer than non-firefighters in Indiana, according to a study that shows death from malignant cancers was the leading cause of death for Indiana firefighters between 1985 and 2013.

4h

New dataset expands understanding of Arctic Spring Bloom

Understanding how the ocean works is like putting together a million-piece puzzle. There are many questions; finding answers takes time, resources, and opportunity. But even when scientists believe they know how the pieces fit together, new knowledge can change the shape of the puzzle. A paper recently published by Dr. Jeffrey Krause of the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the University of South Alabam

4h

Faster 3D imaging could aid diagnosis of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal disease

Researchers have developed a faster way to acquire 3D endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) images.

4h

Tailored lifestyle feedback during colorectal cancer screening improved health behaviors

A program that provided individually tailored lifestyle recommendations for patients undergoing screening for colorectal cancer helped encourage healthy behavior, according to results published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

4h

Targeting sepsis, the leading cause of ICU deaths, with a nanocarrier-delivered microRNA

One obstacle to therapeutic use of microRNAs (miRNA), which are in clinical trial for a number of diseases, are ribonucleases, whose job it is to destroy them. Medical University of South Carolina researchers report in Inflammation that an miRNA (miR-126) protective against sepsis can be delivered effectively via a nanocarrier. Almost 67 percent of mice treated with one of the nanocarrier/miR-126

4h

Data Sharing in Action: When Drug Companies Open Their Trial Vaults

YODA, a program facilitated by Yale University researchers, has successfully distributed clinical trial records from Johnson & Johnson and Medtronic to external researchers since 2013.

4h

Teens prank health surveys but researchers fight back

Teen pranksters may have compromised data on the health risks and drug use of LGBQ young people, research shows. These “mischievous responders”—research survey respondents who mislead researchers by providing extreme and untruthful responses to multiple items—have significantly affected overall estimates of health disparities between lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) youth and their h

4h

Epigenetic map may pave way for new therapeutic solutions to hearing loss

Prof. Karen B. Avraham, Vice Dean of the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University, has created the first epigenetic map of the inner ear, a milestone discovery that may pave the way for new therapeutic solutions to hearing loss.

5h

Genetic relic of the 'black death' may offer clues in treating liver disease

A gene mutation that is believed to have safeguarded some people in 14th century Europe from the bubonic plague today may be protecting HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis C from potentially fatal liver scarring, says a University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine physician-scientist.

5h

The secret contamination of polar bears

Using a new approach to measure chemical contaminants in polar bears, scientists from Canada and the United States found a large variety of new chlorinated and fluorinated substances, including many new polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites. Worryingly, these previously unrecognized contaminants have not declined in the past decades, and many long-chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonic acids have been in

5h

Physicists shed X-ray light on melting polymers

Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and Lomonosov Moscow State University have combined thermal analysis and X-ray scattering — two techniques for studying crystal structure — in one experimental setup to investigate semicrystalline polymers.

5h

Will light be the basis for quantum computing?

Using a compact optical platform that exploits the quantum characteristics of light, Professor Roberto Morandotti and his team are one step closer to realizing the first powerful photonic quantum computer. In Nature Physics, the INRS researchers revealed to have generated a particular class of quantum states – d-level cluster states, robust and powerful than any other such states demonstrated thus

5h

Capturing the surprising flexibility of crystal surfaces

Images taken using an atomic force microscope have allowed researchers to observe, for the first time, the flexible and dynamic changes that occur on the surfaces of 'porous coordination polymer' crystals when guest molecules are introduced. The findings, published in the journal Nature Chemistry, have implications for investigations into materials that can be used for storing and sensing molecule

5h

The science of team sports

Joint successes in the past increase the chances of winning. This has now been statistically proven in a variety of different team sports.

5h

Colloidal quantum dots make LEDs shine bright in the infrared

A group of ICFO researchers report on the development of a colloidal quantum-dot light emitting diode with unprecedented quantum and power conversion efficiencies in the infrared range.The study, published in Nature Nanotechnology, has proven that these devices can also be integrated in inorganic solar cells and may lead to even higher efficiencies

5h

Neuroscientists pinpoint genes tied to dementia

A UCLA-led research team has identified genetic processes involved in the neurodegeneration that occurs in dementia — an important step on the path toward developing therapies that could slow or halt the course of the disease. The findings appear Dec. 3 in the journal Nature Medicine.

5h

First jellyfish genome reveals ancient beginnings of complex body plan

The first in-depth look at the genome of a jellyfish — the moon jelly Aurelia aurita — shows that early jellyfish recycled existing genes to gain the ability to morph from polyp to medusa.

5h

Discovery may lead to safer drugs to save more women in childbirth

While several developing countries rely on misoprostol to treat women bleeding during or after childbirth, the drug has risky side effects. USC and SLAC researchers have a 3D model of the key receptor interacting with the drug molecule, marking the first step toward possible development of a safer drug.

5h

Prescribed burning not as damaging as previously thought

New research by the University of Liverpool has found that prescribed burning, a controversial technique where fires are intentionally used to manage vegetation, is not as damaging to peat growth as previously thought if carried out on a sensible rotation, and can produce several positive outcomes.

5h

Opioid prescriptions from dentists linked to youth addiction risk, Stanford study finds

Teens and young adults who receive their initial opioid prescriptions from their dentists or oral surgeons are at increased risk for opioid addiction in the following year, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found.

5h

Stentrode (TM) developed for brain treatments without major surgery

Australian researchers have developed a tiny device that electrically stimulates the brain and could one day be used to treat conditions such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease without invasive surgery. They have shown for the first time that electrical stimulation can be delivered into the brain from a 4 mm diameter Stentrode permanently implanted inside a blood vessel.

5h

In death, Lonesome George reveals why giant tortoises live so long

Genetic analysis of DNA from Lonesome George and samples from other giant tortoises of the Galapagos — which can live more than 100 years in captivity — found they possessed a number of gene variants linked to DNA repair, immune response, and cancer suppression not possessed by shorter-lived vertebrates.

5h

How common is Autism spectrum disorder and do kids receive treatment?

National survey data for 43,000 U.S. children suggests an estimated 2.8 percent have ever been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 2.5 percent currently have ASD. Among 1,115 children with current ASD, almost 30 percent aren't treated with behavioral therapies or medication. ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by social impairments, communication difficulties, repetitive beha

5h

Patients report skimping on insulin because of cost

In a small survey of patients at an urban diabetes center, 1 in 4 reported skimping on their prescribed insulin because of cost and this was associated with poor glycemic control. Insulin is lifesaving for people with diabetes and is listed as an essential medicine by the World Health Organization, which means that it should be available at a price individuals and the community can afford.

5h

Are opioids prescribed by dental providers associated with later use, abuse?

An analysis of claims data for privately insured adolescents and young adults suggests initial exposure to opioids prescribed by dental providers may be associated with increased risk of subsequent opioid use and abuse. Dentists are a leading source of opioid prescriptions for children and adolescents. This observational study examined outpatient opioid prescriptions for patients 16 to 25 in 2015

5h

Poor sleep, missed meals, less mobility and stress in hospital may lead to readmission

Patients who experience disturbances in sleep, mobility, nutrition or mood while admitted in hospital may be more likely to be readmitted within 30 days after discharge, finds a new study co-led by St. Michael's Hospital and the University Health Network (UHN) in Canada.

5h

Study discovers 40 new genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk

The most comprehensive genome-wide association study, or GWAS, of colorectal cancer risk to date, published today in Nature Genetics, has discovered 40 new genetic variants and validated 55 previously identified variants that signal an increased risk of colon cancer.

5h

Nanoscale tweezers can perform single-molecule 'biopsies' on individual cells

Using electrical impulses, the 'tweezers' can extract single DNA, proteins and organelles from living cells without destroying them.

5h

Light-induced changes in photosensory proteins

Researchers have been able to demonstrate how, on a molecular level, a specific protein allows light signals to be converted into cellular information. Their findings have broadened our understanding of the way how plants and bacteria adapt to changes in light conditions, which regulate essential processes, such as photosynthesis.

5h

Teknologineutralt udbud gav fem gange så meget ve-kapacitet som forventet

I Danmarks første teknologineutrale udbud dystede 17 sol- og vindprojekter om 254 mio. kroner i støtte. Det gav samlet set 200 MW ny ve-kapacitet, fordelt på tre solcelle- og tre vindmølleparker.

5h

Soyuz Is Back in Business

A three-person crew has successfully launched to space and toward the International Space Station, about two months after a similar attempt failed and subjected the crew to a nerve-racking emergency landing back on Earth. Three crew members—Oleg Kononenko of Russia, Anne McClain of the United States, and David Saint-Jacques of Canada—squeezed into a capsule at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, a Russian l

5h

The water in Saturn's rings and satellites is like that on Earth except for moon Phoebe, which is out of this world

By developing a new method for measuring isotopic ratios of water and carbon dioxide remotely, scientists have found that the water in Saturn's rings and satellites is unexpectedly like water on the Earth, except on Saturn's moon Phoebe, where the water is more unusual than on any other object so far studied in the Solar System.

5h

These new tweezers let scientists do biopsies on living cells

Nanotweezers that can pluck molecules from cells without killing them could enable real-time analysis of the insides of healthy and diseased cells.

5h

Linguistic study finds 'the I's have it' when it comes to education rates

Linguistic study finds 'the I's have it' when it comes to education rates.

5h

Combination of space-based and ground-based telescopes reveals more than 100 exoplanets

An international team of astronomers using a combination of ground and space based telescopes have reported more than 100 extrasolar planets (here after, exoplanets) in only three months. These planets are quite diverse and expected to play a large role in developing the research field of exoplanets and life in the Universe.

5h

LIGO and Virgo announce four new gravitational-wave detections

The LIGO and Virgo collaborations have now confidently detected gravitational waves from a total of 10 stellar-mass binary black hole mergers and one merger of neutron stars, which are the dense, spherical remains of stellar explosions. Six of the black hole merger events had been reported before, while four are newly announced.

5h

Artificial intelligence for studying the ancient human populations of Patagonia

Argentine and Spanish researchers have used statistical techniques of automatic learning to analyze mobility patterns and technology of the hunter-gatherer groups that inhabited the Southern Cone of America, from the time they arrived about 12,000 years ago until the end of the 19th century. Big data from archaeological sites located in the extreme south of Patagonia have been used for this study.

5h

Wild yeasts may hold key to better wines from warmer climates

Researchers have found yeasts that naturally occur on wine grapes may improve wines produced in warmer climates. Up until now the use of these 'natural' or 'wild' yeasts during the production process has mostly been discouraged by wine makers.

5h

Solving 21st-century problems requires skills that few are trained in, scientists find

From companies trying to resolve data security risks to coastal communities preparing for rising sea levels, solving modern problems requires teamwork that draws on a range of expertise and life experiences. Yet individuals receive little training to develop the skills that are vital to these collaborations. A new scientific report identifies the essential components of collaborative problem solvi

5h

Not in the DNA: Epigenetics discovered in single-celled archaea

Researchers have reported the first experimental evidence of epigenetics in the single-celled organisms known as archaea. The simplicity of archaea — combined with the fact that their cells resemble eukaryotes' in some important ways — may allow researchers to investigate epigenetic questions in humans much faster and more easily than was possible before, the authors say.

5h

5h

First jellyfish genome reveals ancient beginnings of complex body plan

Jellyfish undergo an amazing metamorphosis, from tiny polyps growing on the seafloor to swimming medusae with stinging tentacles. This shape-shifting has served them well, shepherding jellyfish through more than 500 million years of mass extinctions on Earth.

5h

In death, Lonesome George reveals why giant tortoises live so long

Lonesome George's species may have died with him in 2012, but he and other giant tortoises of the Galapagos are still providing genetic clues to individual longevity through a new study by researchers at Yale University, the University of Oviedo in Spain, the Galapagos Conservancy, and the Galapagos National Park Service.

5h

Nanoscale tweezers can perform single-molecule 'biopsies' on individual cells

Using electrical impulses, the 'tweezers' can extract single DNA, proteins and organelles from living cells without destroying them.

5h

Prescribed burning not as damaging as previously thought

New research by the University of Liverpool has found that prescribed burning, a controversial technique where fires are intentionally used to manage vegetation, is not as damaging to peat growth as previously thought if carried out on a sensible rotation, and can produce several positive outcomes.

5h

Confessions of a recovering micromanager | Chieh Huang

Think about the most tired you've ever been at work. It probably wasn't when you stayed late or came home from a road trip — chances are it was when you had someone looking over your shoulder, watching your each and every move. "If we know that micromanagement isn't really effective, why do we do it?" asks entrepreneur Chieh Huang. In a funny talk packed with wisdom and humility, Huang shares the

5h

Learning to read comes at a cost

Learning how to read may have some disadvantages for learning grammar. Children who cannot read yet often treat multiword phrases as wholes ('how-are-you'). After learning to read, children notice individual words more, as these are separated by spaces in written language ('how are you').

5h

New two-year data show 39 percent patients treated with CAR T remain in remission

A new article shows 39 percent of large B cell lymphoma patients treated with the chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy (CAR T) Yescarta® (axicabtagene ciloleucel) remained in remission more than two years (27.1 months median follow up) following therapy, and more than half of the patients treated remain alive.

5h

Here's How Much Climate Change Could Cost the U.S.

Warming could exact a major economic toll, but reducing emissions and adapting to changes can alleviate those costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

A study connects the genetic background of autistic spectrum disorders with stem cell dysfunction

A recently completed study provides new information on functional changes in the brain connected with autistic spectrum disorders. The findings help identify factors related to the individual manifestation of autistic spectrum disorders and associated diseases.

5h

Shortcut strategy for screening compounds with clinical potentials for drug development

The journey of developing a new drug often takes years and needs hundreds of millions of dollars. A 'shortcut' has now been found by a collaborated research led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU), which can potentially reduce the time and costs of developing new drugs by sorting out the high potential candidates out of a long list of chemical compounds.

5h

Soyuz Rocket Launches Flawlessly, Weeks After Malfunction

The Russian rocket carried a three-person crew into orbit on Monday, making a successful return to flight following a dramatic failure.

5h

Graphene unlocks new potential for 'smart textiles'

The quest to create affordable, durable and mass-produced 'smart textiles' has been given fresh impetus through the use of the wonder material Graphene.

5h

New Quantum Paradox Clarifies Where Our Views of Reality Go Wrong

That quantum mechanics is a successful theory is not in dispute. It makes astonishingly accurate predictions about the nature of the world at microscopic scales. What has been in dispute for nearly a century is just what it’s telling us about what exists, what is real. There are myriad interpretations that offer their own take on the question, each requiring us to buy into certain as-yet-unverifi

5h

Nothing Says Midwest Like a Well-Dressed Porch Goose

When the creators of the long-running ABC sitcom The Middle , about a middle-class family living in Indiana, were coming up with the show’s aesthetic, there was one prop they knew they had to have, to give the Hecks’ family home genuine Midwestern flavor: a statue of a concrete goose to keep on their porch. And outfits to dress it up in. “Our showrunners are natives of Indiana, and they gave me g

5h

Graphene unlocks new potential for 'smart textiles'

The quest to create affordable, durable and mass-produced 'smart textiles' has been given fresh impetus through the use of the wonder material Graphene.

6h

A change in marital status affects the number of daily steps

Changes in relationships have links to physical activity. The total number of non-exercise steps was reduced during a four-year follow-up study for men who divorced. For women who found a new spouse between the measurement points, the total steps decreased significantly when compared to women married throughout the period.

6h

Research: A third of hospitalized adolescents with life-threatening anorexia are not thin

Health workers are being urged to closely monitor adolescents losing weight after a study of patients with anorexia nervosa found 31 per cent had all the cognitive features and physical complications of the disease without being underweight.

6h

Artificial intelligence tracks biological age at every level and rewinds the aging clock

Artificial Intelligence for Aging and Longevity Research: Recent Advances and Perspectives" in Ageing Research Reviews. The paper introduces recent advances in deep learning for aging research and provides fair insight into the field.

6h

Regeringen og DF kører finansloven ind med mere asfalt

Forbedringer for tog og cykler er stort set fraværende i finanslovsaftalen mellem regeringen og DF.

6h

Cubesats kan blive vigtige hjælpere i det dybe rum

To cubesats fulgte Mars- sonden InSight hele vejen og sendte data hjem fra landingen på Mars. Det var første test af minisatellitterne så langt fra Jorden.

6h

NASA's first asteroid sample-collector nears target, BennuNASA Bennu OSIRIS-REx

NASA's first-ever mission designed to visit an asteroid and return a sample of its dust back to Earth arrives Monday at its destination, Bennu, two years after launching from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

6h

Precisely fitting bone implants from the printer

Cancerous tumors, infections or bad fractures can make it necessary to surgically remove bones and insert implants in their place. In collaboration with European partners, Fraunhofer researchers have now developed a technique with which bone implants that are precisely fitting, stable and variable in dimensions can be 3-D printed from a special plastic. The secret lies in the printing process, whe

6h

American Foreign Policy Could Use More Prudence

During George H. W. Bush’s single term in the White House, the Berlin Wall fell and Germany reunified peacefully. The Warsaw Pact dissolved, the Soviet Union crumbled, and the Cold War ended. The American military ejected Manuel Noriega from Panama and liberated Kuwait from Saddam Hussein. The United States emerged as the world’s preeminent power after four decades of superpower standoff. This ou

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A Forgotten Legacy of George H. W. Bush

Former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney will deliver one of the four eulogies for President George H. W. Bush at his state funeral Wednesday. This is fitting, and not only because the two men were close friends. Mulroney and Bush were joint architects of one of the most important environmental achievements of the past three decades: the great reduction of acid rain. In the late 1980s, lakes

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How to make your own scratch-and-sniff holiday cards

DIY Add a whiff of cheer. Want to jazz up your homemade holiday cards? Decorate them with some scratch-and-sniff paint made from household products.

6h

A Supercell Storm Chaser Photographs Thundering Formations

Photographer Mitch Dobrowner has spent the past decade tracking storms across the American heartland.

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Why is having baggage always seen as a bad thing?

The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Why is “having baggage” always seen as a bad thing? Isn’t it possible to have good baggage? Jane Brennan, Manchester Continue reading…

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Macroscopic phenomena governed by microscopic physics

Researchers at Osaka University observe a magnetic reconnection driven by electron dynamics in laser-produced plasmas. Magnetic reconnections are often observed in the magnetic flux on the Sun and the Earth's magnetosphere. It has been highly challenging to reveal the electron scale, microscopic information in the vast universe. Applying a weak magnetic field, where only electrons are directly cou

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A Mediterranean diet in pregnancy is associated with lower risk of accelerated growth

Over 2,700 women and their children participated in this study that highlights the benefits of a healthy diet.

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CRISPR babies raise an uncomfortable reality – abiding by scientific standards doesn't guarantee ethical research

Uncertainty continues to swirl around scientist He Jiankui's gene editing experiment in China. Using CRISPR technology, He modified a gene related to immune function in human embryos and transferred the embryos to their mother's womb, producing twin girls.

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Scientist at work: To take atomic-scale pictures of tiny crystals, use a huge, kilometer-long synchrotron

It's 4 a.m., and I've been up for about 20 hours straight. A loud alarm is blaring, accompanied by red strobe lights flashing. A stern voice announces, "Searching station B. Exit immediately." It feels like an emergency, but it's not. In fact, the alarm has already gone off 60 or 70 times today. It is a warning, letting everyone in the vicinity know I'm about to blast a high-powered X-ray beam int

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SUTD researchers discover new material — black silver

SUTD researchers have discovered a new material that could lead to highly sensitive biomolecule detectors and more efficient solar cells.

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Chemists created new diagnostic method for difficult climate conditions

Scientists from ITMO University developed a method to detect viral RNA without special equipment. The sensor is based on a polymerization reaction: if the sample contains traces of the target virus, then under the ultraviolet irradiation the liquid-sensor turns into a gel. The results of such an analysis can easily be detected even by people with limited vision. Due to stable reagents the method c

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Light-induced changes in photosensory proteins

Researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to demonstrate how, on a molecular level, a specific protein allows light signals to be converted into cellular information. Their findings have broadened our understanding of the way how plants and bacteria adapt to changes in light conditions, which regulate essential processes, such as photosynthesis. Their research has been

6h

Global warming increases frost damage on trees in Central Europe

Global warming increases frost damage on trees in large areas of Central Europe, according to a new Finnish-Chinese study. Late frost damages are economically important in agriculture and forestry. In certain years, they are known to have caused losses amounting to up to hundreds of millions of euros.

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Not in the DNA: Epigenetics discovered in single-celled archaea

Researchers have reported the first experimental evidence of epigenetics in the single-celled organisms known as archaea. The simplicity of archaea — combined with the fact that their cells resemble eukaryotes' in some important ways — may allow researchers to investigate epigenetic questions in humans much faster and more easily than was possible before, the authors say.

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Wild yeasts may hold key to better wines from warmer climates

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found yeasts that naturally occur on wine grapes may improve wines produced in warmer climates. Up until now the use of these 'natural' or 'wild' yeasts during the production process has mostly been discouraged by wine makers.

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Free, publicly available health data proves to be research gold mine

Immunotherapy has become a popular treatment for some cancers. University of Calgary researchers discover how a set of genes, those associated with the extracellular matrix, had a direct connection to how cancer patients respond to immunotherapy.

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There's no simple answer to what counts as 'science' in teaching reading

What is the best way to teach children to read? This apparently simple question has, in fact, has been the subject of robust and often polarised debate.

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The more male gorillas look after young, the more young they're likely to have

Paternal care – where fathers care for their children – is rare among mammals (that is, animals which give birth to live young). Scientists have identified more than 6,000 mammal species, but paternal care only occurs in 5 to 10% of them.

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Covert infrared image encoding—hiding in plasmonic sight

Plasmonic materials can uniquely control the electromagnetic spectrum due to nano-scale surface architecture. Recent advances in nanotechnology and materials science and their combined capacity to develop controlled geometries at the nano-scale continue to evolve, as observed with optical properties of amplitude, phase and wave fronts for materials in optics. Although researchers have focused on i

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Imec reports for the first time direct growth of 2-D materials on 300mm wafers

This week, at the 2018 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), imec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technologies, presents a 300mm-wafer platform for MOSFET devices with 2-D materials. 2-D materials could provide the path towards extreme device-dimension scaling as they are atomically precise and suffer little from short channel effects. Ot

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Aarhus Universitetshospital aflyser næsten alle ikke-akutte operationer denne uge

Aarhus Universitetshospital må aflyse 250 ikke-akutte operationer, fordi hospitalets sterilcentral ikke kan følge med.

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Dana-Farber researchers report clinical trial results in treatment of leukemia & lymphoma

New results from clinical trials of immunotherapy and experimental targeted agents for patients with leukemia and lymphoma are being presented by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers at the ASH Annual Meeting.

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Learning to read comes at a cost

Learning how to read may have some disadvantages for learning grammar. Children who cannot read yet often treat multiword phrases as wholes ('how-are-you'). After learning to read, children notice individual words more, as these are separated by spaces in written language ('how are you').

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Big study links gene to risk of alcohol dependence

The largest study of genetic factors linked to alcohol dependence has identified a gene known to affect risk. The work also determines that many other genes also contribute to risk for alcohol dependence to a lesser degree. In addition, the study links genetic factors associated with alcohol dependence to other psychiatric disorders, such as depression, and shows that genetic factors tied to typi

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Creating digital twins of materials

To ensure the digital networking of production systems and the optimization of material-specific requirements, we need to measure, analyze and replicate the changes in material properties in a process in which "digital twins" of materials are created. The materials data space developed by Fraunhofer researchers has laid the groundwork for this process.

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Novel color sensors are less expensive to manufacture

In the FOWINA project, the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS in Erlangen and the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC in Würzburg have developed novel color sensors with a special microlens arrangement. The sensors can be realized directly on the chip and combine multiple functions in a minimum of space. Their extremely slim design makes the sensors suitable for a wide ran

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Astronomers detect low-mass brown dwarf around A-type main-sequence star

Using HATSouth Exoplanet Survey, an international group of astronomers has discovered a low-mass brown dwarf transiting an A-type main-sequence star. The newly detected brown dwarf, designated HATS-70b, is the first such object found around a star of this type. The finding is detailed in a paper published November 16 on arXiv.org.

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Instagram Is the New Evite

When Mandy gets invited to a party, it’s not via Facebook invite, or email, or even text message. She’s 13, so, naturally, it’s through Instagram. Here’s how it works: When teenagers are planning a big party, they’ll sometimes create a new Instagram account, often with a handle that includes the date of the party, like @Nov17partyy or @SarahsBdayOctober27. The account will be set to private, and

7h

Star Wars News: 'Episode IX' Might Feature Lando's Daughter

Emphasis on the "might." Also, here's some more *Mandalorian* casting news.

7h

Lenovo Yoga Book C930 Review: E-Ink Just Isn't Our Type

Lenovo's newest ultraportable Yoga Book replaces the traditional laptop keyboard with an E-Ink variant.

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Porsche Wants You to Use Maps for Exploration—Not Navigation

The automaker is teaming up with Mapbox to make in-car maps more than tools for getting from one place to another as efficiently as possible.

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Children perform better when parents are involved in school life

A family's involvement in a child's education acts as a source of social mobility, according to a study by experts from the HSE Centre of Social and Economic School Development, Mikhail Goshin and Tatyana Mertsalova http://doi.org/10.17323/1814-9545-2018-3-68-90. Lower income parents who actively participate in their children's school life open up more opportunities for their children.

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New two-year data show 39 percent of NHL patients treated with CAR T remain in remission

A new article published today in The Lancet Oncology shows 39 percent of large B cell lymphoma patients treated with the chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy (CAR T) Yescarta® (axicabtagene ciloleucel) remained in remission more than two years (27.1 months median follow up) following therapy, and more than half of the patients treated remain alive.

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New study highlights CAR T-cell therapy success for lymphoma when used as standard of care

Moffitt Cancer Center partnered with 16 academic cancer centers to analyze real world data of 274 patients treated commercially with Yescarta® (axicabtagene ciloleucel), one of two CAR T products that is now standard of care for patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who have not responded to two or more therapies. The researchers then compared those figures with results from the pivo

7h

Salt-evolved zooplankton grow too slowly to block salt-induced algal blooms

Small animals at the base of the freshwater food chain can rapidly adapt to salt pollution — from sources like winter road deicing, agriculture, and mining — but at a price.

7h

Billions of nanoplastics accumulate in marine organisms within six hours

A ground-breaking study has shown it takes a matter of hours for billions of minute plastic nanoparticles to become embedded throughout the major organs of a marine organism.

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Running a marathon can increase cardiac strain in amateur runners

Amateurs running full-length marathons could be significantly raising levels of several key biomarkers of cardiac strain. Levels of two proteins — troponin I and troponin T — were highest after runners completed a full marathon compared to a half marathon, and a 10K race, as were other biomarkers of cardiac stress.

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Importance of good sleep routines for children

A new review of sleep research backs use of bedtime routines to promote healthy sleep for children.

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Saltier waterways are creating dangerous 'chemical cocktails'

New research suggests that saltier, more alkaline freshwater can release toxic metals and harmful nitrogen-containing compounds from streambeds and soils in drainage basins. The results further suggest that many of these chemicals travel together throughout watersheds, forming 'chemical cocktails' that can have more devastating effects on drinking water supplies and ecosystems when compared with i

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Who will decide which students get into college—a committee or a computer?

It's crunch time for college applications, and hopeful high school seniors are working hard to impress admissions committees to land a spot at the school of their choice.

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Chemist develop egg-like nanoreactors from titanium dioxide and graphene

A RUDN chemist has developed a new method for synthesizing "yolk-shell" nanoparticles on the basis of titanium dioxide and graphene. The complex structure of the new particles allowed the scientists to carry out a selective oxidation for aldehyde production for many hours without the formation of any byproducts. The research was published in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental.

7h

An artificial Proba-2 view of the solar north pole

We've sent numerous missions into space to study the Sun; past and present solar explorers include ESA's Proba-2 (PRoject for OnBoard Autonomy 2) and SOHO (SOlar Heliospheric Observatory) probes, NASA's SDO and STEREO missions (the Solar Dynamics Observatory and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, respectively), and the joint NASA/ESA Ulysses mission. However, most of these spacecraft have fo

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Charting a course for astronaut safety as NASA launches to the Moon and to Mars

In the next decade, NASA aims to launch humankind toward the moon and on to Mars—a monumental step in crewed space travel. Such a journey is filled with challenges and perils, not unlike those faced by the first explorers to cross the ocean. However, instead of stormy seas, these explorers will set sail amid the hazards of the heliosphere—the magnetic environment emanating out from the sun and enc

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New global survey highlights bribery and corruption in businesses

While progress has been made, improvements to companies' anti-bribery and corruption strategies are still needed, according to the 2018 Global White Collar Crime Survey, which has been launched by The University of Manchester and global law firm White & Case LLP.

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Screening the human future: YouTube, persuasion and genetically engineered children

On Sunday, Nov. 25, the scientist He Jiankui claimed the birth of the world's first genetically engineered children: twins, created by IVF, their DNA altered at fertilization. Changes like these, because they're inheritable – "editing the germline" – are widely prohibited by law and avoided by scientific consensus. If He really did this, it's a very big step across a very bright line.

7h

Læger: Finanslov svigter sundheden

Glæden over den nye finanslov er afdæmpet blandt lægeformændene. De mener ikke, at der er afsat nok midler til psykiatrien og resten af sundhedsvæsenet.

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Finanslovsaftale afsætter tre mia. kr. til sundhed over de næste fire år

Den kommende sundhedsreform, vaccinationer og psykiatrien er blandt de områder, der har fået tildelt midler fra finanslovsaftalen, regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti står bag.

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Niels Tønder er ansat som ledende overlæge

Niels Tønder er tiltrådt som ledende overlæge på kardiologisk afdeling på Nordsjællands Hospital. Særligt den akutte kardiologi kommer til at blive et indsatsområde, siger han.

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Cycle lanes and walkways cut car use, reduce emissions, study finds

Researchers have shown for the first time that investing in cycle lanes and walkways encourages people to drive less and cuts carbon emissions.

7h

How do stellar binaries form?

Most stars with the mass of the sun or larger have one or more companion stars, but when and how these multiple stars form is one of the controversial central problems of astronomy. Gravity contracts the natal gas and dust in an interstellar cloud until clumps develop that are dense enough to coalesce into stars, but how are multiple stars fashioned? Because the shrinking cloud has a slight spin,

7h

COP24: How a plastics treaty could clean up our oceans

It seems new action to tackle plastic pollution is announced every week, from the 5p plastic bag charge to governments debating a tax on plastic packaging. Businesses are also showing their green credentials as major supermarkets pledge to reduce plastic packaging alongside some multinational companies.

7h

Deepwater corals thrive at the bottom of the ocean, but can't escape human impacts

When people think of coral reefs, they typically picture warm, clear waters with brightly colored corals and fishes. But other corals live in deep, dark, cold waters, often far from shore in remote locations. These varieties are just as ecologically important as their shallow water counterparts. They also are just as vulnerable to human activities like fishing and energy production.

7h

Wild yeasts may hold key to better wines from warmer climates

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found yeasts that naturally occur on wine grapes may improve wines produced in warmer climates. Up until now the use of these 'natural' or 'wild' yeasts during the production process has mostly been discouraged by wine makers.

7h

Toxic flame retardants are in children's car seats

Scientists have found toxic flame retardants in newly manufactured children's car seats, sparking concerns about children's health. Of the 18 children's car seats tested, 15 contained new or traditional hazardous flame retardant chemicals.

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Bonus for superior snoozing: Students who meet 8-hour sleep challenge do better on finals

Students given extra points if they met 'The 8-hour Challenge' — averaging eight hours of sleep for five nights during final exams week — did better than those who snubbed (or flubbed) the incentive, according to new research.

7h

Undercover investigation: Socio-economic survey of pangolin hunting in Assam, India

Referred to as the world's most trafficked mammal, pangolins are not only being gradually pushed to the edge of extinction, but also made an innocent victim to huge cruelty. Having conducted a 2-year socio-economic survey of pangolin poaching in Northeast India, a research team aims to quantify and understand the drivers of the practice in the previously unstudied region in order to recommend adeq

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Scientists call for eight steps to increase soil carbon for climate action and food security

Leading scientists call for action to increase global soil carbon, in advance of the annual climate summit of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP24) and World Soil Day.

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Why a curious crustacean could hold secret to making renewable energy from wood

Scientists studying gribble — a curious wood-eating crustacean — have discovered how they are able to digest wood despite being the only known animal to have a sterile digestive system. The discovery may help to develop cheaper and more sustainable tools for converting wood into biofuel in the future.

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New mudweed species threatens Hawaiʻi marine environments

A team of scientists led by researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa Department of Botany has discovered two populations of a new species of leather mudweed or Avrainvillea erecta, a widespread tropical algae, which may pose a threat to Hawai'i's marine environments.

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Analysis of 6000-year-old earthenware bowl shows Mesolithic people were better at cooking than thought

A team of researchers with the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics and the Brandenburgisches Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archaeologisches Landesmuseum, both in Germany, has found evidence that suggests Mesolithic people ate much better than previously thought. In their paper published on the open access site PLOS ONE, the group describes their study of food remains foun

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The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg, Germany have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual pho

7h

Revealed: the first ever picture of the sun’s north pole

The sun has a north pole but no spacecraft has ever photographed it. Now the European Space Agency has cleverly pieced a together picture of it using other images

7h

Chemists create new diagnostic method for difficult climate conditions

Scientists from the SCAMT Laboratory of ITMO University developed a method to detect viral RNA without special equipment. The sensor is based on a polymerization reaction: if the sample contains traces of the target virus, then under ultraviolet irradiation the liquid-sensor turns into a gel. The results of such an analysis can easily be detected even by people with limited vision. As the required

7h

LCO and NASA's Kepler work together to determine origins of supernova

Astronomers at Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) are part of an international team of scientists who used NASA's Kepler satellite to catch a rare glimpse of a Type Ia supernova minutes after explosion. The supernova, named SN 2018oh, was brighter than expected over the first few days. The increased brightness is an indication that it slammed into a nearby companion star. This adds to the growing body

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Knowing exactly what genes are saying – and where

Scientists can now discover how the fine details of gene activity differ from one cell type to another in a tissue sample, thanks to a technique invented by Weill Cornell Medicine researchers.

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Tracing iron in the North Pacific

The micronutrient iron (Fe) is recognized as a key factor in controlling oceanic primary productivity, and subsequently impacting the carbon cycle and marine ecosystem. The high-latitude area of the North Pacific is one of the three main high-nutrient and low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions on Earth. Also, the growth of phytoplankton is limited by the availability of Fe. Climate change, human activitie

7h

Massive need for growing trees on farms

It's now over 50 years since the world was first warned that resources were being used at an unsustainable rate. It has now been estimated that almost one quarter to one third of the world's land is degraded to some extent.

7h

Evolution sans mutation discovered in single-celled archaea

University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers have found revolutionary evidence that an evolutionary phenomenon at work in complex organisms is at play in their single-celled counterparts, too.

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Understanding 'green' consumers key to business success

Massey University Ph.D. graduate Dr. Fred Angels Musika set out to develop a reliable way of measuring green consumer consciousness to better understand the decision-making processes of this growing market segment.

8h

Interpretability and performance: Can the same model achieve both?

Interpretability and performance of a system are usually at odds with each other, as many of the best-performing models (viz. deep neural networks) are black box in nature. In our work, Improving Simple Models with Confidence Profiles, we try to bridge this gap by proposing a method to transfer information from a high-performing neural network to another model that the domain expert or the applica

8h

Salt-evolved zooplankton grow too slowly to block salt-induced algal blooms

Small animals at the base of the freshwater food chain can rapidly adapt to salt pollution — from sources like winter road deicing, agriculture, and mining — but at a price.

8h

Billions of nanoplastics accumulate in marine organisms within six hours

A ground-breaking study has shown it takes a matter of hours for billions of minute plastic nanoparticles to become embedded throughout the major organs of a marine organism.

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Mosquito-trapping balloons could help us understand one of the world's deadliest diseases

Health New research finds the mosquitoes are traveling much further than previously thought. Scientists are deploying balloons to capture mosquitoes and figure out how high mosquitoes can fly. They hope this will help them better understand the spread of…

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Nanotechnology solution for photovoltaic systems

Photovoltaic (PV) systems, which harvest sustainable and clean energy from the sun, accumulate dirt or particles like dust, water and sand. This build-up leads to a reduction in the light energy reaching the solar cells and lowers their power output by up to 50%, according to some studies. Therefore, it's crucial to keep them clean. However, the process of regular cleaning and maintenance could be

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Dual 8-bit breakthroughs bring AI to the edge

This week, at the International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) and the Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS), IBM researchers will showcase new hardware that will take AI further than it's been before: right to the edge. Our novel approaches for digital and analog AI chips boost speed and slash energy demand for deep learning, without sacrificing accuracy. On the digital s

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Diabetics, be careful driving to your cholesterol test

For patients who take diabetes medications, fasting before having blood drawn for cholesterol tests contributes to low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. The study, which appears in the International Journal of Endocrinology , shows that people with diabetes are more likely to experience FEEHD—fasting-evoked en route hypoglycemia in diabetes—than they would if they hadn’t fasted. The “en route” comes

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How a candidate's looks may be swinging your vote (without you even realising it)

If someone asks you why you chose the election candidate you voted for, you will likely have a good answer. Maybe you agree with the candidate's policy stances. Maybe you support his/her party. Maybe you are tired of the corruption, bad policies, or inaction of the people in power. These are all perfectly acceptable answers. One reason you probably will not mention is that you voted for this perso

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Great strides for carbon capture using earth-abundant elements as photocatalytic system

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have designed a CO2 reduction method based only on commonly occurring elements. Achieving a 57 percent overall quantum yield of CO2 reduction products, it is the highest performing system of its kind reported to date, raising prospects for cost-effective carbon capture solutions.

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A bastard seal from the past reveals the potential for human hybrids

Almost 90 years ago on a freezing January morning, the keepers of the Stockholm Zoo in Sweden discovered a dead seal pup in their seal pond. The pup was immediately recognized as a bastard—a hybrid between species that should not interbreed. Only two grey seal males and one ringed seal female, species belonging to different mammalian genera, were housed in the pond. The hybrid appeared to carry a

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Curiosity to study possible meteorite on Mars surface

Curiosity woke up to Mr Rogers' "Please would you be my neighbour" this morning to welcome InSight, and then got busy at the Highfield drill site. Curiosity will dump the Highfield sample, which requires several MAHLI looks and an APXS operation, but the plan also requires swinging the arm out of the way so other instruments can have their unobscured look at the dump pile.

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Generation Share: Why more older Australians are living in share houses

An increasing number of older Australians are living in share housing. A relatively new group to emerge on the share-housing scene, they are choosing to share for financial reasons, but finding unexpected social benefits.

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How to Build a Museum in Outer Space

In 2001, Alice Gorman returned home after a long day of work, grabbed a cold beer, and settled into a chair on the veranda of her house in Australia. She lifted her head and stared at the night sky. Countless milky-white stars glittered in the velvety darkness. Her mind began to churn. “I just started to think about the fact that there’s a lot of space junk up there, and wondered what its heritag

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Salt-evolved zooplankton grow too slowly to block salt-induced algal blooms

Small animals at the base of the freshwater food chain can rapidly adapt to salt pollution—from sources like winter road deicing, agriculture, and mining—but at a price. In a special December edition of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B devoted to freshwater salt pollution, research shows that salt-adapted freshwater zooplankton grow 65 percent slower than regular zooplankton. Thei

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Billions of nanoplastics accumulate in marine organisms within six hours

A ground-breaking study has shown it takes a matter of hours for billions of minute plastic nanoparticles to become embedded throughout the major organs of a marine organism.

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AI software can dream up an entire digital world from a simple sketch

Creating a lifelike digital scene normally requires skill, creativity, and patience. Now we can just offload the work to an AI algorithm.

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DPS's New Phantom Ski Wax Gives You a Lifetime Speed Boost

The new wax treatment developed in Utah lasts longer than a traditional ski wax and doesn't scrape off, lasting the life of the ski.

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From ‘Buffy’ to ‘Charmed’ to 'Doctor Who,' ‘Woke’ TV Reboots Are Anything But

“Progressive” reimaginings of classic shows like Doctor Who, Buffy, and Charmed often hit a sour note—true inclusion will take more than creative casting.

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Image of the Day: Beetle Fight

The exaggerated horns and elongated forelegs of male flower beetles, which use these appendages as weapons in combat for females, do not slow down the insects in a race.

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Inactivating genes can boost crop genetic diversity

Researchers from CIRAD and INRA recently showed that inactivating a gene, RECQ4, leads to a three-fold increase in recombination in crops such as rice, pea and tomato. The gene inhibits the exchange of genetic material via recombination (crossover) during the sexual reproduction process in crops. This discovery, published in the journal Nature Plants on 26 November 2018, could speed up plant breed

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Macroscopic phenomena governed by microscopic physics

It has been difficult to simultaneously obtain micro- and macroscopic information in outer space. Global images of distant astrophysical phenomena provide macroscopic information, however local information is inaccessible. In contrast, in situ observations with spacecraft provide microscopic information of phenomena such as the Earth's magnetosphere, but it is difficult to obtain global informatio

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NASA Arrives at Bennu Today, But Exactly Where Is That Asteroid?

NASA is starting scientific observations of a new asteroid called Bennu today (Dec. 3), kicking the OSIRIS-REx mission into full gear.

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I Smelled Like a Man for a Day

During a recent shower, I grabbed my bottle of body wash—which smells like lavender and has “relaxing” properties—and squeezed. It was dead empty. This left me with the backup plan many girlfriends know well: using your boo’s “manly” body wash. You’ve seen it—dark gray bottle, sometimes with grippy nubs on the side. It gets you “deep clean,” like you’re polishing a rim wheel rather than scrubbing

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Dutch court rejects man’s request to be 20 years younger

Emile Ratelband, 69, argued that his age was causing him to struggle to find work and love A Dutch court has rejected the request of a self-styled “positivity guru” to shave 20 years off his age, in a case that drew worldwide attention. Last month, Emile Ratelband asked the court in Arnhem to formally change his date of birth to make him 49. He said his official age did not reflect his emotional

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Astronauts launch in Soyuz rocket for first time since botched takeoff

A Soyuz rocket carrying three astronauts to the International Space Station launched successfully, ending a period of uncertainty for human spaceflight

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Følg med live: I eftermiddag ankommer Nasa til asteroiden Bennu

Efter mere end to år undervejs ankommer en Nasa-sonde kl. 17.45 til sit kredsløb om asteroiden Bennu. Målet er at sende materiale hjem for at kunne sige mere om dannelsen af solsystemet.

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Gravitational waves: Monster black hole merger detectedLIGO Virgo Black Hole

Laser labs sense gravitational waves from a black hole collision at least five billion light-years away.

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Why George H. W. Bush Struggled to Connect With America

Amid the outpouring of tributes honoring the life and, by some measures, underrated presidency of George Herbert Walker Bush—who died Saturday at the age of 94—is the inevitable criticism of his communication skills. In his brilliant book What It Takes , about the 1988 presidential campaign, Richard Ben Cramer captured the problem in a nutshell: “People thought the President’s speeches didn’t pac

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Dear Therapist: I Don’t Know How to Deal With My Workplace Jealousy

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at . Dear Therapist, About four months ago, I was passed over for a promotion. This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, a longtime goal, and when I found out, I was devastated. It precipitated a depressive episode; I have been working with my therapist since

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Why social design is a north star for entrepreneurs

Problem solving doesn't have to involve numbers. Sometimes it just involves connecting dots between markets, and simple experiments based on data. These tweaks can make huge differences in people's lives. And anyone can do it, as social design can life entire communities. People who participate in social design learn how to apply it in the future, making social design a learnable and transferable

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Three astronauts blast off to International Space Station

Three astronauts have blasted off to the International Space Station, a successful launch that follows October's aborted mission.

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Here's a Way to Fight Climate Change: Empower Women

Women are disproportionately affected by climate change, says environmentalist Katharine Wilkinson, but she says there are three distinct ways to make a difference.

9h

Should We Subsidize Nuclear Power to Fight Climate Change?

That’s what some are advocating, but the arguments in favor of doing so are flawed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Soyuz rocket: First crewed launch since failure docks at ISS

Russia's space agency confirmed the docking – the first crewed launch since October's failure.

9h

Danmark prøver igen at bevare masse-logning: Vil have ny EU-dom

Danmark vil have EU-Domstolen til at genoverveje de udtalelser, som har fejet tæppet væk under telelogningen herhjemme. Derfor hjælper regeringen Belgien med at forsøge at bevare en tilsvarende masse-overvågning.

9h

Mariott retsforfølges for over 80 mia. kroner efter kæmpe datalæk

Efter det store datalæk, hvor op imod en halv milliard kunders kreditkortinfo kan være blevet lækket til hackere, indløber flere søgsmål.

9h

Warming Waters Could Make Sharks "Right-Handed"–and Deadlier

New findings reveal how rising ocean temperatures could boost sharks’ thinking, potentially disrupting food chains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Why a curious crustacean could hold secret to making renewable energy from wood

Scientists studying the digestive system of a curious wood-eating crustacean have discovered it may hold the key to sustainably converting wood into biofuel.

9h

How Butt Gas, Drugs and Amazing Memories Led to This Weird Turtle Photo

The ancient cosmologers were right and Galileo was wrong: This turtle's got the whole freaking world on its back.

9h

LIVE: Afgørende vagtskifte på den internationale rumstation

Sidste gang en Soyuz-raket skulle sende astronauter til ISS, gik det galt. Denne gang skal den russiske raket fungere. Følg opsendelsen LIVE her.

9h

Did Trump Advise Michael Cohen to Lie to Congress?

Michael Cohen, the former Donald Trump lawyer and loyalist, has now revealed more of the president’s lies and misrepresentations, this time exposing falsehoods about the history of the president’s business dealings with Russia. The lies were detailed in court documents made public on Thursday, as Cohen pleaded guilty to lying to Congress. Cohen previously admitted to the lies told about arrangeme

9h

Kemoterapi kan skade visse patienter med aggressivt lymfom

Høj-dosis kemoterapi medfører høj risiko for død for patienter med aggressivt lymfom, der har mutationer i generne TP53 og PPM1D. Det viser et nyt dansk studie, hvis data fremlægges på den amerikanske hæmatologikongres ASH.

9h

Flere højrisikopatienter med myelomatose bør få dobbelt-transplantation

Nye data indikerer, at højrisikopatienter med myelomatose opnår bedre overlevelse af at få to transplantationer frem for blot en. Det giver anledning til at overveje praksis i Danmark, mener hæmatolog på Sygehus Lillebælt.

9h

Specifikke genmutationer er mulig trigger af myeloplastisk syndrom

Forsker fra Rigshospitalet har opdaget, at personer med visse genmutationer har en øget risiko for at udvikle myeloplastisk syndrom senere i livet.

9h

Hurtig genetisk screening kan forbedre behandling af leukæmi

Et nyt studie viser, at det kan betale sig for læger at bestemme, hvilken molekylær undergruppe patienter med akut myeloid leukæmi tilhører, inden de begynder behandlingen.

9h

Langvarig brug af binyrebarkhormon kan undgås ved hjælp af IL5-antagonister

Brugen af binyrebarkhormon hos patienter med eosinofili kan reduceres ved hjælp af nye typer af behandlinger som f.eks. IL5-antagonister.

9h

Tarmbakterier spiller rolle for succes ved celletransplantation

Nyt studie viser, at der er større risiko for komplikationer ved en hæmatopoietisk celletransplantation, hvis patienten har lav diversitet i sammensætningen af tarmbakterier.

9h

Ny lymfom-behandling viser lovende takter

Ny form for behandling til patienter med diffus storcellet B-celle lymfom bringer den gennemsnitlige overlevelse ud over 12 mdr., og forskerne tror på fuld helbredelse.

9h

Thriving Plateau Region That Slipped Beneath North Sea 8,000 Years Ago Reveals Its Secrets

Archaeologists are finding out what the vast landscape looked like before it slipped beneath the salty water so long ago.

9h

House Democrats Shift Their Focus From Collusion to Leverage

The House Democrats preparing to lead their own Russia probes appear to be turning their attention from possible collusion between the 2016 Trump campaign and Russian intelligence to potential Russian leverage over the president. The turning point came last week when Michael Cohen, Trump’s former personal lawyer and fixer, pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about the Trump Organization’s dealing

10h

George H. W. Bush Was Decent Even to Rivals Like Me

On a Wednesday morning in the United States Senate in February 1984, I was voting on President Ronald Reagan’s plan to renew funding for the B-1 bomber, as I recall. The vice president was in the Presiding Officer’s chair to cast the tiebreaker if necessary. George H. W. Bush beckoned to me as the clerk was calling the roll. The night before, my campaign for the Democratic nomination for presiden

10h

John Kasich Searches for His Place in the GOP

John Kasich, the stalwart never-Trumper who says he may or may not run for president in 2020—maybe as a Republican challenging Donald Trump or maybe as an independent, because all options are open unless they’re not—stopped in Philadelphia on Friday to practice his Art of the Tease. “As for me and what I’m going to do,” he riffed during a nonpartisan forum, in his usual free-form manner, “I’ve be

10h

The Conscience of a Conservative

Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina opposed the Civil Rights Act , calling it “the single most dangerous piece of legislation ever introduced in the Congress.” He opposed the Voting Rights Act. He filibustered a bill to establish a federal holiday to honor Martin Luther King Jr., accusing the civil-rights leader of “action-oriented Marxism.” He protected South Africa’s apartheid government from

10h

What’s Really Happening to Retail?

What’s really going on with retail in New York City? According to some, the sky is falling. As one representative of the real-estate company Douglas Elliman told The New York Times , 20 percent of Manhattan’s retail space is vacant. A separate survey from Morgan Stanley determined that a similar share of street-level retail space along the borough’s most high-end corridors is “available,” meaning

10h

Techtopia #81: Dansk firma lover stabil kryptovaluta

Aryze vil lancere en ny elektronisk valuta kaldet e-kr med fast kurs og sikkerhed i statsobligationer – som et link mellem traditionel valuta og kryptovaluta.

10h

Bones of Handless Man Found Near Mysterious Medieval Dolphin Burial

The body was found just a few feet from the burial of a mysterious medieval skeleton of a dolphin.

10h

Dads, not just moms, can pass along mitochondrial DNA

Data from three families suggest that in rare cases children can inherit mitochondria from their fathers.

10h

Is visiting a robot brothel ok? Most people say yes, if you are single

When people in Finland were asked about the morality of visiting a robot brothel most thought it was OK for singles to do it, but not people who were married

10h

Computermodel giver mere præcis prognose for patienter med myelodysplastisk syndrom

Når maskiner laver modeller til at forudsige livslængden for patienter med myelodysplastisk syndrom, virker de bedre end guldstandarden på området.

10h

The Honey Factory review – the buzz of exploring honeybees’ secrets

A real insider book explains why the saying busy as a bee has honeybees all wrong – and how studying them in the wild could be good news for them and us

10h

10h

Why a curious crustacean could hold secret to making renewable energy from wood

Scientists studying gribble — a curious wood-eating crustacean — have discovered how they are able to digest wood despite being the only known animal to have a sterile digestive system. The discovery may help to develop cheaper and more sustainable tools for converting wood into biofuel in the future.

11h

Running a marathon can increase cardiac strain in amateur runners

Amateurs running full-length marathons could be significantly raising levels of several key biomarkers of cardiac strain. Levels of two proteins — troponin I and troponin T — were highest after runners completed a full marathon compared to a half marathon, and a 10K race, as were other biomarkers of cardiac stress.

11h

Klimarådet: Dårlig ide at opfylde klimamål med biodiesel

Brug hellere bioethanol, når vi skal nå de kortsigtede klimamål, vurderer rådet.

11h

How taking a home genetics test could help catch a murderer

Specialists are using public-access DNA databases to track down violent criminals such as the notorious Golden State Killer. But the technique raises a host of legal and ethical questions DNA sleuth CeCe Moore recalls the moment that the pieces came together, in May, in the hunt for her first suspected killer – the man now thought to be responsible for the brutal 1987 murders of a young Canadian

11h

The Placenta, an Afterthought No Longer

An ephemeral organ, long dismissed merely as afterbirth, increasingly is viewed as critical to understanding the health and course of pregnancy.

11h

NASA’s Osiris-Rex Arrives at Asteroid Bennu After a Two-Year JourneyNASA Bennu OSIRIS-REx

The spacecraft now begins a close study of the primitive space rock, seeking clues to the early solar system.

11h

The New Health Care: Why Hospitals Should Let You Sleep

Frequent disruptions are more than just annoying for patients. They can also cause harm.

11h

11h

High Stakes As International Climate Conference Begins

The U.N. climate meeting underway in Poland is the most important climate conference since the 2015 Paris Agreement set emissions reduction goals for nearly every country on Earth. (Image credit: Czarek Sokolowski/AP)

11h

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?

Protein snacks and supplements are popular, but unless you're an extreme athlete or recovering from an injury, you may already get enough protein in your diet. Here's how to tell how much you need. (Image credit: Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR)

11h

Kids With Concussions Can Phase In Exercise, Screen Time Sooner Than Before

No longer do kids with concussions need to sit in dark rooms for days on end. For the first time in nearly a decade, the nation's pediatricians have loosened their guidance on concussion recovery. (Image credit: Gregoire Sitter/EyeEm/Getty Images)

11h

#52 Penge eller patientliv

Stetoskopet kigger nærmere på, hvordan medicin prissættes.

11h

Act now or risk disaster, nations told at UN climate summit

After the starkest warnings yet of the catastrophic threat posed by climate change, nations gathered in Poland on Sunday to chart a way for mankind to avert runaway global warming.

11h

World Bank promises $200 bn in 2021-25 climate cash

The World Bank on Monday unveiled $200 billion in climate action investment for 2021-25, adding this amounts to a doubling of its current five-year funding.

11h

Forskere vil forhindre at dit juletræ taber nålene

Danskernes yndlings-juletræ, nordmannsgranen, taber nålene på det inderste af grenene….

11h

Turning the page: Japan's last pager service ends after 50 years

The end of the pager era is nigh in Japan after five decades as the country's last provider announced on Monday it would be scrapping its service next year.

11h

Solving 21st-century problems requires skills that few are trained in, scientists find

From companies trying to resolve data security risks to coastal communities preparing for rising sea levels, solving modern problems requires teamwork that draws on a broad range of expertise and life experiences. Yet individuals receive little formal training to develop the skills that are vital to these collaborations.

11h

New data dashboards launched to inform policymaking on modern slavery and child labor

Marking the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, new interactive data dashboards have been launched that visualise trends in forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking, and child labour. For the first time, country-level data visualisations and details on governments' efforts to address these abuses have been brought together in order to inform evidence-based policymaking.

11h

Scientists call for eight steps to increase soil carbon for climate action and food security

Leading scientists call for action to increase global soil carbon, in advance of the annual climate summit of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Katowice, Poland (COP24) and World Soil Day (5 Dec).

11h

Undercover investigation: Socio-economic survey of pangolin hunting in Assam, India

Alarming footage captured by World Animal Protection and the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) at University of Oxford reveals the heart-breaking moment a pangolin is brutally killed for its body parts to be sold on the black market in Assam, north-eastern India.

12h

Woman takes in grey squirrel found injured in Somerset

The squirrel, named Horatio, was acting "really confused" when found by the side of the road.

12h

In the Blink of an Eye, a Hunt for Oil Threatens Pristine Alaska

For decades, opposition to drilling has left the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge off limits. Now the Trump administration is hurriedly clearing the way for oil exploration.

12h

Drilling in the Arctic: Questions for a Polar Bear Expert

The Trump administration is reversing a longstanding ban on oil exploration on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The area is home to about 900 polar bears, which are already struggling because of climate change. Can they withstand another disruption?

12h

The Race for Alaskan Oil: 6 Key Takeaways

For more than a generation, opposition to drilling has left a 19-million-acre wildlife refuge in Alaska largely unscathed. But the region is on the cusp of major change as Washington speedily rolls back protections.

12h

Addressing the epidemic of antivaccine misinformation

Last week, Dr. Gorski was on vacation. However, part of his vacation involved spending a couple of hours with two of his heroes, meeting new pro-science advocates, and talking vaccine hesitancy and the antivaccine movement.

12h

Flyvende drivhuse skal dyrke tomater i miljøer som på Månen og Mars

To drivhuse med tomatfrø bliver opsendt til lavt jordkredsløb mandag aften sammen med kunstig urin, bakterier og alger for at simulere madproduktion i baser på Månen og Mars. Missionen er drevet af dansk udstyr.

13h

Big Brussels climate march marks COP24 start

Tens of thousands of marchers took to the streets of Brussels on Sunday to mark the start of the UN climate summit in Poland.

13h

Climate change: 'Trump effect' threatens Paris pact

President Trump's actions are restricting global efforts to cut carbon, a study suggests.

13h

Weibo eyes expansion to 'Chinese-speaking world'

Chinese social media giant Weibo is making a push into foreign markets and is considering launching new products in different languages, a senior executive told AFP, brushing off concerns over censorship and credibility.

13h

First manned space mission launches since Soyuz failure

The first manned space mission to the International Space Station since an unprecedented accident in October, which raised concerns about Moscow's Soviet-designed spacecraft, will launch on Monday.

13h

Saltier waterways are creating dangerous 'chemical cocktails'

A recent study led by University of Maryland researchers found that streams and rivers across the United States have become saltier and more alkaline over the past 50 years, thanks to road deicers, fertilizers and other salty compounds that humans indirectly release into waterways. The team named this effect "Freshwater Salinization Syndrome."

13h

Study finds toxic flame retardants in children's car seats

In a new study, Indiana University scientists found toxic flame retardants in newly manufactured children's car seats, sparking concerns about children's health. Of the 18 children's car seats tested, 15 contained new or traditional hazardous flame retardant chemicals.

13h

Can you solve it? An Aboriginal family puzzle

The skins they live in UPDATE: The solution is now available here. Hi guzzlers, Today I have a logic puzzle based on the complex kinship rules found in Australian Aboriginal society. Aboriginal groups are divided into subgroups, called “skins.” Your skin is determined at birth, based on your parents’ skins, and it does not change in your lifetime. Your skin will determine certain social rules, su

14h

Ringe datavalidering årsag til fejlbehæftede digitale årsregnskaber

Seks år, at efter danske virksomheder begyndte at indberette digitale årsregnskaber til Erhvervsstyrelsen, mangler der stadig basal datavalidering. Resultatet er fejlagtige årsregnskaber som mulige fejlkilder for bl.a. virksomheder og erhvervspolitik.

14h

Scientists call for eight steps to increase soil carbon for climate action and food security

Leading scientists call for action to increase global soil carbon, in advance of the annual climate summit of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP24) and World Soil Day (December 5).

15h

The 'climate diaspora' trying to save the Paris agreement from Trump

There was an exodus of climate experts from the White House after the 2016 election – but they still turn up to UN talks In a hallway beneath the UN climate change headquarters in Bonn, Germany, Sue Biniaz leans on a table, scribbling some thoughts on a piece of paper. It’s May 2018, three years after representatives from nearly 200 countries convened in France in an extraordinary display of inte

15h

The Blurring Boundaries Between Hong Kong and Mainland China

HONG KONG—Lau Wing Yin has a curious weekend pastime. He slips through malls and stakes out bus depots on the northwest corner of Lantau, Hong Kong’s largest island. Armed with his mobile phone, he hunts for illegal tour guides, collecting photo evidence to turn over to police—what he believes is his part in curbing the sudden and swelling inflow of mainland-Chinese day-trippers here. It was not

15h

Mande-prævention på vej: Hormon-gel skal smøres på kroppen

De amerikanerne sundhedsmyndigheder vil teste en hormon-gel, som kan blokere mandens produktion af sædceller.

15h

Solving 21st-century problems requires skills that few are trained in, scientists find

From companies trying to resolve data security risks to coastal communities preparing for rising sea levels, solving modern problems requires teamwork that draws on a range of expertise and life experiences. Yet individuals receive little training to develop the skills that are vital to these collaborations. A new scientific report identifies the essential components of collaborative problem solvi

16h

New review highlights importance of good sleep routines for children

University of British Columbia review of sleep research backs use of bedtime routines to promote healthy sleep for children.

16h

Bonus for superior snoozing: Students who meet 8-hour sleep challenge do better on finals

Students given extra points if they met 'The 8-hour Challenge' — averaging eight hours of sleep for five nights during final exams week — did better than those who snubbed (or flubbed) the incentive, according to Baylor University research.

16h

Undercover investigation: Socio-economic survey of pangolin hunting in Assam, India

Referred to as the world's most trafficked mammal, pangolins are not only being gradually pushed to the edge of extinction, but also made an innocent victim to huge cruelty. Having conducted a 2-year socio-economic survey of pangolin poaching in Northeast India, a research team aims to quantify and understand the drivers of the practice in the previously unstudied region in order to recommend adeq

16h

Study finds toxic flame retardants in children's car seats

Indiana University scientists have found toxic flame retardants in newly manufactured children's car seats, sparking concerns about children's health. Of the 18 children's car seats tested, 15 contained new or traditional hazardous flame retardant chemicals.

16h

Acute flaccid myelitis: Five things to know

Acute flaccid myelitis, a syndrome with rapid muscle weakness in children, has been seen in hospitals in the United States and Canada this fall. A practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) outlines five things to know about this health issue.

16h

Tool identifies which patients with COPD are at risk of death, serious complications

A new decision tool to help emergency physicians identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are at high risk of serious complications, including death, performs better than current practice, according to a validation study of the Ottawa COPD Risk Scale in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

16h

High-strength opioid formulations: The case for the federal minister of health to recall them

One regulatory tool that has yet to be deployed to curb the ongoing opioid epidemic is the power of the federal minister of health to recall high-strength opioid formulations from the market. These opioid formulations can harm patients with chronic pain in multiple ways and the minister could recall them, argues a commentary in CMAJ.

16h

Sacked man claims discrimination against his 'ethical veganism'

Jordi Casamitjana wants to have ethical veganism recognised as a philosophical belief, in a landmark legal action.

16h

NASA's OSIRIS-REx Spacecraft Just Arrived at Asteroid BennuNASA Bennu OSIRIS-REx

The space rock could hold clues to the origins of our solar system, and maybe even life on Earth.

16h

16h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 3. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

17h

Women reveal the reasons they reject a preventive drug for breast cancer

Only around a fifth of women at higher risk of developing breast cancer think they need to take a drug proven to help prevent the disease, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK and published today in Clinical Breast Cancer.

20h

Saltier waterways are creating dangerous 'chemical cocktails'

New research suggests that saltier, more alkaline freshwater can release toxic metals and harmful nitrogen-containing compounds from streambeds and soils in drainage basins. The results further suggest that many of these chemicals travel together throughout watersheds, forming 'chemical cocktails' that can have more devastating effects on drinking water supplies and ecosystems when compared with i

20h

Baby's first cold can last longer depending on nose-dwelling bacteria

New research on the types of bacteria living in babies' noses could offer clues as to why some recover quickly from their first cough or cold, while others suffer for longer. The study suggests that babies who have a wide variety of different bacteria living in their noses tend to recover more quickly from their first respiratory virus, compared to those who have less variety and more bacteria fro

20h

Epileptics in high-crime neighborhoods have three times as many seizures

People with epilepsy living in high crime neighborhoods in Chicago had three times as many seizures as those living in neighborhoods with lower crime rates according to new research.

21h

The country where being a climate activist is a lonely job

Almost 80% of Poland's electricity is generated by coal. Patryk Bialas says it's time that changed.

21h

How kids with ‘overweight genes’ can lose pounds

Children who are genetically predisposed to being overweight can still lose weight by changing their diet and exercise habits, a study of about 750 children shows. In 2016, 124 million children and adolescents worldwide had obesity. The new study examines how genetics affect children and young people’s ability to lose excess weight. “We are trying to understand the genetic driving force behind ov

21h

Lizards get twitchy to survive fire ant invasion

Lizards in the eastern US are adapting to invasive fire ants—which can bite, sting, and kill them—in unexpected ways. The changes reverse geographical trends in behavioral and physical traits for avoiding predators. “Rapid environmental change, be it from changing climate or the introduction of invasive species, is putting a lot of pressure on native species,” says Christopher Thawley, graduate s

21h

21h

Forearm arteries work just fine for coronary bypass

Forearm arteries are more effective in coronary bypass surgery than the commonly used leg vein, a new study shows. In around 95 percent of bypass operations globally, surgeons still use veins from the legs, in combination with one of the chest wall arteries. And that’s despite the fact that half of veins used in heart bypasses become completely blocked within 10 years of surgery. Arms and hands c

22h

10 philosophy books to develop a diverse metaphysical perspective

After thousands of years, and an infinite amount of novel experiences, there are today many dueling schools of philosophical thought. A great philosophical background takes into account a number of metaphysical positions and ideas. These 10 philosophy books all take on the questions of existence in a unique and varied manner. There is an endless stream of philosophies to frolic in, play with, and

22h

Starwatch: the sun sets, and out come the moon and Saturn

Provided you have a clear western horizon, this week is a good time to see the crescent moon and the ochre spot of Saturn Between 8 and 10 December, the young moon will be close to the planet Saturn in the evening sky just after sunset. It will be a tough challenge to see this pair together but a beautiful sight if you manage it. Saturn is currently moving closer to the sun and will disappear int

23h

Epileptics in high-crime neighborhoods have three times as many seizures

People with epilepsy living in high crime neighborhoods in Chicago had three times as many seizures as those living in neighborhoods with lower crime rates according to new research from the University of Illinois at Chicago presented at the American Epilepsy Society 2018 conference in New Orleans.

1d

Google's DeepMind predicts 3D shapes of proteins

AI program’s understanding of proteins could usher in new era of medical progress Having laid waste to the Atari classics and reached superhuman performance in chess and the Chinese board game, Go , Google’s DeepMind outfit has turned its artificial intelligence on one of the toughest problems in science. The result, perhaps, was predictable. At an international conference in Cancun on Sunday, or

1d

Photos of the Paris “Yellow Vest” Riots

A third weekend of protest in Paris, France, turned violent on Saturday, as thousands of “yellow vests” ( gilets jaunes ) battled with riot police, burned cars, and damaged property. The protest movement began largely focused on anger toward rising fuel taxes, but has grown into a wider anti-government movement. Paris police reported that 133 people were injured in the riots, and more than 400 we

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