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Nyheder2018december04

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In a first, a woman with a uterus transplanted from a deceased donor gives birth

After receiving a uterus from a deceased donor, a woman gave birth to a healthy girl in December of 2017.

57min

Enhancing our vision of the past

An international group of scientists led by researchers from the University of Bristol have advanced our understanding of how ancient animals saw the world by combining the study of fossils and genetics.

25min

A toxin that travels from stomach to brain may trigger Parkinsonism

Combining low doses of a toxic herbicide with sugar-binding proteins called lectins may trigger Parkinsonism — symptoms typical of Parkinson's disease like body tremors and slowing of body motions — after the toxin travels from the stomach to the brain.

25min

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The Atlantic Daily: Without Warning

What We’re Following We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? People vs. Macron: Over the past several weeks, France has been in the grips of a grassroots social uprising, in part over a consequential tax on gas, that culminated in violent demonstrati

4min

Enhancing our vision of the past

An international group of scientists led by researchers from the University of Bristol have advanced our understanding of how ancient animals saw the world by combining the study of fossils and genetics.

4min

Microplastics found in all sea turtle species

Tests on more than 100 sea turtles — spanning three oceans and all seven species — have revealed microplastics in the guts of every single turtle.

4min

Smokers who roll their own less inclined to quit

Smokers who roll their own cigarettes are less likely to try quitting smoking, according to a new study carried out by UCL.

4min

Too much or too little sleep linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death

The amount of time you sleep, including daytime naps, is linked to your risk of developing cardiovascular disease and death, according to a study of over 116,000 people in seven regions of the world, published in the European Heart Journal.

4min

Religious vows, rituals, readings and music should be allowed in civil marriage, study shows

Couples marrying in civil ceremonies should be allowed to have religious vows, rituals, readings, and music as part of their ceremony for the first time, a major new study has concluded.

25min

Microplastics found in all sea turtle species

Tests on more than 100 sea turtles—spanning three oceans and all seven species—have revealed microplastics in the guts of every single turtle.

25min

Weirdly shaped mouse sperm can be used to tell species apart

Think back to health class and picture a sperm. It's got a smooth rounded head, with a long skinny tail at the end, right? As it turns out, the sperm from different species of animals have different shapes—and, as a new study in the Journal of Mammalogy shows, those shapes can be used to tell apart closely related species.

25min

Black Americans' life expectancy decreasing due to firearms

While it is well known that gun deaths are a major public health problem, a new study quantifies the significance of substantially higher gun homicide rates in driving down life expectancy among black Americans.

39min

The Lancet: First baby born via uterus transplant from a deceased donor

Currently, uterus donation is only available for women with family members who are willing to donate. With live donors in short supply, the new technique might help to increase availability and give more women the option of pregnancy.

39min

Extent of US lives shortened by gun violence twice as great among blacks as whites

The magnitude of lives shortened by gun violence in the US since the turn of the century has been more than twice as great among black Americans — particularly those up to the age of 20 — as it has been among whites, finds research published online in BMJ Evidence Based Medicine.

39min

Kids of the 1% are 10 times more likely to become inventors

A new study reveals the economic class from which most U.S. inventors come. Wealth, race, and gender are all factors in innovation. Exposure to innovators and inventions in childhood can bridge the gap. None A just-released comparison of patent records and tax and school-district records has produced a stunning picture of a critical form of inequality in the U.S. The Equality of Opportunity proje

40min

Woman gives birth using womb transplanted from dead donor

Patient in Brazil who had been born without uterus gives birth to baby girl A woman in Brazil has successfully given birth after receiving a womb from a dead donor, the first time such a procedure has been successful. While researchers in countries including Sweden and the US have previously succeeded in transplanting wombs from living donors into women who have gone on to give birth , experts sa

49min

4 books on race in America everyone should read

These books, from authors like Toni Morrison and John F. Kennedy, open up a whole new perspective on the American landscape. Read Jose Antonio Vargas' groundbreaking essay on life as an undocumented migrant in The New York Times Magazine . Vargas' memoir, Dear America, Notes of an Undocumented Citizen , is out now. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Growing up, no book stimulated me more than Morris

52min

For many teens, the battle with opioid addiction starts with wisdom teeth

Health A study suggests dentists are over-prescribing the drugs. Young people are particularly vulnerable to the effect of painkillers, but dentists may over-prescribe them after surgery.

1h

Mothers whose responses to infants' facial cues increase report stronger bonds with babies

A new study examines whether pregnancy changes mothers' neural sensitivity to infants' facial cues, and whether such changes affect mother-infant bonding. The study finds that increases in cortical responses to infants' faces from the prenatal to the postnatal period in individual mothers are associated with more positive relationships with the baby (as reported by the mothers) after birth.

1h

So cute you could crush it?

Until now, research exploring how and why cute aggression occurs has been the domain of behavioral psychology. But recently, a licensed clinical psychologist with a background in neuroscience has taken formal study of the phenomenon a few steps further. To her knowledge, the results of her latest study are the first to confirm a neural basis for cute aggression.

1h

New building block in quantum computing demonstrated

Researchers have demonstrated a new level of control over photons encoded with quantum information. The team's experimental system allows them to manipulate the frequency of photons to bring about superposition, a state that enables quantum operations and computing.

1h

Study reveals dangerous prescribing practices for Idaho patients on opioids

A quarter of chronic opioid users in Idaho were at risk for overdose from unsafe combinations of prescriptions for controlled substances in 2017, according to research presented at the ASHP (American Society for Health-System Pharmacists) 53rd Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exhibition. Forty-four percent of the dangerous overlapping prescriptions were written by more than one prescriber.

1h

A Small-Town Radio Station’s Lonely Souls

Willcox, Arizona. Population 3,500. “It's not unlike many other towns one might pass by on the freeway while driving around the American West,” the filmmaker Zack Wright told The Atlantic . Driving by is exactly what Maxey and his co-director, Ryan Maxey were doing when they happened to tune into KHIL, the town’s country-music station. “Were treated to a half hour of great, obscure country music

1h

Google’s Night Sight photo mode is great—here’s how to fake it with your smartphone

Gadgets Google's Pixel phones take impressive photos in the dark. Here are some editing tips to match it. The Google Pixel 3 is really good in the dark, but you can try to match it with any smarthpone.

1h

Saving the world's last West African giraffes in Niger

The highly threatened subspecies has been brought back to a reserve in Niger after a 50-year absence.

2h

Understanding the current rise of the far right using Marx and Lacan

The article posits several arguments suggesting that we must turn to thinkers Marx and Lacan and the philosophical concepts they coined to understand the rise of the far right.

2h

Researchers classify Alzheimer's patients in 6 subgroups

Researchers studying Alzheimer's disease have created an approach to classify patients with Alzheimer's disease, a finding that may open the door for personalized treatments.

2h

Chinese scientist vanishes after claiming to have made first gene-edited babies

He Jiankui caused international controversy by claiming to have used the CRISPR gene-editing tool to modify the genes of two babies. Some reports suggested he was being held under house arrest, though others say that's inaccurate. It's not unusual for people to disappear in China at the hands of government authorities. None Where is He Jiankui? The scientist who caused international uproar by cla

2h

Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in water bottles. So, why didn't it?

One hundred thousand residents of Flint, Michigan could only use water from bottles or filters during a years-long lead contamination crisis, which started when the city switched to a new drinking water source in 2014.

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Amazing ‘Tariff Man’!

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ). We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Today in 5 Lines After a closed-door briefing with CIA Director Gina Haspel, several senators, including the Republica

2h

Maternal stress at conception linked to children's stress response at age 11

A new study published in the Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease finds that mothers' stress levels at the moment they conceive their children are linked to the way children respond to life challenges at age 11. SFU health sciences professor Pablo Nepomnaschy led an interdisciplinary research team on this first cohort study.

2h

Forget 'needle in a haystack'; try finding an invasive species in a lake

When the tiny and invasive spiny water flea began appearing in UW-Madison researchers' nets in 2009, scientists began to wonder how Lake Mendota, one of the most-studied lakes in the world, went from flea-free to infested seemingly overnight, undetected by trained technicians. A new report published in the journal Ecosphere says Lake Mendota's story may be the rule, rather than an exception.

2h

Is the pancreas regeneration debate settled? An original theory renewed

A contentious debate among diabetes researchers has surrounded the regeneration of pancreatic insulin-producing cells: not if these cells regenerate, but rather how. Diabetes Research Institute scientists now draw categorical conclusions that pancreatic progenitors do exist. The prevailing theory, they say, is based upon an unreliable tool in an inadequate model.

2h

Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in water bottles. So, why didn't it?

The Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in waste. A Purdue University case study investigates why not and proposes solutions for future water disasters.

2h

Study shows low-income women in Texas are not getting contraception after childbirth

The study shows that two-thirds of women did not receive their desired contraception at the six-week postpartum visit, increasing risk of unintended pregnancy.

2h

'Error Neurons' play role in how brain processes mistakes

New research from Cedars-Sinai has identified neurons that play a role in how people recognize errors they make, a discovery that may have implications for the treatment of conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. The study also offers a new level of understanding for error-related negativity, which can be easily measured using an EEG and could one day become standard

2h

GOP Email Hack Shows How Bad Midterm Election Meddling GotNRCC House Republican

Election-related hacking during the midterm season seemed fairly muted, but it turns out that the National Republican Congressional Committee suffered a major breach.

2h

The Coming Senate Showdown Over Saudi Arabia

Senate leaders are pitted against the White House in an escalating battle over whether Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman himself ordered the hit on the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. That split grew into a chasm on Tuesday, after CIA Director Gina Haspel briefed select Senate leaders on her agency’s conclusions. Her closed-door testimony followed separate briefings from Secretary of State

2h

Carnivores: Facts About Meat Eaters

A carnivore is an animal or plant that eats the flesh of animals.

3h

Study finds increased long-term mortality in pediatric firearm injury survivors

Children and adolescents who survive assault, including by firearm, have increased long term mortality compared to those who survive unintentional, nonviolent trauma.

3h

High lead levels found in some spices purchased abroad

Investigations of lead poisoning cases in New York City (NYC) have found high levels of lead in certain spices purchased abroad, reports a study in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, part of a special supplement devoted to Lead Poisoning Prevention. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

3h

New study shows that fish oil does not increase bleeding risk in surgery patients

A new study published in Circulation showed that fish oil — which contains the omega-3s EPA and DHA — did not increase perioperative bleeding in surgery patients. In fact, higher blood omega-3 levels were associated with lower risk of bleeding.

3h

'Unfinished agenda' in preventing lead poisoning

Over the years, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and its partners have made major progress towards reducing lead exposure in the United States. But more work remains in preventing lead poisoning in US children and adults, according to a special supplement to the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

3h

Spinal cord injury could throw off body's internal clock, study shows

Although paralysis is the most noticeable result of a spinal cord injury, a new study by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin suggests such injuries could throw off the internal clock of the entire body's daily activities, from hormones to sleep-wake schedules.

3h

Expanded cord blood shows potential for use in adult bone marrow transplants

Umbilical cord blood stem cells that are cultured and expanded outside the body before being used for bone marrow transplant in adult blood cancer patients appear safe and restore blood count recovery faster than standard cord blood. The findings advance efforts to improve cord blood use among adults who have been diagnosed with blood cancers.

3h

Developing tools to combat 'fake news'

In order to combat this issue, tools and practices need to be developed to help consumers and journalists filter the information they are constantly being fed.

3h

Quantum computers pose a security threat that we’re still totally unprepared for

Some US experts think it could take at least 20 years to get quantum-proof encryption widely deployed.

3h

Navigation system in rodents akin to ancient, open ocean direction-finding

The navigation system used by rodents is similar to that used by Pacific Islanders in finding their way through the open ocean without a compass, a team of neuroscientists has found.

3h

New Zika vaccine effective in preclinical trials

Researchers have successfully developed a vaccine candidate for the Zika virus, showing that it is effective in protecting both mice and monkeys from the infection. Demonstrating the effectiveness of their vaccine candidate in monkeys (non-human primates) is an important milestone because it typically predicts the vaccine will work in humans, enabling further clinical development.

3h

Qualcomm's New Snapdragon Chip Suggests 5G Is Almost Here

At an event on the island of Maui, Qualcomm and Samsung showed off new tech that should put some 5G wireless capability onto mobile handsets in 2019.

3h

The seasons are shifting, but redrawing their lines won't erase the problem

Environment We shouldn’t redefine the seasons just yet. There are three ways to define a season: astronomical, climatological, and biological. The first is fixed, constant, forever. But the other two—the ones human feel most…

3h

Cameras, drones: Rio de Janeiro to put electronic eyes on crime

Rio de Janeiro state is moving ahead with plans to deploy security cameras and drones to help fight crime, according to its next governor, a far-right politician loyal to president-elect Jair Bolsonaro.

3h

Developing tools to combat 'fake news'

With news coverage being a constant cycle and information being amplified across social media channels, it can be difficult to discern between sound news and 'fake news.' As a result people's trust in scientific information has begun to break down. This is especially harmful to society when the mass dissemination of misinformation, especially as it relates to issues such as climate change, is prob

3h

Can rice and flushing the toilet be slowly poisoning you?

Many of the substances that humans consume on a regular basis as parts of their basic diet actually contain harmful toxins. Rice, barbecued meat and drinking water all pose threats to human health as hosts to potent toxins, carcinogens and opportunistic pathogens. In many cases, the rise in concentrations of these harmful substances is a direct result of human activity, such as the use of harmful

3h

New graphene-based sensor design could improve food safety

In the US, more than 100 food recalls were issued in 2017 because of contamination from harmful bacteria such as Listeria, Salmonella or E. coli. A new sensor design could one day make it easier to detect pathogens in food before products hit the supermarket shelves, thus preventing sometimes-deadly illnesses from contaminated food.

3h

Spinal injury throws body clocks off schedule

In the hours and days after a traumatic injury, the gears of circadian clocks fall profoundly out of sync, disrupting body temperature, hormonal rhythms, and immune response, new research shows.

3h

A missed opportunity

New study shows low use of telehealth services for substance use disorder. More than 20 million Americans have substance use disorders related to alcohol, opioids and other drugs.Less than one in five receive treatment for substance use disorder, in part because of lack of providers, especially in rural areas.

3h

Largest police force in the US steps into the drone age

The New York Police Department has shown off its first fleet of drones.

3h

Gut microbiome differs among ethnicities, researchers find

Research increasingly links the gut microbiome to a range of human maladies, including inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes and even cancer. Attempts to manipulate the gut with food rich in healthy bacteria, such as yogurt or kombucha, are in vogue, along with buying commercial probiotics that promise to improve users' chances against illness.

3h

Human actions impact wild salmon's ability to evolve

Once spring-run chinook salmon disappear, they are not likely to re-emerge, indicates genetic analysis of the revered wild fish in a study led by the University of California, Davis. Prompt conservation action could preserve spring-run chinook, as well as their evolutionary potential.

3h

Navigation system in rodents akin to ancient, open ocean direction-finding

The navigation system used by rodents is similar to that used by Pacific Islanders in finding their way through the open ocean without a compass, a team of neuroscientists has found.

3h

Human environmental effects favor cosmopolitan species over local iconic species

Human habitat modification is favouring the same species everywhere, while unique species are disappearing, finds a study publishing on December 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, led by Tim Newbold at University College London and Andy Purvis at the Natural History Museum in London.

3h

Madrid orders removal of electric scooters

Madrid's city hall said Tuesday it had refused to grant a licence to three electric scooter-share companies and gave them 72 hours to remove their scooters from the streets of the Spanish capital.

3h

Thomson Reuters announces 3,200 job cuts over two years

Financial data and news agency Thomson Reuters announced Tuesday cuts of 3,200 jobs and dozens of office closures worldwide over the next two years as part of a restructuring.

3h

Climate talks shift to nitty-gritty details of Paris accord

Negotiators at the U.N. climate talks got down to the nitty-gritty task Tuesday of finalizing the rules for the Paris accord, a landmark agreement by countries three years ago to curb global warming.

3h

Natural selection in the womb can explain health problems in adulthood

Conditions encountered in the womb can have life-long impact on health. Scientists previously assumed this is because embryos respond to adverse conditions by programming their gene expression. Now scientists report a radically different alternative. Rather than being programmed by the environment, random differences in gene expression may provide some embryos with a survival advantage. The resear

3h

Realistic exposure study supports the use of zinc oxide nanoparticle sunscreens

An important new study provides the first direct evidence that intact zinc oxide nanoparticles neither penetrate the human skin barrier nor cause cellular toxicity after repeated application to human volunteers under in-use conditions. This confirms that the known benefits of using ZnO nanoparticles in sunscreens clearly outweigh the perceived risks, researchers say.

3h

NASA-NOAA satellite finds Owen fading in the Coral Sea

Tropical Cyclone Owen appeared disorganized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Coral Sea in the Southern Pacific Ocean. Imagery from the Suomi NPP satellite showed that Owen was being stretched out and had weakened from wind shear.

3h

African maroon resistance at Hispaniola heavily challenged European conquest

African resistance strongly shaped Spanish Hispaniola of the 1500s— now the island home to Haiti and the Dominican Republic—but historians have often considered that resistance to be a byproduct of Spanish colonialism and its reliance on slavery, according to a University of Kansas historian who studies the development of race in Latin America.

3h

Immune health in space

With a new crew arriving at the International Space Station, astronauts will be relieved to know that they won't have to worry about a major aspect of their immune system being compromised. While researchers know a lot about astronauts' skeletal and muscular health during spaceflight and when they return to Earth, much less is known about how spaceflight affects immunity. It has been generally tho

3h

Study shows how mussels handle microplastic fiber pollution

New research shows that mussels readily take in microplastic pollution fibers from the ocean but quickly flush most of them out again, according to a study by researchers from Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. The findings were published in December's Marine Pollution Bulletin.

3h

Tissue chips rocket to International Space Station

When traveling in space, astronauts experience physiological changes normally associated with aging, such as bone loss, muscle deterioration and altered immune systems. When the astronauts return to Earth, the changes often reverse. To better understand the relevance of the astronauts' experience to human health—both on the ground and beyond—NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Scienc

3h

Biologists show inner workings of cellular 'undertaker'

One of a cell's most important responsibilities is to break down and recycle proteins that are no longer needed or endanger the cell. This task is carried out by a cellular nanomachine called the proteasome.

4h

New graphene-based sensor design could improve food safety

In the U.S., more than 100 food recalls were issued in 2017 because of contamination from harmful bacteria such as Listeria, Salmonella or E. coli. A new sensor design could one day make it easier to detect pathogens in food before products hit the supermarket shelves, thus preventing sometimes-deadly illnesses from contaminated food.

4h

The ‘new American farmer’ isn’t who you think

The number of farmers markets in the US has grown dramatically in recent years, but with an aging population of farmers, who’s supporting this growth? Meet the “new American farmer.” Andrew Flachs, an environmental anthropologist at Purdue University, uses the term to describe a movement of younger people new to agricultural work who do it for different reasons than the conventional farmer. They

4h

Institute of Human Virology researchers discover that a bacterial protein promotes cancer

The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) announced today the discovery that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell's ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer.

4h

New Zika vaccine effective in preclinical trials

Researchers at the University of Hawaii medical school have successfully developed a vaccine candidate for the Zika virus, showing that it is effective in protecting both mice and monkeys from the infection.Demonstrating the effectiveness of their vaccine candidate in monkeys (non-human primates) is an important milestone because it typically predicts the vaccine will work in humans, enabling furt

4h

Navigation system in rodents akin to ancient, open ocean direction-finding

The navigation system used by rodents is similar to that used by Pacific Islanders in finding their way through the open ocean without a compass, a team of neuroscientists has found.

4h

Tehran Is Sinking Dramatically, And It May Be Too Late to Recover

The ground is shifting under Tehran, capitol of Iran.

4h

Gut microbiome differs among ethnicities

Changing the gut microbiome to beat illness really does hold great potential, said a biologist, but first scientists must answer what constitutes a healthy gut microbiome and in whom.

4h

Human environmental effects favor cosmopolitan species over local iconic species

Human habitat modification is favoring the same species everywhere, while unique species are disappearing, finds a new study.

4h

Human actions impact wild salmon's ability to evolve

Once spring-run chinook salmon disappear, they are not likely to re-emerge, indicates genetic analysis of the revered wild fish. Prompt conservation action could preserve spring-run chinook, as well as their evolutionary potential.

4h

Single workout can boost metabolism for days

A new study shows neurons in mice that influence metabolism are active for up to two days after a single workout.

4h

How mussels handle microplastic fiber pollution

New research shows that mussels readily take in microplastic pollution fibers from the ocean but quickly flush most of them out again, according to a new study.

4h

Algae testbed experiment yields data useful for future projects

A unique experiment that explored how well algae grows in specific regions of the United States yielded data that could prove useful as the industry moves forward.

4h

Negative views of flexible working prevalent, especially among men

Flexible working often leads to negative views from other employees, with 1/3 of all UK workers believing those who work flexibly create more work for others, while a similar proportion believe their career will suffer if they use flexible working arrangements, according to new research.

4h

Discovery of single material that produces white light could boost efficiency of LED bulbs

The equation to make the inorganic compound combines a lead-free double perovskite with sodium.

4h

‘Flowstones’ change timeline of early human ancestors

Drastic climate changes shaped the timeline for rich deposits of early human ancestor fossils from a network of South African caves known as the “Cradle of Humankind,” suggests a new study. “This is a really important study that should transform our understanding of the timing of important events in human evolution,” says David Strait, professor of anthropology at Washington University in St. Lou

4h

How young women view men affects how they imagine their future selves

When young women believe more men are becoming stay-at-home dads, they are more likely to imagine themselves as the financial providers for their future families. When they don't think men's roles are changing, they are more likely to see themselves as their future families' primary caregivers, researchers found.

4h

SWOG shares trio of studies at San Antonio breast cancer symposium

SWOG Cancer Research Network members will share the results of three studies at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, an international gathering of breast cancer physicians and researchers that starts today, with an estimated 7,500 attendees expected from more than 90 countries.

4h

2018 in Photos: How the First Months Unfolded

As the year comes to a close, it’s time to take a look at some of the most memorable events and images of 2018. Events covered in this essay (the first of a three-part photo summary of the year) include the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, the March for Our Lives gun control rally, Mark Zuckerberg facing Congress, continued conflict in Syria and Yemen, the birth of a royal baby, and much more. See

4h

Microscopic 'sunflowers' for better solar panels

The pads of geckos' notoriously sticky feet are covered with setae—microscopic, hairlike structures whose chemical and physical composition and high flexibility allow the lizard to grip walls and ceilings with ease. Scientists have tried to replicate such dynamic microstructures in the lab with a variety of materials, including liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs), which are rubbery networks with atta

4h

Oral cancer prognostic signature identified

Discovery based on analysis of tissue and saliva samples from oral cancer patients shows a correlation between a signature comprising three peptides and the presence of lymph node metastasis.

4h

Single workout can boost metabolism for days

A new study from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows neurons in mice that influence metabolism are active for up to two days after a single workout.

4h

Cancer DNA Binds to Gold. That Could Lead to New Cancer Blood Test.

Researchers have discovered a curious difference between the DNA from cancer cells and that from healthy cells, and this finding could lead to a new blood test for cancer.

4h

A step closer to fusion energy: Imaging allows better testing of components for devices

Harnessing nuclear fusion, which powers the sun and stars, to help meet earth's energy needs, is a step closer after researchers showed that using two types of imaging can help them assess the safety and reliability of parts used in a fusion energy device.

4h

Researchers look to see how elevated housing in Florida stood up to Hurricane Michael

It's commonplace in U.S. coastal areas and floodplains to upraise homes in order to keep living areas dry in case the water rises. However, mobile and wood homes standing a few feet off the ground could be a lot more susceptible to winds exerting force from underneath and increasing the force of loads on walls and ceilings—a possibility that has been studied little, until now.

4h

Three Trump Lieutenants, Three Different Approaches to Mueller

The fateful decision to work for Donald Trump years ago has put a lot of people in the position of making much harder legal decisions. As Special Counsel Robert Mueller, as well as prosecutors in New York and investigators from the House and Senate, zero in on the president himself, they’ve swept up a series of his lieutenants in what’s been called “ a classic Gambino-style roll-up ”: Go after ai

4h

New medical implants need a higher approval bar than toothbrushes

To protect patients we must make it as difficult to gain approval for medical devices as it is for medicines, says Peter Wilmshurst

4h

New Gravitational-Wave Detections Include Largest, Most Distant Black Hole Crash Ever

The four fresh signals from merging black holes hint at a forthcoming data deluge from the LIGO and Virgo observatories — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

University of Arizona Chemistry Professor Sues over Discrimination

Katrina Miranda, seeking class-action status, alleges that women professors are paid less and passed over for promotions and resources.

5h

Young black gay men have vastly higher HIV rates yet fewer partners

Young black men who have sex with men are 16 times more likely to have an HIV infection than their white peers, despite being less likely to have unsafe sex, reports a large, new study. The men's social networks are more dense and interconnected, which makes infections transmitted more efficiently through the group. That, coupled with the higher HIV prevalence in the population, means any sexual a

5h

So cute you could crush it?

Until now, research exploring how and why cute aggression occurs has been the domain of behavioral psychology, said Katherine Stavropoulos, an assistant professor of special education at the University of California, Riverside. But recently Stavropoulos, a licensed clinical psychologist with a background in neuroscience, has taken formal study of the phenomenon a few steps further. To her knowledg

5h

Human actions impact wild salmon's ability to evolve

Once spring-run chinook salmon disappear, they are not likely to re-emerge, indicates genetic analysis of the revered wild fish in a study led by the University of California, Davis. Prompt conservation action could preserve spring-run chinook, as well as their evolutionary potential.

5h

Fasting for lab tests isn't good for patients with diabetes

Fasting before getting your blood drawn for cholesterol tests is common practice, but new research from Michigan State University shows it is a contributing factor of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, in patients who take diabetes medications.

5h

Gut microbiome differs among ethnicities, researchers find

Changing the gut microbiome to beat illness really does hold great potential, said Vanderbilt University biologist Seth Bordenstein, but first scientists must answer what constitutes a healthy gut microbiome and in whom.

5h

New possible target for treating major common diseases

There is a large, untapped potential for developing drugs against cancer, fibrosis and cardiovascular diseases by targeting a family of receptors known as Frizzleds, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden believe. In a new study published in Science Signaling, they identify how these receptors are activated in the cell membrane and the processes that are then triggered within the cell.

5h

Human environmental effects favor cosmopolitan species over local iconic species

Human habitat modification is favoring the same species everywhere, while unique species are disappearing, finds a study publishing on Dec. 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, led by Tim Newbold at University College London and Andy Purvis at the Natural History Museum in London.

5h

Tumblr's Porn Ban Reveals Who Controls What We See OnlineTumblr Adult Content

The visual microblogging service banned porn two weeks after Apple deleted its app from the App Store, amid a new federal sex trafficking law.

5h

NASA's IMERG measures heavy rainfall in California wildfire areas

Heavy precipitation recently fell in areas of California that were recently devastated by deadly wildfires such as the Camp Fire and the Woolsey fire. This flooding rainfall has resulted in evacuations in burn scarred areas such as Butte County where the deadly Camp Fire hit this month. NASA used data from satellites and other sources to calculate the amount of rainfall that has occurred recently.

5h

New possible target for treating major common diseases

There is a large, untapped potential for developing drugs against cancer, fibrosis and cardiovascular diseases by targeting a family of receptors known as Frizzleds, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden believe. In a new study published in Science Signaling, they identify how these receptors are activated in the cell membrane and the processes that are then triggered within the cell.

5h

U.S. groundwater supply is smaller than we thought

The US groundwater supply is smaller than originally thought, a new study shows. The findings offer important insights into the depths of underground fresh and brackish water in some of the most prominent sedimentary basins across the country. “We found that potable groundwater supplies in the US do not go as deep as previously reported, meaning there is less groundwater for human and agricultura

5h

Spectrum, Comcast, and the Telecom Fight to Win Free Speech

Justice Brett Kavanaugh is a boon to telecom companies like Spectrum Cable and Comcast, which want the freedom to choose what "speeches" they carry.

5h

CRISPR Scientists Slam Methods Used on Gene-Edited Babies

Since He Jiankui presented his results at last week's gene editing summit, researchers have raised concerns about his protocol, calling the procedure "amateurish" and "unconscionable."

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Centipedes and Millipedes: Lots of Legs, What's the Difference?

At first glance, centipedes and millipedes look alike with their numerous legs. But there are a few key differences between these squirmy creatures.

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COP24, the New Round of Global Climate Talks, Has Begun. We Answer Three Key Questions.

Negotiators from nearly 200 countries are gathering in Poland over the next two weeks to try to put global climate negotiations back on track.

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The Guardian view on editing human DNA: a bad idea, and badly executed | Editorial

A Chinese scientist has produced twins using the powerful gene-editing technology. This is pointless, dangerous and unethical The Crispr/Cas9 technique of editing DNA is, by the standards of earlier methods, astonishingly quick and easy. It is not entirely reliable or accurate, but it places enormous potential power in the hands of ordinary scientists. It is also internationally widespread, and be

6h

Phonons Bring Good Vibrations to Quantum Physicists

Phonons Bring Good Vibrations to Quantum Physicists A new way to measure vibrations may eventually help detect gravitational waves and store quantum memory. abstract-waves.jpg Rights information: Public domain Physics Tuesday, December 4, 2018 – 11:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — “I'm picking up good vibrations. She's giving me excitations.” Little did the Beach Boys know, their 196

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How does the precision medicine initiative affect me?

The symposium session at the 2018 Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) Annual Meeting will address cutting edge risk communication, risk assessment and risk management issues with respect to precision medicine, addressing issues such as trust, governance, tort liability and data access and quality.

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The AI That Knows Exactly What You Want to Eat

Flavor, the conjunction of taste and smell, is not a sensation that yields easily to analysis. Unlike sights and sounds, which can be captured by cameras and microphones, there is no widespread way to measure flavor. What people experience when they eat has heretofore been largely ineffable and uncomputable. “If I go to a farmers’ market, I can take a picture of a really lovely mushroom, but I ca

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Why are girls hitting puberty earlier? The answer could lie in the medicine cabinet.

American girls have been hitting puberty at earlier ages compared to past decades. Chemicals found in common cosmetic products could be responsible for the changes, according to the results of a nearly 20-year study, which found that boys didn't seem to be affected by the same chemicals. It's still unclear whether these chemicals cause early puberty, but it might be worth avoiding products contai

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Scientists’ collection of gravitational waves just got a lot bigger

The biggest black hole merger yet seen created one set of the spacetime ripples.

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New solar panel material can take more heat

A new synthetic material will make solar energy a more cost-effective, efficient, and reliable source of power Clean energy is at a crossroads. To become a viable replacement for fossil fuels, solar power plants must first improve their efficiency to match the electrical output of nonrenewable energy sources. This relies heavily upon the innovation and development of new products that absorb and

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Mountain splendor? Scientists know where your eyes will look

Using precise brain measurements, researchers predicted how people's eyes move when viewing natural scenes, an advance in understanding the human visual system that can improve a host of artificial intelligence efforts, such as the development of driverless cars.

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Older women who suffer tooth loss more likely to develop high blood pressure

A study indicates that postmenopausal women who experience tooth loss are at higher risk of developing high blood pressure.

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Fine analysis of fur grooming in cats Cat grooming fur. Image courtesy of Candler Hobbs (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta). Domestic cats, which sleep on average 14 hours each day, spend up to a quarter of their waking hours grooming, which removes fleas, debris, and excess heat from fur. Cats’…

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Incorrect policy interpretation affects conclusion on SO2 emissions by coal-fired power plants in China [Social Sciences]

Karplus et al. (1) raise the concern of potential data manipulation by coal-fired power plants in China by comparing Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) data with NASA satellite data. Since the two sources of data are not directly comparable, the comparison in the paper is empowered by a policy shock…

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Reply to Qi and Dong: Policy clarification and robustness of effects [Social Sciences]

The central concern in ref. 1 that the “timing of the policy shock is incorrect for key regions” is false. We received confirmation from the Ministry of Environmental Protection’s representative who authored the policy document issued on February 27, 2013. We confirmed that by July 1, 2014, in the key…

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Penicillins’ defined daily doses must be changed [Biological Sciences]

Klein et al. (1) suggest that defined daily doses (DDDs) are not a perfect outcome measure of antibiotic prescribing, particularly for penicillins (39% of total DDDs in 2015 for broad-spectrum penicillins). We identified the same limitations as illustrated by the results of our study (2), which measured the bias of…

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Reply to Charra et al.: Global longitudinal assessment of 2019 changes in defined daily doses [Biological Sciences]

The concept of defined daily doses (DDDs) is rooted in the understanding that to assess drug utilization and to develop rational interventions at the patient level, a common framework for comparing varied sources and forms of drug utilization data are necessary (1–3). A primary aim of the WHO Collaborating Centre…

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The varied careers of Kenneth L. Bowles [Retrospectives]

It is not unusual for the careers of scientists and engineers to span a range of topics, driven by their insatiable curiosity about how things work, the fun they derive from problem solving, an aesthetic sense for “sweet solutions,” and a joy in sharing their knowledge with others. Few careers…

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Interspecific conflict structures urban avian assemblages [Ecology]

Land cover change, of which urbanization is a major driver, remains the greatest threat to terrestrial biodiversity. More than half of all people now live in cities spread across 3% of the global terrestrial surface, and this population is predicted to rise to 68% by 2050 (1). Growth in urban…

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Environmentalism, norms, and identity [Environmental Sciences]

Although environmental justice emerged as a research area in the 1970s, those facing environmental risk had analyzed their problems and mobilized for redress long before that time (1, 2). In the United States, ample research shows that the marginalized and the less affluent are more exposed to environmental threats than…

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Janzen’s mountain passes hypothesis is comprehensively tested in its fifth decade [Evolution]

It is my intent to emphasize the concept that greater sensitivity to change is promoted by less frequent contact with that change. [Janzen (1)] Two hundred eleven years ago, Alexander von Humboldt returned to Europe from South America and began publishing accounts, maps, and diagrams that catalyzed the scientific community’s…

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What it takes for a cough to expel mucus from the airway [Medical Sciences]

Cough is one of the most common symptoms for seeking medical care (1, 2). If cough is going to cause that much trouble, it better be worth it, and the clinical evidence is that indeed it is. Patients with impaired cough due to neuromuscular disease or postoperative sedation suffer high…

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ACSL6 is critical for maintaining brain DHA levels [Neuroscience]

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) is the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in the brain, where it is largely esterified to membrane phospholipids. While DHA is found throughout the brain, its levels are relatively higher in gray matter and it is especially enriched at the synapse (1). DHA is a precursor…

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Nanomagnetic properties of the meteorite cloudy zone [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Meteorites contain a record of their thermal and magnetic history, written in the intergrowths of iron-rich and nickel-rich phases that formed during slow cooling. Of intense interest from a magnetic perspective is the “cloudy zone,” a nanoscale intergrowth containing tetrataenite—a naturally occurring hard ferromagnetic mineral that has potential applications as…

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Contrasting temporal difference and opportunity cost reinforcement learning in an empirical money-emergence paradigm [Economic Sciences]

Money is a fundamental and ubiquitous institution in modern economies. However, the question of its emergence remains a central one for economists. The monetary search-theoretic approach studies the conditions under which commodity money emerges as a solution to override frictions inherent to interindividual exchanges in a decentralized economy. Although among…

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Design and in vitro realization of carbon-conserving photorespiration [Biochemistry]

Photorespiration recycles ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) oxygenation product, 2-phosphoglycolate, back into the Calvin Cycle. Natural photorespiration, however, limits agricultural productivity by dissipating energy and releasing CO2. Several photorespiration bypasses have been previously suggested but were limited to existing enzymes and pathways that release CO2. Here,

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Single nucleotide polymorphisms alter kinase anchoring and the subcellular targeting of A-kinase anchoring proteins [Biochemistry]

A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) shape second-messenger signaling responses by constraining protein kinase A (PKA) at precise intracellular locations. A defining feature of AKAPs is a helical region that binds to regulatory subunits (RII) of PKA. Mining patient-derived databases has identified 42 nonsynonymous SNPs in the PKA-anchoring helices of five AKAPs….

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Molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotide release from the circadian clock protein KaiC reveal atomic-resolution functional insights [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The cyanobacterial clock proteins KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC form a powerful system to study the biophysical basis of circadian rhythms, because an in vitro mixture of the three proteins is sufficient to generate a robust ∼24-h rhythm in the phosphorylation of KaiC. The nucleotide-bound states of KaiC critically affect both…

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Ubiquilin 2 modulates ALS/FTD-linked FUS-RNA complex dynamics and stress granule formation [Cell Biology]

The ubiquitin-like protein ubiquilin 2 (UBQLN2) has been genetically and pathologically linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but its normal cellular functions are not well understood. In a search for UBQLN2-interacting proteins, we found an enrichment of stress granule (SG) components, including ALS/FTD-linked…

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Species interactions limit the occurrence of urban-adapted birds in cities [Ecology]

Urbanization represents an extreme transformation of more natural systems. Populations of most species decline or disappear with urbanization, and yet some species persist and even thrive in cities. What determines which species persist or thrive in urban habitats? Direct competitive interactions among species can influence their distributions and resource use,…

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Loss of protein synthesis quality control in host-restricted organisms [Evolution]

Intracellular organisms, such as obligate parasites and endosymbionts, typically possess small genomes due to continuous genome decay caused by an environment with alleviated natural selection. Previously, a few species with highly reduced genomes, including the intracellular pathogens Mycoplasma and Microsporidia, have been shown to carry degenerated editing domains in aminoacyl-tRNA…

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The CD4-CD8- MAIT cell subpopulation is a functionally distinct subset developmentally related to the main CD8+ MAIT cell pool [Immunology and Inflammation]

Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are unconventional innate-like T cells that recognize microbial riboflavin metabolites presented by the MHC class I-like protein MR1. Human MAIT cells predominantly express the CD8α coreceptor (CD8+), with a smaller subset lacking both CD4 and CD8 (double-negative, DN). However, it is unclear if these two…

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Excessive endosomal TLR signaling causes inflammatory disease in mice with defective SMCR8-WDR41-C9ORF72 complex function [Immunology and Inflammation]

The SMCR8-WDR41-C9ORF72 complex is a regulator of autophagy and lysosomal function. Autoimmunity and inflammatory disease have been ascribed to loss-of-function mutations of Smcr8 or C9orf72 in mice. In humans, autoimmunity has been reported to precede amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutations of C9ORF72. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying…

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Genetic deletion of vesicular glutamate transporter in dopamine neurons increases vulnerability to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in mice [Neuroscience]

A subset of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VgluT2), which facilitates synaptic vesicle loading of glutamate. Recent studies indicate that such expression can modulate DA-dependent reward behaviors, but little is known about functional consequences of DA neuron VgluT2 expression in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease (PD)….

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Interlinked regulatory loops of ABA catabolism and biosynthesis coordinate fruit growth and ripening in woodland strawberry [Plant Biology]

Fruit growth and ripening are controlled by multiple phytohormones. How these hormones coordinate and interact with each other to control these processes at the molecular level is unclear. We found in the early stages of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry) fruit development, auxin increases both widths and lengths of fruits, while…

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Resistance protein Pit interacts with the GEF OsSPK1 to activate OsRac1 and trigger rice immunity [Plant Biology]

Resistance (R) genes encode intracellular nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) family proteins that serve as critical plant immune receptors to induce effector-triggered immunity (ETI). NLR proteins possess a tripartite domain architecture consisting of an N-terminal variable region, a central nucleotide-binding domain, and a C-terminal leucine-rich repeat. N-terminal coiled-coi

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Mesoscale structure, mechanics, and transport properties of source rocks’ organic pore networks [Applied Physical Sciences]

Organic matter is responsible for the generation of hydrocarbons during the thermal maturation of source rock formation. This geochemical process engenders a network of organic hosted pores that governs the flow of hydrocarbons from the organic matter to fractures created during the stimulation of production wells. Therefore, it can be…

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Oscillating path between self-similarities in liquid pinch-off [Applied Physical Sciences]

Many differential equations involved in natural sciences show singular behaviors; i.e., quantities in the model diverge as the solution goes to zero. Nonetheless, the evolution of the singularity can be captured with self-similar solutions, several of which may exist for a given system. How to characterize the transition from one…

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SIR proteins create compact heterochromatin fibers [Biochemistry]

Heterochromatin is a silenced chromatin region essential for maintaining genomic stability and driving developmental processes. The complicated structure and dynamics of heterochromatin have rendered it difficult to characterize. In budding yeast, heterochromatin assembly requires the SIR proteins—Sir3, believed to be the primary structural component of SIR heterochromatin, and the Sir2–4…

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Differential growth and shape formation in plant organs [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Morphogenesis is a phenomenon by which a wide variety of functional organs are formed in biological systems. In plants, morphogenesis is primarily driven by differential growth of tissues. Much effort has been devoted to identifying the role of genetic and biomolecular pathways in regulating cell division and cell expansion and…

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Cats use hollow papillae to wick saliva into fur [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The cat tongue is covered in sharp, rear-facing spines called papillae, the precise function of which is a mystery. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed film, grooming force measurements, and computed tomography (CT) scanning to elucidate the mechanism by which papillae are used to groom fur….

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Probabilistic control of HIV latency and transactivation by the Tat gene circuit [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The reservoir of HIV latently infected cells is the major obstacle for eradication of HIV infection. The “shock-and-kill” strategy proposed earlier aims to reduce the reservoir by activating cells out of latency. While the intracellular HIV Tat gene circuit is known to play important roles in controlling latency and its…

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Receptor selectivity from minimal backbone modification of a polypeptide agonist [Chemistry]

Human parathyroid hormone (PTH) and N-terminal fragments thereof activate two receptors, hPTHR1 and hPTHR2, which share ∼51% sequence similarity. A peptide comprising the first 34 residues of PTH is fully active at both receptors and is used to treat osteoporosis. We have used this system to explore the hypothesis that…

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Elastic and Li-ion-percolating hybrid membrane stabilizes Li metal plating [Chemistry]

Lithium metal batteries are capable of revolutionizing the battery marketplace for electrical vehicles, owing to the high capacity and low voltage offered by Li metal. Current exploitation of Li metal electrodes, however, is plagued by their exhaustive parasitic reactions with liquid electrolytes and dendritic growth, which pose concerns to both…

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Structural analysis of transient reaction intermediate in formic acid dehydrogenation catalysis using two-dimensional IR spectroscopy [Chemistry]

The molecular structure of a catalytically active key intermediate is determined in solution by employing 2D IR spectroscopy measuring vibrational cross-angles. The formate intermediate (2) in the formic acid dehydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a phosphorus–nitrogen PN3P–Ru catalyst is elucidated. Our spectroscopic studies show that the complex features a formate ion…

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Bots increase exposure to negative and inflammatory content in online social systems [Computer Sciences]

Societies are complex systems, which tend to polarize into subgroups of individuals with dramatically opposite perspectives. This phenomenon is reflected—and often amplified—in online social networks, where, however, humans are no longer the only players and coexist alongside with social bots—that is, software-controlled accounts. Analyzing large-scale social data collected during the…

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Change in household fuels dominates the decrease in PM2.5 exposure and premature mortality in China in 2005-2015 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

To tackle the severe fine particle (PM2.5) pollution in China, the government has implemented stringent control policies mainly on power plants, industry, and transportation since 2005, but estimates of the effectiveness of the policy and the temporal trends in health impacts are subject to large uncertainties. By adopting an integrated…

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Potential shift from a carbon sink to a source in Amazonian peatlands under a changing climate [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Amazonian peatlands store a large amount of soil organic carbon (SOC), and its fate under a future changing climate is unknown. Here, we use a process-based peatland biogeochemistry model to quantify the carbon accumulation for peatland and nonpeatland ecosystems in the Pastaza-Marañon foreland basin (PMFB) in the Peruvian Amazon from…

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Large changes in biomass burning over the last millennium inferred from paleoatmospheric ethane in polar ice cores [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Biomass burning drives changes in greenhouse gases, climate-forcing aerosols, and global atmospheric chemistry. There is controversy about the magnitude and timing of changes in biomass burning emissions on millennial time scales from preindustrial to present and about the relative importance of climate change and human activities as the underlying cause….

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Partitioning mortality into growth-dependent and growth-independent hazards across 203 tropical tree species [Ecology]

Tree death drives population dynamics, nutrient cycling, and evolution within plant communities. Mortality variation across species is thought to be influenced by different factors relative to variation within species. The unified model provided here separates mortality rates into growth-dependent and growth-independent hazards. This model creates the opportunity to simultaneously estimate…

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Dynamic effects of enforcement on cooperation [Economic Sciences]

In situations where social payoffs are not aligned with private incentives, enforcement with fines can be a way to sustain cooperation. In this paper we show, by the means of a laboratory experiment, that past fines can have an effect on current behavior even when no longer in force. We…

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Detecting and explaining why aquifers occasionally become degraded near hydraulically fractured shale gas wells [Environmental Sciences]

Extensive development of shale gas has generated some concerns about environmental impacts such as the migration of natural gas into water resources. We studied high gas concentrations in waters at a site near Marcellus Shale gas wells to determine the geological explanations and geochemical implications. The local geology may explain…

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Smoke radiocarbon measurements from Indonesian fires provide evidence for burning of millennia-aged peat [Environmental Sciences]

In response to a strong El Niño, fires in Indonesia during September and October 2015 released a large amount of carbon dioxide and created a massive regional smoke cloud that severely degraded air quality in many urban centers across Southeast Asia. Although several lines of evidence indicate that peat burning…

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Diverse segments of the US public underestimate the environmental concerns of minority and low-income Americans [Environmental Sciences]

In a nationally representative survey experiment, diverse segments of the US public underestimated the environmental concerns of nonwhite and low-income Americans and misperceived them as lower than those of white and more affluent Americans. Moreover, both whites and nonwhites and higher- and lower-income respondents associated the term “environmentalist” with whites…

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Testing the retroelement invasion hypothesis for the emergence of the ancestral eukaryotic cell [Evolution]

Phylogenetic evidence suggests that the invasion and proliferation of retroelements, selfish mobile genetic elements that copy and paste themselves within a host genome, was one of the early evolutionary events in the emergence of eukaryotes. Here we test the effects of this event by determining the pressures retroelements exert on…

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Narrow thermal tolerance and low dispersal drive higher speciation in tropical mountains [Evolution]

Species richness is greatest in the tropics, and much of this diversity is concentrated in mountains. Janzen proposed that reduced seasonal temperature variation selects for narrower thermal tolerances and limited dispersal along tropical elevation gradients [Janzen DH (1967) Am Nat 101:233–249]. These locally adapted traits should, in turn, promote reproductive…

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Biological sex affects vaccine efficacy and protection against influenza in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]

Biological sex affects adaptive immune responses, which could impact influenza infection and vaccine efficacy. Infection of mice with 2009 H1N1 induced antibody responses, CD4+ T cell and CD8+ T cell memory responses that were greater in females than males; both sexes, however, were equally protected against secondary challenge with an…

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MARCH3 attenuates IL-1{beta}-triggered inflammation by mediating K48-linked polyubiquitination and degradation of IL-1RI [Immunology and Inflammation]

The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β plays critical roles in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. IL-1β signaling is tightly regulated to avoid excessive inflammatory response. In this study, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase membrane-associated RING-CH-type finger 3 (MARCH3) as a critical negative regulator of IL-1β–triggered signaling. Overexpression of MARCH3 inhibited IL-1β–triggered activa

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Targeted exon skipping of a CEP290 mutation rescues Joubert syndrome phenotypes in vitro and in a murine model [Medical Sciences]

Genetic treatments of renal ciliopathies leading to cystic kidney disease would provide a real advance in current therapies. Mutations in CEP290 underlie a ciliopathy called Joubert syndrome (JBTS). Human disease phenotypes include cerebral, retinal, and renal disease, which typically progresses to end stage renal failure (ESRF) within the first two…

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Redox dysregulation as a link between childhood trauma and psychopathological and neurocognitive profile in patients with early psychosis [Medical Sciences]

Exposure to childhood trauma (CT) increases the risk for psychosis and affects the development of brain structures, possibly through oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also linked to psychosis, it may interact with CT, leading to a more severe clinical phenotype. In 133 patients with early psychosis (EPP), we explored…

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Roles of mucus adhesion and cohesion in cough clearance [Medical Sciences]

Clearance of intrapulmonary mucus by the high-velocity airflow generated by cough is the major rescue clearance mechanism in subjects with mucoobstructive diseases and failed cilial-dependent mucus clearance, e.g., subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have investigated the mechanical forces generated at airway surfaces…

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Model metabolic strategy for heterotrophic bacteria in the cold ocean based on Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H [Microbiology]

Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H is a model psychrophilic bacterium found in the cold ocean—polar sediments, sea ice, and the deep sea. Although the genomes of such psychrophiles have been sequenced, their metabolic strategies at low temperature have not been quantified. We measured the metabolic fluxes and gene expression of 34H at…

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Artemisinin resistance phenotypes and K13 inheritance in a Plasmodium falciparum cross and Aotus model [Microbiology]

Concerns about malaria parasite resistance to treatment with artemisinin drugs (ARTs) have grown with findings of prolonged parasite clearance t1/2s (>5 h) and their association with mutations in Plasmodium falciparum Kelch-propeller protein K13. Here, we describe a P. falciparum laboratory cross of K13 C580Y mutant with C580 wild-type parasites to…

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The Pseudomonas aeruginosa T6SS-VgrG1b spike is topped by a PAAR protein eliciting DNA damage to bacterial competitors [Microbiology]

The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a supramolecular complex involved in the delivery of potent toxins during bacterial competition. Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses three T6SS gene clusters and several hcp and vgrG gene islands, the latter encoding the spike at the T6SS tip. The vgrG1b cluster encompasses seven genes whose…

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Acyl-CoA synthetase 6 enriches the neuroprotective omega-3 fatty acid DHA in the brain [Neuroscience]

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid that is highly abundant in the brain and confers protection against numerous neurological diseases, yet the fundamental mechanisms regulating the enrichment of DHA in the brain remain unknown. Here, we have discovered that a member of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase family, Acsl6,…

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Arc/Arg3.1 mediates a critical period for spatial learning and hippocampal networks [Neuroscience]

During early postnatal development, sensory regions of the brain undergo periods of heightened plasticity which sculpt neural networks and lay the foundation for adult sensory perception. Such critical periods were also postulated for learning and memory but remain elusive and poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that the activity-regulated and…

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Generalizability of heterogeneous treatment effect estimates across samples [Social Sciences]

The extent to which survey experiments conducted with nonrepresentative convenience samples are generalizable to target populations depends critically on the degree of treatment effect heterogeneity. Recent inquiries have found a strong correspondence between sample average treatment effects estimated in nationally representative experiments and in replication studies conducted with convenience sa

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Opinion: Flood-risk reduction: Structural measures and diverse strategies [Sustainability Science]

Floods continue to hit many countries, both less developed and industrialized, bringing human suffering and immense economic damage (see floodobservatory.colorado.edu/). Hurricane Florence and Typhoon Mangkhut were just the most recent reminders of the disruption that flooding can bring. Hence, striving to improve the flood-risk governance system has broad relevance. Yet,…

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Correction for Benej et al., Papaverine and its derivatives radiosensitize solid tumors by inhibiting mitochondrial metabolism [Corrections]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Papaverine and its derivatives radiosensitize solid tumors by inhibiting mitochondrial metabolism,” by Martin Benej, Xiangqian Hong, Sandip Vibhute, Sabina Scott, Jinghai Wu, Edward Graves, Quynh-Thu Le, Albert C. Koong, Amato J. Giaccia, Bing Yu, Shih-Ching Chen, Ioanna Papandreou, and Nicholas C. Denko, which was first published…

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Correction to Supporting Information for Alix-Garcia et al., Payments for environmental services supported social capital while increasing land management [SI Corrections]

SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction to Supporting Information for “Payments for environmental services supported social capital while increasing land management,” by Jennifer M. Alix-Garcia, Katharine R. E. Sims, Victor H. Orozco-Olvera, Laura E. Costica, Jorge David Fernández Medina, and Sofía Romo Monroy, which was first published June 14, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1720873115 (Proc Natl…

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Correction to Supporting Information for Kwon et al., Coiled-coil structure-dependent interactions between polyQ proteins and Foxo lead to dendrite pathology and behavioral defects [SI Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction to Supporting Information for “Coiled-coil structure-dependent interactions between polyQ proteins and Foxo lead to dendrite pathology and behavioral defects,” by Min Jee Kwon, Myeong Hoon Han, Joshua A. Bagley, Do Young Hyeon, Byung Su Ko, Yun Mi Lee, In Jun Cha, Seung Yeol Kim, Dong Young Kim, Ho…

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Correction to Supporting Information for Nobori et al., Transcriptome landscape of a bacterial pathogen under plant immunity [SI Corrections]

PLANT BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for “Transcriptome landscape of a bacterial pathogen under plant immunity,” by Tatsuya Nobori, André C. Velásquez, Jingni Wu, Brian H. Kvitko, James M. Kremer, Yiming Wang, Sheng Yang He, and Kenichi Tsuda, which was first published March 12, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1800529115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci…

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The boozy and violent story behind America's Eggnog Riot

In 1826, Americans loved to drink, and the young cadets at West Point Academy were no exception. After being forbidden from imbibing everyone's favorite egg-based holiday beverage, West Point cadets would go on to start a riot that lasted into the early hours of Christmas morning. The story behind the Eggnog Riot both offers a glimpse into life in 1826 and the history behind how West Point became

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Biologists show inner workings of cellular 'undertaker'

One of a cell's most important responsibilities is to break down and recycle proteins that are no longer needed or endanger the cell. This task is carried out by a cellular nanomachine called the proteasome. Scientists from Scripps Research deciphered how the proteasome converts energy into mechanical motion that untangles and unfolds proteins for destruction. The findings, published in Science, c

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Promising research shows blood vessel growth key to healthy fat tissue

research led by York University's Faculty of Health shows that inhibiting a protein within blood vessels stimulates new blood vessel growth, resulting in healthier fat tissue (adipose) and lower blood sugar levels. The findings provide key insight into how improving blood vessel growth could help to mitigate serious health problems that arise with obesity, such as diabetes.

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NASA's IMERG measures heavy rainfall in California wildfire areas

Heavy precipitation recently fell in areas of California that were recently devastated by deadly wildfires such as the Camp Fire and the Woolsey fire. This flooding rainfall has resulted in evacuations in burn scarred areas such as Butte County where the deadly Camp Fire hit this month. NASA used data from satellites and other sources to calculate the amount of rainfall that has occurred recently.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds Owen fading in the Coral Sea

Tropical Cyclone Owen appeared disorganized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Coral Sea in the Southern Pacific Ocean. Imagery from the Suomi NPP satellite showed that Owen was being stretched out and had weakened from wind shear.

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How becoming a manager can be a double-edged sword

A new study calls the transition to manager a 'double-edged sword' and found that a manager's ability to mentally detach from work during non-work hours can help reduce the increased exhaustion and work-family conflict that come with the new role.

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In team sports, chemistry matters

Researchers analyzed game statistics across major sports and online games, revealing that past shared success among teammates improves their team's odds of winning future games.

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High cost of infidelity for swift parrots

Scientists have found a chronic shortage of females in a critically endangered parrot species has led to love triangles, sneaky sex on the side, increased fighting between males and fewer babies.

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New catalyst achieves unprecedented activities

Researchers have developed a new efficient catalyst to synthesise aromatic amines, which are central building blocks in many drugs and pesticides. The system is more active than conventional catalysts, so less energy is required during the reaction, and also difficult compounds can be synthesized.

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Can guaranteed admissions help reduce college undermatching?

Low-income, highly qualified students are more likely to choose selective universities that match their academic profiles when they know their admission is guaranteed through state automatic admissions policies, according to a new study.

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Gennembrud for fusionskraft: Forskere løser brandvarmt problem

Længe har det været et problem at slippe af med brandvarme overskuds-partikler fra fusionsreaktorer, men engelske forskere har nu en mulig løsning.

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China Reneges on Its Deals. The Vatican Is Learning That the Hard Way.

As China’s economic and military power has expanded over the past decade, Beijing has shown a proclivity to renege on agreements and to make access to its markets conditional on acceding to its shifting demands. Countries, companies, and international organizations have found it difficult to push back. The Vatican, as both a state and the spiritual head of a major international institution, is no

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Finding enough donors with this girl's rare blood type is next to impossible

Health There’s a lot more to blood type than A/B/O. Most of the time, all 35 blood group indicators don’t matter, but if you’re a little girl undergoing intensive chemotherapy and will rely on blood transfusions to…

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Immunotherapy pioneers reveal updated efficacy data of tisagenlecleucel CAR T-cell therapy

Physician-scientists from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia presented updated efficacy and safety data on Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel, formerly CTL019) — the first-ever FDA-approved personalized CAR T-cell gene immunotherapy for aggressive blood cancers, at the 60th American Society of Hematology annual meeting, as well as first-of-its-kind research on overcoming CAR T-cell resistance.

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New cancer immunotherapy approach turns immune cells into tiny anti-tumor drug factories

In lab and mouse experiments, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers developed a method to leverage B cells to manufacture and secrete tumor-suppressing microRNAs.

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Vaping cannabis produces stronger effects than smoking cannabis for infrequent users

In a small study of infrequent cannabis users, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have shown that, compared with smoking cannabis, vaping it increased the rate of short-term anxiety, paranoia, memory loss and distraction when doses were the same.

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Drug dramatically reduces risk of dangerous blood clots in cancer patients

A large clinical trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine provides the first approach for safely preventing blood clots (venous thromboembolism) in people with cancer. Venous thromboembolism is the second leading cause of death in cancer patients and it can also affect quality of life. About half of people newly diagnosed with a solid cancer could be candidates for the strategy, whic

7h

Neil deGrasse Tyson, #MeToo, and the Celebrity Photo Op

In 2009, hundreds of astronomers gathered in Long Beach, California, for the annual conference of the American Astronomical Society. Attendees participated in workshops during the day and mingled at after-parties at night. At one party, Katelyn Allers, now an astronomy and physics professor at Bucknell University, spotted Neil deGrasse Tyson, the well-known astrophysicist. Allers approached Tyson

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What Defines a Stem Cell? Scientists Rethink the Answer

For the past three years, researchers at the Hubrecht Institute in the Netherlands have been painstakingly cataloging and mapping all the proliferating cells found in mouse hearts, looking for cardiac stem cells. The elusive cells should theoretically be able to repair damaged heart muscle, so the stakes in finding them have been high. Indeed, that search, involving many labs over decades, has be

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Gene-edited girls as a Monolith moment | Letter

The controversial gene-editing breakthrough claimed by Dr He Jiankui may be a pivotal moment in human development, says Doug Clark There have been many 2001: A Space Odyssey Monoliths in mankind’s history: the wheel, the development of agriculture, the internal combustion engine. Not all of these, however, have been physical. There have been several such step-changes in our thinking, our ethics an

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Lack of preparedness and insecurity hampered response to cholera epidemic in Yemen

Analysis by researchers at Johns Hopkins Center for Humanitarian Health identifies 20 top recommendations to mitigate future cholera outbreaks in Yemen and other humanitarian emergencies, including call for end of attacks on health, water and sanitation infrastructure.

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Novel approach improves understanding of the formation of new neurons in the mammalian adult brain

A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, the Texas Heart Institute and Texas Children's Hospital has developed a powerful new approach to understand the formation of new neurons in the mammalian adult brain.

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Team converts wet biological waste to diesel-compatible fuel

In a step toward producing renewable engine fuels that are compatible with existing diesel fuel infrastructure, researchers report they can convert wet biowaste, such as swine manure and food scraps, into a fuel that can be blended with diesel and that shares diesel's combustion efficiency and emissions profile.

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A step closer to fusion energy

Harnessing nuclear fusion, which powers the sun and stars, to help meet earth's energy needs, is a step closer after researchers showed that using two types of imaging can help them assess the safety and reliability of parts used in a fusion energy device.

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Microscopic 'sunflowers' for better solar panels

Scientists from Harvard's Wyss Institute have harnessed magnetic fields to control the molecular structure of liquid crystal elastomers and create microscopic three-dimensional polymer shapes that can be programmed to move in any direction in three-dimensional space in response to multiple types of stimuli, including light and heat. The applications of this technology include message encryption, r

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Researchers demonstrate new building block in quantum computing

Researchers with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a new level of control over photons encoded with quantum information. The team's experimental system allows them to manipulate the frequency of photons to bring about superposition, a state that enables quantum operations and computing.

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Natural selection in the womb can explain health problems in adulthood

Conditions encountered in the womb can have life-long impact on health. Scientists previously assumed this is because embryos respond to adverse conditions by programming their gene expression. Now scientists report a radically different alternative. Rather than being programmed by the environment, random differences in gene expression may provide some embryos with a survival advantage. The resear

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A toxin that travels from stomach to brain may trigger Parkinsonism

Combining low doses of a toxic herbicide with sugar-binding proteins called lectins may trigger Parkinsonism — symptoms typical of Parkinson's disease like body tremors and slowing of body motions — after the toxin travels from the stomach to the brain.

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The Changing Norms Around Donor-Sibling Networks

By now, it’s relatively common for people conceived through sperm donation to discover half siblings floating around in the world who they’ve never met—people who, despite being strangers socially, share half their genetic material and perhaps even look, talk, or act like them. It’s a scenario that’s formed the basis for many a human-interest story and provided the backdrop for works of fiction,

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We Need More Diversity in Our Genomic Databases

The ones we have now are too heavily skewed toward people of European descent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Volcanoes fed by 'mush' reservoirs rather than molten magma chambers

Volcanoes are not fed by molten magma formed in large chambers finds a new study, overturning classic ideas about volcanic eruptions.

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Social marketing campaigns can help threatened wildlife species recover

Encouraging people to change their behavior through social marketing campaigns can help the recovery of threatened wildlife populations.

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Gene that lets you eat as much as you want holds promise against obesity

It sounds too good to be true, but a novel approach that might allow you to eat as much as you want without gaining weight could be a reality in the near future. When a single gene known as RCAN1 was removed in mice and they were fed a high fat diet, they failed to gain weight, even after gorging on high fat foods for prolonged periods.

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Crystal clear: Understanding magnetism changes caused by crystal lattice expansion

An international team has demonstrated helimagnetic behavior in a cubic perovskite material by expanding the lattice through barium doping. The experimental findings were well supported by calculations from first principles, showing that the materials were highly sensitive to the lattice constant. It is hoped that the findings will form the foundation for new applications in sensing.

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Gene therapy for blood disorders

Delivering gene-regulating material to cells that live deep in our bone marrow and direct the formation of blood cells. That would be a major step forward in gene therapy and a team of UD researchers has taken that step.

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Yumanity Therapeutics announces publication of paper in Cell Reports

Yumanity Therapeutics, a company focused on discovering transformative therapies to treat neurodegenerative diseases, today announced the publication of study results describing a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in Parkinson's disease and other related disorders.

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Bees Get Stung by Decision to Scale Back National Monument

The rich flower diversity of Grand Staircase-Escalante supports hundreds of species of bees — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories

Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories Video of Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories Human Tuesday, December 4, 2018 – 11:15 Alistair Jennings, Contributor Alistair Jennings sums up some of the most interesting science stories for the month. Filed under Neuroscience Events Republish Authorized news s

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More info from sound waves could make sonar better

By essentially turning down the pitch of sound waves, engineering researchers have created a way to unlock greater amounts of data from acoustic fields than ever before. That additional information could boost performance of passive sonar and echolocation systems for detecting and tracking adversaries in the ocean; medical imaging devices; seismic surveying systems for locating oil and mineral de

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Garlic oil beats antibiotics at killing Lyme bacteria

Oils from garlic and other common herbs and medicinal plants may be useful against Lyme disease symptoms that persist despite standard antibiotic treatment new lab-dish testing shows. Researchers tested essential oils—oils pressed from plants or their fruits that contain the plant’s main fragrance, or “essence.” Ten of the oils, including those from garlic cloves, myrhh trees, thyme leaves, cinna

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Danmark giver 20 millioner til ny havaffaldsfond

Verdensbanken opretter ny fond, der skal hjælpe udviklingslande med at mindske plastforurening.

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New graphene-based sensor design could improve food safety

In the US, more than 100 food recalls were issued in 2017 because of contamination from harmful bacteria such as Listeria, Salmonella or E. coli. A new sensor design could one day make it easier to detect pathogens in food before products hit the supermarket shelves, thus preventing sometimes-deadly illnesses from contaminated food.

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Sex-specific effects of DHEA on bone mineral density and body composition

Women 55 and older have an increased risk of bone and muscle loss but therapy with the hormone Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may help prevent bone loss and increase muscle mass in older women, according to a new study led by Catherine M. Jankowski, PhD, FACSM, an exercise physiologist and associate professor at the University of Colorado College of Nursing at the Anschutz Medical Campus.

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Immune health in space

With a new crew arriving at the International Space Station, astronauts will be relieved to know that they won't have to worry about a major aspect of their immune system being compromised.

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Realistic exposure study supports the use of zinc oxide nanoparticle sunscreens

An important new study provides the first direct evidence that intact zinc oxide nanoparticles neither penetrate the human skin barrier nor cause cellular toxicity after repeated application to human volunteers under in-use conditions. This confirms that the known benefits of using ZnO nanoparticles in sunscreens clearly outweigh the perceived risks, reports the Journal of Investigative Dermatolog

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Study shows how mussels handle microplastic fiber pollution

New research shows that mussels readily take in microplastic pollution fibers from the ocean but quickly flush most of them out again, according to a study by researchers from Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.

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African maroon resistance at Hispaniola heavily challenged European conquest

In a new study, Robert Schwaller, KU associate professor history, argues that Spanish colonial records reveal that resistance by indigenous and African maroons, who were runaway slaves, not only tested Spanish economic and labor arrangements but also challenged European conquest itself.

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Inactivating genes can boost crop genetic diversity

Researchers from CIRAD and INRA recently showed that inactivating a gene, RECQ4, leads to a three-fold increase in recombination in crops such as rice, pea and tomato. The gene inhibits the exchange of genetic material via recombination (crossover) during the sexual reproduction process in crops. This discovery, published in the journal Nature Plants on Nov. 16, 2018, could speed up plant breeding

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PPIs combined with oral anticoagulants reduce risk of gastrointestinal bleeding

A Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study published today in JAMA shows that patients already at higher risk for gastrointestinal bleeding gain a marked protection from this risk when they take a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in combination with an oral anticoagulant.

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Protein may slow progression of emphysema, Rutgers study finds

A protein generated as part of our body's immune response to intestinal worms could slow the progression of emphysema, according to a Rutgers study.

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Marmoset study gives insights into loss of pleasure in depression

'Anhedonia' (the loss of pleasure) is one of the key symptoms of depression. An important component of this symptom is an inability to feel excitement in anticipation of events; however the brain mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. Now, in a study involving marmosets, scientists at the University of Cambridge have identified the region of the brain that contributes to this

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New Parkinson's disease drug target revealed through study of fatty acids

A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has provided insights into the role of fatty acids and suggests that inhibiting a specific enzyme can protect against neurotoxicity.

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A universal DNA nano-signature for cancer

Researchers from the University of Queensland's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) have discovered a unique nano-scaled DNA signature that appears to be common to all cancers. Based on this discovery, the team has developed a novel technology that enables cancer to be quickly and easily detected from any tissue type, e.g. blood or biopsy.

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No bleeding required: Anemia detection via smartphone

Instead of a blood test, an app uses smartphone photos of someone's fingernails to accurately measure hemoglobin levels.

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Neurotechnology provides real-time readouts of where rats think they are

An international team of scientists demonstrates a new neurotechnology for reading out neural signals of position in real-time as rats run a maze, or replay it during sleep, with a high degree of accuracy, with more than 1,000 input channels, and the ability to account for the statistical relevance of the readings almost instantly after they are made.

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Study examines med school diversity after accreditation standards introduced

This observational study looked at changes in student makeup by sex, race and ethnicity at US medical schools after an accrediting organization introduced diversity standards in 2009. An analysis of data from 120 medical schools suggests implementation of the diversity standards were associated with increasing percentages of female and black students. The study cannot demonstrate causality and oth

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Study estimates proportion of health care professionals not born in US

Health care professionals not born in the United States, including those who are noncitizens, made up a significant proportion of the health care workforce in 2016. An analysis of US Census Bureau data for 164,000 health care professionals found 16.6 percent weren't born in the United States and 4.6 percent were noncitizens.

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Diversity efforts drive rise in female and minority medical school students

Medical schools in the United States are accepting more women and minority students a decade after diversity standards were introduced by a national accrediting body. According to Yale researchers, the standards are associated with an increase in both the number and proportion of applicants from underrepresented groups, suggesting that the pool of minority talent is sufficient to boost diversity.

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Alibaba already has a voice assistant way better than Google’s

It navigates interruptions and other tricky features of human conversation to field millions of requests a day.

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The distance of microbial competitions shapes their community structures

Inside the microbial communities that populate our world, microbes are fighting for their lives.

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Negative views of flexible working prevalent, especially among men

Flexible working often leads to negative views from other employees, with 1/3 of all UK workers believing those who work flexibly create more work for others, while a similar proportion believe their career will suffer if they use flexible working arrangements, according to new research.

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Rotavirus outsources cellular protein CK1-alpha to assemble virus factories

Rotaviruses, like all viruses, reproduce inside living cells. Making new viruses requires assembling replication factories via a complex, little known process that involves both viral and cellular components. A report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by a multidisciplinary team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine reveals that the formation of rotavirus factories

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Four robot vacuums that will clean up your mess

Gadgets Happy holidays to you. Robot vacuums are a huge time saver. Over the past few months, I’ve gotten to see some of these suckers in action. Here's a list of some of my favorites.

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Capturing the surprising flexibility of crystal surfaces

Images taken using an atomic force microscope have allowed researchers to observe, for the first time, the flexible and dynamic changes that occur on the surfaces of 'porous coordination polymer' crystals when guest molecules are introduced. The findings have implications for investigations into materials that can be used for storing and sensing molecules.

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France’s Fuel-Tax Protests Expose the Limits of Macron’s Mandate

PARIS—The grassroots social uprising that’s taken hold across France in the past three weeks is not an ideal crisis for Emmanuel Macron. The youthful French president excels at lofty, often abstract, rhetoric; at symbolic gestures; at grand moments, such as the one last month for Armistice Day , when he united most leaders of the free world and gave a speech beneath the Arc de Triomphe—a monument

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Seven steps to save the planet: How to take on climate change and win

It's the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced, but we can keep global warming to within the "safe" boundary of 1.5°C. Here's how we do it

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Phone app can diagnose anaemia from photos of fingernails

Two billion people have anaemia – now a smartphone app that analyses photos of their fingernails can help them monitor the condition

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Royal jelly research could propel cure for Alzheimer’s, claim scientists

Researchers say similar protein to royalactin in humans builds up ‘self-renewal’ stem cells It is the mysterious substance that turns worker honeybees into queens and fills the shelves of health food shops which tout its unverified powers to fend off ageing, improve fertility and reinvigorate the immune system. Whether royal jelly has genuine health benefits for humans is a matter for more resear

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Scientists develop 10-minute universal cancer test

Inexpensive procedure shows whether patient has cancerous cells in the body, but does not reveal where or how serious it is Scientists have developed a universal cancer test that can detect traces of the disease in a patient’s bloodstream. The cheap and simple test uses a colour-changing fluid to reveal the presence of malignant cells anywhere in the body and provides results in less than 10 minu

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Skeletons found in London archaeology dig reveal noxious environs

The discoveries were made at a 19th-century burial site at New Covent Garden market News reports and social media anxiety may make us feel that life is tough in Britain today but the extraordinary findings of a new archaeological excavation have provided a salutary reminder that, a couple of centuries ago, it was so much worse. Archaeologists who worked on an early 19th-century burial site at the

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Toxic chemicals calling: Cell phones as a source of flame retardants

Cell phones—much has been written about their detrimental effects on attention spans, stress levels and dinner table conversations. People are in constant contact with their cell phones at all hours of the day. New research from the University of Toronto (U of T) suggests they could also be a source of toxic chemicals, or at least an indicator of the chemicals to which people are exposed.

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3 questions to ask yourself about everything you do | Stacey Abrams

How you respond after setbacks is what defines your character. Stacey Abrams was the first black woman in the history of the United States to be nominated by a major party for governor — she lost that hotly contested race, but as she says: the only choice is to move forward. In an electrifying talk, she shares the lessons she learned from her campaign for governor of Georgia, some advice on how t

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Darzalex øger progressionsfri overlevelse med 44 pct. hos nydiagnosticerede

Ældre patienter med nydiagnosticeret knoglemarvskræft, der ikke er egnede til at få en transplantation, opnår markant længere progressionsfri overlevelse og generel overlevelse, hvis de behandles med Darzalex.

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How microbial interactions shape our lives

The interactions that take place between the species of microbes living in the gastrointestinal system often have large and unpredicted effects on health, according to new work from a team led by Carnegie's Will Ludington. Their findings are published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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How becoming a manager can be a double-edged sword

There are perks to becoming a manager: higher pay, career mobility, and more authority and influence when it comes to making decisions. But there are also downsides: having too much work and not enough time to do it. A new study from Portland State University and University of Zurich researchers calls the transition a "double-edged sword" and found that a manager's ability to mentally detach from

8h

A universal DNA nano-signature for cancer

Researchers from the University of Queensland's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) have discovered a unique nano-scaled DNA signature that appears to be common to all cancers.

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The distance of microbial competitions shapes their community structures

Researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to know if varying distances of interactions affect the organization of microbial communities. Through the development of mathematical models and synthetic microbial communities they are studying the role of varying distances during microbial battles, using created ecosystems that involved one-directional competition, where one microbe kills another

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Algae testbed experiment yields data useful for future projects

A unique experiment that explored how well algae grows in specific regions of the United States yielded data that could prove useful as the industry moves forward, according to research from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Arizona State University (ASU).

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Rotavirus outsources cellular protein CK1α to assemble virus factories

Rotavirus outsources cellular protein CK1α to assemble virus factories.

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Dynamics of chromatin during organ and tissue regeneration

The researchers, who conducted the analysis with Drosphila melanogaster, discovered a group of genes involved in regeneration and which are kept in different species.

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A bit of a stretch… material that thickens as it's pulled

While examining the capabilities of Liquid Crystal Elastomers, scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker — at the molecular level — as it is stretched.

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Colombia tropical forest fires spike after 2016 Peace Accords

Fires that contribute to deforestation spiked six-fold in Colombia in the year after an historic 2016 peace agreement ended decades of conflict between FARC guerrilla and government forces, according to a study in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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Set your teeth on EDGE: World's weirdest sharks and rays on the brink of extinction

Sharks that use a whip-like tail to stun their prey, rays with saws on their faces, and river rays half the length of a bus are among the most unique species at risk of extinction according to the latest ranking from international conservation charity ZSL's (Zoological Society of London) pioneering EDGE of Existence programme.

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Spending too much time on your phone? Behavioral science has an app for that

We're squandering increasing amounts of time distracted by our phones. And that's taking a serious toll on our mental and physical well-being.

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Fathers Can Pass Mitochondrial DNA to Children

Researchers identify unique cases in which people inherited mitochondrial DNA not just from their mother but also from their father.

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Negative views of flexible working prevalent, especially among men

Flexible working often leads to negative views from other employees, with 1/3 of all UK workers believing those who work flexibly create more work for others, while a similar proportion believe their career will suffer if they use flexible working arrangements, according to new research.

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How microbial interactions shape our lives

The interactions that take place between the species of microbes living in the gastrointestinal system often have large and unpredicted effects on health, according to new work from a team led by Carnegie's Will Ludington. Working with fruit flies, the team found that the interactions that take place between the microbial populations are as important to a fly's physiology as which individual speci

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Toxic chemicals calling: Cell phones as a source of flame retardants

New research by environmental scientists at the University of Toronto suggests that the exterior of mobile phones could be a source of toxic chemicals, or at least an aggregate indicator of the chemicals to which people are exposed on a daily basis.

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Eliminating microglia prevents heightened immune sensitivity after stress

Using an animal model of chronic stress, researchers at The Ohio State University have shown that the immune cells of the brain, called microglia, hold unique signatures of chronic stress that leave the animal more sensitive to future stressful experiences, evident by increased anxiety and immune responses.

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More diversity than before

A study by the universities in Konstanz and Glasgow find indications for recovery after ecosystem pollution.

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Global review finds consumption of children's antibiotics varies widely

Researchers analyzing the sales of oral antibiotics for children in 70 high- and middle-income countries found that consumption varies widely from country to country with little correlation between countries' wealth and the types of antibiotics. Of concern is the relatively low-level use of amoxicillin, an antibiotic to treat the most common childhood infections.

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Ibrutinib plus rituximab superior to standard treatment for patients with chronic leukemia

The results of the E1912 phase 3 clinical trial show that the novel treatment of ibrutinib and rituximab is superior to the historical best treatment, which is chemotherapy. This targeted therapy regimen improved not only progression-free survival but also overall survival. This trial establishes irbutinib-based therapy as the best first-line therapy for CLL. The trial was designed and led by the

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Cleveland Clinic-led study: Rivaroxaban reduced blood clots and related death in cancer patients

Cleveland Clinic medical oncologist and researcher, Alok Khorana, M.D., is the primary investigator on a study that concluded rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism (VTE), a blood clot in the venous system, significantly reduced VTE and VTE-related death for outpatient, at-risk cancer patients while they were taking the oral blood thinner.

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Microbial-based treatment reverses autism spectrum social deficits in mouse models

An unconventional approach has successfully reversed deficits in social behaviors associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in genetic, environmental and idiopathic mouse models of the condition.

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Global warming increases frost damage on trees in Central Europe

Global warming increases frost damage on trees in large areas of Central Europe, according to a new Finnish-Chinese study by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, the Chinese Academy of Science and Zhejiang A&F University.

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Trilobites: Devoted Dads of the Amphibian World

The males of an obscure frog species in Borneo faithfully tend their eggs, undistracted by new mates.

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New Zealand is home to species found nowhere else but biodiversity losses match global crisis

The recently released 2018 Living Planet report is among the most comprehensive global analyses of biodiversity yet. It is based on published data on 4,000 out of the 70,000 known species of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians.

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A study describes the dynamics of chromatin during organ and tissue regeneration

The researchers, who conducted the analysis with Drosphila melanogaster, discovered a group of genes involved in regeneration and which are kept in different species.

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Volcanoes fed by 'mush' reservoirs rather than molten magma chambers

Volcanoes are not fed by molten magma formed in large chambers finds a new study, overturning classic ideas about volcanic eruptions.

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How parenting affects antisocial behaviors in children

Less parental warmth and more harshness in the home environment can affect how aggressive children become and whether they lack empathy and a moral compass-a set of characteristics known as callous-unemotional (CU) traits.

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Niosomes, efficient DNA delivery vehicles for gene therapy of the central nervous system

In a piece of research conducted in collaboration, the NanoBioCel group of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Pharmacy, and the University of Elche have designed some niosomes, which are lipid vesicles for use in gene therapies designed to treat diseases of the central nervous system. One of the new aspects of these vesicles is that lycopene has been used as an element, which has enabled transfection into b

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Portsmouth researchers make vital contribution to new gravitational wave discoveries

Researchers from the University of Portsmouth have made vital contributions to the observations of four new gravitational waves, which were announced this weekend (Dec. 1).

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The 'wrong' connective tissue cells signal worse prognosis for breast cancer patients

In certain forms of cancer, connective tissue forms around and within the tumour. One previously unproven theory is that there are several different types of connective tissue cells with different functions, which affect the development of the tumour in different ways. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has identified three different types of connective tissue cells. In studies of b

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Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, December 2018

ORNL story tips: ORNL solved methane mystery through tree trunk, soil study; neutrons unlock secrets of corn nanoparticles; lithium-ion battery study could inform safer designs; corrosion tests could advance molten salt reactor designs; thought leaders discuss sea of energy change at maritime risk meeting.

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Mathematical model offers new strategies for urban burglary prevention

As with most crime, the highest rates of burglary occur in urban communities. However, existing mathematical models typically examine burglaries in residential, suburban environments. In an article publishing tomorrow in the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems, Joan Saldaña, Maria Aguareles, Albert Avinyó, Marta Pellicer, and Jordi Ripoll present a nonlinear model of urban burglary dynamics

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Drug wholesalers drove fentanyl's deadly rise, report concludes

Fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid implicated in nearly 29,000 overdose deaths in the United States last year, most likely spread because of heroin and prescription pill shortages, and also because it was cheaper for drug wholesalers than heroin, according to a report on illicit US drug markets by researchers at UC San Francisco.

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VIDEO Førerløs båd fjerner olieforurening

Norskudviklet båd splitter olien op ved hjælp af havvand under højt tryk, så naturens egne bakterier let kan klare nedbrydningen.

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I really am quite brilliant – at giving myself compliments and raising my self-esteem | Rhik Samadder

Violent aversion to self-praise is wired into British cultural DNA, yet the evidence points to the beneficial effects of patting our own backs once in a while Look at you! Reading a newspaper site rather than staring, bovine, at pap snaps of Rihanna on a beach, or endless updates on the possible contents of a royal womb. You’re smart, and discerning. Did you make your own lunch today? That is bot

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Innovative DNA recovery techniques could help victims catch rapists in Kenya

A huge global health challenge is physical and sexual violence against women and girls, affecting more than one third of all women globally.

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Earth needs climate 'reality check', space pioneer warns

The world needs a "reality check" on the threat posed by climate change, NASA astronaut Mae Jemison said Tuesday at a UN summit to chart mankind's path away from runaway global warming.

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Study counts the high cost of infidelity for swift parrots

Scientists at ANU have found a chronic shortage of females in a critically endangered parrot species has led to love triangles, sneaky sex on the side, increased fighting between males and fewer babies.

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Sanctuary for a frog on the slippery slope to extinction

The survival prospects of one of the world's most threatened and evolutionarily distinct amphibians have just received an enormous boost in the shape of a new community-based protected area in Ghana.

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Developing AI in a responsible way

Université de Montréal, in collaboration with the Fonds de recherche du Québec, today unveiled the Montréal Declaration for Responsible Development of Artificial Intelligence. This set of ethical guidelines for the development of artificial intelligence is the culmination of more than a year of work, research and consultations with citizens, experts, public policymakers and industry stakeholders,

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Bacteria under stress can live without cell wall

Thread-like bacteria make cells that no longer have a cell wall under the influence of osmotic stress. A remarkable discovery, since the cell wall serves as a protection barrier for bacteria. It could also help to explain how pathogenic bacteria can hide in our body from our immune system. A team of Leiden researchers led by Dennis Claessen has published this on 4 December in Nature Communications

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Crazy Rich Asians Tanked in China—But That’s Okay

As the film industry moves more and more toward prioritizing worldwide box office over domestic ticket sales, genres such as dramas and romantic comedies have begun to die out. Major studios, focused on billion-dollar grosses that can move stock needles, mostly make big franchises instead. One of the best examples of that shift is Disney reportedly declining to make a sequel to its 2009 smash hit

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How Kyrie Irving Could've Leaned Over So Far Without Falling

In a video, the Boston Celtics player stands on a basketball court and leans… and leans. Here’s how to parse the mystery of why he doesn’t fall.

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Gifts for people with a lot of hair

Gadgets No present is better than beautiful hair. I have a lot of hair. Seriously, check my credentials. And when you are truly blessed with a rich abundance of follicles, it kind of consumes your life.

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Social marketing campaigns can help threatened wildlife species recover

Encouraging people to change their behaviour through social marketing campaigns can help the recovery of threatened wildlife populations.

9h

New passenger scanner uses space technology to speed up airport security

A super-sensitive passenger scanner that reveals hidden security threats is being trialled at Cardiff Airport in the UK.

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Why we should stop labelling people climate change deniers

In the westernmost reaches of Nunavut, on the Northwest Passage, Inuit hunters have told me some pithy things about climate change. "The land is changing. It isn't climate change. This is part of cycles. Our elders saw this coming."

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ESA team blasts Intel's new AI chip with radiation at CERN

An ESA-led team subjected Intel's new Myriad 2 artificial intelligence chip to one of the most energetic radiation beams available on Earth. This test of its suitability to fly in space took place at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The AI chip is related in turn to an ESA-fostered family of integrated circuits.

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Sculpted Wi-Fi waves can turn your whole office into a computer

Bouncing around specially tailored waves can turn an entire room into an analogue computer, which could help build an energy-efficient artificial intelligence

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Sports analytics analysis reveals that past shared success among team members improves odds of future wins

When Lebron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Bosh signed with the National Basketball Association's (NBA) Miami Heat in 2010 as free agents, basketball fans and sports pundits heralded the arrival of the league's first "super team." Yet despite boasting a starting lineup featuring three of the league's best players, the Heat began the 2011 season with a disappointing 9-8 record as its stars acclimate

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New catalyst achieves unprecedented activities

Researchers have developed a new catalyst to synthesise aromatic amines, which are central building blocks in many drugs and pesticides. The system is more active than conventional catalysts, so less energy is required during the reaction, and difficult compounds can be synthesized.

9h

Undersøgelse: Sundhedsplatformen forværrer psykiatriske overlægers arbejdsforhold

De psykiatriske overlæger i Region Hovedstaden mener, at deres arbejdsforhold er betydeligt forringet efter indførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen. Det viser en ny undersøgelse.

9h

Social marketing campaigns can help threatened wildlife species recover

Encouraging people to change their behavior through social marketing campaigns can help the recovery of threatened wildlife populations.

9h

New catalyst achieves unprecedented activities

Researchers have developed a new efficient catalyst to synthesise aromatic amines, which are central building blocks in many drugs and pesticides. The system is more active than conventional catalysts, so less energy is required during the reaction, and also difficult compounds can be synthesized.

9h

Plant cells inherit knowledge of where's up and where's down from mother cell

Knowing which way is up or down is important for all living things. For plants, which grow roots into the soil and flowers above ground, getting this polarization wrong would cause a whole host of problems. In plants, polarization of the entire organism depends on every single cell being polarized. Cell division, however, disrupts polarization. How polarity is reestablished was previously unknown.

9h

Study puts the Neotropics on the map of the world's food production centers in antiquity

Shell middens are archaeological features consisting mainly of the remains of marine animals thrown away near settlements over hundreds or thousands of years. They are the debris of human activity. In Brazil, they are known by the Tupi word sambaqui.

9h

New discovery complicates efforts to measure universe's expansion

A study led by Texas Tech University shows that supersoft X-ray emissions can come from accretion as well as nuclear fusion.

9h

Mathematical model offers new strategies for urban burglary prevention

As with most crime, the highest rates of burglary occur in urban communities since large metropolitan areas generally boast more concentrated wealth. Big cities also allow burglars to maintain anonymity and evade authority while offering ample opportunities for discreet disposal of stolen property. Burglars observe their target cities with the careful attention of urban planners, taking note of pu

9h

New parasite decimates giant clam species in Mediterranean

With rapid efficiency, a mysterious parasite is seeking out and killing a giant species of clam found only in the Mediterranean Sea. Unless scientists can find a way of stopping it soon, they say the mollusk could go extinct.

9h

Researchers discover new material—black silver

Researchers from the Singapore University of Design and Technology (SUTD) have engineered a new, inexpensive nanomaterial that has applications ranging from biomolecule detectors to solar energy conversion. The key to the material's remarkable performance is its nanostructure, which strongly interacts with visible and infrared light. This nanomaterial is easily coated onto other materials, includi

9h

Chemical engineers develop new class of multi-function precision polymer

Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a new class of multi-functional sequence-defined polymers.

9h

A journey underground into one of Poland's working mines

As Poland hosts COP24 in nearby Katowice, David Shukman journeys into the depths of a working mine.

9h

Monumental Disaster at the Department of the Interior

A new report documents suppression of science, denial of climate change, the silencing and intimidation of staff — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Study suggests fipronil caused massive honeybee die-off in France

A team of researchers from the University of Exeter and Fera Science Ltd, both in the U.K. has found evidence that implicates the insecticide fipronil as the culprit behind a massive die-off of honeybees in France in the 1990s. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of two insecticides that were thought to be behind the die-offs

9h

Agro-ecology: A way for farming systems in the global South to adapt to climate and global change

While almost 80% of countries say they count agriculture as a possible way of mitigating climate change, the whole of sub-Saharan Africa—2 billion people to be fed by 2050—recognizes the need to adapt agriculture to climate change.

9h

Careless CRISPR?

A set of gene-edited twins has made questions about the ethics of modifying humans much more urgent.

9h

The Reason Many Ultrarich People Aren’t Satisfied With Their Wealth

As the number of millionaires and billionaires in the world climbs ever higher , there are a growing number of people who possess more money than they could ever reasonably spend on even the lushest goods. But at a certain level of wealth, the next million isn’t going to suddenly revolutionize their lifestyle. What drives people, once they’ve reached that point, to keep pursuing more? There are s

9h

How the neoliberal obsession with valuing nature changes our understanding of it

Over the last decade, an industry has developed that values different aspects of nature in different ways. Its growth has been underpinned by the argument that, in a neoliberal world where the market is the dominant mechanism for distributing scarce resources, those assets that cannot be priced and traded are either undervalued or overlooked. Putting a price on nature allows it to be included in t

9h

The promise of the "learn to code" movement

This week, educators, students and the public around the world are participating in Computer Science Education Week by organizing and leading one-hour coding tutorials.

9h

Maintaining the unlimited potential of stem cells

Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are the very definition of being full of potential, given that they can become any type of cell in the body. Once they start down any particular path toward a type of tissue, they lose their unlimited potential. Scientists have been trying to understand why and how this happens in order to create regenerative therapies that can, for example, coax a person's own cells to

9h

Machine learning identifies cryptocurrency scams before they happen

Pump-and-dump schemes have become increasingly common in cryptocurrency markets. Now security researchers have learned how to spot them in advance.

9h

Sustainable palm oil doesn't make the grade

From food and biofuels to cosmetics and detergents, palm oil is found in countless products these days. Demand for the oil has surged in the last decade—global usage went from 37 million metric tons in 2006 to 64.2 million in 2016—in part because it is cheap and, for a time, enjoyed a good-for-you reputation.

9h

Moldy mouse food postpones SpaceX launch

SpaceX has postponed its cargo launch to the International Space Station until Wednesday after mold was found on food bars for a mouse experiment bound for the orbiting outpost, NASA said.

9h

New study sheds light on medication administration errors leading to death — omission is a common cause

Medication administration errors leading to death are common with anticoagulants and antibiotics in particular, according to a new study that analyzed incidents reported in England and Wales. The most common error category was omitted medicine, followed by a wrong dose or a wrong strength. In half of the reported incidents, the patient was aged over 75.

9h

What are the cost-effective implants in hip replacement surgery?

New research led by the Hip Implant Prosthesis Study (HIPS) team at the University of Bristol Medical School has shown that small-head (less than 36 mm in diameter) cemented metal-on-plastic hip replacements are the most cost-effective in men and women older than 65 years. For adults younger than 65, small-head cemented ceramic-on-plastic hip replacements are more likely to be cost-effective.

9h

Study counts the high cost of infidelity for swift parrots

Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have found a chronic shortage of females in a critically endangered parrot species has led to love triangles, sneaky sex on the side, increased fighting between males and fewer babies.

9h

Russian scientists developed a new drug for cancer diagnostics and treatment

Russian researchers announced the development of a combined action drug based on ionizing radiation and bacterial toxin. Their total effect appeared to be 2,200 times stronger compared to that exerted by the radiation and toxin, separately. The drug affects tumor cells selectively providing better diagnostics and treatment of malignant tumors

9h

How becoming a manager can be a double-edged sword

A new study from a Portland State University researcher calls the transition to manager a 'double-edged sword' and found that a manager's ability to mentally detach from work during non-work hours can help reduce the increased exhaustion and work-family conflict that come with the new role.

9h

Gene that lets you eat as much as you want holds promise against obesity

It sounds too good to be true, but a novel approach that might allow you to eat as much as you want without gaining weight could be a reality in the near future. When a single gene known as RCAN1 was removed in mice and they were fed a high fat diet, they failed to gain weight, even after gorging on high fat foods for prolonged periods.

9h

Crystal clear: Understanding magnetism changes caused by crystal lattice expansion

An international team including researchers from Osaka University demonstrated helimagnetic behavior in a cubic perovskite material by expanding the lattice through barium doping. The experimental findings were well supported by calculations from first principles, showing that the materials were highly sensitive to the lattice constant. It is hoped that the findings will form the foundation for ne

9h

Here's the seafood Australians eat (and what we should be eating)

Many Australians are concerned with the sustainability of their seafood. While definitions of sustainability vary, according to government assessments, over 85% of seafood caught in Australia is sustainable.

9h

New report addresses curbing climate change and sustainably supplying food, water, and energy

Over the next several decades as the global population grows, society will be faced with pressing challenges such as providing reliable supplies of food and water, diminishing climate change and adapting to its impacts, and building healthy, resilient cities. These challenges call for new and expanded roles for environmental engineers, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engin

9h

Debunking the 'population bomb'

The dire warnings are everywhere these days about catastrophic climate change, particularly the perils of overpopulation and the burning of fossil fuels.

9h

Moldy Mouse Chow Delays SpaceX Dragon Launch to Space Station

SpaceX's next cargo launch to the International Space Station has been pushed back to Wednesday (Dec. 5) due to a rodent problem.

9h

With no teeth or filters, ancient whales used suction to eat

A newly named fossil whale, Maiabalaena nesbittae , provides information about the evolution of baleen, the filter-feeder system inside the mouths of certain whales, according to new research. For some time, researchers have known that the ancestors to mysticete whales had teeth. But what hasn’t been clear is how the transition from feeding with teeth to filter feeding with baleen took place. Whi

9h

Fast magnetoacoustic waves and magnetic field measurements in the solar corona with the Low Frequency Array

Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains are a promising seismological probe of the sun's corona, revealing the magnetic connectivity and providing an estimation of the absolute value of the coronal magnetic field. Low-frequency radio observations allow for the detection of fast wave trains in middle and upper corona, above the field-of-view of EUV imagers and spectrographs, via the modulation of the radi

10h

Siri, what is AI good for? Expert explains why that is a difficult question

Personal data collection, machine learning and artificial intelligence are encroaching in our lives at a pace that many of us find unsettling, if not downright scary. Not to mention that many of us can't tell the difference in what these terms mean.

10h

Volcanoes fed by 'mush' reservoirs rather than molten magma chambers

Volcanoes are not fed by molten magma formed in large chambers finds a new study, overturning classic ideas about volcanic eruptions.

10h

Researchers suggest ritual finger amputation may explain missing fingers in Upper Paleolithic people

A trio of researchers at Simon Fraser University in Canada theorizes that ritualistic finger amputation during the Upper Paleolithic explains the number of missing fingers in depictions from that time. In their paper published in the Journal of Paleolithic Archeology, Brea McCauley, David Maxwell and Mark Collard outline the reasons for their theory, even as they acknowledge more evidence is requi

10h

IoT-sensorer løber hurtigt tør for strøm

Det er ikke sådan bare lige til at etablere et trådløst netværk af sensorer til optimering af bygningsdrift. For sensorernes batterier har langt kortere levetid end forventet.

10h

Can guaranteed admissions help reduce college undermatching?

Low-income, highly qualified students are more likely to choose selective universities that match their academic profiles when they know their admission is guaranteed through state automatic admissions policies, according to a new study published online today in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

10h

Ideal marriage partners drive Waorani warriors to war

In a new study, a team of researchers examined the social composition of raiding parties and their relationship to marriage alliances in an Amazonian tribal society, the Waorani of Ecuador. The Waorani formerly practiced lethal raiding, or small-scale warfare, as part of their social fabric. The anthropologists spoke in detail with tribal members about their raiding histories in an attempt to unde

10h

Otago researchers discover a promising therapy for improving heart attack survivorship

In pre-clinical trials, University of Otago researchers have discovered a promising new therapy that has the potential to be used clinically for improving survival rates for people who suffer a heart attack.

10h

In team sports, chemistry matters

Northwestern Engineering's Noshir Contractor and researchers analyzed game statistics across major sports and online games, revealing that past shared success among teammates improves their team's odds of winning future games.

10h

Aluminum nitride to extend life of solar power plants

NUST MISIS scientists together with their colleagues from the Central Metallurgical R&D Institute (Cairo, Egypt) have developed a composite material to extend the life of solar towers up to five years. The research article has been published in Renewable Energy.

10h

Physicists shed X-ray light on melting polymers

Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and Lomonosov Moscow State University have combined thermal analysis and X-ray scattering—two techniques for studying crystal structure—in one experimental setup to investigate semicrystalline polymers. Over 100 million tons of such polymers are produced annually to make fabrics, packaging materials, neural prosthetics, and more

10h

NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrives at asteroid Bennu

NASA's Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft completed its 1.2 billion-mile (2 billion-kilometer) journey to arrive at the asteroid Bennu Monday. The spacecraft executed a maneuver that transitioned it from flying toward Bennu to operating around the asteroid.

10h

Mars new home 'a large sandbox'

With InSight safely on the surface of Mars, the mission team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, is busy learning more about the spacecraft's landing site. They knew when InSight landed on Nov. 26 that the spacecraft had touched down on target, a lava plain named Elysium Planitia. Now they've determined that the vehicle sits slightly tilted (about 4 degrees) in a shallow d

10h

SpaceX Delay May Mean 36,000 Wormy Passengers Are Too Old for Their Planned Experiments

Here's what those wriggling worms are expected to do in space … and it's not to scare aliens.

10h

Foreign Trolls Are Targeting Veterans on Facebook

Opinion: The VA needs to take preventative measures to protect vets—and more broadly, our democracy—from digital manipulation and fraud.

10h

Research worms 'too old' to go to space station

A launch is delayed due to mouldy food bars, meaning the worms could be a day too old for research.

10h

Can guaranteed admissions help reduce college undermatching?

Low-income, highly qualified students are more likely to choose selective universities that match their academic profiles when they know their admission is guaranteed through state automatic admissions policies, according to a new study published online today in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

10h

Open source tool picks best chemo drug 80% of the time

A new machine learning tool could help find the chemotherapy drug most likely to attack cancer in individual patients. The tool, which analyzes RNA expression tied to information about patient outcomes with specific drugs, predicted the chemotherapy drug that had provided the best outcome 80 percent of the time, according to a new study. The selection of a first-line chemotherapy drug to treat ma

10h

What is that bright object next to the moon?

A spectacular sight lights up the sky as Venus and the moon rise together

10h

Structure of electrolyte controls battery performance

The research team at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology has reported that adding water into electrolyte improves the function of vanadium oxide, which is one of positive electrode material in calcium-ion batteries. The results of the present study indicate that this phenomenon is caused by changes in the electrolyte structure.

10h

Set your teeth on EDGE: World's weirdest sharks and rays on the brink of extinction

Sharks that use a whip-like tail to stun their prey, rays with saws on their faces, and river rays half the length of a bus are among the most unique species at risk of extinction according to the latest ranking from international conservation charity ZSL's (Zoological Society of London) pioneering EDGE of Existence program.

10h

People with OCD get stuck in ‘loop of wrongness’

A study of hundreds of brain scans sheds light on abnormalities common to people with obsessive-compulsive disorder. People with OCD may wash and re-wash their hands or check—and re-check, then check again—that the stove is off. But because the reasons for the behaviors are unclear, about half of patients don’t have effective treatment options. Now, new research pinpoints the specific brain areas

10h

Scientists Just Discovered What May Be Canada's Largest Cave. And It Looks Like the Sarlacc's Pit.

A helicopter team counting caribou in Canada recently made an unexpected discovery.

10h

Lægeforeningen har fået et forskningsudvalg

Lægeforeningen nedsætter varigt forskningsudvalg, der skal skabe bedre rammer for forskning og udvikling, samt styrke lægernes stemme i den forskningspolitiske debat.

10h

Humanity's Largest Atom Smasher Takes a Pause, Will Wake Up Again in 2021

Particles: Breathe easy. Scientists at the world's largest particle collider have no plans to smash you together until spring 2021.

10h

BrainWorks: Exploring the Brain-Computer Interface

At the end of the day, computers and brains share at least one trait. On a very basic level, both use electrical currents to send messages and commands to accomplish certain tasks. Understanding exactly how that process works within our brain and how it relates to computers may be key for researchers and doctors when it comes to helping various types of patients. Eric H. Chudler , Ph.D., is back

10h

The powerful impact of real-world learning experiences for kids

Real-world learning experiences, like summer camps, can significantly improve children's knowledge in a matter of just days, a new study suggests. Researchers found that 4- to 9-year-old kids knew more about how animals are classified after a four-day camp at a zoo.It wasn't that children who attended just knew more facts about animals, the researchers noted. The camp actually improved how they or

11h

No scientific proof that war is ingrained in human nature, according to study

Is it in our nature to go to war? Should we just accept the fact that humans have this innate tendency and are hardwired to kill members of other groups?

11h

What Venice Can Teach American Cities

Venice, Italy, has been flooding for centuries. Once just a symptom of the city’s location on a series of islands, and its maze of canals, frequent inundation has turned Venice into a cautionary tale of environmental degradation and inevitable submersion. Climate change will assuredly bring similar risk to U.S. coastal communities. Venice offers an early warning: Some fear that the city will inev

11h

Megapixels: Watch NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft zoom in on its asteroid target

Space After a long trip, OSIRIS-REx gets down to business. On Monday, a NASA spacecraft OSIRIS-REx reached asteroid Bennu, kicking off a research mission that could help us unlock secrets of the early solar system.

11h

Scientists create roadmap for examining soil and using sensing technology

Microbes are single-cell organisms that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. Yet while relatively inconspicuous, they are the dominant life form on our planet.

11h

Taking the measure of an asteroid

CU Boulder scientists have a front row seat today to observe a NASA spacecraft as it arrives at the asteroid Bennu, coming to within 4.5 miles of the space rock.

11h

13 Best Geeky Gifts for Mom and Dad: Roku, Echo, Fitbit, and More

From a smart microwave to a new board game, check out our favorite gifts for your favorite parents—whether they’re tech-savvy or not.

11h

May Mobility's Not-So-Sexy Plan to Win at Self-Driving Cars

The Ann Arbor startup's path to success hinges on using robo-cars in simple scenarios, where they can work well and bring in revenue.

11h

'Hitman 2' Is My 'Forever Game'

Everyone is pining for an interactive infinity in their games. 'Hitman 2' delivers just that.

11h

Study Revives Debate About Google's Role in Filter Bubbles

Rival browser maker DuckDuckGo found users got different results for the same search, even when they were logged out or using Incognito mode.

11h

Fishermen Sue Big Oil For Its Role In Climate Change

The food industry is already feeling the effects of climate change, which will likely force expensive adaptations in the future. At least one sector is looking to make energy companies pay. (Image credit: Michael Melford/Getty Images)

11h

Rebel honeybee workers lay eggs when their queen is away

A honeybee queen’s absence in the colony triggers some workers to turn queen-like and lay eggs, sometimes in other colonies.

11h

Women have been written out of science history – time to put them back

Can you name a female scientist from history? Chances are you are shouting out Marie Curie. The twice Nobel Prize-winning Curie and mathematician Ada Lovelace are two of the few women within Western science to receive lasting popular recognition.

11h

Image of the Day: Scarred Hearts

Maps of diving cells before and after heart attacks in mice offer additional evidence against the existence of cardiac stem cells.

11h

Albert Einstein's 'God letter' sells for $2.9m

The 1954 letter about religion smashed its predicted price at an auction in New York.

11h

Astrocast successfully launches its first satellite

Yesterday evening, Astrocast – a young start-up spun out of EPFL – launched its first demonstration satellite intended to test its Internet-of-Things system. It was put into orbit by a SpaceX rocket that took off from California.

11h

Simple yet powerful model predicts DNA organization

Scientists often try to understand important processes in the cell by interfering and observing what happens. But often the cell just dies.

11h

Colloidal quantum dots make LEDs shine bright in the infrared

The ideal optoelectronic semiconductor material would be a strong light emitter and an efficient charge conductor to allow for electrical injection in devices. These two conditions, when met, can lead to highly efficient LEDs as well as to solar cells that approach the Shockley-Queisser limit. Until now, the materials that have come closest to meeting these conditions have been based on costly, ep

11h

Researchers demonstrate new building block in quantum computing

Researchers with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a new level of control over photons encoded with quantum information. Their research was published in Optica.

11h

Study uses rings in teeth to understand the environment Neanderthals faced

Scientists are painting the clearest picture yet of what life may have been like for Neanderthals living in Southern France some 250,000 years ago, and to do it, they're using an unlikely day-to-day record of what their environment was like—their teeth.

11h

Novel digitization methods and restoration technologies for preserving cultural heritage

How can we protect and preserve cultural heritage? Researchers from 16 Fraunhofer Institutes are collaborating on the executive board's cultural heritage project to develop the technologies needed for this undertaking.

11h

Combination of space-based and ground-based telescopes reveals more than 100 exoplanets

An international team of astronomers using a combination of ground and space-based telescopes have reported more than 100 extrasolar planets in only three months. These planets are quite diverse and are expected to play a large role in developing the research field of exoplanets and life in the universe.

11h

House in a lab

Scientists have rebuilt a terraced house inside a laboratory to help make UK homes energy-efficient.

11h

Artificial intelligence for studying the ancient human populations of Patagonia

Argentine and Spanish researchers have used statistical techniques of automatic learning to analyze mobility patterns and technology of the hunter-gatherer groups that inhabited the Southern Cone of America from the time they arrived about 12,000 years ago until the end of the 19th century. Big data from archaeological sites located in the extreme south of Patagonia have been used for this study.

11h

Early literacy may compromise grammatical learning

Learning how to read may have some disadvantages for learning grammar. Children who cannot read yet often treat multiword phrases as wholes ("how-are-you"). After learning to read, children notice individual words more, as these are separated by spaces in written language ("how are you").

11h

Ideal marriage partners drive Waorani warriors to war

Why do people go to war when the consequences of warfare are so dramatic? Scholars have suggested that the motivations for participating in war either lie in the individual rewards warriors receive (to the victor goes the spoils) or because group members coerce them to participate for fear of punishment. Understanding the factors that motivate warriors to join war parties sheds light on some of th

11h

Why autonomous vehicles won't reduce our dependence on cars in cities

The technology of autonomous vehicles (AVs) is progressing rapidly, but have we really thought through how they'll work in reality?

11h

Understanding magnetism changes caused by crystal lattice expansion

The pattern of arrangement of atoms in a crystal, called the crystal lattice, can have a huge effect on the properties of solid materials. Controlling and harnessing these properties is a challenge that promises rewards in applications such as novel sensors and new solid-state devices. An international research collaboration, including researchers from Osaka University, has reported the induction

11h

Common Chemicals in Toiletries May Lead to Early Puberty

Chemicals found in shampoo and makeup may shift up the onset of puberty.

11h

Were Paleo Artists Also Self-Mutilators?

A new paper argues that Paleolithic cave artists may have cut off their own fingers.

11h

Albert Einstein's 'God letter' reflecting on religion auctioned for $3m

Missive that calls the Bible ‘a collection of primitive legends’ was expected to fetch only half that much A handwritten missive by Albert Einstein known as the “God letter” fetched almost $3m at auction on Tuesday. Christie’s auction house in New York stated on Tuesday afternoon that the letter, including the buyer’s premium, fetched $2.89m under the hammer. That was almost twice the expected am

11h

Light-induced changes in photosensory proteins

Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have demonstrated on a molecular level how a specific protein allows light signals to be converted into cellular information. Their findings have broadened the understanding of how plants and bacteria adapt to changes in light conditions that regulate essential processes such as photosynthesis. Their research has been published in Nature Commun

11h

Capturing the surprising flexibility of crystal surfaces

Images taken using an atomic force microscope have allowed researchers to observe, for the first time, the flexible and dynamic changes that occur on the surfaces of 'porous coordination polymer' crystals when guest molecules are introduced. The findings, published in the journal Nature Chemistry, have implications for investigations into materials that can be used for storing and sensing molecule

11h

Nature's 'laboratory' offers clues on how plants thrive through genetic diversity

Scientists have turned to nature's own 'laboratory' for clues about how plants adapt in the environment to ensure their own survival.

11h

The Republicans’ Midwest ‘Power Grab’

In Wisconsin and Michigan, Republicans are responding to their loss of top statewide offices in last month’s elections by rapidly trying to undercut the Democrats about to take office. The gambit seems straight out of North Carolina, where Republicans used the lame-duck session after the 2016 elections to limit the power of the incoming Democratic governor in what one top Democrat called a “legis

11h

New detections of gravitational waves brings the number to 11 – so far

Four new detections of gravitational waves have been announced at the Gravitational Waves Physics and Astronomy Workshop, at the University of Maryland in the United States.

11h

Democrats Are Crafting a Post-Obama Foreign Policy

For several years now, commentators have wondered if Democrats—who have shifted left on domestic issues—would shift left on foreign policy, too. We now know the answer; the shift is under way. The clearest evidence yet is the Senate’s vote last Wednesday to move forward a bill that would end America’s role in the war in Yemen. It signals the birth of a post-Obama Democratic foreign policy. Rememb

12h

It's Almost Impossible to Be a Mom in Television News

It was the only time I had cried in front of one of my bosses at CBS News. As we sat in my office, door closed, I was struggling to explain why I was uncertain whether to sign a new three-year contract with the network. Yes, I could stay on as a general-assignment correspondent, but that would mean being ready and willing to leave town at a moment’s notice to cover whatever breaking news was unfo

12h

There are two kinds of identity politics. One is good. The other, very bad.

Freedom is speech is being eradicated on college campuses in favor of identity politics and "snowflake" culture. Rather than be open to new ideas, differing opinions that might make students "feel bad" are shut out. This creates a cycle of negativity between not only the colleges and the students but also the very idea of college being a place of higher learning. The Coddling of the American Mind

12h

Nonprofits on Facebook Get Hacked—Then They Really Need Help

Facebook is an enormous platform for charitable giving, but some nonprofit leaders say there aren’t enough resources when something goes wrong.

12h

An Eye-Scanning Lie Detector Is Forging a Dystopian Future

EyeDetect is pitched as more efficient and accurate than a polygraph, but a WIRED investigation found that a reliable lie detector is still a fantasy.

12h

China Is Both the Best and Worst Hope for Clean Energy

China is the world’s biggest polluter but a leader in renewable energy, making it the country to watch at this week's climate summit in Poland.

12h

Heavy Rains and Hurricanes Clear a Path for Supercharged Mold

Warmer temperatures and rising CO2 can also ramp up some fungal toxins and allergens — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Find vanter og kamera frem: Nu starter julens store stjerneregn

Meteorsværmen Geminiderne starter i aften, og selvom den først topper næste uge, giver det klare vejr dig god mulighed for at se stjerneskud allerede nu.

12h

Nyt antistof leverer responsrater på næsten 60 pct.

Det er ikke hver dag, at man som forsker kan få lov til at præsentere smækre responsrater på et godt stykke over 50 pct. Men det oplevede for overlæge Martin Hutchings fra Rigshospitalet på ASH-kongressen. Han vil mindes præsentationen som et lyspunkt og et højdepunkt.

12h

Venetoclax går igen i 35 abstracts på ASH

Lægemidlet venetoclax, der er godkendt til behandling af CLL i Europa, fylder rigtig meget i årets program for den amerikanske hæmatologikongres ASH. Dets helt unikke virkningsmekanisme og toxicitet gør, at det har potentiale til at kunne indgå i og styrke kombinationsbehandlinger til en lang række hæmatologiske kræftsygdomme.

12h

Mange hæmatologer får røde knopper af for høje doser CAR-T

Antallet af sessions, der omhandler de store potentialer ved CAR-T-behandling er på dette års ASH går lidt over gevind oplever flere hæmatologer. De håber på, at ASH fremover vil prioritere flere reelle nyheder i indlæggene og give plads til mere af den sunde skepsis.

12h

Think about bees say researchers as Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument shrinks

A year ago, President Donald Trump announced his intention to reduce the size of Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which Utah State University researchers say is a hotspot for bee biodiversity. The entomologists urge federal agencies to consider the pollinators in management plans, going forward, for the monument.

13h

Fukushima-kræftundersøgelse giver intet klart svar

Flere japanske børn og unge har fået skjoldbruskkræft efter ulykken på atomkraftværket i 2011. Men undersøgelsen er sat forkert op, erkender forskerne.

13h

Opfordring: Vestager bør undersøge maskineriet bag techgiganters reklameindtægter

En opfordring til at granske, hvordan Facebook og Google helt præcist tjener penge på onlinereklamer, er landet på EU’s konkurrencekommissær Margrethe Vestagers bord.

13h

Miljøminister vil ensrette sortering af plastaffald

Affaldsbranchen mener, at minister sparker en åben dør ind: Vi er undervejs med fælles sorteringskriterier og piktogrammer.

13h

Biler fra Europas fabrikker sender overvågningsdata til det kinesiske styre

BMW, Mercedes og VW leverer data som led i en stor og sofistikeret dataindsamling – og kan bruges som real-tid overvågning.

13h

Mueller Is Laying Siege to the Trump Presidency

“Today is the first day I actually thought Donald Trump might not finish his term in office,” said the legal commentator Jeffrey Toobin on CNN last Thursday. “This is the beginning of the end for Trump,” declared Neal Katyal, a former acting solicitor general, on MSNBC . “The deal may be among the biggest news in the nearly 18-month investigation,” wrote Barry Berke, Noah Bookbinder, and Norman E

13h

Trump’s Iran-centric Syria Policy Takes Shape

This fall, U.S.-led coalition forces escalated attacks in Syria once more, launching more than 1,000 air and artillery strikes , nearly all of them close to the border with Iraq, as Washington seeks to crush the Islamic State’s presence in the country before the end of the year. “They’re either here to fight to death or they’re just going to get killed because they have nowhere to go,” the coalit

13h

I Served in Congress Longer Than Anyone. Here’s How to Fix It.

In my six decades in public service, I’ve seen many changes in our nation and its institutions. Yet the most profound change I’ve witnessed is also the saddest. It is the complete collapse in respect for virtually every institution of government and an unprecedented cynicism about the nobility of public service itself. These are not just the grumblings of an angry old man lamenting the loss of “t

13h

Trump’s Shallow Sympathies

It could have been worse. Responding to the death of George H. W. Bush, with whom he had a slow-simmering feud , President Donald Trump avoided taking a swipe, and instead paid his respects to his Republican predecessor. Still, the president’s remarks to reporters in Argentina, where he was traveling for the G20 summit, were peculiar. “He was a very fine man. I met him on a number of occasions,”

13h

Donor-celler kommer kræftsyges trætte immunforsvar til undsætning

Mange års kræftsygdom og intensiv kræftbehandling kan være så strabadserende for patientens T-celler, at de er nogle sølle soldater i kampen mod kræft. T-celler fra donorer kan måske i langt højere grad give kræften kamp til stregen.

13h

Genetisk signatur udpeger patienter til ny kombinationsbehandling

Kun en undergruppe af t-celle-lymfom-patienter kan ifølge et nyt dansk-initieret fase-3-forsøg gavn af antistoffet alemtuzumab i kombination med kemo.

13h

Ulmende myelomatose kan bremses

Kombinationsbehandling med med tre lægemidler kan gøre patienter med ulmende myelomatose progressionsfrie i flere år.

13h

Antistof er veltolereret blandt patienter med akut myeloid leukæmi

Første humane forsøg med et nyt antistof, der angriber akut myeloid leukæmi på to forskellige måder, viser, at lægemidlet er sikkert at bruge til patienter.

13h

Behandling mod ophobet jern giver bedre overlevelse

Jernkelateringsterapi med deferasirox forbedrer eventfri overlevelse for patienter med lavrisiko myelodysplastisk syndrom.

13h

How some sap-sucking insects fling their pee

Sharpshooters hurl their pee with structure called a stylus, which sends droplets flying at 20 times the acceleration of Earth’s gravity.

13h

Think about bees say researchers as Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument Shrinks

The state of Utah's nickname is "The Beehive State," and the moniker couldn't be more apt, say Utah State University scientists. One out of every four bee species in the United States is found In Utah and the arid, western state is home to more bee species than most states in the nation. About half of those species dwell within the original boundaries of the newly reduced Grand Staircase-Escalante

13h

Aarhus Universitet sender sin første cubesat til ISS

Den lille nye skal sende billeder hjem af askeskyer, gletsjere og måske stjerner.

13h

West Mersea mammoth tusk 'dates back 12,000 years'

It was discovered off the Essex coast after an unusually low tide exposed it for about half an hour.

13h

BAGGRUND: Lindholms skift fra laboratorium til udrejsecenter

Det er ikke så ligetil at skifte fra virusforsøg til ophold for mennesker. Alt skal renses, og valget står mellem citronsyre og formalin.

14h

Colombia tropical forest fires spike after 2016 Peace Accords

Fires that contribute to deforestation spiked six-fold in Colombia in the year after an historic 2016 peace agreement ended decades of conflict between FARC guerrilla and government forces, according to a study in Nature Ecology & Evolution. "This dramatic increase from trends in the last decade will boost the likelihood of deforestation in protected areas in the upcoming year," said study co-auth

14h

A bit of a stretch… material that thickens as it's pulled

While examining the capabilities of Liquid Crystal Elastomers, scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker — at the molecular level — as it is stretched.

14h

Mountain splendor? Scientists know where your eyes will look

Using precise brain measurements, Yale researchers predicted how people's eyes move when viewing natural scenes, an advance in understanding the human visual system that can improve a host of artificial intelligence efforts, such as the development of driverless cars.

14h

Bacton Gas Terminal to be protected by sandscaping plan

A nationally important terminal on the Norfolk coast is to be protected by a new "sandscape".

14h

VIDEO: To Save A Fox, Scientists Took To Land, Air And Sea

When the population of Channel Islands foxes started to vanish in the '90s, no one knew why. Bringing them back from near-extinction has meant unraveling a mystery that started with World War II. (Image credit: Ryan Kellman/Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear)

14h

A bit of a stretch… material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker—at the molecular level—as it is stretched.

14h

Facial gestures can move this AI-motorized wheelchair

A new wheelchair may give people with severe mobility challenges another reason to smile about artificial intelligence—that grin might literally help them control their wheelchair.

15h

Giant baby birds sitting on their potty-like nests make a fine sight

Rare Chatham albatross chicks get a room with a view – the adults build towering ground nests up to a metre tall to try to keep their young high and dry

15h

India pollution watchdog fines Delhi over toxic smog

India's environmental watchdog has slapped New Delhi's government with a $3.5 million fine for failing to enforce rules to reduce smog in the world's most polluted major city, officials said Tuesday.

16h

Australia set to pass sweeping cyber laws despite tech giant fears

Australia's two main parties struck a deal Tuesday to pass sweeping cyber laws requiring tech giants to help government agencies get around encrypted communications used by suspected criminals and terrorists.

16h

Young, hip farmers: Coming to a city near you

If you've been to your neighborhood farmers market or seen a small "local" section pop up in your grocery store, you may have noticed a trend: People want to know where their food is coming from, and the agricultural industry is responding. The number of farmers markets in the U.S. has skyrocketed in recent years, but with an aging population of farmers, who's supporting this growth?

16h

Puritan Tiger Beetles, ‘Vicious Predators,’ May Soon Hunt Again

The beetles are New England’s most endangered species. Now scientists have begun an unlikely effort to return them to the banks of the Connecticut River.

16h

New technique to identify phloem cells aids in the fight against citrus greening

Crops worldwide are increasingly vulnerable to pandemics, as diseases hitch rides on global flows of people and goods, hopping from continent to continent. Phloem diseases such as citrus greening are one particularly devastating group of plant diseases that have been wreaking economic havoc globally. However, these diseases can be difficult to study, as phloem cells are relatively inaccessible and

16h

Reader’s Digest Promotes Prevagen

Reader's Digest is advertising a memory aid, Prevagen, that has been tested and shown not to work. Shame on them!

16h

Development threatens tropical forests, researchers say

Tropical forests in the Amazon, Indonesia, and Mesoamerica face multiple threats from mining, oil, and gas extraction and massive infrastructure projects over the next two decades, according to a study by Clark University researchers and their international colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). This encroachment not only threatens forests and biodiversity but al

16h

Coping with threats from hurricanes, wildfires and rising sea levels

As sea levels continue to rise and more severe storms, like Hurricanes Maria and Michael, threaten coastline communities, local leaders need to assess the hazards and vulnerabilities of their locale. Risk assessment and risk mitigation practices can be beneficial in creating adaptation plans and making mitigation decisions for coastal communities. As scientists ponder the possibility of category s

16h

NASA catches newborn Tropical Cyclone Owen's rainfall, observed by GPM satellite

Tropical Cyclone Owen formed in the Southern Pacific Ocean's Coral Sea southwest of the Solomon Islands when the GPM core observatory satellite passed above and analyzed its rainfall.

16h

Team demonstrates electrochemical techniques for monitoring microbial growth

Savannah River National Laboratory, in collaboration with Clemson University, the University of South Carolina and Savannah River Consulting LLC, has demonstrated the use of electrochemical techniques to monitor the growth status and energy levels of microorganisms used in biotechnology industries. As published in a recent Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Express article, the techniques moni

16h

Making the world hotter: India's expected AC explosion

Ratan Kumar once battled India's brutal summers with damp bedsheets and midnight baths. Now he is among millions upon millions of Indians using air conditioning—helping make the world hotter still.

16h

CHP may have used Tesla Autopilot to stop speeding car

The California Highway Patrol says it may have used the Autopilot system of a Tesla to stop the car after its driver fell asleep.

16h

It-ordfører om Datatilsynet efter GoMentor-sag: »Vi bliver nødt til at sætte foden ned«

Socialdemokratiets it-ordfører er rystet over Datatilsynets prioritering i GoMentor-sagen. Nu vil hun gå til ministeren.

17h

Are we on the cusp of a breakthrough in Ebola treatment?

Leading scientist hopes drug trials in DRC could lessen the impact of deadly virus Ebola could be transformed from a terrifying disease into something that can be managed at home if drug trials in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are successful, a leading scientist believes. Four experimental drugs are starting to be used as part of a groundbreaking trial under extremely difficult conditions

18h

Red tape preventing cancer patients from accessing new drugs

Some cancers have had no new drugs licensed since 2000, according to Institute of Cancer Research report Cancer patients are missing out on innovative new drugs, with red tape covering clinical trials and licensing among the factors to blame, according to a report by the UK’s Institute of Cancer Research . Children’s cancers have received little in the way of new treatments, a finding the authors

18h

God kondi kan halvere din risiko for hjerteanfald

Norsk forskning viser, at risikoen for hjerteanfald og hjertekramper falder i takt med, at konditallet stiger. Også hos raske personer i lavrisikogruppen.

18h

Genetically engineered immune cells show promise for fighting relapsed blood cancer

Researchers are presenting preliminary results from a clinical study of an investigational cellular immunotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma expressing the CD30 protein marker.

19h

Uneven rates of sea level rise tied to climate change

The pattern of uneven sea level rise over the last quarter century has been driven in part by human-caused climate change, not just natural variability, according to a new study.

19h

New technique to identify phloem cells aids in the fight against citrus greening

Phloem diseases, including the economically devastating citrus greening, are particularly difficult to study because phloem cells — essential for plant nutrient transport — are difficult to access and isolate. Researchers at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center have developed a technique to identify phloem cells using fluorescent microscopy and organelle-specific dyes t

19h

Exercise may improve kidney function in obesity, reduce risk of renal disease

Aerobic exercise may reduce the risk of diabetes-related kidney disease in some people, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology — Renal Physiology and was chosen as an APSselect article for December.

19h

Discovery of single material that produces white light could boost efficiency of LED bulbs

The equation to make the inorganic compound combines a lead-free double perovskite with sodium.

19h

SRNL demonstrates electrochemical techniques for monitoring microbial growth

Savannah River National Laboratory, in collaboration with Clemson University, the University of South Carolina and Savannah River Consulting LLC, has demonstrated the use of electrochemical techniques to monitor the growth status and energy levels of microorganisms used in biotechnology industries.

19h

Older women who suffer tooth loss more likely to develop high blood pressure

A study published in the American Journal of Hypertension indicates that postmenopausal women who experience tooth loss are at higher risk of developing high blood pressure.

19h

Mothers whose responses to infants' facial cues increase report stronger bonds with babies

A new study forthcoming in the journal Child Development examined whether pregnancy changes mothers' neural sensitivity to infants' facial cues, and whether such changes affect mother-infant bonding. The study found that increases in cortical responses to infants' faces from the prenatal to the postnatal period in individual mothers were associated with more positive relationships with the baby (a

19h

New strategies may improve CAR-T cell therapy

Researchers have developed two new strategies that may improve the performance of chimeric antigen receptor therapy (CAR-T cell therapy) in treating cancer.

19h

Retail outlets using telehealth pose significant privacy, policy concerns for health care

As retail outlets deliver health care services, including telehealth, physicians say more needs to be done to protect patient privacy, anticipate the capabilities of artificial intelligence and other rapidly advancing technologies.

19h

Neuroscientists pinpoint genes tied to dementia

A research team has identified genetic processes involved in the neurodegeneration that occurs in dementia — an important step on the path toward developing therapies that could slow or halt the course of the disease.

19h

New research on stem cell transplantation for myeloid cancers

Improving outcomes for patients with myeloid cancers who undergo stem cell transplantation is a focus of several studies being presented this week.

19h

Personalized ultrasound scan showing atherosclerosis helps reduce cardiovascular risk

Low adherence to medication and resistance to lifestyle changes have so far hampered prevention efforts for cardiovascular disease. Personalized scans and depiction showing biological age and plaque formation of arteries could help prevention of cardiovascular disease.

19h

High childhood BMI linked to obesity at age 24 in women

Girls who gain weight more rapidly between the ages of 5 and 15 are more likely to be obese at age 24, according to researchers.

19h

New tool to find and fight most dangerous types of lymphoma

Scientists have found a new way to identify people with the most aggressive types of lymphoma who are less likely to respond to standard drugs.

19h

To detect new odors, fruit fly brains improve on a well-known computer algorithm

It might seem like fruit flies would have nothing in common with computers, but new research reveals that the two identify novel information in similar ways. The work not only sheds light on an important neurobiological problem — how organisms detect new odors — but could also improve algorithms for novelty detection in computer science.

20h

Machine learning helps predict worldwide plant-conservation priorities

A new approach uses data analytics and machine learning to predict the conservation status of more than 150,000 plants worldwide. Results suggest that more than 15,000 species likely qualify as near-threatened, vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered.

20h

Development threatens tropical forests

While infrastructure expansion has been broadly investigated as a driver of deforestation, the impacts of extractive industry and its interactions with infrastructure investment on forest cover are less well studied. These challenges are urgent given growing pressure for infrastructure investment and resource extraction. The authors use geospatial and qualitative data from Amazonia, Indonesia, and

20h

Glemte budgetpost på 290 millioner: Derfor blev Ringsted Station dobbelt så dyr

Tværgående omkostninger – eller slet og ret projektledelse og planlægning – blev glemt.

20h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 4. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

20h

Young, hip farmers: Coming to a city near you

The population of American farmers is aging, but a study shows a new generation of farmers is flocking to cities with large populations, farmers markets and the purchasing power to support a market for niche goods.

20h

Prenatal exposure to chemicals in personal care products may speed puberty in girls

Girls exposed to chemicals commonly found in toothpaste, makeup, soap and other personal care products before birth may hit puberty earlier, according to a new longitudinal study. Researchers found that daughters of mothers who had higher levels of diethyl phthalate and triclosan in their bodies during pregnancy experienced puberty at younger ages.

20h

As married couples age, humor replaces bickering

Honeymoon long over? Hang in there. A new study shows those prickly disagreements that can mark the early and middle years of marriage mellow with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance.

20h

Watch the New ‘Captain Marvel’ Trailer Now

Behold Carol Danvers in all of her 1990s glory.

20h

Early clinical trial data show gene therapy reversing sickle cell anemia

After over a decade of preclinical research and development, a new gene therapy treatment for Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) is reversing disease symptoms in two adults and showing early potential for transportability to resource-challenged parts of the world where SCA is most common. Preliminary data from a pilot Phase 1-2 clinical trial testing the gene-addition therapy were presented Dec. 3 at the Am

21h

‘Our Hearts Ache With His Loss’

The ceremony for the late president began at the Capitol as the sun set. A military guard carried his American-flag-draped casket into the Rotunda, where current and former lawmakers, Cabinet officials, Supreme Court justices, and his family stood waiting. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell delivered the opening eulogy for George Herbert Walker Bush, the 41st president of the United States, t

21h

The Climate Crisis Is a Health Crisis [Video]

This year’s 24 Hours of Reality live broadcast will explore humanity’s greatest challenge and prospective solutions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Nasa probe reaches Bennu – asteroid that could one day hit Earth

Osiris-Rex spacecraft will eventually scoop up material for analysis back home After a two-year chase, a Nasa probe has reached the ancient asteroid Bennu. The robotic explorer Osiris-Rex pulled within 12 miles (19km) of the diamond-shaped object on Monday and will go into orbit around it on 31 December. No spacecraft has ever orbited such a small body. Bennu is considered a potentially hazardous

22h

A Sleeping Tesla Driver Highlights Autopilot's Biggest Flaw

California Highway Patrol officers used a clever trick to stop a Tesla going 70 mph with a sleeping man at the wheel.

22h

The Atlantic Daily: Memorials

What We’re Following We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Sanctions Lite: It’s not only the U.S.—Britain and France, for instance, have also rejected harsher measures against Saudi Arabia, such as halting arms exports. Why are countries treading d

23h

Mayo Clinic researchers identify new strategies that may improve CAR-T cell therapy

Mayo Clinic researchers have developed two new strategies that may improve the performance of chimeric antigen receptor therapy (CAR-T cell therapy) in treating cancer. They are presenting results of their preclinical research at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego.

23h

World's strangest sharks and rays 'on brink of extinction'

A shark that uses its tail to stun prey and a ray half the length of a bus are on the list of 50 species.

23h

Now Mental Health Patients Can Specify Their Care Before Hallucinations and Voices Overwhelm Them

Psychiatric advance directives allow patients with serious mental illness to specify the treatment they want if they become too sick to say so.

23h

Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse

Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse.

1d

Dana-Farber to present research on myeloma progression from precursor conditions

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists will present research marking significant advances against the hematologic cancer multiple myeloma at the ASH Annual Meeting.

1d

Prenatal exposure to chemicals in personal care products may speed puberty in girls

Girls exposed to chemicals commonly found in toothpaste, makeup, soap and other personal care products before birth may hit puberty earlier, according to a new longitudinal study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. Researchers found that daughters of mothers who had higher levels of diethyl phthalate and triclosan in their bodies during pregnancy experienced puberty at yo

1d

Tough as old boots: a Thames skeleton's durable footwear

Archaeologists say man who died 500 years ago may have been a mudlark or fisherman He was found lying on his front, head twisted to the side. One arm was bent above his head, suggesting he had fallen – or perhaps had been pushed – to his death in the river more than five centuries ago. But aside from his puzzling position, the skeleton discovered this year near the shore of the Thames in London w

1d

Hello, Bennu! NASA Asteroid-Sampling Probe Reaches Its Target Space Rock

NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe sidled up to the diamond-shaped asteroid Bennu today (Dec. 3), bringing an end to a circuitous deep-space chase that lasted 27 months.

1d

SpaceX Rocket Makes Historic 3rd Launch Into Space with 64 Satellites On Board

A Falcon 9 rocket with a twice-flown first stage lifted off from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base today (Dec. 3), carrying 64 tiny satellites to orbit. SpaceX had never launched the same first stage three times before.

1d

Dana-Farber to present new research on stem cell transplantation for myeloid cancers

Improving outcomes for patients with myeloid cancers who undergo stem cell transplantation is a focus of several studies to be presented by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists at the ASH Annual Meeting.

1d

Personalised ultrasound scan showing atherosclerosis helps reduce cardiovascular risk

Low adherence to medication and resistance to lifestyle changes have so far hampered prevention efforts for cardiovascular disease. Personalized scans and depiction showing biological age and plaque formation of arteries could help prevention of cardiovascular disease.

1d

The Lancet: Personalized ultrasound scan showing atherosclerosis helps reduce cardiovascular risk

Low adherence to medication and resistance to lifestyle changes have so far hampered prevention efforts for cardiovascular disease. Personalized scans and depiction showing biological age and plaque formation of arteries could help prevention of cardiovascular disease.

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Sticks and Stone

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ). We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Today in 5 Lines President Donald Trump railed against one longtime associate, Michael Cohen, while praising another, Roger Stone, for refusing to testify against

1d

Here's what you need to know about the global climate summit happening right now

Environment COP24 will affect the U.S. even though President Trump skipped it. World leaders are meeting this week and next for COP24, a key United Nations climate change conference being held this year in Katowice, Poland.

1d

LIGO found four more pairs of black holes, including the biggest yet

In a reanalysis of all of its data, LIGO spotted gravitational waves from four new pairs of black holes colliding, bringing the total detection count up to 11

1d

Sculptor Unknowingly Poisons Herself with Her Own Art

When a sculptor in Toronto started feeling ill in 2013, she had no idea that her art was the reason why.

1d

Clark University researchers: Development threatens tropical forests

While infrastructure expansion has been broadly investigated as a driver of deforestation, the impacts of extractive industry and its interactions with infrastructure investment on forest cover are less well studied. These challenges are urgent given growing pressure for infrastructure investment and resource extraction. The authors use geospatial and qualitative data from Amazonia, Indonesia, and

1d

Machine learning helps predict worldwide plant-conservation priorities

A new approach co-developed at The Ohio State University uses data analytics and machine learning to predict the conservation status of more than 150,000 plants worldwide. Results suggest that more than 15,000 species likely qualify as near-threatened, vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered.

1d

Tele-ERs can help strengthen rural hospitals

A new study from the University of Iowa finds rural hospitals that use tele-medicine to back up their emergency room health care providers save money and find it easier to recruit new physicians. The findings suggest one way to help strengthen health care in rural areas, where hospitals frequently struggle financially and have difficulty recruiting and retaining doctors.

1d

As married couples age, humor replaces bickering

Honeymoon long over? Hang in there. A new University of California, Berkeley, study shows those prickly disagreements that can mark the early and middle years of marriage mellow with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance.

1d

High risk alternative tobacco products disproportionately sold in low-income communities

Retailers in minority and low-income communities are more likely to sell and advertise the most inexpensive and risky alternative tobacco products. Potentially less risky, non-combusted products such as smokeless tobacco and e-cigarettes are more accessible in higher income and predominantly White neighborhoods.

1d

NASA catches newborn Tropical Cyclone Owen's rainfall, observed by GPM satellite

Tropical Cyclone Owen formed in the Southern Pacific Ocean's Coral Sea southwest of the Solomon Islands when the GPM core observatory satellite passed above and analyzed its rainfall.

1d

To detect new odors, fruit fly brains improve on a well-known computer algorithm

It might seem like fruit flies would have nothing in common with computers, but new research from the Salk Institute reveals that the two identify novel information in similar ways. The work, which appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on December 3, 2018, not only sheds light on an important neurobiological problem–how organisms detect new odors–but could also impro

1d

10 gifts for the nerdy runner in your life

Gift Guides I'm a nerdy runner myself, so you can trust me on this one. This holiday season you can show you care by giving them the apparel and equipment that helps get their numbers and splits-obsessed selves to the finish line.

1d

Life has a new ingredient

Our prehistoric Earth, bombarded with asteroids and lightening, rife with bubbling geothermal pools, may not seem hospitable today. But somewhere in the chemical chaos of our early planet, life did form. How? For decades, scientists have created miniature replicas of infant Earth in the lab in order to hunt for life's essential ingredients. Now, one of those replicas points to a possible new ingre

1d

Young, hip farmers: Coming to a city near you

The population of American farmers is aging, but a study in the journal Rural Sociology shows a new generation of farmers is flocking to cities with large populations, farmers markets and the purchasing power to support a market for niche goods.

1d

Health and beauty info sources may influence risky indoor tanning behaviors

Young women who receive health and beauty information from their friends and through social media may be more likely to ignore the risks of indoor tanning, according to a team of researchers.

1d

How Would NYC's Anti-AirDrop Dick Pic Law Even Work?

The bill's sponsors want cyber flashers to face the same consequences as their offline counterparts, but there are technical and legal hurdles.

1d

Sadism in the St. Louis Police Department

Last year, former police officer Jason Stockley was on trial in St. Louis, Missouri, for the shooting death of a black motorist named Anthony Smith. He was acquitted, sparking street protests. The St. Louis police activated what it calls its Civil Disobedience Team. Among the cops assigned to it were Dustin Boone, Randy Hays, and Christopher Myers, who sent texts to one another expressing their e

1d

Simultaneous Blazes, Like California's Camp and Woolsey Fires, Have Become the New Normal

Earth It’s now more common to see multiple giant wildfires burning at once, straining firefighting resources, scientists say. 12/03/2018 Ramin Skibba, Contributor To read more…

1d

Tumblr bans porn to clean up the blogging platformTumblr Adult Content

Tumblr on Monday said it is banning adult content from the Yahoo-owned blogging platform, which saw its app pulled from Apple's App Store last month over child pornography.

1d

Children's Colorado researchers link sleep health to insulin resistance in obese teens

Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have identified a connection between overweight and obese teens' sleep health and their insulin sensitivity.

1d

The Truth About Facebook's Fake Quest to Connect the World

Facebook execs assured employees that the cash-rich business of amassing users was a moral imperative. To survive, the company must revise its mission.

1d

Three astronauts safely aboard International Space Station (Update)

Three astronauts who were launched into space aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft Monday entered the International Space Station nearly eight hours later, a relief to relatives and scientists months after a rocket failure aborted another mission.

1d

At-risk nations plead for 'justice' at UN climate summit

Nations facing imminent environmental disaster on Monday called on rich polluters to help them back from the brink, as the UN warned the world's plan to avoid climate catastrophe was "way off course".

1d

Disappearing Arctic sea ice threatens Canada's polar bears: expert panel

A committee of wildlife experts warned Monday that Canada's largest land predator, the polar bear, was at risk of disappearing from its vast Arctic landscape as melting Arctic sea ice makes hunting prey a challenge.

1d

Nexstar to buy Tribune Media for $4.1 bn

Tribune Media agreed Monday to be acquired by Nexstar Media Group for $4.1 billion in a deal that would create the largest operator local US television stations.

1d

SpaceX launches 64 satellites at once

SpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket on Monday, sending an unusual payload into space—64 satellites at the same time, a US record.

1d

Nearly 200 Countries Meet In Poland To Participate In Climate Conference

The world's nations meet in Poland this week to continue negotiations on how to slow climate change as recent research and extreme weather reveal that dangerous effects on climate are already here.

1d

3 things you already have in your house that are good for your mental health

It's getting dark earlier now, as we head towards the crisp snap of November air. Days at work , as a result, can feel longer: You're leaving the office and it's already nearly nighttime. Those who suffer from seasonal affective disorder begin to experience the effects during the fall, according to the Mayo Clinic . And even if you don't have SAD, it's easy to feel overwhelmed and stressed this t

1d

​SpaceX launches 64 satellites in mission that breaks 2 world records

SpaceX launched 64 satellites, belonging to various public and private organizations, into low orbit on Monday. The company launched the satellites aboard its reusable Falcon 9 rocket. Some of the satellites deployed on the mission come from companies seeking to revolutionize the Internet of Things. None On Monday afternoon, SpaceX's reusable Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Vandenberg Air Force

1d

Can predictive analytics help banks, consumers avoid overdraft issues? New study says, yes

In 2012, consumers paid $32 billion in overdraft fees, which represented the single largest source of revenue for banks from demand deposit accounts, while leading to significant levels of consumer dissatisfaction and attracting attention from government regulators.

1d

Study finds bad bosses could turn you into a great boss

A new University of Central Florida study suggests abuse and mistreatment by those at the top of an organization do not necessarily lead to abusive behavior by lower-level leaders. When offered leadership opportunities, prior victims of workplace abuse are more likely to treat their own subordinates better by learning from the bad behavior of their bosses.

1d

The irrational consumer: Decision making based on feelings rather than facts

Risk and benefit perceptions are crucial to people's acceptance of a particular technology and therefore their willingness to become a consumer. It has been suggested that, due to resource restraints, consumers' perceptions are frequently formed based on heuristics and biases, or other factors such as trust or affect. While some consumer behaviors may seem irrational, their actions are actually qu

1d

Borophene advances as 2-D materials platform

Borophene—two-dimensional (2-D) atom-thin-sheets of boron, a chemical element traditionally found in fiberglass insulation—is anything but boring. Though boron is a nonmetallic semiconductor in its bulk (3-D) form, it becomes a metallic conductor in 2-D. Borophene is extremely flexible, strong, and lightweight—even more so than its carbon-based analogue, graphene. These unique electronic and mecha

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Genetically engineered immune cells show promise for fighting relapsed blood cancer

At the 60th Annual American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting in San Diego on Monday, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers presented preliminary results from a clinical study of an investigational cellular immunotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma expressing the CD30 protein marker.

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For large health systems, telehealth programs mean challenges and results

Increasingly, major health systems throughout the country are implementing telehealth programs in an effort to increase access and improve patient experiences. This move is made possible by more support from insurance payers, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, who recently announced a proposal to expand telehealth access for Medicare recipients. However, as a new report in t

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Retail outlets using telehealth pose significant privacy, policy concerns for health care

As insurers, medical groups, vendors and supply chains expand services with acquisitions/mergers, and Walmart, Amazon and other retail outlets deliver health care services, including telehealth, UC Davis School of Medicine physicians say more needs to be done to protect patient privacy, anticipate the capabilities of artificial intelligence and other rapidly advancing technologies, and leverage th

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Heart failure telemedicine programs prove effective 6 months after discharge, study finds

Home telemedicine programs for heart failure are effective at preventing death for at least six months after hospitalization, but generally lose any benefit after one year, according to a meta-analysis of clinical trials published today and announced tomorrow at a briefing.

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Despite increase in telehealth participation, underserved populations use telehealth least

Despite a substantial increase in the overall use of telehealth services, underserved populations continue to use telehealth options least, according to a new study by the George Washington University Health Workforce Research Center.

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New tool to find and fight most dangerous types of lymphoma

UK scientists have found a new way to identify people with the most aggressive types of lymphoma who are less likely to respond to standard drugs.

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