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Nyheder2018december06

A DNA methylation reader complex that enhances gene transcription

DNA methylation generally functions as a repressive transcriptional signal, but it is also known to activate gene expression. In either case, the downstream factors remain largely unknown. By using comparative interactomics, we isolated proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana that associate with methylated DNA. Two SU(VAR)3-9 homologs, the transcriptional antisilencing factor SUVH1, and SUVH3, were amon

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Viscous control of cellular respiration by membrane lipid composition

Lipid composition determines the physical properties of biological membranes and can vary substantially between and within organisms. We describe a specific role for the viscosity of energy-transducing membranes in cellular respiration. Engineering of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli allowed us to titrate inner membrane viscosity across a 10-fold range by controlling the abundance of u

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Temperature-dependent hypoxia explains biogeography and severity of end-Permian marine mass extinction

Rapid climate change at the end of the Permian Period (~252 million years ago) is the hypothesized trigger for the largest mass extinction in Earth’s history. We present model simulations of the Permian/Triassic climate transition that reproduce the ocean warming and oxygen (O 2 ) loss indicated by the geologic record. The effect of these changes on animal survival is evaluated using the Metaboli

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Early human dispersals within the Americas

Studies of the peopling of the Americas have focused on the timing and number of initial migrations. Less attention has been paid to the subsequent spread of people within the Americas. We sequenced 15 ancient human genomes spanning from Alaska to Patagonia; six are ≥10,000 years old (up to ~18 x coverage). All are most closely related to Native Americans, including those from an Ancient Beringia

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Animals and the zoogeochemistry of the carbon cycle

Predicting and managing the global carbon cycle requires scientific understanding of ecosystem processes that control carbon uptake and storage. It is generally assumed that carbon cycling is sufficiently characterized in terms of uptake and exchange between ecosystem plant and soil pools and the atmosphere. We show that animals also play an important role by mediating carbon exchange between eco

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Open-source discovery of chemical leads for next-generation chemoprotective antimalarials

To discover leads for next-generation chemoprotective antimalarial drugs, we tested more than 500,000 compounds for their ability to inhibit liver-stage development of luciferase-expressing Plasmodium spp. parasites (681 compounds showed a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of less than 1 micromolar). Cluster analysis identified potent and previously unreported scaffold families as well as oth

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Chess, a Drosophila of reasoningAlphaZero DeepMind

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News at a glance

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Taking aim

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At arm's length

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The uterus may play a role in memory

In lab tests, rats that underwent hysterectomies had worse spatial memories.

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Volcanic eruptions that depleted ocean oxygen may have set off the Great Dying

Massive eruptions from volcanoes spewing greenhouse gases 252 million years ago may have triggered Earth’s biggest mass extinction.

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Mice display altered immune system following spaceflight

New research published in The FASEB Journal brings to light new information regarding the increased susceptibility of mice to infection during spaceflight. Based on examinations of mice that had been on board the Bion-M1 biosatellite, the study demonstrates that the outer space environment impairs the production of B lymphocytes, the white blood cells responsible for antibody production. The study

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Interventions in dog populations could reduce rabies in rural China

Domestic dogs play a key role in the transmission and expansion of rabies in rural areas of China, according to a study published December 6 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Huaiyu Tian of Beijing Normal University, Hailin Zhang of the Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory for Zoonosis Control and Prevention, Simon Dellicour of KU Leuven, and colleagues.

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Helium exoplanet inflated like a balloon, research shows

Astronomers have discovered a distant planet with an abundance of helium in its atmosphere, which has swollen to resemble an inflated balloon.

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An exoplanet loses its atmosphere in the form of a tail

A new study led by scientists from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) reveals that the giant exoplanet WASP-69b carries a comet-like tail made up of helium particles escaping from its gravitational field and propelled by the ultraviolet radiation of its star. The results of this work are published today in the journal Science.

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Biggest mass extinction caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath

The largest extinction in Earth's history marked the end of the Permian period, some 252 million years ago. Long before dinosaurs, our planet was populated with plants and animals that were mostly obliterated after a series of massive volcanic eruptions in Siberia.

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Rules to boost fuel economy for vehicles will do more good than harm, new study shows

Scholars from USC and other leading universities conclude that rules on the books to increase fuel economy for passenger vehicles will do more good than harm, contradicting claims by the Trump administration as it seeks to roll back fuel economy standards.

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Climate players: Animals can swing a landscape's capacity to store carbon

Advances in remote sensing technologies are helping scientists to better measure how global landscapes—from forests to savanna—are able to store carbon, a critical insight as they evaluate the potential role of ecosystems in mitigating climate change.

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One million mosquitoes and 500,000 tests later, new buzz about a malaria prevention drug

Most malaria drugs are designed to reduce symptoms after infection. They work by blocking replication of the disease-causing parasites in human blood, but they don't prevent infection or transmission via mosquitoes. What's worse, the malaria parasite is developing resistance to existing drugs.

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New organic plastic material allows electronics to function at extreme temperatures without sacrificing performance

From iPhones on Earth to rovers on Mars, most electronics only function within a certain temperature range. By blending two organic materials together, researchers at Purdue University could create electronics that withstand extreme heat.

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Warming Water and Lack of Oxygen Caused Massive Extinction

Simulations of Earth's climate 252 million years ago reveal that the same symptoms of modern climate change likely account for the time period's extensive loss of marine life.

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Data analysis could help locate the missing Malaysian MH370 plane

Despite the most expensive search in history, Malaysian Airlines MH370 has never been found. A new mathematical model suggests searchers have been looking in the wrong location.

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Fossil fuel emissions climb for 2nd straight year

Global fossil fuel emissions are on track to rise for a second year in a row, primarily due to growing energy use, a new study warns. The projections come in a week when international negotiators are gathering in the coal-mining city of Katowice, Poland, to work out the rules for implementing the Paris climate agreement. Under the 2015 accord, hundreds of nations pledged to cut carbon emissions a

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USGS identifies largest continuous oil and gas resource potential ever

Today, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced the Wolfcamp Shale and overlying Bone Spring Formation in the Delaware Basin portion of Texas and New Mexico's Permian Basin province contain an estimated mean of 46.3 billion barrels of oil, 281 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 20 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to an assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Thi

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The Charter-School Teachers’ Strike in Chicago Was ‘Inevitable’

Teachers’ strikes have been a constant across the country in 2018, popping up in six states, from West Virginia to Oklahoma. But so far, the wave of activism has been limited to educators at traditional public schools. That is, until earlier this week, when unionized teachers from one of Chicago’s largest charter-school networks, Acero Schools, took to the picket line. The strike is the first of

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YouTuber David Dobrik's Biggest Crush Is Still Ariana Grande

He's been a fan since the 'Victorious' days.

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USGS identifies largest continuous oil and gas resource potential ever

USGS announces an assessment of continuous oil and gas in Texas and New Mexico's Delaware Basin, the largest USGS has ever conducted, with an estimate of 46.3 billion barrels of oil and 281 trillion cubic feet of natural gas.

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Deprescribing can be valuable tool in managing polypharmacy, experts say

Reducing the number of medications older adults use can have surprising benefits, according to research presented in a new issue of the journal Public Policy & Aging Report from The Gerontological Society of America.

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Reusable respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care personnel

Half-facepiece reusable elastomeric respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care workers from exposure to airborne transmissible contaminants or infectious agents — for example, influenza virus — during day-to-day work or with a sudden or rapid influx of patients, such as during a public health emergency, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Eng

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New imaging tools that trace key breast cancer enzymes may help guide therapies

A set of emerging diagnostic tools may help identify breast cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies that target important enzymes fueling a range of subtypes, including BCRA-mutated and triple negative cancers.

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An ancient strain of plague may have led to the decline of Neolithic Europeans

Researchers have identified a new strain of Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that causes plague, in DNA extracted from 5,000-year-old human remains. Their analyses suggest that this strain is the closest ever identified to the genetic origin of plague. Their work also suggests that plague may have been spread among Neolithic European settlements by traders, contributing to their decline.

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Graphene strengthens seaweed-based smart material

A new way to use graphene oxide (GO) could add some backbone to hydrogel materials made from alginate, a natural material derived from seaweed. In a paper in the journal Carbon , researchers describe a 3D printing method for making intricate and durable alginate-GO structures that are far stiffer and more fracture resistant that alginate alone. “One limiting factor in the use of alginate hydrogel

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The path of bliss: 11 epic quotes from Joseph Campbell

The famous academic will forever be known for his message to "follow your bliss". George Lucas admitted that Star Wars was heavily influenced by Campbell. The Power of Myth remains one of the most popular public television series of all time. None Very few biographies can be described in three words, yet the entirety of mythologist Joseph Campbell's career has often been summed up in one simple m

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The Deeper Meaning Behind Ed Sheeran and Beyoncé’s Clothing Clash

“I saw you in that dress looking so beautiful,” go the words to Ed Sheeran’s “Perfect,” which hit No. 1 on the Hot 100 when it was re-released as a duet with Beyoncé. “I don’t deserve this, darling.” In yet another example that reality is a comedy programmed by higher beings, those exact words were sung during a Global Citizen Festival performance in South Africa, where the disparity between Shee

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Doctors Aren’t Sure How This Even Came Out of a Patient

On Tuesday, The New England Journal of Medicine tweeted the most recent addition to its photo series of the most visually arresting medical anomalies. The image is of a mysterious, branchlike structure that, posted elsewhere, would probably pass for a cherry-red chunk of some underground root system or a piece of bright reef coral. But this is no creature of the deep. It’s a completely intact, si

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US interstate highways need overhaul, says new report

The future of the U.S. Interstate Highway System is threatened by a persistent and growing backlog of structural and operational deficiencies and by various looming challenges, such as the progress of automated vehicles, developments in electric vehicles, and vulnerabilities due to climate change. Unless a commitment is made to remedy the system's deficiencies and prepare for these oncoming challe

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Wild African fruit flies offer clues to their modern-day domestic life

The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is quite possibly the most studied organism on the planet. Fruit flies are also quite familiar residents in many of our kitchens, attracted as they are to the fruit bowl. But how do the flies live in the wild? Surprisingly little is known.

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Acrobatic geckos, highly maneuverable on land and in the air, can also race on water

Asian geckos were observed running over water at nearly a meter per second, as fast as on land. Lab experiments show how. They get support from surface tension but also slap the water rapidly with their feet. They also semi-plane over the surface and use their tail for stabilization and propulsion. They thus sit between insects, which use only surface tension, and larger animals, which run upright

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'Chemo Brain' May Result from Effects on 'Helper Cells.' The Finding Could Lead to Possible Treatments.

A new study provides insight into how certain chemotherapy drugs affect brain cells. The study also identified a potential new treatment for "chemo brain."

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US interstate highways need overhaul, says new report

The future of the US Interstate Highway System is threatened by a persistent and growing backlog of structural and operational deficiencies and by various looming challenges, such as the progress of automated vehicles, developments in electric vehicles, and vulnerabilities due to climate change.

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Pumping up fitness app features may add muscle to workout commitment

Fitness apps are easy to download and can help motivate people to start workout routines, but that may not be enough to sustain those routines in the long run. However, Penn State researchers suggest there may be ways to tweak those apps to inspire a deeper commitment to a fitness routine and help users hit their fitness goals.

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VCU researchers test effectiveness of anti-opioid vaccine

Virginia Commonwealth University researchers are testing a vaccine against opioid abuse developed by the Scripps Research Institute in California. The vaccine is meant to block the effects of heroin and fentanyl in patients with opioid use disorder.

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Kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury suitable for transplant

Organ procurement teams are sometimes leery of accepting kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury (AKI), fearing they will harm the recipients. However, a national study chaired by a Johns Hopkins kidney specialist suggests these fears may be unfounded.

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Engineers demonstrate mechanics of making foam with bubbles in distinct sizes

It's easy to make bubbles, but try making hundreds of thousands of them a minute—all the same size.

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China's unbridled export of coal power imperils climate goals

Even as China struggles to curb domestic coal-fired power and the deadly pollution it produces, the world's top carbon emitter is aggressively exporting the same troubled technology to Asia, Africa and the Middle East, an investigation by AFP has shown.

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College students choose smartphones over food, researchers find

An experiment out of Buffalo shows that students are willing to put off eating in order to look at their phones. The subjects were willing to pay ever increasing amounts of money to use their phones even as the price of food remained the same. The finding doesn't prove phone addiction is a thing, but it makes it possible. In a turn of events that should surprise nobody, researchers at the Univers

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Wisconsin Republicans Are Shooting Themselves In the Foot

The Wisconsin GOP’s lame-duck power play was not the death of democracy. But it was bad enough: petty, vindictive, and self-destructive. It was, as the saying goes, worse than a crime. It was a blunder. And for what? In its arrogant insularity, the Wisconsin GOP became a national symbol of win-at-all-costs, norms-be-damned politics. Cut through the overwrought rhetoric and what did the Republican

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Uterine Cancer Killing More US Women, with Black Women Hardest Hit

More women in the U.S. are developing and dying from uterine cancer than they were nearly two decades ago, and black women are "disproportionately" affected.

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US to ease oil drilling controls protecting imperiled birdDonald Trump US WH

The Trump administration moved forward Thursday with plans to ease restrictions on oil and natural gas drilling, mining and other activities that were put in place to protect an imperiled bird species across millions of acres in the American West.

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Millions of O2, SoftBank customers hit by glitch

UK mobile phone operator O2 and Japan's SoftBank said Thursday that tens of millions of their customers were unable to use data due to a glitch with sofware made by Sweden's Ericsson.

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EKG, other heart health features come to Apple Watch

Apple Watch is now fulfilling its promise to let people take EKGs of their heart and notify them of any irregular heartbeat.

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Nedbøren falder skævt

Regnen falder tungt få dage om året, og i fremtiden vil den falde endnu tungere på færre dage.

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Forcing your kids to apologize can make them less 'likable'

A new study finds that making children apologize can make things worse. When kids say fake "sorry" their victims dislike them even more. Children respond most positively when regret is sincere. "You did what? You apologize right now! That may be the sound of a grownup making a mistake. According to new research published by the University of Michigan this year, forcing a child to apologize when t

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CO2 Emissions Reached an All-Time High in 2018

The uptick follows several years of relatively flat emissions, underscoring the urgency of climate action — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Exclusive: Controversial skeleton may be a new species of early human

A skeleton found decades ago in South Africa may be a new species of Australopithecus, and could help reveal when our ancestors evolved to walk on two feet

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Facial recognition has to be regulated to protect the public, says AI report

The research institute AINow has identified facial recognition as a key challenge for society and policymakers—but is it too late?

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Purdue developing new treatment options for millions with autoimmune diseases

Purdue University researchers have developed a series of molecules that may provide more reliable relief with fewer side effects for people with any of several autoimmune diseases. The new molecules overcome difficulties with current drugs in targeting, for purposes of inhibiting, the appropriate form of Janus kinase, which has four forms affecting cell signaling and gene expression.

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Engineers demonstrate mechanics of making foam with bubbles in distinct sizes

Rice University engineers fine-tune a microfluidic process for producing uniform bubbles to make ordered foams with bubbles in two or three distinct sizes. The customizable, 'wet' foams are intended for applications that include chemical and biological studies.

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Toothed giant rips through Alps despite rail link protests

There is a fierce nip in the air outside, but inside the temperature is almost tropical and the further you advance into the dark, the louder the noise becomes.

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Idé til julegaven: Her er 4 måder, du kan flyve som en superhelt

Vovehalse flyver rundt som Batman og Iron Man ude i virkeligheden. Og det kan du måske også komme til, hvis du sparer lidt på juleindkøbene.

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Wintertime Arctic sea ice growth slows long-term decline

New NASA research has found that increases in the rate at which Arctic sea ice grows in the winter may have partially slowed down the decline of the Arctic sea ice cover.

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The Saudi Ambassador is Back in D.C. Will Anyone Talk to Him?

Updated at 3:56 p.m. The Saudi ambassador to the United States may have quietly returned to Washington, but he’s going to have some trouble getting meetings on Capitol Hill. Prince Khalid bin Salman’s return Wednesday came a little more than a month after he left the U.S. capital following the killing of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a murder many Senators have blamed on the ambassador’s

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Could algae that are 'poor-providers' help corals come back after bleaching?

How much of the ability of a coral reef to withstand stressful conditions is influenced by the type of algae that the corals hosts?

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Industrial fisheries are starving seabirds all around the world

Industrial fisheries are starving seabirds like penguins and terns by competing for the same prey sources, new research from the French National Center for Scientific Research in Montpellier and the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia has found.

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Hazelnuts improve older adults' micronutrient levels

Older adults who added hazelnuts to their diet for a few months significantly improved their levels of two key micronutrients.

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What can a snowflake teach us about how cancer spreads in the body?

What can seashells, lightning and the coastline of Britain teach us about new drugs for cancer? The answer, according to a team of researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, may revolve around fractals, the infinitely complex patterns found in nature.

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Trilobites: An Insect Flees Danger. Suddenly, It Picks Up a Tiny Hitchhiker.

When running for safety, aphid nymphs crawl onto the backs of their elders. The adult aphids don’t seem to like it.

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Trump Drilling Plan Threatens 9 Million Acres of Sage Grouse Habitat

A plan to strip protections for the imperiled bird would open more land to drilling than any other step the administration has taken, experts said.

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Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2-D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

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Parrot genome analysis reveals insights into longevity, cognition

Parrots are famously talkative, and a blue-fronted Amazon parrot named Moises—or at least its genome—is telling scientists volumes about the longevity and highly developed cognitive abilities that give parrots so much in common with humans. Perhaps someday, it will also provide clues about how parrots learn to vocalize so well.

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What should we do with all of those empty churches?

With many churches only being operational for a few hours each week, thousands of churches are shutting down. Church attendance is down nationwide, adding to the problem of what to do with so much real estate. Inventive uses for abandoned churches include co-working spaces, Airbnbs, and bookstores. None Earlier this year I was amazed walking around the 110 acres that is Vatican City while visitin

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It turns out geckos can run on water—and this adorable video shows how

Animals These little lizards combined evolutionary tactics to come up with their own unique way of running. Geckos can run straight up a wall, but it’s their ability to run across water that makes them truly weird.

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How Do American Families Have Time to Watch 8 Hours of TV Every Day?

Even as phones and tablets extend their reach into daily life, a bigger screen remains supreme. According to the market-research firm Nielsen, the average American household watches nearly eight hours of television a day . If people are working and sleeping and doing anything else at all, how do eight hours of TV even fit into people’s days? Nielsen has been measuring TV viewership since 1949. Th

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Germs of Genius–a Masterpiece's "Microbiome" Can Spell Its Demise

But microbes living on canvases may also help preserve irreplaceable works of art — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Revolutionary technology pinpoints biopsies to detect prostate cancer

Medical software that overlays tumor information from MRI scans onto ultrasound images can help guide surgeons conducting biopsies and improve prostate cancer detection.

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Young aphids piggyback on adult aphids to get to safety faster

Young aphids may ride on the backs of adult aphids to get back to the safety of a host plant quicker, according to a new study.

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How do schools address self-harm in adolescents?

In a survey-based study of 153 secondary schools in England and Wales, staff stated that adolescent self-harm is an important concern, but emotional health and wellbeing is the primary health priority for schools.

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Media coverage of disasters can have lasting effects on children's mental health

Disaster communication experts at the University of Missouri say disaster media coverage can have lasting effects on children's mental health and suggest teachers and parents be prepared to respond to questions during and after a catastrophe.

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Study among first to describe work environments for nurses in Mexico

A study of nurses in Mexico identifies both positive and problematic areas of their work environments, with age, experience, and education level influencing nurses' perceptions of their workplaces.

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Recapitulating 3-D Microenvironments In Vitro Using Hollow Fiber Bioreactors

Download this white paper from FiberCell Systems to learn about how HFBRs are used in single cell-type/multi cell-type assays, antiviral and anticancer drug evaluations, and generating 3-D cellular models!

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Rodents navigate like Pacific Island sailors

The navigation system rodents use is similar to the way Pacific Islanders navigate the open ocean without a compass, according to new research. The findings correct a common misconception: that mammals’ navigation systems operate like a global positioning system, which relies on a compass-like direction sense. “These findings offer new, compelling evidence of how our internally organized sense of

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Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

Rice University engineers develop a method to transfer complete, flexible, two-dimensional circuits from their fabrication platforms to curved and other smooth surfaces. Such circuits are able to couple with near-field electromagnetic waves and offer next-generation sensing for optical fibers and other applications.

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Exploring the Ecosystem of the U.S.–Mexico Border

Nature is fluid; walls are not — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sorry France, but fuel taxes are a bitter pill we must all swallow

The reversal of France’s fuel tax sends a worrying message to world leaders meeting this week in Poland to firm up climate commitments, says Olive Heffernan

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Hunter Who Killed Man-Eating Tiger in India Broke Laws, Officials Say

The tiger was blamed for killing 13 people. The man who shot her says he fired in self-defense after a tranquilizer dart failed to stop her.

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What does expanded Medicaid mean for the health & work lives of enrollees? A lot

A new study could help states that will soon expand Medicaid, or may add a work requirement, understand what might be in store. Nearly half of enrollees in Michigan's expanded Medicaid felt their physical health improved; more than a third cited better mental or dental health. Over two-thirds of those with jobs said coverage helped them do better at work; those who said their health had improved w

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Does Trump Even Understand How Tariffs Work?

This weekend, President Donald Trump announced a major economic deal with Beijing. “China has agreed to reduce and remove tariffs on cars,” he wrote on Twitter. “Farmers will be a a very BIG and FAST beneficiary of our deal with China. They intend to start purchasing agricultural product immediately,” he added . “Farmers, I LOVE YOU!” A few days later, Trump flip-flopped. “We are either going to

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New imaging tools that trace key breast cancer enzymes may help guide therapies

A set of emerging diagnostic tools may help identify breast cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies that target important enzymes fueling a range of subtypes, including BCRA-mutated and triple negative cancers. New research from two studies conducted by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, are presented on today at the 2018 San Ant

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Wintertime Arctic sea ice growth slows long-term decline: NASA

New NASA research has found that increases in the rate at which Arctic sea ice grows in the winter may have partially slowed down the decline of the Arctic sea ice cover.

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Could algae that are 'poor-providers' help corals come back after bleaching?

How much of a reef's ability to withstand stressful conditions is influenced by the type of symbiotic algae that the corals hosts? New work investigates how the nutrients algae share with their coral hosts varies between species and what this could mean for a coral's ability to survive in a changing climate. They determined that in the wake of a bleaching event, even an algal tenant that's poor pr

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Researchers discover new disease with 'Bubble Boy' roots

A team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) led by Dr. Donald Vinh, the RI's so-called "Dr. House" because of his research into rare diseases, has discovered a new human disease and the gene responsible for it, paving the way for the proper diagnosis of patients globally and the development of new therapies. Their findings are published in the Journal of Exp

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Parrot genome analysis reveals mutations favoring longevity and cognition

A genome analysis of traits in parrots and 26 other bird species revealed that parrots and other long-lived birds share high rates of conserved mutations in genes responsible for supporting an abnormally long lifespan for a small animal. For example, the expected lifespan for a bird of a similar size as a parrot would be in the range of 15-20 years, whereas the blue-fronted Amazon parrot can live

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Profiling a killer in warm blood

Israeli scientists and physicians develop a new technology for profiling the unique genetic makeup of myeloma tumor cells that will allow better diagnosis and treatment.

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Parrot genome analysis reveals insights into longevity, cognition

Parrots are famously talkative, and a blue-fronted Amazon parrot named Moises — or at least its genome — is telling scientists volumes about the longevity and highly developed cognitive abilities that give parrots so much in common with humans. Perhaps someday, it will also provide clues about how parrots learn to vocalize so well.

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Industrial fisheries are starving seabirds all around the world

Industrial fisheries are starving seabirds like penguins and terns by competing for the same prey sources. Seabirds are now the most threatened bird group.

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Predicting the transmission of rare, genetically based diseases

A McGill-led research team traced the gene mutations underlying a rare genetic disease back to two European founding families who arrived in the province in the 17th century. To track these rare mutations, the researchers developed a sophisticated computational process, which took two weeks to run. They and others will now be able to trace a range of genetically based rare diseases. In future, the

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Study explains how geckos gracefully gallop on water

Geckos are amazingly agile. In addition to running across land and up trees, the animals can prance across the surface of water. A new study reveals how they do it.

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New ways to look at protein-RNA networks

For their vital tasks, all RNA molecules in our cells require proteins as binding partners. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) and colleagues from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) have developed the first method with which they can analyze the composition of the entire RNA-protein network of the cell. The new method has now been

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Putting the brakes on tumor stealth

New research undertaken at Monash University has shed new light on how some cancers are able to escape our immune system. The findings have significant implications for the burgeoning field of cancer immunotherapy, an approach that is focused on harnessing the remarkable power of our own immune system to seek out and destroy cancer.

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Scientists cut main heart disease risk locus out of DNA by genome editing

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in unveiling the major genetic risk factor for heart disease by precisely cutting the DNA culprit from the genome, which prevents blood vessel cell abnormalities related to these devastating diseases.

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Stanford researchers use zinc to target insulin-producing cells with regenerative drug

A team of Stanford University endocrinologists and chemists has taken a step toward targeting the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin more precisely, using a property that researchers have long known about but never exploited for treatment: Beta cells, the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, have a particularly strong taste for zinc.

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Acrobatic geckos, highly maneuverable on land and in the air, can also race on water

Asian geckos were observed running over water at nearly a meter per second, as fast as on land. Lab experiments at UC Berkeley show how. They get support from surface tension but also slap the water rapidly with their feet. They also semi-plane over the surface and use their tail for stabilization and propulsion. They thus sit between insects, which use only surface tension, and larger animals, wh

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'Chemo brain' caused by malfunction in three types of brain cells, Stanford study finds

In a new study explaining the cellular mechanisms behind cognitive impairment from chemotherapy, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have demonstrated that a widely used chemotherapy drug, methotrexate, causes a complex set of problems in three major cell types within the brain's white matter. The study, which will be published online Dec. 6 in Cell, also identifies a potentia

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An ancient strain of plague may have led to the decline of Neolithic Europeans

A team of researchers from France, Sweden, and Denmark have identified a new strain of Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that causes plague, in DNA extracted from 5,000-year-old human remains. Their analyses, publishing Dec. 6 in the journal Cell, suggest that this strain is the closest ever identified to the genetic origin of plague. Their work also suggests that plague may have been spread among Neo

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Watch how geckos run across water

Geckos run across water at up to almost a meter a second using a unique mix of surface tension and slapping, say researchers reporting Dec. 6 in the journal Current Biology. They found that the mouse-sized lizards are too big to float on water using only surface tension, like insects, but too small to use only foot slapping, like basilisks.

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Wild African fruit flies offer clues to their modern-day domestic life

The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is quite possibly the most studied organism on the planet. Fruit flies are also quite familiar residents in many of our kitchens, attracted as they are to the fruit bowl. But how do the flies live in the wild? Surprisingly little is known.

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Geckos sprint across water on air bubbles they make with their legs

House geckos are too big to float using surface tension, and too small to create enough force to walk across water, so they use a combination of these tricks

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Parrots are clever because their brains evolved the same way as ours

Like humans, parrots have big brains and good communication skills – now we know the DNA regulating parrot and human brain development evolved in a similar way

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Facebook grew so big that it destabilised the world. What now?

Facebook used to “move fast and break things”, but now everything is broken. Here’s what governments can do to reign in the tech giants

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There won’t be many more gene-edited babies just yet – here’s why

The news of gene-edited twins is more likely to have a chilling effect on research into the technique used than to open the floodgates to millions more edited babies

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Three Identical Strangers review: a good film about bad science

What begins as a feel-good human-interest documentary about the dance of nature and nurture will leave you feeling very angry indeed – and much better informed

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Harmful, unfounded myths about migration and health have become accepted, used to justify policies of exclusion

Stereotypes that migrants are disease carriers who present a risk to public health and are a burden on services are some of the most prevalent and harmful myths about migration. Evidence from a comprehensive new report, including new international data analysis, shows these myths to be unfounded, yet they continue to be used to deny migrants entry, restrict access to healthcare, or detain people u

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Here’s how geckos (almost) walk on water

New high-speed video reveals how geckos use a hybrid walking-swimming gait in water to reach speeds similar to those on land.

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Earliest plague strain found in Sweden holds clue to stone age migration from east

Pandemic could explain crash in European population 5,500 years ago and influx of people from Eurasian steppe An ancient strain of the plague found in a woman buried in Sweden may be the fatal signature of a devastating pandemic that swept through stone age farmers and set the stage for a massive migration into Europe from the east. Evidence for the grim scenario came to light when scientists ran

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Ancient, Unknown Strain of Plague Found in 5,000-Year-Old Tomb in Sweden

In a nearly 5,000-year-old tomb in Sweden, researchers have discovered the oldest-known strain of the notorious bacterium Yersinia pestis.

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An Ancient Case of the Plague Could Rewrite History

The troublesome teeth belonged to a woman buried in Sweden. She lived 4,900 years ago, and she died young. Archaeologists found her at the turn of the last millennium, her bones jumbled up with dozens of others in a limestone tomb. Geneticists sequenced her DNA a few years ago, revealing her to be, unsurprisingly, one of the Neolithic farmers who occupied Europe at the time. Only when scientists

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Breaking Down the 2019 Golden Globe Nominations

The Golden Globes—Hollywood’s annual Oscar-adjacent celebration of the beginning of awards season—announced their nominees Thursday morning with a predictable showering of love on films like A Star Is Born , The Favourite , Green Book , and Vice . The television nominations held a few more surprises as the members of the 90-odd Hollywood Foreign Press Association did their best to hack through th

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How Geckos Run on Water

How Geckos Run on Water Animals famous for walking up walls can also use a combination of techniques to race across water. Gecko_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: UC Berkeley Media Relations Creature Thursday, December 6, 2018 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — The flat-tailed house gecko can not only stick to walls and glide through the air, but also run on water, a new study f

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Blood test for tau, Alzheimer's disease under development

Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital are working to develop a blood test to accurately diagnose or even predict Alzheimer's disease before symptoms appear.

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Virus- and oncogene-free reprogramming method for the production of iPSCs published in the journal Regenerative Medicine

Regenerative Medicine is delighted to publish open access original research demonstrating the first virus- and oncogene-free induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to produce safer pluripotent stem cells from cord blood and peripheral blood.

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Statins overprescribed for primary prevention

Taking cholesterol-lowering drugs, or statins, as a preventive measure can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. A study by the University of Zurich now shows that this measure is recommended too often, as current guidelines fail to take into account the risks of side effects.

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An ancient strain of plague may have led to the decline of Neolithic Europeans

A team of researchers from France, Sweden, and Denmark have identified a new strain of Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that causes plague, in DNA extracted from 5,000-year-old human remains. Their analyses, publishing December 6 in the journal Cell, suggest that this strain is the closest ever identified to the genetic origin of plague. Their work also suggests that plague may have been spread among

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Researchers use zinc to target insulin-producing cells with regenerative drug

An insulin injection can manage diabetes symptoms, but actually curing the disease would mean healing cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in blood.

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Acrobatic geckos, highly maneuverable on land and in the air, can also race on water

Geckos are renowned for their acrobatic feats on land and in the air, but a new discovery that they can also run on water puts them in the superhero category, says a University of California, Berkeley, biologist.

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New ways to look at protein-RNA networks

For their vital tasks, all RNA molecules require proteins as binding partners. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) and colleagues from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) have developed the first method to analyze the composition of the entire RNA protein network of the cell. The new method has now been published in the scientific j

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Wild African fruit flies offer clues to their modern-day domestic life

The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is quite possibly the most studied organism on the planet. Fruit flies are also quite familiar residents in many of our kitchens, attracted as they are to the fruit bowl. But how do the flies live in the wild? Surprisingly little is known.

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We've been studying a glacier in Peru for 14 years – and it may reach the point of no return in the next 30

High mountain environments in South America, which in many locations encompass peaks that reach 21,000 feet (6,500 meters) or more in altitude, are home to some of the most spectacular glaciers on our planet. My research on one particular glacier shows how endangered these environments are.

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Simple steps to climate-proof farms have big potential upside for tropical farmers

Cacao farmers in Nicaragua lose their crop, the main ingredient for chocolate, to fungal blight and degrading soils. Yields drop in Vietnam's rice paddies because of higher temperatures and increased salinity. Bean and maize growers in Uganda see their plants die during severe dry spells during what should be the rainy season. The two-punch combination of climate change and poor agricultural land

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A 5,000-year-old mass grave harbors the oldest plague bacteria ever found

DNA from an ancient strain of the plague-causing bacterium could help uncover the origins of the deadly disease.

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New molecular tool identifies sugar-protein attachments

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have developed a new molecular tool they call EXoO, which decodes where on proteins specific sugars are attached—a possible modification due to disease. The study, published in issue 14 of Molecular Systems Biology, describes the development of the tool and its successful use on human blood, tumors and immune cells.

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New approach helps mitigating the effect of climate change on sea turtles

New research has reported effective conservation strategies that can mitigate the impacts of climate warming on sea turtle nesting success.

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The vast majority of people fib to the doctor. Why?

Between 60 and 80 percent of people surveyed have not been forthcoming with their doctors about information that could be relevant to their health, according to a new study. Besides fibbing about diet and exercise, more than a third of respondents didn’t speak up when they disagreed with their doctor’s recommendation. Another common scenario was failing to admit they didn’t understand their clini

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The web really isn't worldwide: Every country has different access

What the internet looks like to users in the U.S. can be quite different from the online experience of people in other countries. Some of those variations are due to government censorship of online services, which is a significant threat to internet freedom worldwide. But private companies – many based in the U.S. – are also building obstacles to users from around the world who want to freely expl

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Sails make a comeback as shipping tries to go green

As the shipping industry faces pressure to cut climate-altering greenhouse gases, one answer is blowing in the wind.

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Researchers discover information about a gene that helps define us as humans

University of Otago researchers have discovered information about a gene that sets primates—great apes and humans—apart from other mammals, through the study of a rare developmental brain disorder.

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A lesson on looking | Amy Herman

Are you looking closely? Visual educator Amy Herman explains how to use art to enhance your powers of perception and find connections where they may not be apparent. Learn the techniques Herman uses to train Navy SEALs, doctors and crime scene investigators to convert observable details into actionable knowledge with this insightful talk.

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More belt-tightening at VW to fund electric new start

German car giant Volkswagen said Thursday it is looking for three billion euros ($3.8 billion) in new savings to help fund its pivot towards electric vehicles, adding that it could not rule out job cuts.

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Video: Why Antarctic fish don't freeze to death

The notothenioid fishes that inhabit the Antarctic Ocean have evolved an unusual adaptation to living in icy waters.

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Regular bedtimes and sufficient sleep for children may lead to healthier teens

Having a regular, age-appropriate bedtime and getting sufficient sleep from early childhood may be important for healthy body weight in adolescence, according to researchers at Penn State.

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AMNOG as a learning system: New study on ingenol mebutate in AK shows added benefit

Following a negative G-BA decision due to a lack of data in 2013, the drug manufacturer now presented a suitable, albeit very short study.

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Liquid biopsies in SOLAR-1 trial predict benefit of Alpelisib in PIK3CA-mutant breast cancer

Liquid biopsy-based assessment of PIK3CA mutational status served as a better indicator of progression-free survival compared with analysis of tissue biopsy in breast cancer patients enrolled in the phase III clinical trial SOLAR-1, according to data presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Business this week

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Agricultural waste drives us closer to greener transport

Composite materials made from agricultural waste could be used to produce sustainable, lightweight and low-cost applications in the automotive and marine industries.

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Australia passes cyber snooping laws with global implications

Australia Thursday passed controversial laws allowing spies and police to snoop on the encrypted communications of suspected terrorists and criminals, as experts warned the "unprecedented powers" had far-reaching implications for global cybersecurity.

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Capturing spray from flash-boiling liquid jets

Ultrafast video capture of droplet cloud formation should help minimize the risk of gas-leak explosions.

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Electrifying transportation in Trikala, Greece

An EU project will deploy 10 new light electric vehicles in smart city Trikala to show citizens the benefits of driving three- and four-wheel electric vehicles in urban areas.

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How molecular partners form dynamic scaffolding for protein machinery

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have mapped key details of how molecular partners regulate assembly of protein-making factories called ribosomes.

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Slut med at gange karaktersnittet med 1,08

Alle Folketingets partier står bag aftale, som fjerner karakterbonus for hurtig studiestarter og giver tid til en pause mellem bachelor- og kandidat. Målet er at skabe et mere fleksibelt uddannelsessystemet, lyder det fra uddannelses- og forskningsministeren.

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Elevated hormone flags liver problems in mice with methylmalonic acidemia

NHGRI researchers have discovered a hormone in a mouse study that can be used immediately to can help doctors predict how severely patients with the rare disease methylmalonic acidemia are affected and when to refer them for liver transplants. The findings, published December 6 in JCI Insight, also might shed light on more common disorders such as fatty liver disease, obesity and diabetes.

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New model for assessing the effect of ionizing radiation on microelectronic devices

The main trend in the development of hardware components for digital and analog electronic equipment is to reduce the size of the active regions of diode and transistor structures. This can be achieved by improving the performance characteristics of micro- and nanoelectronics devices (increasing their speed and memory, increasing operating frequencies and power, noise reduction, etc.) while keepin

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Lymph node ratio may predict who lives and dies from oral cavity cancer

Patients with lymph node ratio greater than 10 percent had about 2.5 times greater risk of cancer recurrence and 2.7 times greater risk of death than patients with LNR below 10 percent.

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Scientists found new giant dinosaur

Paleontologists from Russia have described a new dinosaur, the Volgatitan. Seven of its vertebrae, which had remained in the ground for about 130 million years, were found on the banks of the Volga, not far from the village of Slantsevy Rudnik, five kilometers from Ulyanovsk. The study has been published in the latest issue of Biological Communications.

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Drawing is better than writing for memory retention

Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that even if people weren't good at it, drawing, as a method to help retain new information, was better than re-writing notes, visualization exercises or passively looking at images.

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Radiation therapy's pivotal role in treating breast cancer featured at SABCS 2018

This year's San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) features a record number of radiation oncology trials among its oral presentations. Today's General Session 4 (3:15-5:00 p.m. CT in Hall 3) will showcase five major studies designed to improve outcomes for the majority of breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy to cure and/or provide relief from the disease.

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PET scans to optimize tuberculosis meningitis treatments and personalize care, study finds

Although relatively rare in the United States, and accounting for fewer than 5 percent of tuberculosis cases worldwide, TB of the brain — or tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) — is often deadly, always hard to treat, and a particular threat to young children.

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Missing the forest for the trees: An unexpected picture of New York City forests

An inventory of New York City's expansive yet overlooked 'forested natural areas' reveals that, contrary to previous reports, native species still comprise about 82 percent of the city's forest stands. In the forests' mid- and understory, however, the proportion of native species fell significantly, suggesting that their dominance could decline in coming decades.

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Convictions for drug-driving quashed in forensics lab inquiry

Total of 41 cases overturned and further 50 investigations dropped after Randox lab data ‘manipulation’ The criminal convictions of 41 people have been quashed following an investigation into alleged data tampering at a forensics lab, the National Police Chiefs’ Council has said. The NPCC’s forensics lead, chief constable James Vaughan, said the 41 convictions or guilty pleas, all relating to dru

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Transforming our food system to ensure a sustainable future

By 2050, the world will have almost 10 billion people. It will be impossible to feed everyone without exacerbating poverty, accelerating deforestation and increasing GHG emissions unless we start making substantial changes to our food system now. This issue is covered in a new report, Creating a Sustainable Food Future , published on 5 December in the World Resources Report series. The report was

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Smart trains with no driver

Everyone's talking about autonomous cars, wondering if they'll soon be whizzing along our roads. This hype surprises me, because many vehicles in other transport systems have been moving about driverless for years, or even decades. In industrial environments and harbours, automated transport systems have been in place for over 60 years. And most of the metros are highly automated. These systems ju

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Survey reveals bovine TB in a fifth of roadkill badgers in Cheshire

The first study to test for bovine tuberculosis in badgers on the edge of the cattle TB epidemic in England, has shown that one in five badgers tested positive for the disease.

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Friendly electromagnetic pulse improves survival for electronics

An electromagnetic pulse, or EMP, emitted by a nuclear weapon exploded high above the United States could disable the electronic circuits of many devices vital to military defense and modern living.

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Double the stress slows down evolution

Like other organisms, bacteria constantly have to fight to survive in hostile living conditions. Together with colleagues in Finland, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön have discovered that bacteria adapt to their environment more slowly and less efficiently as soon as they are exposed to two stress factors rather than one. This is due to mutations in differen

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On the age of computation in the epoch of humankind

In a white paper, Christoph Rosol, Benjamin Steininger, Jürgen Renn and Robert Schlögl outline the significance of digitalization in the Anthropocene and outline the background and goals of the new research field of geoanthropology. The researchers aim to analyse global change in a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach of natural sciences, humanities and technology, developing perspectives for

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Is China's social credit system really the dystopian sci-fi scenario that many fear?

British journalist James O'Malley was on the Beijing-Shanghai bullet train last month when he heard a disturbing announcement.

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Research finds that now is the time to protect Western Australia's tall forests

South-western Australia's tall karri forests require a new management approach for their conservation based on a changed moral consensus in the community, a new Curtin University study has found.

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Why Black Hole Interiors Grow (Almost) Forever

Leonard Susskind , a pioneer of string theory , the holographic principle and other big physics ideas spanning the past half-century, has proposed a solution to an important puzzle about black holes . The problem is that even though these mysterious, invisible spheres appear to stay a constant size as viewed from the outside, their interiors keep growing in volume essentially forever. How is this

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Alaskan forests show resilience in face of climate change

On a mission to explore the fate of the yellow cedar tree in Southeast Alaska, Stanford University doctoral student Lauren Oakes discovered a surprise: the resiliency of forgotten forests that recovered from years of climate change impacts. In her new book, In Search of the Canary Tree (Basic Books, 2018), Oakes shares the stories of hope she found in Alaska: communities coming together, species

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Keeping up with Moore's Law

These days, Moore's Law is not so much a scientific law as an aspiration. The notion that there is a doubling every year of the number of components that can be squeezed on to the same area of integrated circuitry was first observed in the mid-1960s by Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and Intel. Ever since the microelectronics industry has strived to Moore's Law although in

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Space weather 'piggyback'

The first ESA-funded space weather monitoring instrument was launched on 4 December 2018, hitching a ride on South Korea's new geostationary satellite, GEO-KOMPSAT-2A – the Geostationary Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-2A.

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Neighborhood support boosts middle school grades

What happens at home isn’t the only factor that can influence academic performance in middle school for African-American young people—their neighborhood experiences also matter, according to new research. The study suggests a complex relationship between neighborhood social dynamics and changes in grade point average during middle school. For instance, teens who live in the most “positive” neighb

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Missing the forest for the trees: An unexpected picture of New York City forests

In recent years, most efforts to expand New York City's tree canopy—and thus strengthen the urban environment—have focused on planting new street trees or replacing non-native species with native trees in the city's remaining forests. Yet citywide assessments have found that non-native trees have come to co-dominate the city landscape, calling into question these management strategies and the very

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Nyt projekt skal skabe plast med CO2

DTU og Siemens skal forsøge at føre produktionen af ethylen via CO2-elektrolyse ud af laboratoriet og ind i industrien i nyt projekt. Nu går jagten ind på en katalysator, som muliggør det.

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Transforming our food system to ensure a sustainable future

By 2050, the world will have almost 10 billion people. It will be impossible to feed everyone without exacerbating poverty, accelerating deforestation and increasing GHG emissions unless we start making substantial changes to our food system now. This issue is covered in a new report, Creating a Sustainable Food Future, published on Dec. 5 in the World Resources Report series. The report was produ

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‘Law of light absorption’ solves sooty climate mystery

Researchers have a new way to describe soot’s ability to absorb light: the law of light absorption. With it, scientists will be able to better understand soot’s role in climate change. Soot belches out of diesel engines, rises from wood- and dung-burning cookstoves, and shoots out of oil refinery stacks. According to previous research , air pollution, including soot, is linked to heart disease, s

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An app for operating a self-driving car

The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) and IT Engineering, a Korean electric vehicle producer, have jointly developed a smartphone software package for calling and moving a self-driving car with voice recognition.

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Six router settings you should change right now

DIY Protect your device from vulnerabilities. Your router is full of features that make it easier to use, but these same features often make it less secure. Here are the settings you should change right now.

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Remarkably preserved fossil sea reptile reveals skin that is still soft

The remains of an 180 million-year-old ichthyosaur (literally 'fish-lizard') have been analysed, and the fossil is so well-preserved that its soft-tissues retain some of their original pliability. The study, published in Nature, contributes to our understanding on how convergent evolution works, and shows that ichthyosaurs adapted to marine conditions in a way that is remarkably similar to that of

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Alterations in brain networks explain why some children are resilient to maltreatment

People who experience childhood maltreatment frequently have perturbations in their brain architecture, regardless of whether they develop psychiatric symptoms, but a study in Biological Psychiatry found additional alterations in people who don't develop symptoms.

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Researchers investigate why older people read more slowly

One of the most obvious changes that comes with ageing is that people start doing things more slowly. Numerous studies have shown that ageing also affects language processing. Even neurologically healthy people speak, retrieve words and read more slowly as they get older. But is this slowdown inevitable? Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have been working to answer this question in t

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Agricultural waste drives us closer to greener transport

Composite materials made from agricultural waste could be used to produce sustainable, lightweight and low-cost applications in the automotive and marine industries.

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Fighting smog supports solar power

Model calculations by ETH researchers show that if China fought smog more aggressively, it could massively increase solar power production.

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Glutamate receptor affects the development of brain cells after birth

It had been previously assumed that this protein is only relevant in adults. But this is not the case.

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New approach helps mitigating the effect of climate change on sea turtles

New research has reported effective conservation strategies that can mitigate the impacts of climate warming on sea turtle nesting success.

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Why Tehran is sinking dangerously

Researchers from the Remote Sensing Section of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam used data from radar satellites to measure the subsidence of the Earth's surface in the Tehran region in Iran. They found out that between 2003 and 2017 three areas sank there with rates of sometimes more than 25 centimetres per year, and several meters in total. For the first time, this study

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'Hangxiety' higher in shy people

Very shy people are more likely to suffer 'hangxiety' — anxiety during a hangover — than their extrovert friends, new research shows.

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Interactive size control of catalyst nanoparticles

5, 10, or maybe 15? How many nanometers should nanoparticles of a catalyst be to optimize the course of the reaction? Researchers usually look for the answer by laborious, repetitive tests. At the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, a qualitatively new technique was developed to improve the process of such optimization in microfluidic systems. The size of t

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Acute heart failure patients with 'metabolically healthy obesity' have better survival

Acute heart failure patients with 'metabolically healthy obesity' have better survival than those with 'metabolically unhealthy obesity' or with normal weight regardless of metabolic status, according to a study presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2018. Obese patients had less deterioration in heart structure and function.

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Otago researchers discover information about a gene that helps define us as humans

University of Otago researchers have discovered information about a gene that sets primates — great apes and humans — apart from other mammals, through the study of a rare developmental brain disorder.

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Carbon emissions will reach 37 billion tonnes in 2018, a record high

Carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions from fossil fuels and industry are projected to rise more than 2% (range 1.8% to 3.7%) in 2018, taking global fossil CO₂ emissions to a new record high of 37.1 billion tonnes.

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Ni vil være regionsdirektør i Midtjylland

Region MIdtjylland har modtaget ni ansøgninger til stillingen som regionens nye direktør.

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Kirurgerne på Aarhus Universitetshospital udliciteres til andre hospitaler

Nedsat operationskapacitet på Aarhus Universitetshospital betyder, at kirurger sendes til andre hospitaler for at operere.

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Helt afgørende at værne om psykiatriske patienters rettigheder

Der skal ro til på det psykiatriske område, så det store rekrutteringsarbejde gennem mange år ikke bliver sat år tilbage på grund af det nuværende forslag om ulighed i sundhed, forsøg på at opildne til fagkamp og usikkerhed omkring arbejdsopgaver og ansvar.

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A parent's holiday shopping list to INSPIRE your wannabe astronaut or aerospace engineer

Are you shopping for a child who dreams of being an astronaut or visiting outer space?

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A new molecular player involved in T cell activation

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have imaged live T cells to reveal the role of CLIP-170 in T-cell activation, a critical process in the immune response.

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New molecular tool identifies sugar-protein attachments

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have developed a new molecular tool they call EXoO, which decodes where on proteins specific sugars are attached — a possible modification due to disease. The study, published in issue 14 of Molecular Systems Biology, describes the development of the tool and its successful use on human blood, tumors and immune cells.

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Subtype of immune B cells can delay type 1 diabetes onset in mice

A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Michigan Medical School reports that a subset of immune B cells, known as CD19+IgM+ B cells, can delay the onset of type 1 diabetes in a mouse model of the condition.

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Atmospheric scientists find causes of firenado in deadly Carr Fire

Atmospheric scientist Neil Lareau at the University of Nevada, Reno has authored a paper in the scientific journal Geophysical Research Letters documenting the rare firenado, finding a number of factors that combined at just the right time and place to catalyze the deadly Carr Fire in Northern California. These observations may help forecasters and scientists identify — and potentially warn – for

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NUS engineers invent groundbreaking spin-based memory device

A team of international researchers led by engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have invented a new magnetic device which is able to manipulate digital information 20 times more efficiently and with 10 times more stability than commercial spintronic digital memories. The novel spintronic memory device employs ferrimagnets and was developed in collaboration with researchers fro

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Tailoring the nonlinearity with time domain metasurface for wireless communication

High-efficiency harmonic conversion has been a crucial problem in microwave and optical frequencies. The current harmonic generation techniques usually suffer from drawbacks of low efficiency or small-power harmonic output, which poses great challenges for engineering applications, such as the mobile communication. Scientists in China discover a new route to realize harmonic manipulations with hig

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Ocean Health Index releases seventh annual assessment of global ocean health

Today the Ocean Health Index (OHI) released its seventh assessment of global ocean health. Like the previous two years, the 2018 average score for our oceans was 70 out of 100. This highlights that ocean health is remaining relatively stable, but improvements are still needed to achieve a sustainable future.

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Record levels of mercury released by thawing permafrost in Canadian Arctic

Permafrost thaw slumps in the western Canadian Arctic are releasing record amounts of mercury into waterways, according to new research by University of Alberta ecologists.

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The Apple Watch ECG feature is now here. This is what you need to know.

Technology The tech could be life-saving, complicating, or both. We tried out the new ECG feature on the latest Apple Watch.

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Widespread decrease in wind energy resources found over the Northern Hemisphere

As climate change is becoming a greater matter of concern, efforts on mitigation are being undertaken by the world community. Developing clean and renewable energy is a major component of those efforts for its significant contribution to reducing carbon emission to the atmosphere compared with fossil fuel. In 2016, renewable energy contributed more than 19 percent to global energy consumption. Of

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Here's why data breaches like the one at Marriott are 'treasure troves for spammers'

The massive data breach revealed by Marriott International sheds light on what hackers often do with the personal data they steal, said Long Lu, a cybersecurity expert at Northeastern. Hackers, he said, frequently sell people's names, email addresses, and other personal information to spammers who, in turn, use it steal people's identities or trick people into installing harmful software or buying

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LIGO supercomputer upgrade will speed up groundbreaking astrophysics research

In 2016, an international team of scientists found definitive evidence—tiny ripples in space known as gravitational waves—to support one of the last remaining untested predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity. The team used the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), which has since made several gravitational wave discoveries. Each discovery was possible in part b

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Can space help us understand our cells?

Do astronauts' brains get bigger in space? The answer may be found in 10 small containers of human brain cells on board a SpaceX spacecraft that is scheduled for blast off Dec. 5 for a 16-month voyage to the International Space Station as part of joint project between UCLA and the NASA Ames Research Center.

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Madagascar: fear and violence making rainforest conservation more challenging than ever

People are too afraid to return to the village so they are sleeping in the forest or have left altogether. They have lost their stored grain and all their belongings. I don't know how they will get by.

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New drug ‘building block’ won’t damage your liver

Researchers have developed a safer building block for the development of new medicines. When you reach for a bottle of acetaminophen, you may be looking for relief from a headache. But if you take more than the recommended amount, the drug can damage your liver. That’s because when a component of the drug—a substructure referred to as an aniline—breaks down in the liver, it can produce toxic meta

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Apple Watch: How to Take an ECG Reading

Starting today, the Apple Watch series 3 and 4 gain the ability to take an ECG reading of your heart. Here's how to get the most accurate reading.

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The Good Place’s Janet Is the Most Optimistic AI on Television

Janet isn’t your typical televised artificial lifeform: Nobody hates her and she isn’t miserable, even as she moves towards independence.

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UPS Is Testing Delivery Tricycles in Traffic-Choked Seattle

More than a century after it started delivering telegrams by bike, UPS is going back to pedal power in its hometown.

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Hybrid prevalence estimation: Method to improve intervention coverage estimations

LSTM's Professor Joseph Valadez is senior author on a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which outlines proposals for a more accurate estimator of health data.

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Obesity intervention needed before pregnancy

New research from the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute supports the need for dietary and lifestyle interventions before overweight and obese women become pregnant.

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Mom, I can't recognize your face from profile view!

Babies recognize faces from profile view in the second half of the first year of life.

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Scientists discover possible mantle mineral

Whhat mineral hosts Fe 3+ had remained a secret. Now scientists have a possible answer: Maohokite, a newly discovered high-pressure mineral. It may be what composes the Earth's lower mantle along with Bridgmanite MgSiO 3 and magnesiowüstite MgO.

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Newly identified T cells could play a role in cancer and other diseases

Researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology have identified a new type of T cell called a phospholipid-reactive T cell that is able to recognize phospholipids, the molecules that help form cells' outer membranes.The scientists also discovered that phospholipids compete with glycolipids, another type of molecule that helps form cells' oute

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Expert: 'No single, one-size-fits-all solution' to plastic waste problem

Governments, businesses and people around the world must play major roles in managing the rapidly growing plastics economy and the waste it produces, according to an expert in the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

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Blast off for first UK-led experiment on the International Space Station

UK-led research is taking place on the International Space Station (ISS) for the first time, following a successful launch from Kennedy Space Centre at Cape Canaveral in the US.

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Researchers find a way to peel slimy biofilms like old stickers

Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers at Princeton have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.

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5G network to improve road safety

Next-generation mobile network and fast data transmission solutions can be used to collect a huge amount of data on vehicles on the road. The information can be used, for example, to provide road weather services, carry out road maintenance and control self-driving cars. Ultimately the aim is to reduce accidents.

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The medieval mystery of the booted man in the mud

A mysterious male skeleton, lying face-down deep in the Thames mud, with a pair of in-situ thigh-high leather boots has been discovered by our archaeologists working on one of the sites being used to build London's super sewer in Bermondsey.

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Scientists rule out imminent sun induced cooling of climate

The sun's activity influences environmental conditions in space adversely affecting satellites and space-based technologies such as telecommunications and navigational networks. The sun is also the primary natural source of energy for the Earth's climate. The sun's activity level changes but predicting these changes has been challenging. Now a team of two scientists from the Center of Excellence i

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What is on the horizon for global carbon emissions?

On Dec. 5, the Global Carbon Project published the Global Carbon Budget 2018, giving world leaders access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain was among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the report. Jain talked about the carbon budget and this year's findings with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Y

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Improving hydropower through long-range drought forecasts

Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) have developed a complex hydrological model for forecasting dry spells lasting several weeks with high spatial resolution. These predictions make it possible, for example, to operate hydropower plants more profitably.

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Ny professor forsker i sammenhængen mellem anabole steroider og hjertesygdom

Caroline Kistorp er ny professor i endokrinologi. Hun skal bl.a. forske i anabole steroiders påvirkning på hjertesygdomme og forebyggende behandling i endokrinologien.

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Accelerated PBI close but not equivalent to WBI to control ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence

Data from the NRG (NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413) trial indicated that ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates 10 years after treatment could not reject the hypothesis that accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy was inferior to whole breast irradiation (WBI), according to a presentation at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

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Axillary RT and lymph node surgery yielded comparable outcomes for patients with breast cancer

Patients with early-stage breast cancer who had cancer detected in a sentinel lymph node biopsy had comparable 10-year recurrence and survival rates following either axillary radiotherapy or axillary lymph node dissection, according to data from the randomized, phase III AMAROS clinical trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

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Low-dose tamoxifen reduced recurrence and new disease for patients with DCIS, LCIS, and ADH

Treatment with a low dose of tamoxifen (5 mg per day) halved the risk of disease recurrence and new disease for women who had been treated with surgery following a diagnosis of breast intraepithelial neoplasia compared with placebo, and it did not cause more serious adverse events, according to data from the randomized, phase III TAM-01 clinical trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cance

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Circulating tumor cell count could help choose treatment for metastatic breast cancer patients

Circulating tumor-cell (CTC) count could be used to choose hormone therapy or chemotherapy as frontline treatment for patients with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), HER2-negative (HER2-) metastatic breast cancer, according to data from the phase III STIC CTC clinical trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. In the case of discrepancy between CTC count-based treatment choic

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Doctors say electronic health records up burnout risk

Electronic health records improve communication and access to patient data, but stress associated with using them can lead to doctor burnout, research suggests. The stress comes from having too little time for documentation, time spent at home managing records, and EHR user interfaces that aren’t intuitive, a new study shows. “You don’t want your doctor to be burned out or frustrated by the techn

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Anti-parasite protein could put the brakes on emphysema

A protein the immune system generates to fight intestinal worms could slow emphysema’s progression, a new study finds. Past studies have shown that harmful inflammation associated with activated immune cells contributes to emphysema, a chronic lung disease that causes shortness of breath. Currently, there is no cure, but there are treatments to manage the disease. The study suggests that the prot

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Synlighed om løn giver større ligeløn

Ny forskning viser, at kønsopdelte lønstatistikker virker.

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Hidden koala blood parasites offer new clue for their illness

A new test for detecting multiple parasites in koalas has been developed by a Perth veterinarian and post-doctoral scientist.

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Looking past the hype about 'trackless trams'

The optically guided bus is the latest in a long line of initiatives to repackage the bus as premium rail-derived technology. The name "trackless trams", the vehicle design, and the modest deployment costs all have broad appeal. The concept has gained traction in Australia, with prominent advocates including Professor Peter Newman.

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Protecting our digital heritage in the age of cyber threats

One of the key functions of the government is to collect and archive national records. This includes everything from property records and registers of births, deaths and taxes, to Parliamentary proceedings, and even the ABC's digital library of Australian news and entertainment.

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Researchers propose a new theory to explain iron-oxide concretions found in Utah and Mongolia

A team of researchers from Japan, Mongolia and the U.K. has developed a new theory to explain the origin of iron-oxide concretions (hard, solid masses) found in Utah and Mongolia. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their theory and how well it tested.

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Artificial synapses made from nanowires

Scientists from Jülich together with colleagues from Aachen and Turin have produced a memristive element made from nanowires that functions in much the same way as a biological nerve cell. The component is able to save and process information, as well as receive numerous signals in parallel. The resistive switching cell made from oxide crystal nanowires is thus an ideal candidate for use in buildi

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3-D printing eliminates undesirable trait in conventional superalloys

An undesirable trait found in traditionally processed superalloys does not exist in a 3-D-printed, nickel-based superalloy, according to a team of materials scientists who think this could lead to new manufacturing techniques that allow for alloys with tailored properties.

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Jules Verne møder Star Wars i kampen om en kvantesyg verden

Kvantevåben, larvefødder og ingeniør-foragt mødes i filmen ‘Mortal Engines’, der har premiere torsdag. En Peter Jackson-film, hvor teknik fra 1800-tallet får fremtidskræfter.

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Simple steps to climate-proof farms have big potential upside for tropical farmers

Climate-smart agriculture boosts yields, mitigates extreme weather impact and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. A study by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture in Central America, Africa and Asia points to profitable opportunities for farmers and the environment.

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Performance on exercise test predicts risk of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer

Performance on an exercise test predicts the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other causes, reports a study presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2018. Good performance on the test equates to climbing three floors of stairs very fast, or four floors fast, without stopping. The findings underline the importance of fitness for longevity.

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Evolution of the inner ear: Insights from jawless fish

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics (BDR) and collaborators have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear. Published in the journal Nature, the study provides a new story for inner ear evolution that began with the last common ancestor of modern vertebrates.

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New insights in rust resistance in wheat

For more than 20 years, a large international group of researchers, including from Aarhus University, has worked purposefully to investigate a gene that protects wheat against yellow rust. Yellow rust is a widespread and serious fungal disease that causes many losses in wheat globally. The researchers' new knowledge is an important piece in the jigsaw regarding the development of new cultivars of

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Fighting smog supports solar power

Model calculations by ETH researchers show that if China fought smog more aggressively, it could massively increase solar power production.

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Dutch research team involved in first landing on the far side of the moon

The Chinese space agency will be launching the Chang'e 4 moon lander on Friday 7 December, hoping to make China the first country to land on the far side of the moon. Dutch astronomers are also looking forward to the launch as they are collaborating with Chinese scientists on this mission. A satellite containing a Dutch radio instrument has already been launched to the far side of the moon, ready

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Chemists find way to prevent side effects from malaria medication

The antimalarial drug Mefloquine, branded as Lariam and used by many travellers to tropical countries, is a substance with two different forms of molecule. One form contains the active substance, but the other form causes unpleasant side effects. Until now, it was difficult to separate these two forms in the production process. But chemists from Radboud University have now published the answer in

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Getting a grip on space weather

An international group of scientists has developed a new method for analyzing the sun's energy outbursts, which can help better understand and predict extreme space weather phenomena that directly affect the operation of engineering systems in space and on Earth. The results of their study were published in the Astrophysical Journal.

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New study upends timeline of Iroquoian history

New research by an international team raises questions about the timing and nature of early interactions between indigenous people and Europeans in North America.

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Student engineers an interaction between two qubits using photons

In the world of quantum computing, interaction is everything.

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Researchers identify enzyme responsible for helping cancer tumors spread

Researchers at the University of Missouri have unraveled how a cancer-critical enzyme is positioned on cell surfaces. The enzyme enables tumor cells to tunnel through collagen, creating a convenient path for tumors to spread cancer throughout the body. This breakthrough is an important step toward the development of pharmaceuticals that can prevent and treat the spreading of cancers in the body.

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Arctic ice model upgrade to benefit polar research, industry and military

An update for an internationally vital sea-ice computer model developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory with several collaborating groups, called CICE version 6.0, is being released this week, a timely tool that supports more accurate forecasting of ice occurrence and global climate modeling.

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Location data as an 'identifier' of personal data

A recent doctoral dissertation in legal studies reveals alarming news regarding the vulnerability of location and location data on mobile devices, and while using the internet and location-based services (LBSs) in those devices.

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The gene-edited Chinese twins represent a multi-generational ethical quandary

Science It’s time to talk about informed consent. The shocking story of the CRISPR babies—or maybies, as no outside scientists have yet confirmed their gene-edited status—has been out in the world for almost two weeks…

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How Climate Change Is Challenging American Health Care

C limate change can seem almost too big to fathom. Reports such as the recent National Climate Assessment and the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s recent release have made waves by portraying the dire threats of a warming world, making the case that the fundamental fabric of humanity will be degraded without immediate action. But the scenarios—the biblical floods and dro

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Falcon 9 rocket guides itself to sea

The rocket had a hydraulic problem on its way back to Earth.

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15 Awesome Gift Ideas for New Parents and Babies

From a poppable pacifier to a monitor that teaches a newborn to sleep, here are 15 gifts to make this amazing job just a little easier, whether you're shopping for the holidays, or a baby shower.

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COP24: The Global Climate Summit Surrounded by All Things Coal

This week's climate talks in Katowice, Poland, are taking place in a region that is not at all prepared to quit its coal addiction.

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Image of the Day: Tiny Vandals

Researchers nab the microbial culprits eating away at a 17th century painting.

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Is the U.S. Lagging in the Quest for Quantum Computing?

U.S. government funding is needed to sustain the arduous journey toward a practical quantum computer, experts say — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Astronomers Think They've Figured Out the Raging Swirls of Gas Around Supermassive Black Holes

Churning, hellish, hot-cold gas storms swirl around our universe's supermassive black holes. But the scientists involved in discovering them would prefer you call them "fountains."

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Seeing the light: Researchers offer solution for efficiency problem of artificial photosynthesis

Hydrogen-powered electronics, travel, and more may be a step closer thanks to the work of a collaborative team of scientists in Japan. The researchers have developed an efficient method to produce a key component needed to convert solar energy and water into hydrogen fuel, a process called photoelectrochemical water splitting. They published their results in October in Applied Energy Materials, a

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Researchers examine competing states in high-temperature superconductors

High-temperature superconductors can transport electrical energy without resistance. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have carried out high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering and have found that high uniaxial pressure induces a long-range charge order competing with superconductivity. Their study opens up new insights into the behavior of correlated electrons. The study is

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Molecular adlayer produced by dissolving water-insoluble nanographene in water

Even though nanographene is insoluble in water and organic solvents, Kumamoto University (KU) and Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) researchers have found a way to dissolve it in water. Using "molecular containers" that encapsulate water-insoluble molecules, the researchers developed a formation procedure for a nanographene adlayer that chemically interacts with the underlying substance,

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Multifunctional dream ceramic matrix composites are born

Researchers at Osaka University have produced composites consisting of alumina (AI2O3) ceramics and titanium (Ti), namely AI2O3/Ti composites. They designed a percolation structure for forming a continuous conduction pathway by dispersing fine-sized Ti particles into an AI2O3 matrix, optimizing the particle size of metallic Ti powder and sintering processes. They improved fracture toughness and el

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Copernicus Sentinel-5P ozone boosts daily forecasts

Measurements of atmospheric ozone from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite are now being used in daily forecasts of air quality.

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Bizarre 'dark fluid' with negative mass could dominate the universe

It's embarrassing, but astrophysicists are the first to admit it. Our best theoretical model can only explain 5% of the universe. The remaining 95% is famously made up almost entirely of invisible, unknown material dubbed dark energy and dark matter. So even though there are a billion trillion stars in the observable universe, they are actually extremely rare.

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Report finds discrimination driving disparities in food insecurity

Lifetime experiences of racial and ethnic discrimination are strongly linked to food insecurity in Philadelphia, says a new series of reports released today from researchers at Drexel University's Center for Hunger Free Communities in the Dornsife School of Public Health.

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Survey finds daughters can thrive in tech even without tech savvy parents

As part Computer Science Education Week and the Hour of Code activities planned for this week, TechGirlz shared findings from a new survey of its program participants and their parents. Conducted in partnership with Drexel University's LeBow College of Business, this marks the first time a survey has matched responses from girls and their parents in order to gain a deeper understanding of the role

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Min studentikose arbejdsmetode er blevet ophøjet til golden standard

Kvalitetsarbejde er vigtigt, men journaler og epikriser er blevet til endeløse sikkerhedsfraser. Jeg er ikke i tvivl om, at alt står i teksten, problemet er, at intet kan findes. Hvad blev der af den nordiske minimalisme?

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This Company Wants to Use the Blockchain to Stop Phishing

MetaCert has classified 10 billion URLs as either safe, a suspected source of phishes, or unknown.

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Facebook's Dirty Tricks Are Nothing New for Tech

Big tech companies have a history of discrediting critics, forging alliances with adversaries, and deflecting scrutiny to competitors.

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The Promise—and Heartbreak—of Cancer Genomics

We live in a liminal age of cancer and precision medicine: Despite all the advances science has made, we still know very little and often can do less.

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BedJet V2 Review: Comfortable and Effective Climate Control for Beds

The BedJet under-the-covers climate-control heater system is more than just a bunch of hot air.

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We don’t need stars to navigate space – black holes work way better

If you want to find your way across the universe, forget using stars or GPS. The light from quasars billions of light years away can guide us and even help here on Earth

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A Common Virus May Be Linked to Heart Problems in Fetuses

A common virus that typically causes only mild symptoms in adults might lead to heart defects in developing human fetuses

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What Do Americans Think about Food Additives and GMOs?

About half think they’re unhealthy; the other half aren’t especially concerned — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bikini-krop og vinterdunk: Sådan holder Danmarks mindste hval varmen

Modsat mange andre pattedyr har marsvinet det samme høje stofskifte hele året, men tager kraftigt på op til vinter og går på slankekur i foråret.

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There’s Finally a Persuasive Case of Election Fraud, and Republicans Don’t Care

One early sign that something about McCrae Dowless wasn’t on the up-and-up came in November 2016. With the race between North Carolina Republican Governor Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper down to a razor-thin margin , Republicans filed claims of voter fraud with county boards of election around the state. The GOP was aiming to delegitimize Cooper’s lead and to legitimize years of effort to ove

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Freshwater Is Getting Saltier, Threatening People and Wildlife

Road de-icing, industrial activity and other culprits are pushing salt levels in rivers and streams to alarming levels — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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25 cm om året: Teheran synker med voldsom fart

Kraftig befolkningsvækst, tørke og udtømning af grundvandsmagasiner har forværret problemet.

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Nye afsløringer: Facebook gav data om brugernes venner til udvalgte selskaber

Facebook 'whitelistede' bestemte selskaber., der fik udleveret data om Facebook-brugeres venner, tilsyneladende uden tilladelse.

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Konsulentbistand for 2,3 millioner fangede ikke eklatante budgetfejl i Ringsted

Opsigtsvækkende fejl i budgettet førte til, at ombygningen af Ringsted Station blev fordyret med 118 procent, selv om myndighederne købte konsulentbistand fra tre forskellige virksomheder.

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Hormones help endangered frogs get in the mood to mate in world-first program

In a world first, reproductive biologists at the University of Wollongong (UOW) have successfully applied hormones topically to the abdomens of northern corroboree frogs to get breeding pairs of the critically endangered frog "in the mood" to mate.

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How hands-on learning fires up your brain

Learning is a mental and physical pursuit, says retired astronaut Leland Melvin. Recalling his childhood, Melvin explains how working with his dad to turn a $500 bread truck into a family RV camper ultimately made him a better astronaut, able to maneuver the $2-billion dollar Columbus Laboratory out of the payload bay of a shuttle and attach it to the International Space Station. Experiential lea

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Pushing Back the Darkness in Pittsburgh

I was walking somewhere I was afraid to go, even though I had been there many times before. But I had not been to a religious service at the Tree of Life synagogue—where my husband is the rabbi of New Light Congregation—in more than 30 days, since a shooter killed 11 people in that spot. Though it was not quite 6 o’clock on Sunday evening, the first night of Hanukkah, the winter darkness envelope

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Is Joe Biden Running for President? He Can't Decide.

Watery eyes, clenched chins, insistent grips of his arm: They don’t just think Joe Biden should run for president, or just want him to. They tell him he has to. It’s hard for him to tell them no. It’s hard for him to tell himself no. Already, the timeline Biden had set appears to be shifting. He said he would decide by the beginning of 2019, but now people around him note that he, like everyone e

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The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Gauzy, Gorgeous Fantasy

There are a handful of fleeting moments watching The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel when reality bites. Like when a well-intentioned woman in a Paris nightclub gives the stand-up comedian Midge (Rachel Brosnahan) the number of a psychoanalyst, telling her, “He’s done wonders for my friend Sylvia Plath.” Or every time Susie (Alex Borstein), Midge’s manager, is referred to as “that” or “it.” The pleasure of

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Republicans in Wisconsin and Michigan Aim to Hobble Incoming Democrats

In both Wisconsin and Michigan, Democrats followed a similar formula last month to win the governorship and other key statewide offices: big turnout in urban centers and gains in white-collar suburbs. But in each state, Republican dominance of small-town and rural communities—reinforced by a highly partisan gerrymander of legislative district lines—allowed the party to maintain control of both st

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The White House Has No Plan for Confronting the Mueller Report

Nobody knows how the White House plans to respond to the Mueller report—including the people who work at the White House. The special counsel is reportedly nearing the end of his probe . Sentencing memos are dropping. Plea deals are being struck. The president’s legal team expects a response to his written interview “soon.” When the report will hit is the question. That it will hit, and that it w

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Millennials Didn’t Kill the Economy. The Economy Killed Millennials.

W hen a staid American institution is declared dead, the news media like to haul the same usual suspect before the court of public opinion: the Millennial generation. The 80 million–plus people born in the United States between the early 1980s and the late 1990s stand accused of assassinating various hallmarks of modern life. The list of the deceased includes golf , department stores , the McDona

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Why was HIV chosen as the first target for embryo gene editing?

He Jiankui has tried to create babies that are resistant to HIV infection. But there are safer ways to protect against the virus than untested gene editing

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Digitale kirkebøger forlænger historien

Et multigenerationsregister vil skaffe bedre data om familierelationer i Danmark tilbage til 1920 ved at digitalisere gamle kirkebøger.

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A 3D imaging technique unlocks properties of perovskite crystals

A team of materials scientists from Penn State, Cornell and Argonne National Laboratory have, for the first time, visualized the 3D atomic and electron density structure of the most complex perovskite crystal structure system decoded to date.

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Link between newborns with vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia confirmed

Newborns with Vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life, researchers from Aarhus University and the University of Queensland report. The discovery could prevent some cases of the disease, and shows that neonatal vitamin D deficiency could possibly account for about 8 percent of all schizophrenia cases in Denmark.

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Scientists enter unexplored territory in superconductivity search

Scientists mapping out the quantum characteristics of superconductors — materials that conduct electricity with no energy loss — have entered a new regime. Using newly connected tools named OASIS at Brookhaven Lab, they've uncovered previously inaccessible details of the 'phase diagram' of one of the most commonly studied 'high-temperature' superconductors.

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Link between neonatal vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia confirmed

Newborns with vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life, a team of Australian and Danish researchers has reported.The discovery could help prevent some cases of the disease by treating vitamin D deficiency during the earliest stages of life. The study found newborns with vitamin D deficiency had a 44 percent increased risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia as a

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Silicosis is on the rise, but is there a therapeutic target?

Researchers from the CNRS, the University of Orléans, and the company Artimmune, in collaboration with Turkish clinicians from Atatürk University, have identified a key mechanism of lung inflammation induced by silica exposure, which leads to silicosis, an incurable disease. Their study in mice and patients, published in Nature Communications, shows that this inflammation can be prevented by extra

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Want to Name a New Frog? A Whiskered Mouse? An Orchid? Be the Highest Bidder

Auctioning off the rights to name a new species is a decades-old practice. Some scientists think it’s ethically questionable.

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A 3-D imaging technique unlocks properties of perovskite crystals

A team of materials scientists from Penn State, Cornell and Argonne National Laboratory have, for the first time, visualized the 3-D atomic and electron density structure of the most complex perovskite crystal structure system decoded to date.

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Scientists enter unexplored territory in superconductivity search

Scientists mapping out the quantum characteristics of superconductors—materials that conduct electricity with no energy loss—have entered a new regime. Using newly connected tools named OASIS at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, they've uncovered previously inaccessible details of the "phase diagram" of one of the most commonly studied "high-temperature" superconducto

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Rum-laser skal holde øje med hvert et træ og busk på Jorden i 3D

Nasa-missionen GEDI blev i aftes opsendt til ISS, hvorfra den skal undersøge, hvor meget biomasse der findes på Jorden. Danske stjernekameraer sørger for præcise data.

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This womb transplant breakthrough could open up pregnancy to all sexes | Philip Ball

The live birth of a baby girl in São Paulo is a medical advance that may change the definition of motherhood A year ago, a baby girl was born by caesarean section in a hospital in São Paulo, Brazil, after being conceived by IVF. What made the birth unique was that the child had been gestated in a womb transplanted from a 45-year-old woman who had died. Births resulting from uterus transplants have

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In the Balkans, winter cheer is darkened by a toxic smog

Winter is here and coal is burning, enveloping the Balkans in a toxic smog and turning its cities into some of the most polluted on the planet.

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Climate change offers sparkling prospects to English winemakers

With climate change pushing up temperatures, English winemakers are rubbing their hands as their sparkling wines start to give top champagnes a run for their money.

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Top Huawei executive detained in Canada, angering China

A top executive and daughter of the founder of Chinese telecom giant Huawei has been arrested in Canada and faces extradition to the United States, officials said Thursday, angering Beijing days into a trade war truce with the US.

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Nissan hit by new inspection scandal after Ghosn arrest: report

Nissan plans to conduct another recall owing to "improper" tests on new vehicles, a newspaper said Thursday, dealing a fresh blow to the Japanese car giant following the shock arrest of former chairman Carlos Ghosn.

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Zuckerberg defends Facebook in new data breach controversy

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg pushed back Wednesday against emails showing the social media giant offering Netflix and other popular apps preferential access to people's data even after it had tightened its privacy rules.

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Malaysia torches 2.8 tonnes of African pangolin scales

Malaysia on Thursday torched nearly three tonnes of seized scales of endangered pangolins worth $9 million in a bid to deter illegal wildlife trafficking from Africa.

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Gusts of solar wind may have blown together rocks that formed Earth

The area in our solar system within Mercury’s orbit is empty, which may be because solar winds threw all the rocks farther out, where they helped form planets

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New study explains creation of deadly California 'firenado'

A rare fire tornado that raged during this summer's deadly Carr Fire in Northern California was created by a combination of scorching weather, erratic winds and an ice-topped cloud that towered miles into the atmosphere, according to a study announced Wednesday.

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Ny professor sætter fokus på immunforsvar og infektioner

Susanne Dam Poulsen er nyudnævnt professor og vil i sit professorat skabe et øget fokus på immunmodulerende behandling og at få sat forebyggelse af infektioner på dagsordenen.

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UCL launches inquiry into historical links with eugenics

Staff and students want UCL to remove name of ‘father of eugenics’ Francis Galton from university buildings University College London has launched an inquiry into its historical links with eugenics, following pressure from students and staff. It emerged in January that conferences on eugenics and intelligence had been run secretly at the university for at least three years by James Thompson, an h

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UCL to investigate its historical links to eugenics after outcry over secret meetings

Academics say university’s inquiry must address wider issue of racial equality on campus University College London has launched an inquiry into its historical links with eugenics, following pressure from students and staff. It emerged in January that conferences on eugenics and intelligence had been run secretly at the university for at least three years by James Thompson, an honorary senior lect

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Fræk it-konsulent tjener tykt på at låse kunders kaprede filer op

Russisk aktører har ifølge it-sikkerhedsselskab indgået aftale med afpressere, der angriber med ransomware .

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Climate change made UK heatwave 30 times more likely – Met Office

Global warming is harming people’s lives and humanity will not be able to cope, say scientists The sweltering heat that hit the UK this summer was made 30 times more likely by human-caused climate change, a Met Office analysis has found. Scientists said the research showed global warming was already harming people’s lives and was not only a future threat. Continue reading…

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Is It Time to Bury Merkel's Legacy?

BERLIN — In the race to replace German Chancellor Angela Merkel as the head of her center-right Christian Democrats, the buzzword is undoubtedly change . The CDU party-leader election in Hamburg Friday will mark the first open leadership contest within Germany’s dominant party in decades. As mainstream parties across Europe continue to struggle in the face of challenges from upstart movements and

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Legislative Alchemy 2018: naturopathic licensing and practice expansion shutout?

Naturopathic doctors pushed for licensing and practice expansion in 16 states in 2018. Looks like they are in for a complete shutout.

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Plantefars er bedre for klimaet – men er det sundt for dig?

Proteinerne er plantebaseret, men hvis du tror, at de primært består af hele grøntsager, så tager du fejl, siger ekspert.

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domains: The Squishiest, Sweetest Sleep

The inventor of the water bed is reprising and updating it for a Casper world.

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Country diary: a chainsaw massacre in the alder woods

Witton-le-Wear, County Durham: This tangle of gnarled trees has a hint of the Florida Everglades about it, with mossy, fallen trunks sinking back into the ooze On an overcast, drizzly afternoon at Durham Wildlife Trust’s Low Barns nature reserve, alder ( Alnus glutinosa) provided the brightest splash of colour in the landscape. A tree had been felled and sawn into logs. Chainsaw wounds on this sp

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Protecting cell powerhouse paves way to better treatment of acute kidney injury

For the first time, scientists have described the body's natural mechanism for temporarily protecting the powerhouses of kidney cells when injury or disease means they aren't getting enough blood or oxygen.

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Food system organizations must strengthen their operations to safeguard against potential threats

Food systems face growing threats as extreme weather events become more common and more extreme due to climate change. A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, highlights characteristics of organizations involved in the food system that may lead them to be more prepared to respond to such disasters, an

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Three quarters of a Quebec population fall short of healthy eating guidelines

In a web-based study reported in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, more than three quarters of French-speaking adults in Quebec, Canada, fall short of meeting current dietary guidelines regarding consumption of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, sodium, and saturated fats. The authors recommend stronger, more impactful actions to support everyone in adopting healthier dietary habits to reduce

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Providing supervised medical-grade heroin to heavy users can reduce harms

Some nations — but not the US — provide heroin-assisted treatment and supervised consumption sites as approaches to reduce the harms caused by addiction to opioids. A new study finds that the experiences in other parts of the work find that providing supervised access to medical-grade heroin to people whose use continues after trying multiple traditional treatments has been successful in other c

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Cardiac rehabilitation linked to improved sexual functioning and frequency

A new systematic review of the literature comparing the sexual health of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) who attended cardiac rehabilitation (CR) with patients who did not, found that rehab attendance is associated with improved sexual function and sexual frequency. Published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, the study validates the benefit of exercise training and points to the ne

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Ny rapport: Verdens CO2-udledning har aldrig været højere

Mens der holdes COP24-møde, viser en rapport, at CO2-udledningerne stiger markant og når faretruende højder.

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The MoviePass Reboot Is Here. But Will Moviegoers Want It?

MoviePass is once again changing up its plans—this time with an eye on survival.

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Kom med i Danmarks hurtigste tog

VIDEO: Banedanmark tester, om kørestrøm og signalsystem fungerer ved høje hastigheder på den nye København-Ringstedbane. Kom med, når testtoget rammer 250 km/t.

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 6. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

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Christmas Dinner Rocketed To International Space Station

A cargo that included 5,600 pounds of supplies, science experiments and holiday dinner treats for the crew was launched on Wednesday. (Image credit: John Raoux/AP)

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Data Reveals Most Influential Movies

By analyzing the network connections between 47,000 films on IMDb, researchers found the most influential films ever made. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A microbe's membrane helps it survive extreme environments

Within harsh environments like hot springs, volcanic craters and deep-sea hydrothermal vents — uninhabitable by most life forms — microscopic organisms are thriving. How? It's all in how they wrap themselves.

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30 years of experimental evolution results in a new sex chromosome

Researchers report new findings of an experimental evolutionary project that ran for 30 years on the genomic mechanisms of sex determination in swordtail fish.

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Cereals use chemical defenses in a multifunctional manner against different herbivores

Scientists have characterized multiple functions of benzoxazinoids in wheat: The toxic form of the substances makes the plant directly resistant to lepidopteran larvae, whereas a less toxic form regulates indirect defense mechanisms against aphids. The researchers identified the 'switch' between these different functions as a methyltransferase enzyme, which is activated by caterpillar feeding. Thi

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A detailed look at the microorganisms that colonize, and degrade, a 400-year-old painting

What's a feast for the human eye may be a literal feast for microorganisms that colonize works of art, according to a new study. The researchers characterized the microbial community on a 17th century painting and showed that while some microbes destroy such works of art, others might be employed to protect them.

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Not too big, not too small: Tree frogs choose pools that are just right

Frogs that raise their young in tiny pools of water that collect on plant leaves must make a delicate trade-off between the risk of drying out and the risk of being eaten, according to a new study.

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Memory B cells in the lung may be important for more effective influenza vaccinations

Using a mouse model of influenza and experiments that included parabiosis, researchers definitively showed that lung-resident memory B cells establish themselves in the lung soon after influenza infection. Those lung memory B cells responded more quickly to produce antibodies against influenza after a second infection, as compared to the response by the circulating memory B cells in lymphoid tissu

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Wind power vulnerable to climate change in India

The warming of the Indian Ocean, caused by global climate change, may be causing a slow decline in wind power potential in India, according to a new study.

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Fine-tuning renewables could help Texas balance energy resources

A new study analyzes Texas' mix of wind and solar energy resources, and how to achieve better balance between them going forward.

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Recycle your old mobile phone to save gorilla populations

The link between hoarding disused mobile phones and the decimation of Grauer gorilla habitats is explored in a new paper.

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Congress Races to Pass a Self-Driving Car Law By Year's End

With robo-cars on the road and a new Congress coming in, legislators are trying to finally finish up the AV Start Act.

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Revolutionary technology pinpoints biopsies to detect prostate cancer

Medical software developed at UCL that overlays tumour information from MRI scans onto ultrasound images can help guide surgeons conducting biopsies and improve prostate cancer detection.

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Report reveals link between air pollution and increased risk for miscarriage

Researchers found women living along the Wasatch Front — the most populous region in the state of Utah — had a higher risk (16 percent) of miscarriage following short-term exposure to elevated air pollution.

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The Atlantic Daily: Green New Deal

What We’re Following We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Greener Pastures: “This is going to be the New Deal, the Great Society, the moon shot, the civil-rights movement of our generation,” Representative-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said of a

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Pea aphid youngsters use piggyback rides to escape a crisis

When some mammal is about to munch their plant, aphids drop to the ground and youngsters want a ride to safety.

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Young aphids piggyback on adult aphids to get to safety faster

Young aphids may ride on the backs of adult aphids to get back to the safety of a host plant quicker, according to an article published in Frontiers in Zoology.

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Dirty air now could harm hearts of offspring later

A parent's exposure to dirty air before conception might spell heart trouble for the next generation, a new animal study suggests.

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Reflecting antiferromagnetic arrangements

An X-ray imaging technique could help scientists understand — and ultimately control — the magnetic structure of promising materials for the development of electronic devices that exploit electron spin.

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On the trail of the Higgs Boson

In a quest to understand the production mechanisms for the Higgs Boson, a researcher has investigated the traces of a rare process, called ttH, in which the Higgs Boson is produced in association with a pair of elementary particles referred to as top quarks.

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Sensors developed to detect and measure cancer's ability to spread

Researchers engineered sensors to detect and measure the metastatic potential of single cancer cells. Metastasis is attributed as the leading cause of death in people with cancer.

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Evolution of the inner ear: Insights from jawless fish

Researchers have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear. Published in the journal Nature, the study provides a new story for inner ear evolution that began with the last common ancestor of modern vertebrates.

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Tuberculosis survives by using host system against itself, study finds

Scientists have discovered that the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) releases RNA into infected cells.

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Laws designed to ban or curb drivers' use of cell phones are saving motorcyclists' lives

Laws to ban or curb drivers' use of cell phones and other handheld devices have greatly reduced the rate of fatalities for motorcyclists, according to a new study. Results show that states with moderate to strong bans have motorcycle fatality rates that differ by as much as 11 percent compared to states with no bans.

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Greenland ice sheet melt 'off the charts' compared with past four centuries

Surface melting across Greenland's mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating, according to new research.

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Ancient platform 'damaged' during Stonehenge tunnel work

Preparatory drilling has allegedly damaged 6,000-year-old structure a mile from the stones Archaeologists have accused Highways England of accidentally drilling a large hole through a 6,000-year-old structure near Stonehenge during preparatory work for a tunnel . The drilling, which is alleged to have taken place at Blick Mead, around a mile and a half from the world-famous neolithic ring of ston

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Climate change: Warming made UK heatwave 30 times more likely

Rising global temperatures have massively boosted the chances of summer heatwaves in the UK, says a study.

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Climate change made the sweltering 2018 heatwave 30 times more likely

A study by the UK's Met Office has found that climate change made this year's northern hemisphere summer heatwave around 30 times more likely

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Diabetes drug liraglutide linked to lower risk of cardiovascular events

Real world data from a large Nordic study shows that use of liraglutide, a drug for type 2 diabetes, is associated with a lower risk of myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death. The study, led by researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, is published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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SpaceX’s Failed Landing Still Ended With a Clean Plop

On its 20th flight this year, SpaceX failed to set its booster down on a landing pad. But this rare mishap also showed how many things went well.

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Should sex with a robot be considered cheating?

A new study from Finland suggests that people view sex with a robot more kindly than they view sex with a human prostitute. The effect is maintained even when the customer is married. While the exact causes of these opinions remain unknown, several proposals have been made. They may well serve as ethical guides going forward. None Robot sex dolls are a thing now. A proposed robot brothel in Calif

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Using Centrifugal Ultrafiltration for Cloning and PCR

Learn about how centrifugal ultrafiltration devices can provide a more streamlined cloning process with this application note from PALL Laboratory!

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Victorians worried about books like we worry about iPhones

Health The screen time debate is not new. Since Victorian times people have been concerned about how new innovations might damage eyesight.

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Friskier frogs: endangered species gets a sex appeal boost

Australian researchers have a new way to increase desire in the northern corroboree frog Australian researchers are applying a sex hormone to the skin of the critically endangered northern corroboree frog in a world-first treatment to encourage females to accept less desirable mates in captivity. A trial conducted by the University of Wollongong and Taronga zoo found that, by administering the ho

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Tumblr's Porn-Detecting AI Has One Job—and It's Bad at It

The blogging platform has a new policy forbidding "adult content"—but lots of innocuous posts are getting caught in the fray.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Eulogy for a President

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ). We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Today in 5 Lines The funeral for former President George H. W. Bush, who died Frid

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How Migrants Hide in Trucks to Enter the United States | Border Live

Investigative journalist Lilia Luciano gives us a first-hand look at how migrants make their journey into the U.S by hiding in trucks. Border Live Premieres Tonight, From 9-11 PM ET/PT on Discovery. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.ins

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COSINE-100 experiment investigates dark matter mystery

A new international experiment challenges previous claims about the detection of non-luminous dark matter.

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Narcissists less likely to support democracy

New research suggests that people with a narcissistic self-view are more likely to demonstrate lower support for democracy.

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Using graphene to detect ALS, other neurodegenerative diseases

Graphene can determine whether cerebrospinal fluid comes from a person with ALS, MS or from someone without a neurodegenerative disease.

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Artificial synapses made from nanowires

Scientists have produced a memristive element made from nanowires that functions in much the same way as a biological nerve cell. The component is able to both save and process information, as well as receive numerous signals in parallel. The resistive switching cell made from oxide crystal nanowires is thus proving to be the ideal candidate for use in building bioinspired 'neuromorphic' processor

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Tissue chips rocket to International Space Station

Scientists have recently sent tissue chips, a research technology that reflects the human body, into space. On Dec. 4, the first set of NIH-funded tissue chips that model aspects of the human immune system will launch on SpaceX's 16th commercial resupply mission (awarded by NASA) from Cape Canaveral, Florida, to the ISS National Lab.

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New butterfly named for pioneering 17th-century entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian

More than two centuries before initiatives to increase the number of women in STEM fields, Maria Sibylla Merian was a professional artist and naturalist whose close observations and illustrations were the first to accurately portray the metamorphosis of butterflies and moths and emphasize the intimate relationship between insects and their host plants. Now, a new Central American butterfly species

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Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

The fortuitous dip in emissions of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, during the past three years is over, as economies turn up. The trend in the near future looks grim, say climate scientists. (Image credit: Christian Petersen-Clausen/Getty Images)

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Learning from mistakes

Caltech scientists identify single neurons in the human brain that catch our mistakes and correct future behavior.

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A cheap set of LEDs is the best way to upgrade your fancy new TV

Gadgets Bias lighting will enhance the picture of your screen in a dark room. Eye experts and home theater nerds recommend a little extra light in your home theater.

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OU study explores sexuality & gender gaps in political perspectives among college students

Meredith Worthen has published a new study in the journal, Sexuality Research and Social Policy, on sexuality and gender gaps in political perspectives among lesbian, gay, bisexual, mostly heterosexual and heterosexual college students in the southern United States. Worthen confirms a clear 'sexuality gap' between exclusive heterosexuals and all others as well as gender gaps among mostly heterosex

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New PET tracer identified for imaging Tau in Alzheimer's disease patients

Tau tangles in the brain are markers of Alzheimer's disease and are also potential therapy targets. A study featured in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine reports on the identification of a promising second-generation positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging and measuring tau pathology, contributing to understanding of Alzheimer's and related dementias. The new rese

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Russia threatens ‘retaliation’ after U.S. declares plan to withdraw from arms treaty

The 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) was an agreement between the Soviet Union and the U.S. to ban mid-ranged, nuclear-tipped missiles. Both Russia and the U.S. have accused each other of violating the pact in recent years. As it stands, Russia has 60 days to return to terms agreed upon in the deal or the U.S. will withdraw from the pact. None Russian officials said Wednesday t

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First Child Delivered from Womb Transplanted from Dead Donor

The girl was born in Brazil in December 2017.

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We can assess the health of coral reefs by the sounds algae make

During photosynthesis, algae produces a symphony of little "pings." The sounds are produced by oxygen bubbles breaking away from the plants. Monitoring reef health through its sound is a new avenue for acoustic ecology. When oceanographers Lauren and Simon Freeman, a couple who work with the U.S. Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Rhode Island, first mentioned what they'd heard to others, the respo

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SpaceX Launches Dragon Cargo Ship to Space Station, But Misses Rocket Landing

SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft lifted off into clear blue skies today (Dec. 5), but its first stage spiraled down in a failed landing.

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'Sun in a box' would store renewable energy for the grid

MIT engineers have come up with a conceptual design for a system to store renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, and deliver that energy back into an electric grid on demand. The system may be designed to power a small city not just when the sun is up or the wind is high, but around the clock.

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Too few fully trained nurses linked to daily 3 percent rise in patient death risk

Admission to a hospital ward with below average numbers of fully trained (registered) nurses to care for patients is linked to a 3 percent rise in the risk of death for each day the shortfall persists, suggests UK research.

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Kanopy Is Becoming the Best Free Streaming Service Out There

It's almost a decade old, but recent catalog expansions have made it a worthy investment—in a library card.

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Classifying brain microglia: Which are good and which are bad?

Microglia are important to brain function, and also seem to play a role in disease. New work offers the most comprehensive accounting of brain microglia to date and opens a new chapter in brain exploration. The researchers performed RNA sequencing of 76,000 individual cells — the most comprehensive accounting to date — and spatially mapped them. Their findings could help scientists tell whether

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New immunoassay technique measures extremely low concentrations of small molecules using single-molecule detection

As medical science has come to understand that the human body is controlled on the molecular level by various proteins, hormones, drugs, and other substances, technologies have developed to detect levels of these molecules in order to monitor health and diagnose disease. However, many of these molecules are so small that they cannot be detected by the most widely available analysis techniques, lea

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The More You Know About Mars…

…the more you know about Earth. (Image credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

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Duration of infertility in men may affect sperm count

A longer duration of infertility in men was associated with lower sperm count and other parameters of impaired sperm, according to a recent study. Also, older age and higher body mass index were associated with a longer duration of infertility.

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Not one disease: Researchers classify Alzheimer's patients in six subgroups

Researchers studying Alzheimer's disease have created an approach to classify patients with Alzheimer's disease, a finding that may open the door for personalized treatments.

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Forget 'needle in a haystack'; try finding an invasive species in a lake

When the tiny and invasive spiny water flea began appearing in researchers' nets in 2009, scientists began to wonder how Lake Mendota, one of the most-studied lakes in the world, went from flea-free to infested seemingly overnight, undetected by trained technicians. A new report says Lake Mendota's story may be the rule, rather than an exception.

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Extent of US lives shortened by gun violence twice as great among blacks as whites

The magnitude of lives shortened by gun violence in the US since the turn of the century has been more than twice as great among black Americans — particularly those up to the age of 20 — as it has been among whites, new research finds.

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Lengthy time to conception and fertility treatment might affect child's asthma risk

Children whose parents take more than a year to get pregnant and who use fertility treatment may be at heightened risk of developing asthma, suggests a large population-based study.

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Small molecules come into focus

Many biologically important small molecules, like hormones and amino acids, are too small to be measured by conventional detection methods. Researchers from the Wyss Institute and BWH have created a new type of immuno-assay that is capable of detecting small molecules with 50-fold greater sensitivity than conventional detection methods, and can be easily integrated into existing diagnostic platfor

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Technique inspired by dolphin chirps could improve tests of soft materials

Engineers have devised a technique that vastly improves on the speed and accuracy of measuring soft materials' properties. The technique can be used to test the properties of drying cement, clotting blood, or any other 'mutating' soft materials as they change over time.

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Modeling the microbiome

The gut microbiome — the world of microbes that inhabit the human intestinal tract — has captured the interest of scientists and clinicians for its critical role in health. However, parsing which of those microbes are responsible for effects on our wellbeing remains a mystery.

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Puzzle of snail and slug feeding preferences solved

A study suggests the reason some seedlings are more commonly eaten by slugs and snails may be down to the smells produced by young seedlings in the early stages of their development.

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Analysis estimates mortality from fungal infections of ash trees

A recent analysis of surveys of ash dieback across Europe reveals mortality rates as high as 85 percent in plantations and 70 percent in woodlands.

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Study examines effects of different opioids on driving performance

A new study finds that the influence of single analgesic doses of methadone and buprenorphine — two different opioids — on driving performance was mild and below the impairment threshold of a blood alcohol concentration of 0.5 mg ml-1.

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Cannabis-based compound may reduce seizures in children with epilepsy

A recent analysis of published studies indicates that the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of epilepsy in children looks promising.

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Sleep problems in young adult students revealed in new study

A new study indicates that sleep problems are both prevalent and increasing among students.

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Information from citizens could improve flood modelling

Researchers are working to develop improved methods for flood prevention and warning. A new study points to the potential of an approach that integrates water level data reported by citizens into flood forecasting models.

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Marriott, too: Businesses are losing cyber ‘arms race’

On November 30, 2018, Marriott announced that 500 million accounts had been hacked, the second-largest data compromise behind Yahoo’s 2013 hack that exposed 3 billion accounts. “We are in the [cyber] arms race right now,” says Azer Bestavros, founder of Boston University’s Rafik B. Hariri Institute for Computing and Computational Science & Engineering. “Hackers are becoming more sophisticated aga

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Older women who suffer from tooth loss more likely to develop high blood pressure

Women who experienced loss of all teeth had approximately 20 percent higher risk of developing hypertension during follow-up compared to women who still had natural teeth.

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Scary Map Shows Where Animal Poop Is Turning into Deadly Ammonia Pollution

Here's where all the farm animals are pooping, y'all.

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James Duke, 88, Globe-Trotting Authority on Healing Plants, Is Dead

As a scholar and government researcher, he did field work in remote spots, finding indigenous remedies, trying them himself and pouring them into books.

2d

New attack could make website security captchas obsolete

Researchers have created new artificial intelligence that could spell the end for one of the most widely used website security systems. The new algorithm, based on deep learning methods, is the most effective solver of captcha security and authentication systems to date and is able to defeat versions of text captcha schemes used to defend the majority of the world's most popular websites.

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‘Wisconsin Has Never Seen Anything Like This’

In the early-morning hours Wednesday, Republicans in control of the Wisconsin legislature carried out their plan to neuter the Democrats whom the state’s voters elected to lead them scarcely a month ago. In party-line votes, Republicans passed legislation to limit the ability of the incoming governor, Tony Evers, and attorney general, Josh Kaul, to deliver on their campaign promises to protect th

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Baboons Survive for Half a Year after Heart Transplants from Pigs

The cross-species heart procedure brings human trials into view — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Technique inspired by dolphin chirps could improve tests of soft materials

When you deform a soft material such as Silly Putty, its properties change depending on how fast you stretch and squeeze it. If you leave the putty in a small glass, it will eventually spread out like a liquid. If you pull it slowly, it will thin and droop like viscous taffy. And if you quickly yank on it, the Silly Putty will snap like a brittle, solid bar.

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Tiny sun sensor warns you when your skin is about to burn

A miniature sensor that can be stuck to your skin, clothing or jewellery monitors your UV exposure and lets you know when it’s time to get out of the sun

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Bacteria could protect old paintings from pigment-eating microbes

The microbiome of a 400-year-old painting includes bacteria and fungi that eat pigments but a treatment with other microbes can protect the painting from damage

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UCSF HIV Lab Planning to Close

The facility claims to have a federal contract involving fetal tissue research canceled. HHS denies that claim.

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Scientists design way to track steps of cells' development

Scientists have developed a new tool described as a 'flight data recorder' for developing cells, illuminating the paths cells take as they progress from one type to another. This cellular tracking device could one day help scientists guide cells along the right paths to regenerate certain tissues or organs, or help researchers understand the wrong turns some cells might take on their way to becomi

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Sea invertebrate sheds light on evolution of human blood, immune systems

Botryllus schlosseri, a marine invertebrate that lives in underwater colonies resembling fuzzy pinheads clinging to rocks, has a blood-forming system with uncanny similarities to that of humans, according to scientists.

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Guiding the smart growth of artificial intelligence

A new article provides a comprehensive look at the development of an ethical framework, code of conduct, and value-based design methodologies for AI researchers and application developers in Europe.

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Using drones to simplify film animation

Producing realistic animated film figures is a highly complex technical endeavour. Researchers have now shown how drones can be used to greatly reduce the effort required in the process.

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Infections during childhood increase the risk of mental disorders

A new study shows that the infections children contract during their childhood are linked to an increase in the risk of mental disorders during childhood and adolescence. This knowledge expands our understanding of the role of the immune system in the development of mental disorders.

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Possible alterations in the DNA involved in cancer

The study shows the role of the protein PIF1, capable of undoing different structures in these molecules. These molecules contain the instructions that allow cells to function correctly, so that when there is an alteration that is not repaired properly, mutations can occurred that can cause problems for the health of the body.

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Scientists identify 'youth factor' in blood cells that speeds fracture repair

Researchers previously showed that introducing bone marrow stem cells to a bone injury can expedite healing, but the exact process was unclear. Now, the same team believes it has pinpointed the 'youth factor' inside bone marrow stem cells — it's the macrophage, a type of white blood cell, and the proteins it secretes that can have a rejuvenating effect on tissue.

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How the brain hears and fears

What does the brain do when things go bump in the night? Researchers are looking at neural activity in the amygdala by studying how mice react when they hear a sound they've been taught to fear.

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Can rice filter water from agricultural fields?

While it's an important part of our diets, new research shows that rice plants can be used in a different way, too: to clean runoff from farms before it gets into rivers, lakes, and streams.

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First baby born to mother with uterus transplanted from deceased woman

The healthy baby girl was born to a 32-year-old woman in Brazil who received a uterus transplant from a deceased woman. It marks the first successful transplant from a deceased donor. A handful of transplants from living donors have proven successful so far. Deceased donations would greatly expand the pool of potential donors, considering it's relatively difficult to find living donors willing to

2d

Pollution: New ammonia emission sources detected from space

Researchers have prepared the first global map of the distribution of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) by analyzing measurements taken by satellites between 2008 and 2016. The IASI interferometer allowed them to catalog more than 200 ammonia sources, two-thirds of which had never been identified before. These sources are essentially sites of intensive livestock production and industrial activity.

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Global carbon dioxide emissions rise even as coal wanes and renewables boom

Renewable energy capacity has hit record levels and global coal use may have already peaked. But the world's carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels increased in 2018, and the trend places global warming targets in jeopardy.

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Mystery of color patterns of reef fish solved

Scientists have solved the mystery of why some closely-related species of an iconic reef fish have vastly different colour patterns, while others look very similar.

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Wildfire ash could trap mercury

Researchers studying ash from recent California wildfires report that burned material in forests might help sequester mercury that otherwise would be released into the environment.

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Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs

Although active uranium mining in New Mexico has ceased, rates of cardiovascular and metabolic disease remain high in the population residing close to mines within the Navajo Nation. According to a new study, inhaled uranium in dusts from the mines could be a factor.

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Neighborhoods with more green space may mean less heart disease

People who live in neighborhoods with more green spaces may have better blood vessel health and lower levels of stress, and a lower risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks, strokes and others.

2d

Bringing balance to the universe: New theory could explain missing 95 percent of the cosmos

New research could shed light on the 'missing' dark matter and dark energy that make up 95 percent of our universe and yet are wholly invisible to us.

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Turning climate change from a 'tragedy of the commons' to positive action

Climate change must no longer be viewed as a 'tragedy of the commons', researchers say.

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The new jellyfish genome proves you don’t need weird genes to be a weirdo

Science An interdisciplinary team opens a new window into the creature's bizarre lifecycle. Summary: Researchers sequenced the first true jellyfish genome, and found that they pull off their series of wild transformations without much genetic upheaval.

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Climate reality check: Global carbon pollution up in 2018

After several years of little growth, global emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide experienced their largest jump in seven years, discouraging scientists.

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Report reveals link between air pollution and increased risk for miscarriage

Air quality has been associated with numerous adverse health outcomes from asthma to pre-term birth. Researchers at University of Utah Health found women living along the Wasatch Front — the most populous region in the state of Utah — had a higher risk (16 percent) of miscarriage following short-term exposure to elevated air pollution. The results are available online on December 5 in the journa

2d

Modeling the microbiome

The gut microbiome — the world of microbes that inhabit the human intestinal tract — has captured the interest of scientists and clinicians for its critical role in health. However, parsing which of those microbes are responsible for effects on our wellbeing remains a mystery.

2d

Technique inspired by dolphin chirps could improve tests of soft materials

MIT engineers have devised a technique that vastly improves on the speed and accuracy of measuring soft materials' properties. The technique can be used to test the properties of drying cement, clotting blood, or any other 'mutating' soft materials as they change over time. The researchers report their results in the journal Physical Review X.

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Pixis Labs becomes the first ISO certified cannabis testing laboratory in Oregon.

Pixis Labs becomes the first and only cannabis testing lab in Oregon to achieve ISO/IEC 17025:2005 accreditation for analyses on cannabis/hemp.

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China's unbridled export of coal power imperils climate goals

Even as China struggles to curb domestic coal-fired power and the deadly pollution it produces, the world's top carbon emitter is aggressively exporting the same troubled technology to Asia, Africa and the Middle East, an investigation by AFP has shown.

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First observation of a square lattice of merons and antimerons

Scientists have, for the first time, observed a square lattice of merons and antimerons — tiny magnetic vortices and antivortices that form in a thin plate of the helical magnet Co8Zn9Mn3. The ability to manipulate nanometer-scale spin textures such as merons and skyrmions is a key to the development of spintronics — next-generation electronic devices that are very low in power consumption.

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Could drones replace cameras for making animated movies?

New research shows how drones can greatly reduce the effort required to make realistic animated figures for movies and television. Computer scientist Tobias Nägeli is sure that drones are going to change the film industry in a major way. About a year ago, he showed that spectacular, highly technical film scenes could be shot much more easily with these mini aircraft. For the new project, which he

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Christmas turkey, fruitcake rocketing toward space station

Christmas turkey rocketed toward the International Space Station on Wednesday, along with cranberry sauce, candied yams and the obligatory fruitcake.

2d

CBS’s Les Moonves Problem Isn’t Solved

On Tuesday evening, The New York Times published details of the latest twist in the fate of Les Moonves: The paper had obtained a draft version of the report communicating the findings of CBS’s investigation into its former chief executive. Moonves, facing multiple allegations of sexual misconduct stretching over a period of decades, had misled investigators, the report suggested, at times provin

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Britain's BT scrubs China's Huawei from 4G network

Britain's largest mobile provider revealed on Wednesday it was stripping the equipment of China's telecoms giant Huawei from its core 4G cellular network after similar moves by the United States and New Zealand.

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CO2 emissions up 2.7%, world 'off course' to curb warming: study

Global emissions of carbon dioxide mainly from fossil fuel burning will rise 2.7 percent in 2018, scientists said Wednesday, signalling a world "completely off course" in the fight against climate change.

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Memory B cells in the lung may be important for more effective influenza vaccinations

Using a mouse model of influenza and experiments that included parabiosis, researchers definitively showed that lung-resident memory B cells establish themselves in the lung soon after influenza infection. Those lung memory B cells responded more quickly to produce antibodies against influenza after a second infection, as compared to the response by the circulating memory B cells in lymphoid tissu

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Wind power vulnerable to climate change in India

The warming of the Indian Ocean, caused by global climate change, may be causing a slow decline in wind power potential in India, according to a new study from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Harvard China Project.

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Rethinking the history related to indigenous sites in northeast North America

After radiocarbon dating of plant matter, wood and wood charcoal, scientists estimate that the presumed histories of several key indigenous sites in Canada, as relates to first contact with Europeans, are incorrect by about 50 to 100 years. The findings suggest that European trade goods previously used to date individual locations are not in fact good chronological markers.

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Recycle your old mobile phone to save gorilla populations

Are you among the 400 million people around the world who have relegated an old mobile phone to the top drawer in the past year?

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World's smallest wearable device warns of UV exposure, enables precision phototherapy

The world's smallest wearable, battery-free and virtually indestructible device has been developed to measure exposure to light across multiple wavelengths, from the ultra violet to visible and even infrared parts of the solar spectrum. Smaller than an M&M, the device can optimize treatment of neonatal jaundice, skin diseases, seasonal affective disorder and reduce risk of sunburns and skin cancer

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Wireless, battery-free sensors monitor skin exposure to solar radiation

Researchers have created wireless, battery-free sensors that can monitor exposure to solar radiation in real time.

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Distinguishing resistance from resilience to prolong antibiotic potency

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have experimentally shown that there is more than one flavor of antibiotic resistance. Distinguishing resistance, where individual cells shrug off antibiotics, versus resilience, where a bacterial community's population crashes before adapting to disable the antibiotic, could help keep first-line antibiotics in our medical arsenal.

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Friend or foe? Brain area that controls social memory also triggers aggression

Scientists have identified a brain region that helps tell an animal when to attack an intruder and when to accept it into its home.

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Facebook accused of giving access to users' dataFacebook Mark Zuckerberg

A British parliamentary committee accused Facebook on Wednesday of giving companies such as Netflix preferential access to users' data even after it tightened its privacy rules in 2014-15.

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This Salamander Breathes Through 'Christmas Trees' Growing from Its Head

A new species of two-legged salamander is an elusive aquatic oddity.

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Greenland Is Melting Faster Than Ever

The rate of vanishing ice is "off the charts."

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On the Best Use of Science to Safeguard Humanity

Over in Great Britain, the 76-year-old Cambridge-based astrophysicist Martin Rees, Lord Rees of Ludlow, is a respected figure not only for his scientific contributions but also for how he straddles the difficult territory between science, politics and literature with rare ease and confidence. Since the 1960s, in more than 500 papers, Lord Rees has been adding to our understanding of key cosmologi

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Greenhouse Gas Emissions Accelerate Like a ‘Speeding Freight Train’ in 2018

Accelerating emissions are putting the world on track to face some of the most severe consequences of global warming sooner than expected, scientists said.

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Why Are Scientists So Upset About the First Crispr Babies?

Only because a rogue researcher defied myriad scientific and ethical norms and guidelines. We break it down.

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Vaping marijuana might be too much for first-timers

Vaping marijuana instead of smoking an equal dose increases short-term anxiety, paranoia, memory loss, and distraction, a small study of infrequent users suggests. The findings, described in the journal JAMA Network Open , highlight the importance of dose to the perception that vaping is a safer alternative to smoking cannabis, the researchers say. Vaping devices heat cannabis to a temperature at

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Mystery disease that paralyzes kids may flourish this winter

In 2018, there could be a record number of cases of the mysterious disease Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM). To Karl Kuban, professor of pediatrics and neurology at the Boston University School of Medicine, the rare but incurable disease that has paralyzed at least 116 people in 31 states in 2018—most of them under age 18—is grimly familiar. The majority of AFM patients are children and Kuban has tre

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SpaceX launches cargo, but fails to land rocket

SpaceX on Wednesday blasted off its unmanned Dragon cargo ship, loaded with supplies, science experiments and food for the astronauts living at the International Space Station but failed to successfully land its booster afterwards.

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Fine-tuning renewables could help Texas balance energy resources

Timing and placement of wind and solar power facilities are critical factors for Texas electricity providers that juggle their output with other resources to provide a balanced flow of energy. Rice University researchers have some suggestions on how they can integrate widely varying sources more efficiently.

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New butterfly named for pioneering 17th-century entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian

More than two centuries before initiatives to increase the number of women in STEM fields, 52-year-old Maria Sibylla Merian sailed across the Atlantic on a largely self-funded scientific expedition to document the animals and plants of Dutch Suriname.

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Mantle neon illuminates Earth's formation

The Earth formed relatively quickly from the cloud of dust and gas around the Sun, trapping water and gases in the planet's mantle, based on neon isotopes from the depths of the Earth and deep space. Apart from settling Earth's origins, the work could help in identifying extrasolar systems that could support habitable planets.

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Soft tissue shows Jurassic ichthyosaur was warm-blooded, had blubber and camouflage

An ancient, dolphin-like marine reptile resembles its distant relative in more than appearance, according to an international team of researchers. Molecular and microstructural analysis of a Stenopterygius ichthyosaur from the Jurassic (180 million years ago) reveals that these animals were most likely warm-blooded, had insulating blubber and used their coloration as camouflage from predators.

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High lead levels found in some spices purchased abroad: New York City cases

Investigations of lead poisoning cases in New York City have found high levels of lead in certain spices purchased abroad, a new study finds.

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Maternal stress at conception linked to children's stress response at age 11

A new study finds that mothers' stress levels at the moment they conceive their children are linked to the way children respond to life challenges at age 11.

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Money ills add to cancer struggle

One in five cancer patients could be experiencing financial difficulties because of their care needs, according to new research.

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Biological templating: Using a virus to speed up modern computers

Researchers have successfully developed a method — using a bacteriophage — that could lead to unprecedented advances in computer speed and efficiency.

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What Is X-Ray Spectroscopy?

X-ray spectroscopy is used in many areas of science, medicine and technology, to better understand the characteristics of a material at the atomic level.

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Not too big, not too small—tree frogs choose pools that are just right

Frogs that raise their young in tiny pools of water that collect on plant leaves must make a delicate trade-off between the risk of drying out and the risk of being eaten, according to a study publishing December 5 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mirco Solé from the Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz in Bahia, Brazil and colleagues.

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Distinguishing resistance from resilience to prolong antibiotic potency

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have shown experimentally that there is more than one flavor of antibiotic resistance and that it could—and should—be taken advantage of to keep first-line antibiotics in our medical arsenal.

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Recycle your old mobile phone to save gorilla populations

Are you among the 400 million people around the world who have relegated an old mobile phone to the top drawer in the past year?

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A detailed look at the microorganisms that colonize, and degrade, a 400-year-old painting

What's a feast for the human eye may be a literal feast for microorganisms that colonize works of art, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Elisabetta Caselli of the University of Ferrara, Italy, and colleagues. The researchers characterized the microbial community on a 17th century painting and showed that while some microbes destroy such works of art, others might be e

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Cereals use chemical defenses in a multifunctional manner against different herbivores

A team of scientists from the University of Bern (Switzerland) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and their partners have characterized multiple functions of benzoxazinoids in wheat: The toxic form of the substances makes the plant directly resistant to lepidopteran larvae, whereas a less toxic form regulates indirect defense mechanisms against aphids. Scientists have identified the

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The cerebellum – the brain’s built-in thought editor?

The choices we make have a massive impact on almost every aspect of our lives, and poor decision-making is a common feature across many neurologic and psychiatric diseases. So it makes sense that neuroscientists have been fascinated by decision-making for a long time, and have sought to undercover what influences our choices, which parts of the brain contribute to a decision, and how different as

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Fine-tuning renewables could help Texas balance energy resources

A Rice University study analyzes Texas' mix of wind and solar energy resources, and how to achieve better balance between them going forward.

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2018 in Photos: A Look at the Middle Months

As the year comes to a close, it’s time to take a look back at some of the most memorable events and images of 2018. Among the events covered in this essay (the second of a three-part photo summary of the year): Mexico elected a new president, World Cup fans cheered and cried, protests rocked Nicaragua, a new Ebola outbreak hit central Africa, lava destroyed neighborhoods in Hawaii, and much more

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Baboons live for months after getting genetically modified pig hearts

Genetically modified pig hearts have kept baboons alive for more than 90 days, a threshold that may now allow trials of this type of transplantation in people

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Let’s cheer workers at Google who are holding their bosses to account

Staff at Google, Amazon and Microsoft are using walkouts, work slowdowns and refusals to build to hold the tech giants to their proclaimed ethics

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Fossil blubber shows ichthyosaurs were warm blooded reptiles

A fossil so well preserved that its skin is still flexible is revealing much more about the marine reptiles called ichthyosaurs that swam in the sea during the age of dinosaurs

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Gene-editing experiment widely criticised for safety and ethics issues

The scientist who led an experiment to create gene-edited babies has been criticised for acting unethically towards the couples and infants involved

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Global carbon emissions rose 3 per cent this year (which is bad)

Just weeks after a major UN report on 1.5°C warned that CO2 emissions need to fall fast, the latest figures show they are in fact rising fast

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UK DNA project hits major milestone with 100,000 genomes sequenced

The UK's 100,000 Genomes Project has hit its target for sequencing the genetic data of people with cancer and rare diseases

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9 things you need for a better night’s sleep

Gift Guides A pillow for every body part! Hibernation isn’t an option for human beings, unfortunately. That means we’ve got to make sure every eight-hour allotment is elevated to cloud nine. These practical…

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Narcissists less likely to support democracy

New research suggests that people with a narcissistic self-view are more likely to demonstrate lower support for democracy.

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Monitoring species: Are we looking long enough?

The conservation of animals relies heavily on estimates of their numbers. Without knowing how many individuals there are, it is impossible to know whether a population is thriving or dying out—and whether conservation efforts are getting the job done. But making those estimates is no mean feat, reports Easton R. White of the Center for Population Biology at the University of California, Davis, wri

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UK Documents Suggest Facebook Traded User Privacy For Growth

Newly public documents provide a rare window into CEO Mark Zuckerberg's thoughts on how to expand his social media juggernaut.

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Potential role of bioaerosol sampling in disease surveillance

A pilot study shows that non-invasive bioaerosol sampling and molecular diagnostics can detect respiratory viruses in aerosol samples in public places such as Singapore's MRT trains. Findings support possibility of employing bioaerosol samplers in crowded areas of densely populated cities like Singapore facing heightened risk from global pandemics.

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229 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2018

In 2018, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 229 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 120 wasps, 34 sea slugs, 28 ants, 19 fish, seven flowering plants, seven spiders, four eels, three sharks, two water bears, one

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Without Dna2, genes can jump into DNA breaks

Cells have in place a number of mechanisms to protect the integrity of the genome, including processes that repair mistakes that may occur during DNA replication. The enzyme Dna2 participates in DNA repair, but little is known about the consequences of its absence on chromosome instability. A study published in the journal Nature by researchers from several institutions, including Baylor College o

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Peace, not war, responsible for deforestation in armed conflict zones

Rates of deforestation in war zones increase dramatically once peace is declared, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.

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New butterfly named for pioneering 17th-century entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian

More than two centuries before initiatives to increase the number of women in STEM fields, Maria Sibylla Merian was a professional artist and naturalist whose close observations and illustrations were the first to accurately portray the metamorphosis of butterflies and moths and emphasize the intimate relationship between insects and their host plants.Now, a new Central American butterfly species

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Evolution of the inner ear: Insights from jawless fish

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics (BDR) and collaborators have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear. Published in the journal Nature, the study provides a new story for inner ear evolution that began with the last common ancestor of modern vertebrates.

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Without Dna2, genes can jump into DNA breaks

When Dna2 is absent, small DNA fragments jump from all over the genome into chromosome breaks. This novel mechanism may explain similar events commonly seen in cancer or during antibody diversification.

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COSINE-100 experiment investigates dark matter mystery

Yale scientists are part of a new international experiment that challenges previous claims about the detection of non-luminous dark matter.

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Delaying adjuvant chemo associated with worse outcomes for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

Patients with triple-negative breast cancer who delayed starting adjuvant chemotherapy for more than 30 days after surgery were at significantly higher risk for disease recurrence and death compared with those who started the treatment in the first 30 days after surgery, according to a retrospective study presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

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Sea invertebrate sheds light on evolution of human blood, immune systems

Botryllus schlosseri, a marine invertebrate that lives in underwater colonies resembling fuzzy pinheads clinging to rocks, has a blood-forming system with uncanny similarities to that of humans, according to scientists at Stanford University.

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Scientists design way to track steps of cells' development

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new tool described as a 'flight data recorder' for developing cells, illuminating the paths cells take as they progress from one type to another. This cellular tracking device could one day help scientists guide cells along the right paths to regenerate certain tissues or organs, or help researchers understand the

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Global carbon dioxide emissions rise even as coal wanes and renewables boom

Renewable energy capacity has hit record levels and global coal use may have already peaked. But the world's carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels increased in 2018, and the trend places global warming targets in jeopardy.

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COSINE-100 experiment investigates dark matter mystery

The new COSINE-100 experiment, an underground dark matter detector at the Yangyang Underground Laboratory (Y2L) in Korea has first results that significantly challenge the interpretations made by DAMA that have stood for nearly two decades. Y2L is operated by the Center for Underground Physics (CUP, Director: Yeongduk Kim) of the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in Korea.

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Soft tissue shows Jurassic ichthyosaur was warm-blooded, had blubber and camouflage

An ancient, dolphin-like marine reptile resembles its distant relative in more than appearance, according to an international team of researchers. Molecular and microstructural analysis of a Stenopterygius ichthyosaur from the Jurassic (180 million years ago) reveals that these animals were most likely warm-blooded, had insulating blubber and used their coloration as camouflage from predators.

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Mantle neon illuminates Earth's formation

The Earth formed relatively quickly from the cloud of dust and gas around the Sun, trapping water and gases in the planet's mantle, based on neon isotopes from the depths of the Earth and deep space. Apart from settling Earth's origins, the work could help in identifying extrasolar systems that could support habitable planets.

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Strong growth in global CO2 emissions expected for 2018

Global carbon emissions are set to hit an all-time high in 2018.A projected rise of more than 2 percent has been driven by a solid growth in coal use for the second year in a row, and sustained growth in oil and gas use.But the research team say energy trends are changing and that there is still time to address climate change if efforts to curb carbon emissions rapidly expand in all sectors of the

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Pollution: New ammonia emission sources detected from space

Researchers from the CNRS and the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) have prepared the first global map of the distribution of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) by analyzing measurements taken by satellites between 2008 and 2016. The IASI interferometer developed by the CNES allowed them to catalog more than 200 ammonia sources, two-thirds of which had never been identified before. These sources are esse

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First observation of a square lattice of merons and antimerons

Scientists have, for the first time, observed a square lattice of merons and antimerons — tiny magnetic vortices and antivortices that form in a thin plate of the helical magnet Co8Zn9Mn3. The ability to manipulate nanometer-scale spin textures such as merons and skyrmions is a key to the development of spintronics — next-generation electronic devices that are very low in power consumption.

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Greenland ice sheet melt 'off the charts' compared with past four centuries

Surface melting across Greenland's mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating, according to new research published Dec. 5, 2018, in the journal Nature. The study provides new evidence of the impacts of climate change on Arctic melting and global sea level rise.

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Friend or foe? Brain area that controls social memory also triggers aggression

Columbia scientists have identified a brain region that helps tell an animal when to attack an intruder and when to accept it into its home.

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Adjuvant chemo might not add benefit in breast cancer patients who have excellent response to neoadjuvant chemo

Pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant (presurgery) chemotherapy was associated with significantly lower recurrence risk and higher overall survival in breast cancer patients, and pCR after neoadjuvant chemotherapy had similar association with improved outcomes among those who received additional chemotherapy following surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy) versus those who did not, accor

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Guiding the smart growth of artificial intelligence

A new paper published in AI Communications provides a comprehensive look at the development of an ethical framework, code of conduct, and value-based design methodologies for AI researchers and application developers in Europe. The "Barcelona Declaration for the Proper Development and Usage of Artificial Intelligence in Europe" was launched in the spring of 2017 at the B-Debate event in Barcelona,

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First light for SPECULOOS

The SPECULOOS Southern Observatory (SSO) has been successfully installed at the Paranal Observatory and has obtained its first engineering and calibration images—a process known as first light. After finishing this commissioning phase, this new array of planet-hunting telescopes will begin scientific operations, starting in earnest in January 2019.

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Paving the way for more efficient hydrogen cars

Hydrogen-powered vehicles emit only water vapor from their tailpipes, offering a cleaner alternative to fossil-fuel-based transportation. But for hydrogen cars to become mainstream, scientists need to develop more efficient hydrogen-storage systems. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Chemistry of Materials have used metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to set a new record for hydrogen storage capacity

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Amazon might have a Cambridge Analytica-size problem

This year the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke, implicating Facebook and creating mass data privacy concern. Concerns have been raised of Amazon user information being leaked to third parties on a regular basis. With the amount of sensitive information and huge number of users on the Amazon platform, this is no small concern. None 2018 hasn't been a good year for Facebook. In March, the Cambridg

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Fossil preserves 'sea monster' blubber and skin

Scientists identify fossilised blubber from an ancient marine reptile that lived 180 million years ago.

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Baboons survive 6 months after getting a pig heart transplant

A team of German scientists used new methods to successfully transplant genetically modified and fully functioning pig hearts into baboons.

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George W. Bush’s Eulogy for His Father

Former President George W. Bush delivered a eulogy Wednesday honoring the life of his father, former President George H. W. Bush, who died in Houston last Friday at the age of 94. Below, the full text of George W. Bush’s remarks as delivered. Distinguished guests, including our presidents and first ladies, government officials, foreign dignitaries, and friends, Jeb, Neil, Marvin, Doro, and I, and

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Baboon survives for six months after receiving pig heart transplant

Clinical trials of pig organs in humans could begin in as little as three years, say researchers The transplantation of pig organs into humans is a step closer to becoming a reality after researchers showed the organs can function long-term in baboons. The transplanting of organs from one species to another, known as xenotransplantation, has been the subject of research for many years. Proponents

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Mantle neon illuminates Earth's formation

The Earth formed relatively quickly from the cloud of dust and gas around the Sun, trapping water and gases in the planet's mantle, according to research published Dec. 5 in the journal Nature. Apart from settling Earth's origins, the work could help in identifying extrasolar systems that could support habitable planets.

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Soft tissue shows Jurassic ichthyosaur was warm-blooded, had blubber and camouflage

An ancient, dolphin-like marine reptile resembles its distant relative in more than appearance, according to an international team of researchers that includes scientists from North Carolina State University and Sweden's Lund University. Molecular and microstructural analysis of a Stenopterygius ichthyosaur from the Jurassic (180 million years ago) reveals that these animals were most likely warm-

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Sea invertebrate sheds light on evolution of human blood, immune systems

Botryllus schlosseri, a marine invertebrate that lives in underwater colonies resembling fuzzy pinheads clinging to rocks, has a blood-forming system with uncanny similarities to that of humans, according to scientists at Stanford University.

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Greenland ice sheet melt 'off the charts' compared with past four centuries

Surface melting across Greenland's mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating, according to new research published Dec. 5, 2018, in the journal Nature. The study provides new evidence of the impacts of climate change on Arctic melting and global sea level rise.

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Global carbon dioxide emissions rise even as coal wanes and renewables boom

Global fossil fuel emissions are on track to rise for a second year in a row, primarily due to growing energy use, according to new estimates from the Global Carbon Project, an initiative led by Stanford University scientist Rob Jackson.

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First observation of a square lattice of merons and antimerons

Scientists have, for the first time, observed a square lattice of merons and antimerons—tiny magnetic vortices and antivortices that form in a thin plate of the helical magnet Co8Zn9Mn3. By finely varying a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the thin plate, the researchers were able to induce a transformation between the square lattice of merons-antimerons and a hexagonal lattice of skyrmio

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Strong growth in global CO2 emissions expected for 2018

Global carbon emissions are set to hit an all-time high in 2018—according to researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the Global Carbon Project.

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COSINE-100 experiment investigates dark matter mystery

Astrophysical evidence suggests that the universe contains a large amount of non-luminous dark matter, but no definite signal has been observed despite concerted efforts by many experimental groups. One exception is the long-debated claim by the DAMA group of an annual modulation in the events observed in their detector using sodium-iodide target material as might be expected from weakly interacti

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Pollution: New ammonia emission sources detected from space

Researchers from the CNRS and the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) have prepared the first global map of the distribution of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) by analyzing measurements taken by satellites between 2008 and 2016. The IASI interferometer developed by the CNES allowed them to catalog more than 200 ammonia sources, two-thirds of which had never been identified before. These sources are esse

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Pig Hearts Provide Long-Term Cardiac Function in Baboons

Primates receiving heart transplants from genetically engineered pigs have survived more than six months, a new study reveals.

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University College London Geneticist Cleared of Wrongdoing

A second investigation by the school concludes that David Latchman, also the head of Birkbeck, University of London, was not involved in the image manipulation found in papers he coauthored.

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Common antidepressant does not aid stroke recovery, study finds

Stroke patients prescribed a common antidepressant show no improvement compared with those given a dummy drug, a study led by the University of Edinburgh has found.

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Cars and coal help drive 'strong' CO2 rise in 2018

CO2 emissions hit an all time high, rising nearly 3% in 2018 thanks to coal and a booming global market for cars.

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December open promotions are here!

Hello Eyewirers! It’s time once again to promote a new class of Scouts, Scythes , Mystics , Mods , and Mentors ! Between now and the end of our next major competition, you can fill out the open promotion form here to be considered by HQ without requiring player sponsors. Scout, Scythe, and Mentor Qualifications: Have at least earned 50,000 points and completed 500 cubes Maintain at least 90% accu

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A controversial sighting of dark matter is looking even shakier

Two dark matter experiments disagree despite using the same type of detector material.

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Book Excerpt from Gene Machine

In Chapter 13, "The Final Assault," author Venki Ramakrishnan relays the moment when he and collaborators finally solved the structure of a ribosomal subunit.

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Russia’s Bizarre New Campaign to Define Its National Identity

More than 1,000 miles from Moscow, in a city near Russia’s border with Kazakhstan, residents have taken up an unusual cause: demanding that they be allowed to name their local airport after a famous rock star from the city. In October, fans of Egor Letov, a musician who passed away 10 years ago, started a Facebook page as part of a campaign to change the name of the airport in Omsk, a city of jus

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500-Year-Old Skeleton Found in London (Thigh-High Boots and All)

The discovery of the remains by the River Thames provided a glimpse into the life of a man in medieval times.

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Artificial synapses made from nanowires

Scientists from Jülich together with colleagues from Aachen and Turin have produced a memristive element made from nanowires that functions in much the same way as a biological nerve cell. The component is able to both save and process information, as well as receive numerous signals in parallel. The resistive switching cell made from oxide crystal nanowires is thus proving to be the ideal candida

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Study: Tuberculosis survives by using host system against itself

In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, scientists at the University of Notre Dame have discovered that the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) releases RNA into infected cells.

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Scientist's accidental discovery makes coral grow 40x faster

David Vaughan at the Mote Laboratory is growing coral 40 times faster than in the wild. It typically takes coral 25 to 75 years to reach sexual maturity. With a new coral fragmentation method, it takes just 3. Scientists and conservationists plan to plant 100,000 pieces of coral around the Florida Reef Tract by 2019 and millions more around the world in the years to come. None The news has not be

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First baby born via uterus transplant from a deceased donor

Currently, uterus donation is only available for women with family members who are willing to donate. With live donors in short supply, the new technique might help to increase availability and give more women the option of pregnancy.

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Coal Use Continues to Decline in the U.S.

One power company announces a goal of 100 percent clean energy as a near-record number of coal-fired power plant close — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A banner year for pharma

As 2018 draws to a close, the pharmaceutical industry is celebrating a prosperous year of new investments and therapeutic breakthroughs. These successes were driven by cutting-edge science and progress in finally translating long-standing technology into actual products, according to a cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

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Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper

Even in this digital age, paper is still everywhere. Often, printed materials get used once and are then discarded, creating waste and potentially pollution. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of an easy-to-make "rewritable" paper that can be drawn or printed on over and over again. The messages can last more than half a year, compared to other rewritable

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A molecular look at nascent HDL formation

Oil and water don't mix. But our aqueous blood is full of different types of hydrophobic lipids—including cholesterol. In order to travel via the bloodstream, those lipids need to hitch a ride on an amphipathic carrier. In a recent paper in the Journal of Lipid Research, scientists at Boston University report an advance in our mechanistic understanding of how one such carrier forms.

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Using graphene to detect ALS, other neurodegenerative diseases

The wonders of graphene are numerous—it can enable flexible electronic components, enhance solar cell capacity, filter the finest subatomic particles and revolutionize batteries. Now, the "supermaterial" may one day be used to test for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS—a progressive, neurodegenerative disease which is diagnosed mostly by ruling out other disorders, according to new research fr

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This healthy baby came out of a dead person's uterus

Health It could open up uterine transplants to a lot more people. It may sound like something of a technicality—babies have been born before from uteruses donated by living women—but it’s actually much more important than that.

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On the trail of the Higgs Boson

For the physics community, the discovery of new particles like the Higgs Boson has paved the way for a host of exciting potential experiments. Yet, when it comes to such an elusive particle as the Higgs Boson, it's not easy to unlock the secrets of the mechanism that led to its creation. The experiments designed to detect the Higgs Boson involve colliding particles with sufficiently high energy he

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Effect of religiosity/spirituality on ovarian cancer diagnosis in African American women

An examination of data from a multi-center case-control study of ovarian cancer in African American women found that women who reported higher levels of religiosity/spirituality had increased odds of stage III-IV ovarian cancer at diagnosis.

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Infections during childhood increase the risk of mental disorders

A new study from iPSYCH shows that the infections children contract during their childhood increase the risk of mental disorders during childhood and adolescence. This knowledge expands our understanding of the role of the immune system in the development of mental disorders.

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Monitoring species: Are we looking long enough?

To conserve species, managers need reliable estimates of their population trends. Samples are gathered over time, but the length of the sampling period is often established using crude rules of thumb rather than good statistical methods. In this article, Easton R. White presents an analysis of 820 vertebrate species populations and demonstrates substantial problems with current sampling approaches

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This Frozen Russian Island Is the World's Biggest Jigsaw Puzzle

When Siberia's islands thaw, they turn into a crazy jigsaw puzzle of ice.

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How to protect your phone as you shop and travel

Hackers are watching you this holiday season, so be as mindful of your phone as of your cash and credit cards. In general, your phone and data are safe. Attacks from sophisticated hackers, though, could make your phone vulnerable, according to Michigan State University research. This is particularly noteworthy this time of year, as more people use numerous public Wi-Fi networks as they travel and

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New study sheds light on medication administration errors leading to death — omission is a common cause

Medication administration errors leading to death are common with anticoagulants and antibiotics in particular, according to a new study that analyzed incidents reported in England and Wales. The most common error category was omitted medicine, followed by a wrong dose or a wrong strength. In half of the reported incidents, the patient was aged over 75.

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Electrochemical techniques for monitoring microbial growth demonstrated

Researchers have demonstrated the use of electrochemical techniques to monitor the growth status and energy levels of microorganisms used in biotechnology industries.

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The Best Technology for Fighting Climate Change Isn't a Technology

Forests are the most powerful and efficient carbon-capture system on the planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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On the trail of the Higgs Boson

In a quest to understand the production mechanisms for the Higgs Boson, Silvia Biondi from the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Bologna, Italy investigated the traces of a rare process, called ttH, in which the Higgs Boson is produced in association with a pair of elementary particles referred to as top quarks. Her findings can be found in a recent study published in EPJ Plus.

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UC San Diego researchers develop sensors to detect and measure cancer's ability to spread

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers engineered sensors to detect and measure the metastatic potential of single cancer cells. Metastasis is attributed as the leading cause of death in people with cancer.

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New insights in rust resistance in wheat

Approximately 88 percent of wheat production is susceptible to yellow rust. Researchers have new results regarding the fungus, which evolves quickly to produce new, virulent strains.

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Jameela Jamil and the Trouble With #NoFilter Feminism

Earlier this week, the British actor Jameela Jamil took a familiar stand. For the BBC, she wrote with passion about an issue she’s championed for much of her career: the impossible beauty standards that shape how the world sees women (and how women see themselves). This time, though, Jamil made a particularly bold claim—that airbrushing images should be not just discouraged, but also illegal: “I

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Muggent muse-foder udskød opsendelse: I aften sendes danske projekter i rummet

En satellit fra Aarhus Universitet og stjernekameraer fra DTU Space er med ombord, når SpaceX i aften sender en raket mod den Internationale Rumstation.

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DF-PGT, now possible through massive sequencing techniques

Researchers at the UAB, in collaboration with the Blood and Tissue Bank of Catalonia, have implemented an innovative and universal strategy, prepared for a simultaneous diagnosis of genetic mutations and chromosomal alterations within embryos obtained by in vitro fertilisation (IVF). It allows analysing up to 4,800 genes responsible for the most common hereditary diseases and speeds up the study p

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Widespread decrease in wind energy resources found over the Northern Hemisphere

A new study focusing on the change in wind energy resources and models' simulation ability over the Northern Hemisphere reveals a widespread decline in wind energy resources over the Northern Hemisphere. Using station observation data, the study finds that approximately 30 percent, 50 percent and percent of the stations lost over 30 percent of the wind power potential since 1979 in North America,

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Using graphene to detect ALS, other neurodegenerative diseases

Graphene can determine whether cerebrospinal fluid comes from a person with ALS, MS or from someone without a neurodegenerative disease.

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Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering

Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size. But now, a University of Delaware team has grown a self-assembling, functional network of blood vessels across centimeter scales, a size relevant for human use. With continued development and refinement, the microfluidic system could be used to grow blood vessels for

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Laws designed to ban or curb drivers' use of cell phones are saving motorcyclists' lives

Laws to ban or curb drivers' use of cell phones and other handheld devices have greatly reduced the rate of fatalities for motorcyclists, according to a new study from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Miami. Results show that states with moderate to strong bans have motorcycle fatality rates that differ by as much as 11 percent compared to states with no bans.

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Dirty air now could harm hearts of offspring later

A parent's exposure to dirty air before conception might spell heart trouble for the next generation, a new animal study suggests.

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Type 2 diabetes: A therapeutic avenue is emerging

Restoring the action of insulin is one of the keys to fighting type 2 diabetes. Researchers from Inserm led by Dominique Langin at the Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases (Inserm/Université de Toulouse) are developing a therapeutic strategy that uses the properties of an enzyme (hormone-sensitive lipase) which, when stimulating fatty-acid synthesis in the fat cells, has a beneficial

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A molecular look at nascent HDL formation

Researchers at Boston University pin down a molecular interaction between an apolipoprotein and a lipid transporter that's key to reverse cholesterol transport.

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Meet the astronaut trainer getting billionaire space tourists ready for liftoff

The coming rise in private spaceflight is prompting growth in space companies that give citizen astronauts the know-how they need to fly.

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Infections May Raise The Risk Of Mental Illness In Children

A large study of Danish kids finds that childhood infections are linked with a higher risk of developing some mental illnesses. The risk is highest in the months immediately following the infection. (Image credit: Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source)

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Early clinical trial data show gene therapy reversing sickle cell anemia

After over a decade of preclinical research and development, a new gene therapy treatment for sickle cell anemia (SCA) is reversing disease symptoms in two adults and showing early potential for transportability to resource-challenged parts of the world where SCA is most common.

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After disasters, these types of community groups fight poverty’s rise

In the aftermath of natural disasters, community organizations with broad social ties improve economic and social outcomes for recovering communities, according to new research. Communities recovering from natural disasters often see an increase in the number of businesses and nonprofits that develop in the wake of the cleanup. But that apparent growth doesn’t necessarily counterweigh the accompa

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Maps reveal how each U.S. state enforces drug laws differently

Detox.net recently published maps that use the latest government data on drug use and arrests to show how enforcement varies across the country. Marijuana arrests remain significantly high in many states, even in some where pot's legalized. Methamphetamine is, by far, the drug most commonly involved in drug-related offenses across the country. None American law enforcement agencies made 1.63 mill

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Regeringen: Sådan gør vi genbrug af plastic fantastisk

Et nyt nationalt plastcenter skal identificere barrierer for genanvendelsen af plast og udarbejde designmanualer. Men 50 millioner kroner over fire år er langtfra nok til at gøre genbrug af plastic fantastisk mener kritikere

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How Pink Salt Took Over Millennial Kitchens

For decades, I was under the impression that salt is white. Table salt, sea salt, kosher salt, whatever—the sky is blue, the salt is white, and that’s just how things are. Then, about three years ago and for reasons that were not clear to me at the time, much of the salt I encountered was suddenly pink. I bought some pink salt, but I didn’t know why. It seemed like the right thing to do. Specific

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229 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2018

In 2018, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 229 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 120 wasps, 34 sea slugs, 28 ants, 19 fish, seven flowering plants, seven spiders, four eels, three sharks, two water bears, one

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Reflecting antiferromagnetic arrangements

An x-ray imaging technique could help scientists understand the magnetic structure of promising materials for 'spin'-based electronics.

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Insufficient nutrition during fetal development may lead to early menopause

Previous studies have demonstrated that fetal malnutrition can lead to adult chronic disorders such as type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. A new study out of China now suggests that it also can lead to early menopause and premature ovarian failure. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

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Narcissists less likely to support democracy

New research suggests that people with a narcissistic self-view are more likely to demonstrate lower support for democracy.

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Peace, not war, responsible for deforestation in armed conflict zones

Rates of deforestation in war zones increase dramatically once peace is declared, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.

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Extreme ethnic inequalities in the care system

'White British' children are ten times more likely to be in care than 'Asian Indian' children. 'Black Caribbean' children are 20 times more likely

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Guiding the smart growth of artificial intelligence

A new paper provides a comprehensive look at the development of an ethical framework, code of conduct, and value-based design methodologies for AI researchers and application developers in Europe. The 'Barcelona Declaration for the Proper Development and Usage of Artificial Intelligence in Europe' was launched in the spring of 2017 at the B-Debate event in Barcelona, to stimulate further discussio

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Cardiac surgery for patients with persistent opioid use associated with higher rate of complications, increased costs

Persistent use of opioids by patients is a public health concern in the United States but not much is known about the effect of that use on patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This observational study included 5.7 million patients who underwent cardiac surgery and it compared outcomes among those with persistent opioid use or dependence and those patients without.

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Are infections associated with increased risk of later mental disorders during childhood, adolescence?

This study used Danish nationwide registries to investigate an association between infections treated since birth and subsequent risk of treated childhood and adolescent mental disorders. Among nearly 1.1 million people born in Denmark between 1995 and 2012, about 42,000 (3.9 percent) were hospitalized for any mental disorder and nearly 57,000 (5.2 percent) redeemed a prescription for psychotropic

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Whole-brain imaging of mice during behavior

In a study published in Neuron, Emilie Macé from Botond Roska's group and collaborators demonstrate how functional ultrasound imaging can yield high-resolution, brain-wide activity maps of mice for specific behaviors. The non-invasive technology has promising applications for ophthalmologic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

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Mathematical model offers new strategies for urban burglary prevention

As with most crime, the highest rates of burglary occur in urban communities. However, existing mathematical models typically examine burglaries in residential, suburban environments. In a new article, researchers present a nonlinear model of urban burglary dynamics that accounts for the deterring effect of police presence and emphasizes timing of criminal activity.

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Global review finds consumption of children's antibiotics varies widely

Researchers analyzing the sales of oral antibiotics for children in 70 high- and middle-income countries found that consumption varies widely from country to country with little correlation between countries' wealth and the types of antibiotics. Of concern is the relatively low-level use of amoxicillin, an antibiotic to treat the most common childhood infections.

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Photos: 500-Year-Old Body of Man with Thigh-High Boots

Archaeologists discovered the man's body in London's sewer system.

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Tonnes of food are thrown away daily – could meal kits be the answer?

The scale of food waste is shocking, with almost 30 per cent of US food ending up in the bin. Firms like Blue Apron and HelloFresh could offer a surprising solution

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From a Deceased Woman’s Transplanted Uterus, a Live Birth

A novel transplantation procedure may help more infertile women become pregnant.

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Det nære sundhedsvæsen = 98 forskellige sundhedstilbud

I fremtiden skal flere sundhedsopgaver løses i kommunerne og færre i regionerne. Dermed risikerer syge danskere at blive behandlet ret forskelligt, afhængigt af hvor de bor. Med mindre man udfordrer det kommunale selvstyre, peger Vives Jakob Kjellberg på i dette blogindlæg.

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