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Nyheder2018december05

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Bringing balance to the universe: New theory could explain missing 95 percent of the cosmos

Scientists at the University of Oxford may have solved one of the biggest questions in modern physics, with a new paper unifying dark matter and dark energy into a single phenomenon: a fluid which possesses 'negative mass." If you were to push a negative mass, it would accelerate towards you. This astonishing new theory may also prove right a prediction that Einstein made 100 years ago.

8h

 

First baby born thanks to womb transplant from deceased donor

A woman has successfully given birth after receiving a uterus taken from a dead person. The success could make womb transplants much more widely available

3h

 

Kvinde føder verdens første barn fra død donors livmoder

For første gang nogensinde er det lykkedes at gennemføre en graviditet med en død kvindes livmoder.

10h

 

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The Green New Deal Is Designed to Win

On Monday, speaking at a town hall led by Senator Bernie Sanders, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez framed her chosen climate policy—a Green New Deal—through the lens of gallant American exceptionalism. “This is going to be the New Deal, the Great Society, the moon shot, the Civil Rights Movement of our generation,” she said. Insofar as it exists on paper, the Green New Deal aspires to cut U.S. carbon emi

2min

 

Stress from using electronic health records is linked to physician burnout

Researchers found that health information technology-related stress was most common among primary care doctors.

3min

 

Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper

Even in this digital age, paper is still everywhere. Often, printed materials get used once and are then discarded, creating waste and potentially pollution. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of an easy-to-make 'rewritable' paper that can be drawn or printed on over and over again. The messages can last more than half a year, compared to other rewritable

3min

 

Possible alterations in the DNA involved in cancer

The study shows the role of the protein PIF1, capable of undoing different structures in these molecules. These molecules contain the instructions that allow cells to function correctly, so that when there is an alteration that is not repaired properly, mutations can occurred that can cause problems for the health of the body.

3min

 

Paving the way for more efficient hydrogen cars

Hydrogen-powered vehicles emit only water vapor from their tailpipes, offering a cleaner alternative to fossil-fuel-based transportation. But for hydrogen cars to become mainstream, scientists need to develop more efficient hydrogen-storage systems. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Chemistry of Materials have used metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to set a new record for hydrogen storage capacity

3min

 

DNA damage leads to genetic diseases and cancer

Scientists revealed how DNA damage influences mutations. Turned out that its contribution to mutagenesis was underestimated and many of the inheritance mutations are caused not by errors in DNA doubling, but by damage to this fragile molecule. The study was conducted by an international research group and published in Nature Genetics.

3min

 

30 years of experimental evolution results in a new sex chromosome

On Dec. 3, 2018, the laboratory of Professor Axel Meyer, University of Konstanz published new findings of an experimental evolutionary project that ran for 30 years on the genomic mechanisms of sex determination in swordtail fish in the journal Nature Communications. Dr Paolo Franchini, evolutionary biologist and Junior Research Group Leader at the University of Konstanz is the lead author of this

3min

 

Cell phones without annual plans offer limited help to homeless people

The vast majority of older homeless adults have access to mobile phones, but they are usually basic phones, without annual contracts that let them keep stable numbers, and thus are only practical for one-way communication, according to a UC San Francisco study of how homeless people use mobile and Internet technology.

3min

 

A New Connection Between the Gut and the Brain

A surprising way that diet leads risks of stroke and cognitive and impairment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6min

 

How to motivate people to do good for others | Erez Yoeli

How can we get people to do more good: to go to the polls, give to charity, conserve resources or just generally act better towards others? MIT research scientist Erez Yoeli shares a simple checklist for harnessing the power of reputations — or our collective desire to be seen as generous and kind instead of selfish — to motivate people to act in the interest of others. Learn more about how smal

12min

 

Demand for ‘sustainable’ palm oil ravages forests

Demand for palm oil has surged in the past decade and deforestation is rising in major oil palm-producing countries—most notably in areas certified as “sustainable.” Food, biofuels, and cosmetics all contain palm oil. It’s cheap and has enjoyed a “good-for-you” reputation. Global usage went for 37 million metric tons in 2006 to 64.2 million in 2016. “Oil palms are grown in some of the most sensit

14min

 

It’s going to get hot and dry all over at the same time

The kind of hot, dry conditions that can shrink crop yields, destabilize food prices, and lay the groundwork for devastating wildfires are increasingly striking multiple regions simultaneously as a result of a warming climate, according to a new study. Climate change has doubled the odds that a region will suffer a year that is both warm and dry compared to the average for that place during the m

14min

 

Letters: ‘Our Constitution Is Fundamentally Not Up to the Challenges We Face Today’

Why The U.S. Can’t Solve Big Problems The recent U.S. government report on the immense economic and human costs of climate change, Julian E. Zelizer argued last month, will likely be met by inaction on the part of the federal government. “The unfortunate reality,” he wrote, “is that American politicians have never been good at dealing with big, long-term problems.” The way out, he concluded, is t

17min

 

20min

 

Here's the Truth Behind a NASA Document on Aliens Visiting Earth

Silvano Colombano said that his view on aliens visiting Earth “is not accurately represented” in a viral Fox News article.

21min

 

Asymmetrex Starts New Campaign for Greater Awareness of the Importance of Counting Tissue Stem Cells

Now that Massachusetts stem cell biotechnology company Asymmetrex has developed the first and only technology for specific and accurate counting of therapeutic tissue stem cells, today the company has launched a campaign to alert stem cell scientists, physicians, and patients to the long unmet need of a means to count tissue stem cells. The major misconception that compromises progress in stem cel

25min

 

Study links vitamin D-deficient older adults with greater risk of developing depression

A new study by researchers from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin has shown for the first time in Ireland that a deficiency in vitamin D was associated with a substantial increased risk of depression (+75%) over a four-year follow up period. The findings form part of the largest representative study of its kind.

25min

 

Arc welding fume is detrimental to human health

Working as part of an international group of toxicologists scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) have found that harmful nanoparticles are formed in the process of arc welding using the most common types of electrodes today. Suspending in the welding fume, these particles infiltrate the human body through the respiratory tract. An article about this is published in Scientific Rep

25min

 

New drug target discovered for potential blood pressure treatment

Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice, according to new research in eLife.

25min

 

A new therapeutic target for metastatic and resistant prostate cancers

Researchers from IDIBELL and ICO showed that the most aggressive prostate tumors generate increasing levels of the NSD2 protein, which are related to tumor progression and therapeutic resistance.NSD2 inhibition could lead to the re-sensitization of those prostate tumors resistant to conventional antiandrogenic treatments.The study suggests an innovative, combined therapeutic approach that would in

25min

 

New recommendations for the conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis

An expert working group has established recommendations for the design and conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis, as well as guidance for reporting these evaluations. Additionally, it recommends a set of minimum criteria for evaluations and an osteoporosis-specific checklist of items to incorporate in economic reports.

25min

 

UK releases Facebook emails about data privacy

The British Parliament has released some 250 pages worth of documents that show Facebook considered charging developers for data access.

26min

 

32min

 

BepiColombo now firing on all cylinders

BepiColombo, the joint ESA/JAXA spacecraft on a mission to Mercury, is now firing its thrusters for the first time in flight.

32min

 

Energimærke-fejl skal fanges af it-system

Det udskældte energimærke bliver til tre og samkøring af data skal fange mange af de fejl, der i dag plager energimærkningsordningen for bygninger, lyder fra regeringen.

39min

 

Five diets that could be deadly

Health The desire to be thin can turn trendy diets into lethal weapons. The desire to be thin can turn trendy diets into lethal weapons.

42min

 

Hate and violence on the rise: Is history repeating itself?

Watching the news conveys the sense that acts of violence—particularly violence inspired by bigotry and hate—are on the rise. Unfortunately, the numbers seem to back that up. The FBI recently released a report showing that anti-Semitic crime incidents targeting Jewish people and Jewish institutions in the US spiked about 37 percent between 2016 and 2017. “From my perspective, what is going on is

43min

 

South Africa needs to refresh how it manages by-products from mining

To extract minerals from host rocks, mines grind down rock into fine sand. Once the mineral is extracted, most of this fine sand remains as a by-product called tailings. Every mining operation produces a unique tailings stream and local conditions dictate storage options.

44min

 

Proteins reveal intricate details about life under the microscope

People have always been fascinated by life. We dream about revealing all its mysteries and are even searching other planets trying to find some forms of life there. Philosophies around the world have tried to define and understand life long before science even existed. But some of the answers may actually be found right under our noses – or rather, right under a microscope.

44min

 

Researchers investigate how vial sizes can be optimized to reduce pharmaceutical wastage

Pharmaceuticals are often dosed according to patient weight or body size which means that a dose must be individually measured. In a new study, lead author Anthony Hatswell of Delta Hat Limited and University College London in the UK, shows that by optimizing drug dose sizes available, wastage can be cut by as much as 50 per cent.

46min

 

Assessing India's health with a single question

A country can estimate its population's health status by using national survey questionnaires. Researchers at UNIGE began wondering whether it was possible to use the question — 'What would you say about your health status?' – in India, that is used in Europe. They compared Indian and Swiss databases. They found that the question provided a sound understanding of the health status of the Indian p

46min

 

Women in China have greater treatment rates and control of high blood pressure than men

Women in China have greater awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension than their male counterparts, new research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found.

46min

 

Agrometeorological applications to predict the influence of climate on crops

UPM researchers are working on seasonal weather forecasts and crops based on data provided by the water surface temperature of the oceans.

56min

 

Medullary bone found in Cretaceous birds

A team of scientists led by Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported the first occurrence of medullary bone in Enantiornithes, the dominant clade of birds during the Cretaceous. The findings were published in Nature Communications on Dec. 5.

56min

 

Plant-based proteins for meat lovers

In canteens and supermarkets, plant-based substitute products for chicken escalopes and beef steaks have become standard fare. Together with colleagues from TU Berlin, researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are examining how these products are manufactured. Their aim is to give these high-protein foods, based on soybeans or peas for example, a meat-like texture.

56min

 

Virtual reality connects students to reef die-offs

Experiencing a simulation of the effects of ocean acidification spurred meaningful gains in people’s understanding of the issue, research shows. Utter the words “ocean acidification” in mixed company, and you’ll probably get blank stares. Although climate change has grown steadily in the public consciousness, one of its most insidious impacts—a widespread die-off of marine ecosystems driven by ca

57min

 

Researchers use a virus to speed up modern computers

In a groundbreaking study, researchers have successfully developed a method that could lead to unprecedented advances in computer speed and efficiency.

1h

 

30 years of experimental evolution results in a new sex chromosome

On 3 December 2018, the laboratory of Professor Axel Meyer, University of Konstanz published new findings of an experimental evolutionary project that ran for 30 years on the genomic mechanisms of sex determination in swordtail fish in the journal Nature Communications. Dr. Paolo Franchini, evolutionary biologist and junior research group leader at the University of Konstanz is the lead author of

1h

 

An embellished coat for bone implants

Scientists from the European project Laser4Surf are currently developing a multi-beam optical module to treat the metallic surfaces of dental implants to achieve the best cell adhesion and antibacterial properties. "Surface treatment allows either a bigger surface in contact between the implant and the bone or a better affinity regarding the chemical interaction between the cell and the implant,"

1h

 

Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in water bottles. So, why didn't it?

The Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in waste. A case study investigates why not and proposes solutions for future water disasters.

1h

 

Enhancing our vision of the past

Scientists have advanced our understanding of how ancient animals saw the world by combining the study of fossils and genetics.

1h

 

Drug wholesalers drove fentanyl's deadly rise, study shows

Fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid implicated in nearly 29,000 overdose deaths in the United States last year, most likely spread because of heroin and prescription pill shortages, and also because it was cheaper for drug wholesalers than heroin, according to a report on illicit US drug markets.

1h

 

Science: High pressure orders electrons

High-temperature superconductors can transport electrical energy without resistance. Researchers have carried out high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering and have found that high uniaxial pressure induces a long-range charge order competing with superconductivity. Their study opens up new insights into the behavior of correlated electrons.

1h

 

Molecular adlayer produced by dissolving water-insoluble nanographene in water

Even though nanographene is insoluble in water and organic solvents, researchers have found a way to dissolve it in water. Using 'molecular containers' that encapsulate water-insoluble molecules, the researchers developed nanographene adlayers by just mixing the molecular containers and nanographene together in water. The method is expected to be useful for the fabrication and analysis of next-gen

1h

 

Photo Gallery: A Dress Rehearsal for a Crewed Mission to Mars

Southern Oman became home to a three-week simulation of grappling for a foothold on the Red Planet.

1h

 

Seeing the light: Researchers offer solution for efficiency problem of artificial photosynthesis

Hydrogen-powered electronics, travel, and more may be a step closer thanks to the work of a collaborative team of scientists in Japan. The researchers have developed a new method to more efficiently produce a key component needed to convert solar energy and water into hydrogen fuel, a process called photoelectrochemical water splitting.

1h

 

Using drones to simplify film animation

Producing realistic animated film figures is a highly complex technical endeavour. ETH researchers have now shown how drones can be used to greatly reduce the effort required in the process.

1h

 

Efficient ternary all-polymer solar cells with PCE up to 9.03 percent

Analogue polymers possess very similar chemical structure and matched energy levels to form the cascade of the co-donors. Benefiting from those analogous polymer structures, there is little influence of the morphology in blend film compared to their pristine polymer films. The ternary all-PSCs have more balanced charge mobility and prolonged carrier lifetime compared to the binary devices. The cha

1h

 

Hidden costs – how infrastructure development may fuel illegal wildlife trade

Fauna & Flora International (FFI) works with several companies leading the development of major infrastructure projects, and with the development banks that fund them. Back in 2016, when FFI suggested that one of its corporate partners in Africa should be thinking about its potential impact on illegal wildlife trade when planning a new project, the initial response was exasperation. The list of fa

1h

 

Seabird populations on Antarctic Peninsula unexpected

Results of a new study on Antarctic seabirds shows a larger percentage of their populations inhabit important nesting sites around Ryder Bay, close to British Antarctic Survey's Rothera Station than previously thought. The study has also led to a call for protection of these important nesting sites and is published in the journal Polar Biology (20 November).

1h

 

Woke washing: what happens when marketing communications don't match corporate practice

Brand activism has become the new marketing tactic of choice, and a brand's stance on societal and political issues can offer a differentiating factor in a fast-paced corporate marketplace.

1h

 

Trump to lift carbon-capture mandate for new coal plants, source says

The Trump administration will propose scrapping an Obama-era mandate that new coal-fired power plants use carbon-capture technology, removing a major barrier to constructing the facilities, according to a person familiar with the plans.

1h

 

9 gifts for the friend who's always ready to learn something new

Gift Guides Support your friend as they learn a new language or tackle a new career. Experts offer lessons in everything from makeup application to parkour to chess. Here are the lessons that might appeal to any giftee—and tempt you to accompany them to…

1h

 

AI's huge potential to transform education

A list of 26 ways that AI can contribute to education shows that distance learning is one of the most promising avenues for the application of AI in the field of education. This type of learning focuses on the mobility of learners, who can access learning materials anytime and anywhere using mobile devices such as cell phones, tablets and laptops, which represent nearly 90 per cent of Internet con

1h

 

Rare Rainfall in the Atacama Is Deadly for Its Tiniest Inhabitants

What is supposed to be a boon to life caused bacteria to burst like balloons.

1h

 

Brief reflections from a plasma mirror

When a dense sheet of electrons is accelerated to almost the speed of light, it acts as a reflective surface. Such a 'plasma mirror' can be used to manipulate light. Now an international team of physicists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, LMU Munich, and Umeå University in Sweden have characterized this plasma-mirror effect in detail, and exploited it to generate isolated, high-int

1h

 

Adding new channels to the brain remote control

One of the founding fathers of optogenetics – among the most powerful techniques in neuroscience – has created new tools for controlling neurons with light. In their new study in Frontiers in Neuroscience, Georg Nagel and his collaborators unveil two new light-activated proteins – engineered by combining bacterial and cow DNA – and show that these can be used to switch neurons on and off even in w

1h

 

Multifunctional dream ceramic matrix composites are born!

Researchers at Osaka University produced composites consisting of alumina (Al2O3) ceramics and titanium (Ti), namely Al2O3/Ti composites. They designed a percolation structure for forming a continuous conduction pathway to disperse nanosized Ti particles into an Al2O3 matrix, optimizing the particle size of metallic Ti powder and sintering processes. They improved fracture toughness and electrical

1h

 

A microbe's membrane helps it survive extreme environments

Scientists discovered a protein that modifies a microbe's membrane and helps it survive in hot, acidic environments, proving a long-standing hypothesis that these structures have a protective effect.

1h

 

Duke-NUS highlights potential role of bioaerosol sampling in disease surveillance

Duke-NUS Medical School pilot study shows that non-invasive bioaerosol sampling and molecular diagnostics can detect respiratory viruses in aerosol samples in public places such as Singapore's MRT trains. Findings support possibility of employing bioaerosol samplers in crowded areas of densely populated cities like Singapore facing heightened risk from global pandemics.

1h

 

A versatile method for the protection of carbonyl compounds by camphorsulfonic acid

In this paper, camphor sulfonic acid-catalysed protection of various carbonyl compounds is developed. This method is simple, environmentally friendly and yields products in high yields.

1h

 

Molecular adlayer produced by dissolving water-insoluble nanographene in water

Even though nanographene is insoluble in water and organic solvents, Kumamoto University and Tokyo Institute of Technology researchers have found a way to dissolve it in water. Using 'molecular containers' that encapsulate water-insoluble molecules, the researchers developed nanographene adlayers by just mixing the molecular containers and nanographene together in water. The method is expected to

1h

 

Science: High pressure orders electrons

High-temperature superconductors can transport electrical energy without resistance. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have carried out high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering and have found that high uniaxial pressure induces a long-range charge order competing with superconductivity. Their study opens up new insights into the behavior of correlated electrons. The research

1h

 

Dårlige arbejdsforhold i psykiatrien bekymrer politikere

Den nye undersøgelse, der viser, at Region Hovedstadens psykiatriske overlæger mistrives under Sundhedsplatformen, skaber hovedrysten på politisk niveau.

1h

 

Agricultural insecticide contamination threatens U.S. surface water integrity at the national scale

Insecticides are applied in large volumes across the United States to protect agricultural crops from insect pests. As has been shown before through studies e.g. by the USGS or the U.S. EPA, these substances can be transported from agricultural fields into adjacent water bodies via various pathways where they have profound adverse effects on both water quality and biodiversity. Therefore, insectic

1h

 

Using drones to simplify film animation

Producing realistic animated film figures is a highly complex technical endeavour. ETH researchers have now shown how drones can be used to greatly reduce the effort required in the process.

1h

 

Why the rise of populist nationalist leaders rewrites global climate talks

The election of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil not only marks the rise of another populist nationalist leader on the world stage. It's also a turning point for the global politics of climate change.

1h

 

Mechanism for turning skin cells into blood stem cells uncovered

Researchers have succeeded in converting human skin cells into blood stem cells in an international collaboration project. "This is a first step on the way to generating fully functional blood stem cells in a petri dish which, in the future, could be transplanted into patients with blood diseases," says Filipe Pereira, the researcher from Lund University in Sweden who led the study now published i

1h

 

UBC economist proposes solution to Vancouver's affordability crisis

New research from UBC Sauder School of Business associate professor Thomas Davidoff could help combat Vancouver's housing affordability problem. In new research published in the Canadian Tax Journal, Davidoff outlines how a new model for calculating property tax could help renters.

1h

 

Mystery of color patterns of reef fish solved

Scientists have solved the mystery of why some closely-related species of an iconic reef fish have vastly different colour patterns, while others look very similar.

1h

 

Scientists consider climate change-resistant crops

When it gets hot outside, humans and animals have the luxury of seeking shelter in the shade or cool, air-conditioned buildings. But plants are stuck.

1h

 

Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs

New Mexico contains hundreds of historic uranium mines. Although active uranium mining in the state has ceased, rates of cardiovascular and metabolic disease remain high in the population residing close to mines within the Navajo Nation. According to a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, inhaled uranium in dusts from the mines could be a factor.

1h

 

Oxytocin linked to social bonding in gregarious capuchin monkeys

The hormone oxytocin is important in increasing behaviors that strengthen social bonds in highly gregarious capuchin monkeys, according to a study published by a Georgia State University research team.

1h

 

Conservation of wood-inhabiting fungi is complicated

Many wood-inhabiting fungi suffer from the changes caused by forest management. For that reason, the different fungal groups and tree species should be better addressed in the conservation planning. New information about the wood-inhabiting fungi of boreal forest helps to assess the effects of forest management more precisely than before.

1h

 

UK union loses challenge to Deliveroo over drivers' status

Britain's High Court has ruled that Deliveroo riders do not have the right to collective bargaining—the latest in a series of rulings as U.K. courts grapple with the rise of the so-called "gig economy."

1h

 

How to Overcome Feelings of Shame

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen talks with psychologist Dr. Joseph Burgo about the often-misunderstood experience of shame — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

 

30 millioner til filmarvsprojekt

MEF og Københavns Universitet deltager i et stort projekt om digitalisering, udforskning og tilgængeliggørelse…

1h

 

Reflecting antiferromagnetic arrangements

A team led by Rutgers University and including scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has demonstrated an X-ray imaging technique that could enable the development of smaller, faster, and more robust electronics.

1h

 

Researchers discover mechanism disrupting CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing

The discovery of CRISPR-Cas9 has made gene editing very easy. Unfortunately, the molecular tool has recently been found to be less precise than previously assumed. It can lead to unwanted mutations in a cell's DNA. Researchers at Delft University of Technology have now identified a mechanism that causes such mutations when CRISPR-Cas9 is used incorrectly. This can cause dormant genes to become exp

1h

 

Danske universiteter vil advare forskere mod 'predatory journals'

Både de største og de allermindste udenlandske universiteter har i årevis advaret ansatte om det voksende vildnis af pseudo-videnskabelige tidsskrifter. Nu går de højere danske læreanstalter ind i kampen.

1h

 

Trump’s Emergency Powers Are 'Ripe for Abuse'

Unbeknownst to many Americans, there is one legal scenario in which the president’s power substantially increases. This is the moment he declares a national emergency. Although Congress has passed more than 100 provisions that outline the power that the president gains in this circumstance—such as the ability to shut down media channels or take them over, and the deployment of military troops ins

1h

 

Medullary bone found in Cretaceous birds

A team of scientists led by Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported the first occurrence of medullary bone in Enantiornithes, the dominant clade of birds during the Cretaceous.

1h

 

Men with chronic kidney disease have worse outcomes than women

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that men with chronic kidney disease, or CKD, are more likely to experience disease progression and death when compared with women suffering from the same condition.

1h

 

Money ills add to cancer struggle

One in five cancer patients could be experiencing financial difficulties because of their care needs, according to new research published in the Journal of Cancer Survivorship.

1h

 

Researchers use a virus to speed up modern computers

Researchers have successfully developed a method that could lead to unprecedented advances in computer speed and efficiency.

1h

 

Scientists consider climate change-resistant crops

Meng Chen and his team identified the genetic mechanism used by all plants as they respond to daylight conditions as well as the ability to sense temperature. 'To cope with rapid temperature changes associated with global warming, we may have to help nature to evolve crops to adapt to the new environment,' Chen said.

1h

 

We asked artificial intelligence to analyze a graphic novel – and found both limits and new insights

With one spouse studying the evolution of artificial and natural intelligence and the other researching the language, culture and history of Germany, imagine the discussions at our dinner table. We often experience the stereotypical clash in views between the quantifiable, measurement-based approach of natural science and the more qualitative approach of the humanities, where what matters most is

1h

 

New material could be the answer to infrastructure woes

In the early 1990s, Victor Li, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Michigan, developed Engineered Cementitious Composites, also known as ductile or bendable concrete. More than 20 years later, researchers at LSU are close to bringing this material to mass adoption, producing a cost-effective ECC that utilizes readily available ingredients. Furthermore, through t

1h

 

River deep: Einstein's contribution to earth science

Albert Einstein is famous for a lot of reasons, but the movement of sediments in rivers is perhaps not one of them. Yet, his name is associated with those of Ackers, White, and Shields who developed equations to help explain how grainy materials transported as particles in a river move. Given the importance of sediment from the physical or chemical degradation of rocks in a waterway and the impact

1h

 

Theoretical predictions help dark matter hunt

A new Ph.D. thesis in the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, shows how utilizing tellurium as a detector material can help detect dark matter more effectively than currently used materials. The research also lays a foundation for differentiating between collisions caused by dark matter and neutrinos, the so-called ghost particles, in dark matter detectors using xenon.

1h

 

Can elementary particles change their flavor in flight?

Can elementary particles change their flavor in flight?

1h

 

A microbe's membrane helps it survive extreme environments

Within harsh environments like hot springs, volcanic craters and deep-sea hydrothermal vents – uninhabitable by most life forms – microscopic organisms are thriving. How? It's all in how they wrap themselves.

1h

 

Ny forening skal tiltrække flere investeringer i kliniske forsøg

Det skal være mere attraktivt at placere kliniske forsøg i Danmark. Regeringen, regionerne og en række life-science-virksomheder står bag ny foreningen, der skal fremme den indsats.

1h

 

Lægeforeningen vil ekskludere Svend Lings

Står det til Lægeforeningen, skal Svend Lings ekskluderes som medlem. Lægeforeningen vil indbringe sag ved Voldgiftsretten med påstand om eksklusion.

1h

 

Study describes the dynamics of chromatin during organ and tissue regeneration

Researchers from the Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Statistics and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (UB), in collaboration with the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), have described the genes and regulatory elements of gene expression that are required during the process of tissue and organ regeneration. The study, published in Genome Research, combines class

1h

 

Best VR Headsets (2018): Standalone, for PC, Oculus, PSVR

Virtual reality is more accessible than ever, and these headsets can take you there, whether you want a standalone or PC-based experience.

1h

 

Corn Crop Production May Be Causing More Rainfall

Large-scale corn production seems to be triggering more rain, increasing farmers' yields. But hey, it's climate change, so there's also—always—a dark side.

1h

 

Unusual ultraluminous X-ray source discovered in the galaxy Messier 86

Using data provided by NASA's Chandra spacecraft, astronomers have identified a new unusual ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the elliptical galaxy Messier 86. The newly found ULX, designated M86 tULX-1, resides some 62,000 light years away from the galaxy's center. The finding is reported in a paper published November 26 on arXiv.org.

2h

 

A meteor may have exploded in the air 3,700 years ago, obliterating communities near the Dead Sea

A meteor that exploded in the air near the Dead Sea 3,700 years ago may have wiped out communities, killed tens of thousands of people, and provided the kernel of truth to an old Bible story. The area is in modern-day Jordan, in a 25 km wide circular plain called Middle Ghor. Most of the evidence for this event comes from archaeological evidence excavated at the Bronze Age city of Tall el-Hammam l

2h

 

Increasing crop insurances adoption in developing countries

Farmers in developing countries often rely heavily on their yearly harvest to feed their families. A bad crop can have severe consequences for their livelihood. Despite the significant advantages crop insurance offers in alleviating this risk, only a small percentage of farmers insure their crops. A simple but effective solution tested by researchers from the University of Zurich has increased ins

2h

 

Mystery of color patterns of reef fish solved

Scientists have solved the mystery of why some closely-related species of an iconic reef fish have vastly different colour patterns, while others look very similar.

2h

 

New Report Finds Current Strategies Insufficient for Preventing the Most Preventable Cause of Mental Illness

Guest blog by Brenda Patoine Image: Shutterstock Childhood maltreatment is recognized as the No. 1 preventable cause of mental illness – and some experts argue, of all stress-related diseases – yet science still has no clear answers for how to best prevent the spiral of neglect and abuse that threatens millions of infants and children in the U.S. alone. In a report published this week, the U.S. P

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Geologists Measure Bullet Damage to Ancient Middle Eastern Settlements

The ultimate goal is to inform efforts to conserve or repair heritage sites — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A radio search for artificial emissions from 'Oumuamua

It's the first time a visitor from another star system has been seen nearby. But what is it? An asteroid, a comet … or an alien artifact?

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In 100 years' time, maybe our food won't be grown in soil

It takes a lot to make a room of soil scientists gasp.

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UBC economist proposes solution to Vancouver's affordability crisis

New research from UBC Sauder School of Business associate professor Thomas Davidoff could help combat Vancouver's housing affordability problem. In new research published in the Canadian Tax Journal, Davidoff outlines how a new model for calculating property tax could help renters.

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What's under the Antarctic Ice Sheet?

A unique method created by a USF associate professor to determine radiocarbon ages will be central to an expedition expected to transform the way we view the Antarctic continent.

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Scientists develop a new drug for cancer diagnostics and treatment

Russian researchers announced the development of a combined action drug based on ionizing radiation and bacterial toxin. Their combined effect appeared to be 2,200 times stronger compared to that exerted by the radiation and toxin separately. The drug affects tumor cells, selectively providing better diagnostics and treatment of malignant tumors. These advances were reported in the Proceedings of

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Meet the remote Indigenous community where a few thousand people use 15 different languages

On Australia's remote north-central coast, the small community of Maningrida is remarkable for many reasons. It boasts dramatic coastal scenery, world-renowned bark and sculptural artists, skilled weavers and textile printers, and unique local wildlife. But Maningrida is extraordinary for another reason: it is one of the most linguistically diverse communities in the world, with 15 languages spoke

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Design for flooding: How cities can make room for water

Science is clearly showing that the world is shifting towards a more unstable climate. Weather events like the flash floods in Sydney last week will be more frequent and extreme, while the intervals between them will become shorter. With rising sea levels and frequent floods, water landscapes will become part of our urban routine.

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Structure of electrolyte controls battery performance

The research team at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology has reported that adding water into an electrolyte improves the function of vanadium oxide, a positive electrode material in calcium-ion batteries. Although water in electrolytes is known to produce many negative effects, it has now been found to induce a phenomenon that spe

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What younger people can learn from older people about using technology

Older people are often portrayed in the media as being technically challenged. Jokes are often shared on social media about older people taking photos on their phones with their thumb covering the lens, or accidentally installing viruses on computers.

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Game-on for UK's Team Tao in ocean XPRIZE final

A UK-based team arrives in Greece for the grand final of a contest to find innovative solutions for seafloor mapping.

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New research highlights why HIV-infected patients suffer higher rates of cancer

AIDS patients suffer higher rates of cancer because they have fewer T-cells in their bodies to fight disease. But new research examines why HIV-infected patients have higher rates of cancer–among the leading causes of death among that population–than the general population.

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Adjuvant capecitabine did not improve outcomes for patients with early triple-negative breast cancer

Treating patients who had early-stage triple-negative breast cancer with the chemotherapy agent capecitabine after they completed surgery and standard chemotherapy did not significantly improve disease-free or overall survival compared with observation, according to data from the randomized, phase III GEICAM/CIBOMA clinical trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

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Phase III KATHERINE trial crossed early reporting boundary and met its primary endpoint

Substituting trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1, Kadcyla) for adjuvant trastuzumab (Herceptin) in patients who had residual disease after receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab reduced the risk of developing an invasive recurrence of HER2-positive early-stage breast cancer by 50 percent, according to data from the phase III clinical trial KATHERINE presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Ca

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Wildfire ash could trap mercury

In the summers of 2017 and 2018, heat waves and drought conditions spawned hundreds of wildfires in the western US and in November, two more devastating wildfires broke out in California, scorching thousands of acres of forest, destroying homes and even claiming lives. Now, researchers studying ash from recent California wildfires report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that burned mater

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Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs

New Mexico contains hundreds of historic uranium mines. Although active uranium mining in the state has ceased, rates of cardiovascular and metabolic disease remain high in the population residing close to mines within the Navajo Nation. According to a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, inhaled uranium in dusts from the mines could be a factor.

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Research shows how journalists are faring after redundancy

As many as 3,000 journalism jobs are estimated to have been lost in Australia this decade, the vast majority of which have come from newspaper newsrooms. The consequences for the information needs of the public are profound. But what of the lives and careers of those who left what were typically very stable careers?

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Researchers advance biomass transformation process

Biomass can serve as a renewable source for both energy and carbon. Acetone, n-butanol, and ethanol (ABE) fermentation broth as a biomass-derived source of fuels and chemicals has received a lot of attention for several decades. However, the crude fermentation broth contains low concentrations of oxygenates, limiting its practical applications.

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Nepal attempts record with a Dead Sea of plastic bags

Young Nepalis created a map of the Dead Sea with used plastic bags Wednesday in a bid to set a new international record and raise awareness about the vast volumes polluting the world's oceans.

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Russian tech giant Yandex unveils first smartphone

Russian internet giant Yandex on Wednesday launched its first ever smartphone in a highly anticipated move into hardware that builds on its popular service apps.

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Google's robotic spinoff launches ride-hailing servicePhoenix Waymo One Arizona

Google's self-driving car spinoff is finally ready to try to profit from its nearly decade-old technology.

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First 'piggyback' kit for monitoring space weather launched

Tiny sensors for measuring the Earth's space weather environment have launched today attached to a South Korean satellite.

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Wildfire ash could trap mercury

In the summers of 2017 and 2018, heat waves and drought conditions spawned hundreds of wildfires in the western U.S. And in November, two more devastating wildfires broke out in California, scorching thousands of acres of forest, destroying homes and even claiming lives. Now, researchers studying ash from recent California wildfires report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that burned mat

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I Glostrup kan dagkirurgiske patienter springe besøg hos anæstesilægen over

Dagkirurgi og opvågning på Glostrup Hospital sparer mange patienter for et ekstra besøg inden operation, fordi patienterne bliver screenet, inden de kommer til forundersøgelse hos anæstesilægen.

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The 2018 hurricane season taught us some important lessons—so let’s not forget them

Environment Five things we should remember from this season's destruction. Too often, the public forgets a harrowing hurricane season until the next is rattling our shutters. We learned quite a few lessons during the 2018 Atlantic hurricane…

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Understanding how plants use sunlight

Plants rely on the energy in sunlight to produce the nutrients they need. But sometimes they absorb more energy than they can use, and that excess can damage critical proteins. To protect themselves, they convert the excess energy into heat and send it back out. Under some conditions, they may reject as much as 70 percent of all the solar energy they absorb.

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Study finds indications for recovery after ecosystem pollution

Environmental damage caused by human activity can reduce the number of plant and animal species dramatically. At the same time, very little is known about how biodiversity recovers after ecosystem pollution is curtailed and has been cleaned up. As was common in the mid-1900s, Lake Constance, one of the largest freshwater lakes in Europe, suffered from eutrophication, or nutrient contamination caus

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Galileo satellites prove Einstein's Relativity Theory to highest accuracy yet

Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system – already serving users globally – has now provided a historic service to the physics community worldwide, enabling the most accurate measurement ever made of how shifts in gravity alter the passing of time, a key element of Einstein's Theory of General Relativity.

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Image: Researching supersonic flight

This image of the horizon was seen from the cockpit of NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center's F/A-18 research aircraft during a flight in support of the Quiet Supersonic Flights 2018 research series, or QSF18. NASA test pilots performed the quiet supersonic dive maneuver off the coast of Galveston, Texas, creating a quieter version of the sonic boom to obtain recruited community survey feedback d

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A more accurate way of resolving spatial patterns in weather could lead to better predictions of climate change

A divide and conquer approach, combined with some mathematical gymnastics, has helped KAUST researchers Ying Sun and Yuxiao Li to come up with a fast and flexible statistical scheme for improving the accuracy of climate-change modeling.

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Finally, the Self-Driving Car

CHANDLER , Ariz.—Across Arizona Avenue from Waymo’s self-driving-car showroom sits the Crowne Plaza San Marcos hotel, which is allegedly haunted. According to employees and guests, the ghost can move plates, knock phones off cradles, even—helpfully!—fold clothes. I passed this knowledge on to a Lyft driver, who retorted, “I didn’t know that, but to be honest with you, what isn’t haunted?” Every w

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Image of the Day: Powered by Mushrooms

The fungi are made to generate electricity with the help of photosynthesizing bacteria looped together on a graphene circuit.

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Waymo's So-Called Robo-Taxi Launch Reveals a Brutal TruthPhoenix Waymo One Arizona

The outfit that started as Google's self-driving car team still relies on human safety operators—indicating just how hard this problem really is.

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How Software Code Could Help You Grapple With the Legal Code

Local legal codes can be hard to find online or hidden behind paywalls. The "free and open law" movement wants to change that.

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Italy’s Antivaccine Government – The Attack on Experts Continues

Anti-vaccine Italian government fires its entire Health Council. This is unfortunately part of a bigger trend against expertise and reality-based policy.

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Honeybee protein keeps stem cells youthful

An active protein component of royal jelly helps honeybees create new queens. Stanford researchers have identified a similar protein in mammals, which keeps cultured embryonic stem cells pluripotent.

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Ariane 5's sixth launch this year

An Ariane 5, operated by Arianespace, has delivered the GSAT-11 and Geo-Kompsat-2A satellites into their planned orbits.

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Plasmonic quantum size effects in silver nanoparticles are dominated by interfaces and local environments

When metallic dimensions are reduced to the nanoscale, a phenomenon termed localized surface-plasmon resonance (LSPR) appears due to electron oscillations, resulting in distinct optical properties suited for advanced imaging and sensing technologies. As particles approach the quantum regime with dimensions less than 10 nm in diameter, however, the existing knowledge of their properties becomes qui

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Chopping unlocks new function in protein linked to dementia

Scientists have uncovered an unexpected new role for a protein that may underlie rare diseases.

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The 'camera that saved Hubble' turns 25

Twenty-five years ago this week, NASA held its collective breath as seven astronauts on space shuttle Endeavour caught up with the Hubble Space Telescope 353 miles (568 kilometers) above Earth. Their mission: to fix a devastating flaw in the telescope's primary mirror.

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New technology helps the visually impaired reach for the stars

An app developed by a University of Queensland student is helping the visually impaired navigate the stars and planets in our solar system.

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Landslide risk heightens when rains hit fire-ravaged areas

Rainfall can be a risk as much as a relief in fire-damaged areas of California. Earlier this year, at least 21 people died and more than a 100 were injured when heavy rains prompted a mudslide in Montecito after the Thomas Fire.

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Scientists study impact of lithium dendrites on cathode materials

Rechargeable lithium (Li) batteries are the most widely used energy storage devices found in consumer electronics and electric vehicles today. There are challenges, though, to optimizing their capacity, recyclability, and stability. During a Li battery's charge-discharge cycles, highly localized Li dendrites – strands of Li that grow inside batteries – can form and hurt the battery's performance.

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Dairy calves' personalities predict their ability to cope with stress

A UBC study published earlier this year found that dairy calves have distinct personality traits from a very young age. Researchers from the faculty of land and food systems tested calves for pessimism, fearfulness and sociability at both 25 and 50 days old, and learned that each calf has an inherent outlook that changes little with the passing of time.

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Key components of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument are installed atop the Mayall Telescope

Key components for the sky-mapping Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), weighing about 12 tons, were hoisted atop the Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) near Tucson, Arizona, and bolted into place Wednesday, marking a major project milestone.

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KU-forskere skal udvikle etisk kodeks for kunstig intelligens

Over de næste to år skal to forskere fra Københavns Universitet undersøge de…

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Fjernvarmen splitter energiaftalens partier

Venstres energiordfører kalder ny regulering og lovgivning for ’en fornuftig balancegang’ for fjernvarmen, mens Socialdemokratiet frygter, at spørgsmålet om forblivelsespligt kan få udbygningen til at stoppe og værker til at gå konkurs.

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På to måneder har 3.500 patienter tilmeldt sig to nye regionsklinikker i Hovedstaden

De midlertidige regionsklinikker i Hovedstaden kan melde fuldt hus, to måneder efter den første åbnede for patienter.

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Can a Man Be Imprisoned by His State and His Country for the Same Crime?

Ask a lawyer to explain “sovereignty” and you’ll hear an elevated discussion of Enlightenment political thought, along with some name-dropping—Hobbes, Montesquieu, Madison. Ask Terance Gamble, and he will have a more concrete answer: 34 months of his life. On Thursday, the Supreme Court will hear Gamble’s complaint in Gamble v. United States : If the Constitution protects against “double jeopardy

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SpaceX's Dragon Capsule May Be Contaminating the ISS

Contamination sensors have spiked after several SpaceX arrivals at the International Space Station, suggesting that ISS instruments could be at risk.

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'Fortnite' Season 7: A Civilian's Guide to How We Got Here

The world's most popular game is getting ready to change all over again.

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The Hippies Were Right: It's All about Vibrations, Man!

A new theory of consciousness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Scientific American Helps Shape the English Language

The magazine is more widely cited than the Bible by the Oxford English Dictionary — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ritzau stævnet for industrispionage med lånt login

Ritzau og GF Forsikring er stævnet for 15 millioner af Vocast.

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A Woman's Odd Symptoms After Chiropractic 'Neck Manipulation' Revealed a Brain Cyst

A women's chiropractic procedure to manipulate her neck may have inadvertently led doctors to discover a large cyst in her brain that had likely been there for decades.

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America’s Two Political Parties Are Asymmetrical

Michael Avenatti was never going to be president. The Avenatti boomlet , which began in August, lasted for a little less than three months, until the attorney officially took himself out of the running on Tuesday, citing concerns about his family . Avenatti made a name for himself representing the adult-film actress Stormy Daniels, whom President Donald Trump paid during the closing months of the

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First Successful Uterus Transplant from Deceased Donor Leads to Healthy Baby

If repeated, the feat may open the door to expanding infertility treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Danmark er ramt af større udbrud af salmonella

28 personer fordelt over hele landet har været syge af salmonella, og 18 af dem indlagt på hospitalet. Årsagen kan være svinekød.

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Regeringen vil forbyde mikroplast i kosmetik

Regeringen vil komme EU i forkøbet med et forbud. I dag er 97,5 pct. af produkterne allerede fri for mikroplast, oplyser den europæiske kosmetikbranche.

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Lemvig får den første regionsklinik i Region Midtjylland

Region Midtjylland dropper private udbydere og vil i stedet forsøge sig med sin første regionsklinik i Lemvig. PLO-formand er skeptisk overfor mulighederne for at bemande klinikken.

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Astronomers find far-flung wind from a black hole in the universe’s first light

The detection of black hole winds far from their host galaxy could reveal details of how galaxies and black holes grow up together.

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The Big Bang wasn’t an explosion. Visualize it like this.

Where exactly did the Big Bang happen? Well, nowhere—and everywhere. As NASA's Michelle Thaller explains, thinking of the origins of our universe as an explosion with a central hub is misleading. "The Big Bang wasn't an explosion of matter, it was an expansion of space itself," she says. We don't know how big the universe is, but the general consensus is that there is no edge to the universe, and

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How to Tell the Stories of Immigration

On December 3, at a gathering in New York, the fourth annual Hitchens Prize was awarded to the journalist Masha Gessen, a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of many books, including The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia and The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin . The prize was created by the Dennis and Victoria Ross Foundation, to honor the l

5h

 

What the President Could Do If He Declares a State of Emergency

I n the weeks leading up to the 2018 midterm elections, President Donald Trump reached deep into his arsenal to try to deliver votes to Republicans. Most of his weapons were rhetorical, featuring a mix of lies and false inducements—claims that every congressional Democrat had signed on to an “open borders” bill (none had), that liberals were fomenting violent “mobs” (they weren’t), that a 10 perc

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Start-Ups Aren't Cool Anymore

At happy hours and class breaks, at the part-time MBA program I attend through the University of Texas at Austin, the conversation often drifts toward new business ideas. A mobile app to schedule text messages in the future. (Use case: Compose your best friend’s happy birthday text the day before.) A social network that doesn’t sell your personal information or display any ads. (Business model in

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Historisk gennembrud: Nu er giganter enige om et fælles industrielt internet

Den globale automationsindustri er for første gang nogensinde blevet enige om at udvikle en samlet kommunikationsprotokol, der skal dække fra sensor til sky

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Nye resultater kvalificerer Darzalex som førstelinjebehandling

Resultater fra MAIA-studiet bliver mødt med klapsalver på ASH-kongressen. Antistoffet daratumumab har med sine seneste resultater kvalificeret sig til førstelinjebehandling for ældre med nydiagnosticeret myelomatose.

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Uafhængig forskning skal finde de mest egnede patienter til nye behandlinger

De mange nye behandlingsmuligheder inden for bl.a. CLL er en jungle at navigere i. Som læge har man pligt til at møde medicinalindustriens udmeldinger om egne produkter med sund skepsis, siger Carsten Niemann, der er overlæge ved Rigshospitalet.

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Nye initiativer skal føre til uhørt præcis karakteristik af sygdomme

En stribe nye initiativer inden for myeloide sygdomme skal føre til ekstremt detaljerede kortlægninger af f.eks. leukæmicellers biologi. Håbet er, at det for alvor kan booste præcisionsmedicinen, siger dansk læge, der har hørt et af initiativerne omtalt på ASH.

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Scientists identify 'youth factor' in blood cells that speeds fracture repair

Duke Health researchers previously showed that introducing bone marrow stem cells to a bone injury can expedite healing, but the exact process was unclear. Now, the same Duke-led team believes it has pinpointed the 'youth factor' inside bone marrow stem cells — it's the macrophage, a type of white blood cell, and the proteins it secretes that can have a rejuvenating effect on tissue. Nature Commu

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How the brain hears and fears

What does the brain do when things go bump in the night? Researchers are looking at neural activity in the amygdala by studying how mice react when they hear a sound they've been taught to fear.

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Researchers advance biomass transformation process

Professor WANG Feng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his colleagues from Peking University recently reported an efficient and novel catalytic method for the conversion of aqueous biomass fermentation broth to a water-immiscible product.

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Neighborhoods with more green space may mean less heart disease

People who live in neighborhoods with more green spaces may have better blood vessel health and lower levels of stress, and a lower risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks, strokes and others.

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Trilobites: What a Hungry Snail Reveals About Your Grocery Store Breakdowns

Pond snails can overcome warnings from their senses about what to eat if they get hungry enough. Sound familiar?

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Antistof kontrollerer effektivt blødninger hos børn

Nyt studie viser, at det lægemidlet emicizumab kan hjælpe børn med hæmofili A med inhibitor til effektivt og sikkert at nedsætte risikoen for blødninger.

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Mutation er årsag til resistens mod venetoclax

Når patienter med kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi får en specifik mutation i BCL2-genet, udvikler de resistens mod venetoclax.

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Forebyggende behandling kan mindske kræftpatienters risiko for blodpropper

Cancerpatienter, der får forebyggende behandling med blodfortyndende midler, har mindre risiko for blodpropper.

5h

 

14 Questions Robert Mueller Knows the Answer To

The Russia investigation's known unknowns give valuable hints about the special counsel's next moves.

6h

 

Taxabranchen: Busbaner bør være forbeholdt rene elbiler

Både såkaldt lav- og nulemissionsbiler skal kunne benytte busbaner, lyder det i udkast til ny bekendtgørelse. Men af hensyn til klimaet er det vigtigt kun at give fordele til rene elbiler og andre nulemissionsbiler, mener Det Økologiske Råd. Også taxabranchen advarer mod at ligestille de to tekno…

6h

 

Ibrutinib er mere effektiv til yngre leukæmi-patienter

Behandling med ibrutinib er bedre end standardbehandlingen til yngre patienter med ubehandlet kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi.

6h

 

Er mørkt stof og mørk energi blot negativ masse?

Britisk fysiker tager Einsteins gamle tanke om negativ masse op igen og kommer med en spekulativ, men tankevækkende analyse af et Univers med partikler både med positiv og negativ masse.

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Study solves puzzle of snail and slug feeding preferences

Gardeners have puzzled for years as to why some seedlings are more commonly eaten by slugs and snails—and new research suggests it may be down to the smells produced by young seedlings in the early stages of their development.

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Study solves puzzle of snail and slug feeding preferences

A study led by the University of Plymouth suggests the reason some seedlings are more commonly eaten by slugs and snails may be down to the smells produced by young seedlings in the early stages of their development.

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Breast cancer patients who take heart drug with trastuzumab have less heart damage

Breast cancer patients who take a heart drug at the same time as trastuzumab have less heart damage, according to a study presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2018.

7h

 

Permafrost: a climate time bomb?

The Earth's vast tracts of permafrost hold billions of tonnes of planet-heating greenhouse gases that scientists warn will be released by global warming, along with diseases long locked into the ice.

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Darwin's finches have developed a taste for junk food, and it may be impacting their evolution

A UMass Boston professor and his colleagues have published new research showing that feeding on human junk food may be altering the course of evolution in Darwin's finches.

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Siberian region fights to preserve permafrost as planet warms

Eduard Romanov points to a spot on a block of flats where a major supporting beam has sagged and begun to crack, destabilising the nine storeys of apartments above.

8h

 

Urban planners look to Vienna to solve housing crises

Vienna's sumptuous imperial palaces may be the main draw for the many millions of tourists visiting every year.

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In Brazil backlands, termites built millions of dirt mounds

Roy Funch, an American botanist who has lived and worked in Brazil's hardscrabble northeast for decades, long looked at huge cone-shaped mounds of mud in the distance and wonder.

8h

 

Cuba to begin full internet access for mobile phones

Cuba announced Tuesday night that its citizens will be offered full internet access for mobile phones beginning this week, becoming one of the last nations to offer such service.

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Takeda shareholders agree to $60 bn Shire acquisition

Shareholders at Japanese drug giant Takeda on Wednesday approved a plan to buy Irish pharmaceuticals firm Shire in a deal worth around $60 billion, the biggest foreign takeover ever by a Japanese firm.

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Panama awards $1.4 bn bridge project to Chinese group

The government of Panama awarded Tuesday a Chinese consortium a $1.4 billion contract to build a bridge over the Panama Canal, a day after a visit by President Xi Jinping.

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Understanding the current rise of the far right using Marx and Lacan

As the end of 2018 approaches, a year that celebrated 200 years of the German philosopher Karl Marx, new research detailing core concepts coined by Karl Marx and French psychiatrist Jacques Lacan offers a fresh perspective on the rise of the far right.

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Does where students grow up influence where they go to college?

A new Population, Space and Place study explores how the ethnic composition of where students grow up is linked to where they attend university.

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Information from citizens could improve flood modelling

With increasing floods and flash floods in recent decades, researchers are working to develop improved methods for flood prevention and warning. A new Journal of Flood Risk Management study points to the potential of an approach that integrates water level data reported by citizens into flood forecasting models.

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Forget 'needle in a haystack.' Try finding an invasive species in a lake.

When the tiny and invasive spiny water flea began appearing in University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers' nets in 2009, scientists began to wonder how Lake Mendota, one of the most-studied lakes in the world, went from flea-free to infested seemingly overnight. Subsequent studies found the invader had persisted for years at low population densities that went undetected even as the lake was routi

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How will addressing climate change affect the job market?

The Paris Agreement's goal to keep global warming below 2°C can be achieved by increasing the use of renewable energy and improving energy efficiency. A new International Labour Review study explores the impact of such transitions on employment.

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Turning climate change from a 'tragedy of the commons' to positive action

Climate change must no longer be viewed as a "tragedy of the commons", researchers say.

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Can rice filter water from ag fields?

Rice is a staple food crop of 20 percent of the world's population. It's also grown on every continent except Antarctica.

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CO2 taler ud: Det er ikke min skyld

– Men klimaet bliver jeres problem, udtaler den berømte drivhusgas i denne tegneserie, hvor CO2 forklarer sin rolle i den globale opvarmning.

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Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2018 winners

The Royal Society’s annual photography competition celebrates ‘the power of photography to capture science in its many forms’ Continue reading…

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Research funding is short-changing humanities subjects | John Marenbon

The humanities subjects do not benefit from the research excellence framework. They need a better system The government’s research excellence framework (Ref) is perhaps the ultimate in bureaucratic exercises. It aims every seven years to assess, department by department, every “research active” academic in the UK. The aim is laudable: to ensure that a stream of research funding (known as QR) is d

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Skal politiet med algoritmer forudsige, hvem der begår kriminalitet? KU søger nu et svar

To forskere skal udvikle et etisk kodeks, som beskriver ansvarlig forskningspraksis inden for AI, men også rejse en generel etisk debat om hvad vi vil med kunstig intelligens.

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Bringing balance to the universe: New theory could explain missing 95 percent of the cosmos

New research could shed light on the 'missing' dark matter and dark energy that make up 95 percent of our universe and yet are wholly invisible to us.

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Klimaforandringerne raser: Forstå hvorfor eksperterne altid taler om CO2

Hvis du lige skal have opfrisket, hvad CO2 præcis er, hvad emission betyder, og hvorfor vi har CO2-ækvivalenter, så læs med her.

10h

 

Increasing crop insurances adoption in developing countries

Farmers in developing countries often rely heavily on their yearly harvest to feed their families. A bad crop can have severe consequences for their livelihood. Despite the significant advantages crop insurances would offer in alleviating this risk, only a small percentage of farmers insure their crops. A simple but effective solution tested by researchers from the University of Zurich has increas

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Can rice filter water from ag fields?

While it's an important part of our diets, new research shows that rice plants can be used in a different way, too: to clean runoff from farms before it gets into rivers, lakes, and streams.

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New attack could make website security captchas obsolete

Researchers have created new artificial intelligence that could spell the end for one of the most widely used website security systems.The new algorithm, based on deep learning methods, is the most effective solver of captcha security and authentication systems to date and is able to defeat versions of text captcha schemes used to defend the majority of the world's most popular websites

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Turning climate change from a 'tragedy of the commons' to positive action

Climate change must no longer be viewed as a 'tragedy of the commons', researchers say.

10h

 

How will addressing climate change affect the job market?

The Paris Agreement's goal to keep global warming below 2°C can be achieved by increasing the use of renewable energy and improving energy efficiency. A new International Labour Review study explores the impact of such transitions on employment.

10h

 

Information from citizens could improve flood modelling

With increasing floods and flash floods in recent decades, researchers are working to develop improved methods for flood prevention and warning. A new Journal of Flood Risk Management study points to the potential of an approach that integrates water level data reported by citizens into flood forecasting models.

10h

 

Does where students grow up influence where they go to college?

A new Population, Space and Place study explores how the ethnic composition of where students grow up is linked to where they attend university.

10h

 

Cannabis-based compound may reduce seizures in children with epilepsy

Interest has been growing in the use of cannabinoids–the active chemicals in cannabis or marijuana– for the treatment of epilepsy in children. A recent Epilepsia analysis of relevant published studies indicates that this strategy looks promising.

10h

 

Duration of infertility in men may affect sperm count

A longer duration of infertility was associated with lower sperm count and other parameters of impaired sperm in a BJU International study of 1644 infertile men. Also, older age and higher body mass index were associated with a longer duration of infertility.

10h

 

Research examines causes of complications during pregnancy and delivery in adolescents

Pregnancy in adolescence has been linked with increased risks of mortality and life-threatening complications in young mothers and their newborn babies. New research suggests that biology alone does not explain the high incidence of these adverse outcomes.

10h

 

Study examines effects of different opioids on driving performance

Taking opioids for the treatment of pain has been associated with increased risks of crashing among drivers, but it is unknown whether this applies to all opioids or pertains to specific opioids only. A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study found that the influence of single analgesic doses of methadone and buprenorphine — two different opioids — on driving performance was mild and

10h

 

Risk of hospital-treated infections & use of antibiotics after hip fracture surgery

In a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study that examined trends in the incidence of infections following hip fracture surgery in Denmark, the risk of postoperative infections (at 15, 30, 90, and 365 days) increased between 2005 and 2016.

10h

 

Study reveals sleep problems in young adult students

A study published in the Journal of Sleep Research indicates that sleep problems are both prevalent and increasing among students.

10h

 

Risk factors for falling are different in older men versus older women

Different factors were associated with falling in men versus women in a study of 3,112 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

10h

 

Analysis estimates mortality from fungal infections of ash trees

The ash dieback epidemic, caused by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, has swept across Europe over the past 20 years and caused widespread damage and death in ash tree (Fraxinus excelsior) populations. A recent analysis of surveys of ash dieback across Europe, published in Plants, People, Planet, reveals mortality rates as high as 85 percent in plantations and 70 percent in woodlands.

10h

 

Does weight affect likelihood of experiencing severe flu-like symptoms?

A new Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses study found that adults who are underweight or morbidly obese have an elevated risk of being hospitalized with influenza-like illness due to the flu virus or other respiratory viruses.

10h

 

CEASE program increases smoking cessation assistance provided to breastfeeding mothers

A study led by MassGeneral Hospital for Children researchers demonstrates that an MGHfC-developed program designed to help the parents of pediatric patients quit smoking can increase the provision of such assistance to breastfeeding mothers.

10h

 

Can We Grow More Food on Less Land? We’ll Have To, a New Study Finds

To make meaningful progress on climate change, cows and wheat fields will have to become radically more efficient.

10h

 

Analysis estimates mortality from fungal infections of ash trees

The ash dieback epidemic, caused by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, has swept across Europe over the past 20 years and caused widespread damage and death in ash tree (Fraxinus excelsior) populations. A recent analysis of surveys of ash dieback across Europe, published in Plants, People, Planet, reveals mortality rates as high as 85 percent in plantations and 70 percent in woodlands.

11h

 

Reflekser i skibssiden skyld i ladeproblemer på Helsingør-færgerne

En spand sort maling var den enkle løsning på Scandlines’ batterifærgers problemer med robotten, der fører stikkontakten ind i færgen.

11h

 

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 5. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

11h

 

Mueller’s Sentencing Memo for Flynn Doubles as a Warning to Manafort

President Donald Trump suggested on Monday that witnesses in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe should refuse to cooperate. But in a highly anticipated sentencing memo filed on Tuesday night, Mueller sent a clear message to the current and future witnesses in the Russia investigation: Testify honestly and completely, and you could be spared prison time. In the memo, Mueller asked a jud

12h

 

Michael Flynn Is Worse Than a Liar

The Trump administration has introduced the country to a colorful troupe of liars like none other in memory. Starting with the president himself, the past two years have brought to the national stage a phenomenal array of promiscuous fabricators. It therefore stands to reason that so many of the offenses ferreted out by Special Counsel Robert Mueller are crimes of dishonesty. Prosecutors take the

13h

 

Colombia tropical forest fires spike after 2016 Peace Accords

Fires that contribute to deforestation spiked six-fold in Colombia in the year after an historic 2016 peace agreement ended decades of conflict between FARC guerrilla and government forces, according to a new study.

14h

 

New technique to identify phloem cells aids in the fight against citrus greening

Phloem diseases, including the economically devastating citrus greening, are particularly difficult to study because phloem cells — essential for plant nutrient transport — are difficult to access and isolate. Researchers have developed a technique to identify phloem cells using fluorescent microscopy and organelle-specific dyes that is applicable in a variety of phloem diseases across a range o

14h

 

Novel approach improves understanding of the formation of new neurons in the mammalian adult brain

A team of researchers has developed a powerful new approach to understand the formation of new neurons in the mammalian adult brain.

14h

 

Team converts wet biological waste to diesel-compatible fuel

In a step toward producing renewable engine fuels that are compatible with existing diesel fuel infrastructure, researchers report they can convert wet biowaste, such as swine manure and food scraps, into a fuel that can be blended with diesel and that shares diesel's combustion efficiency and emissions profile.

14h

 

Blood vessel growth key to healthy fat tissue, research shows

New research shows that inhibiting a protein within blood vessels stimulates new blood vessel growth, resulting in healthier fat tissue (adipose) and lower blood sugar levels. The findings provide key insight into how improving blood vessel growth could help to mitigate serious health problems that arise with obesity, such as diabetes.

14h

 

Biologists show inner workings of cellular 'undertaker'

Scientists have deciphered how the proteasome converts energy into mechanical motion that untangles and unfolds proteins for destruction. The findings could help us understand how proteasomes keep diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's at bay.

14h

 

Ideal marriage partners drive Waorani warriors to war

In a new study, a team of researchers examined the social composition of raiding parties and their relationship to marriage alliances in an Amazonian tribal society, the Waorani of Ecuador. The Waorani formerly practiced lethal raiding, or small-scale warfare, as part of their social fabric. The anthropologists spoke in detail with tribal members about their raiding histories in an attempt to unde

14h

 

Think about bees, say researchers, as Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument Shrinks

A year ago, President Donald Trump announced his intention to reduce the size of Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which Utah State University researchers say is a hotspot for bee biodiversity. The entomologists urge federal agencies to consider the pollinators in management plans, going forward, for the monument.

14h

 

Vaping cannabis produces stronger effects than smoking cannabis for infrequent users

In a small study of infrequent cannabis users, researchers have shown that, compared with smoking cannabis, vaping it increased the rate of short-term anxiety, paranoia, memory loss and distraction when doses were the same.

14h

 

Sex-specific effects of DHEA on bone mineral density and body composition

Women 55 and older have an increased risk of bone and muscle loss but therapy with the hormone Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may help prevent bone loss and increase muscle mass in older women, according to a new study.

14h

 

Inactivating genes can boost crop genetic diversity

Researchers recently showed that inactivating a gene, RECQ4, leads to a three-fold increase in recombination in crops such as rice, pea and tomato. The discovery could speed up plant breeding and development of varieties better suited to specific environmental conditions.

14h

 

Neurotechnology provides real-time readouts of where rats think they are

Scientists have demonstrated a new neurotechnology for reading out neural signals of position in real-time as rats run a maze, or replay it during sleep, with a high degree of accuracy, with more than 1,000 input channels, and the ability to account for the statistical relevance of the readings almost instantly after they are made.

14h

 

Microscopic 'sunflowers' for better solar panels

Scientists have harnessed magnetic fields to control the molecular structure of liquid crystal elastomers and create microscopic three-dimensional polymer shapes that can be programmed to move in any direction in three-dimensional space in response to multiple types of stimuli, including light and heat. The applications of this technology include message encryption, responsive solar panels, and sm

14h

 

A step closer to fusion energy

Harnessing nuclear fusion is a step closer after researchers showed that using two types of imaging can help them assess the safety and reliability of parts used in a fusion energy device.

14h

 

A bacterial protein is found to promote cancer

Researchers have discovered that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell's ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer.

15h

 

A missed opportunity: Telemedicine use for treating substance use disorder remains low, despite unmet need

A new study shows low use of telehealth services for substance use disorder. More than 20 million Americans have substance use disorders related to alcohol, opioids and other drugs. Less than one in five receive treatment for substance use disorder, in part because of lack of providers, especially in rural areas.

15h

 

Spinal injury throws body clocks off schedule

In the hours and days after a traumatic injury, the gears of circadian clocks fall profoundly out of sync, disrupting body temperature, hormonal rhythms, and immune response, new research shows.

15h

 

More diversity than before: Indications for recovery after ecosystem pollution

Lake Constance, one of the largest freshwater lakes in Europe, suffered from eutrophication, or nutrient contamination caused by agricultural and waste water run-off in the mid-1900s. A study has now revealed that one European whitefish species expanded its genetic variation through hybridization with other whitefish species during the period of eutrophication.

15h

 

Ash dieback: ash woodlands 'may flourish once again'

Scientists say there is hope that some ash trees can survive in the future, despite ash dieback.

15h

 

Rats and pigeons 'replace iconic species'

"Iconic" animals such as tigers are being replaced by "cosmopolitan" species found everywhere – researchers.

15h

 

How young women view men affects how they imagine their future selves

When young women believe more men are becoming stay-at-home dads, they are more likely to imagine themselves as the financial providers for their future families. When they don't think men's roles are changing, they are more likely to see themselves as their future families' primary caregivers, researchers found.

15h

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