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Nyheder2018december07

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Manafort and Cohen Sentencing Documents Put Donald Trump in Spotlight

The Mueller investigation has a long way to go, but the worst case scenario seems increasingly likely.

8h

Drop dit brok: Batteriet stinker, fordi din telefon er fantastisk

Vores telefoner kan i dag (næsten) alt. Lige bortset fra at holde strøm i mere end én dag. Men hvorfor laver man ikke bare et bedre batteri?

4h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvilke metoder bremser bedst juletræets dryssen med nåle?

En læser vil gerne vide, hvorfor Kodimagnyl skulle være godt til at forhindre, at juletræet drysser? Og kan man også smide en Panodil i vandet? Det svarer lektor fra KU på.

52min

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Batterikrise under opsejling: Kan blive svært at skaffe mineral til batterier i elbiler og smartphones

For få miner og politisk ustabilitet kan spænde ben for den grønne omstilling til elbiler.

3min

Manafort, Cohen, and Individual 1 Are in Grave Danger

Federal prosecutors filed three briefs late on Friday portending grave danger for three men: former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, former Trump fixer Michael Cohen, and President Donald J. Trump. In an age when Americans usually get mere squibs of breaking news from Twitter and Facebook and red-faced cable shouters, many started their weekends poring over complex legal filings and peering su

8min

Nye postkort fra Mars: NASA-sonde sender billeder hjem

InSight-sonden har taget sin kraftige robotarm i brug og sendt friske billeder af sin nye arbejdsplads på Mars hjem til Jorden.

2h

France’s ‘Yellow Vest’ Protesters Aren’t Against Climate Action

PARIS—French President Emmanuel Macron swept into power last year promising to modernize his country and scale back its reliance on fossil fuels. Inspired by the Paris climate accord of 2015, his government quickly unveiled an ambitious policy aimed at reducing carbon emissions by 75 percent—in part by raising taxes on diesel and gasoline. This week, Macron’s government suffered its biggest polit

4h

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 8. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

5h

A new 'spin' on kagome lattices

The kagome ferromagnet Fe3Sn2 exhibits an electronic state that couples unusually strongly to an applied magnetic field that can be rotated to point in any direction of a 3-dimensional space, revealing that magnetization drives — in quantum scale — a 'giant' energy shift within the material, an international team of researchers has found.

7h

Mueller’s Memos and the Alleged Lies of the Trump Lieutenants

Memos issued by federal prosecutors on Friday about President Donald Trump’s longtime personal lawyer Michael Cohen—together with a sentencing memo filed earlier this week about Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn—offer the clearest indication yet of how investigators are encircling the president and perhaps reaching the climax of the 19-month probe into a potential conspiracy

9h

The Last Gasp

Whatever Republicans on the House Judiciary thought they were going to get from Friday’s deposition of former FBI Director James Comey, it doesn’t appear they got it. The proof will come when a transcript of the deposition is released on Saturday, part of a deal Comey struck to testify, having initially resisted a subpoena. But no one seemed especially satisfied on Friday. Certainly not Comey, wh

10h

New generation of therapeutics based on understanding of aging biology show promise for Alzheimer's disease

A scientific strategy that explores therapeutic targets based on the biology of aging is gaining ground as an effective approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease.

10h

Researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

Researchers have used nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy to probe the hydrogen bonds that modulate the chemical reactivity of enzymes, catalysts and biomimetic complexes. The technique could lead to the development of better catalysts for use in a wide range of fields.

10h

Magnetic reconnection in space: Experiment and satellite sightings

New research describes striking similarity of laboratory research findings with observations of the four-satellite Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission that studies magnetic reconnection in space.

10h

Study upends timeline for Iroquoian history

New research raises questions about the timing and nature of early interactions between indigenous people and Europeans in North America.

10h

Graphic warnings snuff out cigarettes' appeal to kids

New research suggests graphic warning labels on cigarette ads have the same anti-smoking effect as similar warning labels on cigarette packs.

10h

The Atlantic Daily: Primary Sources

What We’re Following We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Climate Changed: Climate change—the consequences of which can often be of ungraspable scope—might be made more tangible through the lens of public health, and, inextricably, the question of

10h

Kina har sendt sonde til månens bagside

Sonde ventes at lande omkring nytår, hvor den vil udføre eksperimenter og udforske det ukendte terræn.

11h

He’s let thousands of insects bite and sting him—here’s what he’s learned

Animals Justin Schmidt feels the burn so you don’t have to. Justin Schmidt loves studying bugs, which means he’s gotten some painful nips and stings from his subjects. He decided to turn that agony into something useful.

11h

Sounds of Mars wind captured by Nasa's InSight lander

Scientists celebrate recording low-frequency rumblings – ‘an unplanned treat’ The sound of the wind on Mars has been captured for the first time by Nasa’s InSight lander, which touched down on the red planet 10 days ago. The agency’s jet propulsion laboratory (JPL) released audio clips of the alien wind on Friday evening. InSight collected the low-frequency rumblings during its first week of oper

11h

What sets primates apart from other mammals?

Researchers have discovered information about a gene that sets primates — great apes and humans — apart from other mammals, through the study of a rare developmental brain disorder.

11h

Performance on exercise test predicts risk of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer

Performance on an exercise test predicts the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other causes, a new study finds. Good performance on the test equates to climbing three floors of stairs very fast, or four floors fast, without stopping. The findings underline the importance of fitness for longevity.

11h

'Chemo brain' caused by malfunction in three types of brain cells, study finds

In a new study explaining the cellular mechanisms behind cognitive impairment from chemotherapy, scientists have demonstrated that a widely used chemotherapy drug, methotrexate, causes a complex set of problems in three major cell types within the brain's white matter. The study also identifies a potential remedy.

11h

He Served the Longest Sentence of Any Innocent U.S. Inmate

To experience the full scale of this 360° video, use the arrows on the top left of the video window to change angles, or just click and drag the image in any direction. In 1975, Rickey Jackson was 18 years old when he was sentenced to death for a murder he didn’t commit. Before a witness recantation led to his immediate exoneration and release, Jackson spent four decades in prison. He is the long

11h

Gifts for people you love, like, and tolerate

Gift Guides The only gift guide you need to read. Gifts for people you love, like, and tolerate, because not all friendships are equal. And we totally get that.

11h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Oh Comey All Ye Faithful

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ). Today in 5 Lines Former FBI Director James Comey refused to answer several questions related to the Russia investigation during his testimony before members of Congress. Comey told reporters after the session that he would return to testify again in two weeks. In a new court filing, federal prosecutors recommend

11h

Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia

Rapid screening of leukemia cells for drug susceptibility and resistance are bringing scientists closer to patient-tailored treatment for acute myeloid leukemia. Research on the differing drug response patterns of leukemia stem cells and blasts may show why some attempts to treat are not successful and why some patients relapse.

11h

NASA InSight lander 'hears' Martian windsNASA Mars InSight Lander

NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport InSight lander, which touched down on Mars just 10 days ago, has provided the first ever "sounds" of Martian winds on the Red Planet.

12h

NASA's Mars InSight flexes its armNASA Mars InSight Lander

New images from NASA's Mars InSight lander show its robotic arm is ready to do some lifting. With a reach of nearly 6 feet (2 meters), the arm will be used to pick up science instruments from the lander's deck, gently setting them on the Martian surface at Elysium Planitia, the lava plain where InSight touched down on Nov. 26.

12h

Planetary defense: The Bennu experiment

On Dec. 3, after traveling billions of kilometers from Earth, NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft reached its target, Bennu, and kicked off a nearly two-year, up-close investigation of the asteroid. It will inspect nearly every square inch of this ancient clump of rubble left over from the formation of our solar system. Ultimately, the spacecraft will pick up a sample of pebbles and dust from Bennu's sur

12h

Rules to boost fuel economy for passenger vehicles will do more good than harm, new study shows

Experts conclude that rules on the books to increase fuel economy for passenger vehicles will do more good than harm, contradicting claims by the Trump administration as it seeks to roll back fuel economy standards.

12h

Hear the Sounds of Wind on Mars, Recorded by NASA’s InSight LanderNASA Mars InSight Lander

An instrument aboard the spacecraft for measuring the shaking of marsquakes picked up vibrations in the air.

12h

Sexual Misconduct Allegations Against Neil deGrasse Tyson Reveal the Complexity of Academic Inequality

Accusations that the astrophysicist harassed women remind us that racial and gender bias continue to harm science and scientists — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

China launches rover for first far side of the moon landing

China launched a rover early Saturday destined to land on the far side of the moon, a global first that would boost Beijing's ambitions to become a space superpower, state media said.

12h

Australia anti-encryption law rushed to passage

A newly enacted law rushed through Australia's parliament will compel technology companies such as Apple, Facebook and Google to disable encryption protections so police can better pursue terrorists and other criminals.

12h

Rodent Study Suggests Hysterectomy May Affect Memory and Cognition

Rodent Study Suggests Hysterectomy May Affect Memory and Cognition Rats struggle to solve a maze after their uteruses are removed, raising questions about the impacts of the widespread procedure in humans. watermaze.jpg Image credits: IrinaK/ Shutterstock Human Friday, December 7, 2018 – 16:00 Claire Cleveland, Contributor (Inside Science) — In medical textbooks, the nonpregnant uterus is often

12h

InSight lander 'hears' Martian windsNASA Mars InSight Lander

NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport InSight lander, which touched down on Mars just 10 days ago, has provided the first ever "sounds" of Martian winds on the Red Planet. A media teleconference about these sounds will be held today at 12:30 p.m. EST (9:30 a.m. PST).

12h

New ways to look at protein-RNA networks

For their vital tasks, all RNA molecules in our cells require proteins as binding partners. Scientists have developed the first method with which they can analyze the composition of the entire RNA-protein network of the cell.

12h

Experiments at PPPL show remarkable agreement with satellite sightings

As on Earth, so in space. A four-satellite mission that is studying magnetic reconnection—the breaking apart and explosive reconnection of the magnetic field lines in plasma that occurs throughout the universe—has found key aspects of the process in space to be strikingly similar to those found in experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The

12h

Researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy to probe the hydrogen bonds that modulate the chemical reactivity of enzymes, catalysts and biomimetic complexes. The technique could lead to the development of better catalysts for use in a wide range of fields. The findings were published as a "Very Important Paper" in the Dec. 3 issue of Angewandte Ch

12h

New generation of therapeutics based on understanding of aging biology show promise for Alzheimer's disease

A scientific strategy that explores therapeutic targets based on the biology of aging is gaining ground as an effective approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the December 7, 2018 online issue of Neurology®.

12h

NASA releases first sounds ever captured on MarsNASA Mars InSight Lander

The audio captured by the lander is of Martian winds blowing at an estimated 10 to 15 mph. It was taken by the InSight Mars lander, which is designed to help scientists learn more about the formation of rocky planets, and possibly discover liquid water on Mars. Microphones are essentially an "extra sense" that scientists can use during experiments on other planets. None In 1976, NASA's Viking 1 s

13h

A new 'spin' on kagome lattices

Like so many targets of scientific inquiry, the class of material referred to as the kagome magnet has proven to be a source of both frustration and amazement. Further revealing the quantum properties of the kagome magnet is seen as one of the primary challenges in fundamental physics—to both theorists and experimentalists.

13h

Gas Cylinder Explosion Kills Researcher at Indian Laboratory

Two professors have been arrested for negligence in connection with the blast.

13h

Marlboro maker places $1.8 billion bet on marijuana company

The deal includes the option for Altria Group to take a 55 percent stake in the Cronos Group over the next five years. It marks a continuing trend of big tobacco companies moving into the marijuana industry. If legalized at the federal level in the U.S., the marijuana industry could shape up to be like the current alcohol market in the U.S. None Big tobacco companies have been quietly eyeing a mo

13h

The privacy risks of compiling mobility data

A new study finds that the growing practice of compiling massive, anonymized datasets about people's movement patterns is a double-edged sword: While it can provide deep insights into human behavior for research, it could also put people's private data at risk.

13h

US interstate highways need overhaul, says new report

The future of the US Interstate Highway System is threatened by a persistent and growing backlog of structural and operational deficiencies and by various looming challenges, such as the progress of automated vehicles, developments in electric vehicles, and vulnerabilities due to climate change.

13h

What does expanded Medicaid mean for the health and work lives of enrollees? A lot

A new study could help states that will soon expand Medicaid, or may add a work requirement, understand what might be in store. Nearly half of enrollees in Michigan's expanded Medicaid felt their physical health improved; more than a third cited better mental or dental health. Over two-thirds of those with jobs said coverage helped them do better at work; those who said their health had improved w

13h

Newly identified T cells could play a role in cancer and other diseases

Researchers have identified a new type of T cell called a phospholipid-reactive T cell that is able to recognize phospholipids, the molecules that help form cells' outer membranes.

13h

Putting the brakes on tumor stealth

New research helps explain how some cancers are able to escape our immune system. The findings have significant implications for the burgeoning field of cancer immunotherapy, an approach that is focused on harnessing the remarkable power of our own immune system to seek out and destroy cancer.

13h

Six Michigan Doctors Charged in $464 Million Insurance and Opioid Scheme

Federal prosecutors said the doctors unnecessarily prescribed opioids to patients and sought to defraud insurance companies.

13h

Climate Change Is Making Sharks Right-Handed

Warming oceans lead to some strange brain changes in sharks.

13h

How the Grimch stole Eyewire

Every player in Eyewire liked tracing a lot, But the reaper, who lived beneath Eyewire, did not. The Grimch hated tracing, the whole tracing season! Now, please don’t ask why, no one quite knows the reason. It could be that his scythe wasn’t polished just right, I could be, perhaps, that his cloak was too tight. But I think that the most likely reason of all, May have been that his brain was two

13h

Inflammatory bowel disease linked to prostate cancer

Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is the first report to show these men have higher than average PSA values and a significantly higher risk of potentially dangerous prostate cancer. They need to be screened more carefully for prostate cancer. About 1 million men have inflammatory bowel disease in the U.S., a common

13h

Scientists to produce anti-cancer drugs in yeast

Nature is so complex that natural molecules used for i.e. cancer treatment still can't be produced by chemical synthesis. Today, major chemical and pharmaceutical companies harvest large amounts of rare plants and seeds in order to extract valuable substances.

13h

How ice particles promote the formation of radicals

The production of chlorofluorocarbons, which damage the ozone layer, has been banned as far as possible. However, other substances can also tear holes in the ozone layer in combination with ice particles, such as those found in clouds. Researchers have discovered a possible mechanism for this.

13h

One out of three rivers in the Iberian Peninsula is affected by salinization

One out of three rivers in the Iberian Peninsula has salinization mainly due the impact of agricultural activity and territory urbanization. This environmental problem will affect hydric ecosystems due global warming, the growing use of water and the exploitation of soil natural resources.

13h

The threat of climate change hasn’t curbed our carbon emissions—they’re at a record high

Environment We’re on track for a worst-case scenario. Global carbon emissions are on the rise again, despite rising productivity for renewable energy, and concerns about climate change.

13h

Tiny ceramic particles make this building material fire-safe

Inspired by the insulation on a humble electrical cable, researchers have found that tiny ceramic particles can make plastic-backed cladding fire-safe. How do you make a light-weight cladding material that doesn’t catch fire? It’s a question the building industry globally is wrestling with in the wake of the 2017 Grenfell Tower blaze in London that cost the lives of 72 people. But according to ne

13h

Gadget Lab Podcast: What the Tumblr Porn Ban Means for Users

WIRED writer Emily Dreyfuss joins the Gadget Lab to talk about Tumblr's porn ban and where active members of that community are headed next.

13h

Map shows homicide hotspots in medieval London

This map shows the 142 murders that were committed in London from 1300 to 1340. Each clickable pin reveals the grisly details as recorded in contemporary coroner's reports. Then as now, stabbing was the main method of killing in London — but the murder rate was three times higher. It's January 1322 and William, the son of Henry the Goldsmith at Rowe, is peeing in the public urinal in Cheapside. T

13h

12 weird science facts to share with your family this holiday

Science A taxidermied man, a real-life Wolverine, and a professional farter. Sorry, flatulist. English philosopher Jeremy Bentham was taxidermied. The U.S. Air Force tested an ejector seat with a black bear. There are many weird science facts—here are 12 from The…

13h

Gender bias sways how we perceive competence in faces

Faces that are seen as competent are also perceived as more masculine, according to new research.

13h

What's behind Mediterranean diet and lower cardiovascular risk?

A new study offers insights from a cohort study of women in the U.S. who reported consuming a Mediterranean-type diet.

13h

Scientists exchanged quantum information on daylight in a free-space quantum key distribution

Scientists have reported a successful free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) in daylight with the self-developed polarization encoding chip for the first time. QKD is one of the most promising secure communication technologies, which encodes information into a single-photon, the smallest measurable unit of light. By using the quantum mechanical properties of the single-photon, quantum cryptogra

13h

How fruit flies ended up in our fruit bowls

Fruit flies can be a scourge in our homes, but to date no-one has known how they became our uninvited lodgers. For decades, researchers have searched for their origins and now a Swedish-American research team has succeeded. They have also discovered that fruit flies in the wild are far more picky than their domesticated counterparts, a factor that long ago probably prompted the flies to move in wi

13h

A new 'spin' on kagome lattices

The kagome ferromagnet Fe3Sn2 exhibits an electronic state that couples unusually strongly to an applied magnetic field that can be rotated to point in any direction of a 3-dimensional space, revealing that magnetization drives — in quantum scale — a 'giant' energy shift within the material, an international team of researchers has found.

14h

A code for reprogramming immune sentinels

For the first time, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has successfully reprogrammed mouse and human skin cells into immune cells called dendritic cells. The process is quick and effective, representing a pioneering contribution for applying direct reprogramming for inducing immunity. Importantly, the finding opens up the possibility of developing novel dendritic cell-based immunotherapi

14h

Elucidating protein-protein interactions & designing small molecule inhibitors

To carry out wide range of cellular functionalities, proteins often associate with one or more proteins in a phenomenon known as Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI). Experimental and computational approaches were applied on PPIs in order to determine the interacting partners, and also to understand how an abnormality in such interactions can become the principle cause of a disease.

14h

The Grammy Nominations: A New Generation Arrives

There’s never been more new music. Spotify, to take one recently unveiled example , sees 20,000 songs added to its libraries every day. Feeding the feeling of deluge, the Grammy Awards has expanded the number of nominations in its Big Four general categories from five to eight so as to “better reflect the large number of entries.” When the Oscars grew its field of Best Picture nominees in 2009, t

14h

Molecular insights into spider silk

Spider silk belongs to the toughest fibers in nature and has astounding properties. Scientists have now discovered new molecular details of self-assembly of a spider silk fiber protein.

14h

How Do Animals Breathe Underwater?

Fish do it. So do jellyfish, starfish and sea cucumbers.

14h

New automated N-glycan profiling web app shaves days off of data interpretation for glycobiologists

The first automated, web-based application that enables routine use of enzymatic digestions to improve N-glycan analyses from New England Biolabs (NEB). This software not only saves precious times for glycobiologists who are more attuned to traditional methods, but also provides the most accurate interpretation of glycan enzymatic digestion data on the market.

14h

Canada Welcomes AI—But Not All 'Black in AI' Workshop Guests

More than 100 researchers who hoped to attend a big AI conference in Montreal couldn't get visas.

14h

14h

Bacterial 'sleeper cells' evade antibiotics and weaken defence against infection

New research unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells, potentially opening new avenues to finding ways of clearing these bacterial cells from the body, and stopping recurrence of the bacterial infection.

14h

Seeing and avoiding the 'blind spot' in atomic force measurements

Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy — a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules.

14h

Double the stress slows down evolution

Bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics more slowly if they also have to defend themselves against predators.

14h

Kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury suitable for transplant

Organ procurement teams are sometimes leery of accepting kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury (AKI), fearing they will harm the recipients. However, a new study suggests these fears may be unfounded.

14h

Tiny bubbles break each other up

Engineers have fine-tuned a microfluidic process for producing uniform bubbles to make ordered foams with bubbles in two or three distinct sizes. The customizable, 'wet' foams are intended for applications that include chemical and biological studies.

14h

Cutting the cord: Which cable TV alternatives make the grade

When the average cost of a cable or satellite bill is $85 to $100 a month, is it any wonder that so many are cutting the cord?

14h

Hopeful Images From 2018

2018 has been another year of news stories with photos that can often be difficult or disturbing to view. I’ve made it a tradition to compose an essay of uplifting images from the past year—an effort to seek out and recognize some of the abundant joy and kindness present in the world around us. The following are images from the past year of personal victories, families and friends at play, expres

14h

Recovering frogs plop from backpacks into new places

Translocation—or capturing, transporting, and releasing—Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frogs seems to be working in Yosemite National Park, report researchers. The frogs travel in a box, within a canister, surrounded by snow, tucked tightly into a backpack strapped to a determined ecologist. Twenty at a time they depart places where they’re thriving for sites from which their species has vanished. T

14h

World's First Insect Vaccine Could Help Bees Fight Off Deadly Disease

American foulbrood is an infectious disease that devastates honeybee hives. Scientists say they've created a vaccine for it, despite a big hurdle: Bees don't have antibodies. (Image credit: Bernadett Szabo/Reuters)

14h

Graphic warnings snuff out cigarettes' appeal to kids

New research from Cornell University suggests graphic warning labels on cigarette ads have the same anti-smoking effect as similar warning labels on cigarette packs.

14h

NASA jubler: Fartøj sender lyd hjem fra Mars

For første gang nogensinde er der optaget lyd på den røde planet. Lyt med her.

14h

Dust to dust: How Earth’s most advanced observatory is unraveling our origins

Science It’s a well-oiled machine. Chile's high-altitude ALMA observatory is fully operational, and changing the story of planet formation.

14h

How cells do ‘quality control’ for misfolded proteins

Researchers have identified the key molecular players in the decisions cells make about whether to scrap or salvage misfolded proteins. Proteins are the workhorses of our cells, carrying out essential tasks to keep our cells—and our bodies—functioning properly. But proteins can only do their jobs if they fold into the right shape. When a protein misfolds, the cell can try to salvage the situation

14h

Artificial intelligence fools fingerprint security systems

New research reveals a surprising level of vulnerability in fingerprint-based security systems. Fingerprint authentication systems are a widely trusted, ubiquitous form of biometric authentication, deployed on billions of smartphones and other devices worldwide. Using a neural network trained to synthesize human fingerprints, however, researchers have evolved a fake fingerprint that could potenti

14h

News about a plant hormone

The plant hormone jasmonic acid also performs a function that was previously unknown. It ensures that the leaf pores close when leaves are injured. For the plant, this could be an emergency signal.

14h

Supercomputers without waste heat

Physicists explore superconductivity for information processing.

14h

DDT in Alaska meltwater poses cancer risk for people who eat lots of fish

Children in Alaska whose diet includes a lot of fish from rivers fed by the Eastern Alaska Mountain Range may have a long-term elevated risk for cancer because of insecticides — including DDT — in the meltwater.

14h

Unknown treasure trove of planets found hiding in dust

The first unbiased survey of protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars in the Taurus star-forming region turned up a higher-than-expected number of disks with features suggesting nascent planets, according to a new study.

14h

More bioplastics do not necessarily contribute to climate change mitigation

Bioplastics are often promoted as an environmentally and climate-friendly alternative to conventional petroleum-based plastics. However, a recent study suggests that shifting to plant-based plastics could have less positive effects than expected. Specifically, an increased consumption of bioplastics in the following years is likely to generate increased greenhouse gas emissions from cropland expan

14h

What can a snowflake teach us about how cancer spreads in the body?

What can seashells, lightning and the coastline of Britain teach us about new drugs for cancer? The answer, according to a team of researchers, may revolve around fractals, the infinitely complex patterns found in nature.

14h

Hazelnuts improve older adults' micronutrient levels, study shows

Older adults who added hazelnuts to their diet for a few months significantly improved their levels of two key micronutrients.

14h

Study upends timeline for Iroquoian history

New research from Cornell University raises questions about the timing and nature of early interactions between indigenous people and Europeans in North America.

14h

Harnessing the power of 'spin orbit' coupling in silicon: Scaling up quantum computation

Research teams from UNSW are investigating multiple pathways to scale up atom-based computing architectures using spin-orbit coupling — advancing towards their goal of building a silicon-based quantum computer in Australia.

14h

Are amorphous solids elastic or plastic?

How do amorphous solids respond to a small deformation? Can standard elasticity describe amorphous solids? To answer this question, Dr. JIN Yuliang from the Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with his collaborators, systematically studied the mechanical properties of amorphous solids using a numerical model system.

14h

Brain scans reveal why your brain forgets details

The way we store and retrieve memories prioritises abstract context over specific details, which might help us learn general lessons from our experiences

15h

The Titanic is now a photorealistic gaming experience

Technology This super precise recreation shows VR has a future in history. Vintage Digital Revival launched a demo of its virtual reality experience “Titanic Honor and Glory.”…

15h

How Millennial Parents Are Reinventing the Cherished Family Photo Album

On the top shelf of closets, in dusty basements, and tucked away in chests across the country sit shoeboxes and stacks of albums filled with photos. The images, perhaps slightly curled and yellowed, usually chronicle all the big moments of childhood: births, first days of school, gap-toothed elementary-school smiles, and high-school graduations. For decades, the photo-stuffed shoebox has been a h

15h

Key to lifelong heart health is childhood intervention

Evolving evidence shows that heart healthy habits in adults are rooted in the environments we live in in early childhood, representing a window of opportunity in young children to focus on health promotion and potentially prevent disease in adulthood, according to a review paper.

15h

Are amorphous solids elastic or plastic?

In a crystalline solid, the atoms form an ordered lattice. Crystalline solids respond elastically to small deformations: When the applied strain is removed, the macroscopic stress, as well as the microscopic configuration of the atomic lattice, goes back to the original state. On the other hand, a material behaves plastically if it does not return to its original state. In general, plasticity only

15h

Harnessing the power of 'spin orbit' coupling in silicon: Scaling up quantum computation

Australian scientists have investigated new directions to scale up qubits—utilising the spin-orbit coupling of atom qubits—adding a new suite of tools to the armory.

15h

Man Coughs Up a Giant Blood Clot in the Shape of His Lung

A man in California surprised his doctors when he coughed up an unusual looking blood clot: It was in the shape of his lung.

15h

Magnets make a new soft metamaterial stiffen up in a flash

Scientists can dial the stiffness of a bizarre new type of synthetic material up or down using magnets.

15h

The privacy risks of compiling mobility data

A new study by MIT researchers finds that the growing practice of compiling massive, anonymized datasets about people's movement patterns is a double-edged sword: While it can provide deep insights into human behavior for research, it could also put people's private data at risk.

15h

'Fortnite' survey shows kids are playing in class. So what can parents do?

If getting the kids and teens in your home to disconnect from "Fortnite" feels like a battle royal, take just a little bit of comfort. Parents, you are not alone.

15h

Iron-rich lamellae in the semiconductor

There is often a pronounced symmetry when you look at the lattice of crystals: the atoms are uniformly arranged. This behavior was also to be expected by a crystal, which physicists from Germany and Poland produced: a compound from an indium arsenide semiconductor, spiked with some iron. The material, however, did not adhere to perfect symmetry. The iron formed two-dimensional, lamellar-shaped str

15h

China Launches First-Ever Mission to the Moon's Farside

In late December or early January the Chang’e 4 spacecraft will touch down at a site near the lunar south pole within the solar system’s largest-known impact crater — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

How the CIA Trains Spies to Hide in Plain Sight

It's not just about putting on a fake mustache. Disguise is about changing the way you carry yourself.

15h

Experiments at PPPL show remarkable agreement with satellite sightings

Feature describes striking similarity of laboratory research findings with observations of the four-satellite Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission that studies magnetic reconnection in space.

15h

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy to probe the hydrogen bonds that modulate the chemical reactivity of enzymes, catalysts and biomimetic complexes. The technique could lead to the development of better catalysts for use in a wide range of fields. The findings were published as a 'Very Important Paper' in the Dec. 3 issue of Angewandte Ch

15h

Study highlights correlations between violent death and substance use

Consumption of alcohol or at least one drug was associated with over half the violent deaths that occurred in São Paulo City in the period analyzed.

15h

Nasa's InSight probe listens to Martian windsNASA Mars InSight Lander

Two instruments on the recently landed InSight probe capture the noise made by the planet's wind.

15h

Being yelled at: Our brain on alert in a flash

What happens within the brain when it perceives a threatening signal, such as an aggressive voice? Researchers have studied brain activity during the processing of various emotional voices. They discovered that we notice a voice much faster when it is considered threatening than when it is perceived as normal or happy. Our attention is more focused on threatening voices to enable us to clearly rec

15h

Damning evidence of dam's impacts on rainforest birds

Conservation scientists have found that a dam built in Thailand 31 years ago has caused the local bird population to collapse.

15h

3D-printed glucose biosensors

A 3D-printed glucose biosensor for use in wearable monitors has been created. The work could lead to improved glucose monitors for millions of people who suffer from diabetes.

15h

Engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug

Engineers have repurposed wasp venom as an antibiotic drug that's nontoxic to human cells.

15h

New algorithm provides a more detailed look at urban heat islands

Urban areas are warmer than the adjacent undeveloped land, a phenomenon known as the urban heat island effect. A new interactive map gives us the most detailed look yet at these 'urban heat islands' across the world.

15h

Rat Study Points to Role of Uterus in Memory

When researchers removed the reproductive organ, female rats had more difficulty solving a water maze.

16h

Half a million tests and many mosquitoes later, new buzz about a malaria prevention drug

Researchers spent two years testing chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the malaria parasite at an earlier stage in its lifecycle than most current drugs, revealing a new set of chemical starting points for the first drugs to prevent malaria instead of just treating the symptoms.

16h

Mitigating the effect of climate change on sea turtles

New research has reported effective conservation strategies that can mitigate the impacts of climate warming on sea turtle nesting success.

16h

Link between neonatal vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia confirmed

Newborns with vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life, a team of researchers has reported. The discovery could help prevent some cases of the disease by treating vitamin D deficiency during the earliest stages of life. The study found newborns with vitamin D deficiency had a 44 percent increased risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia as adults compared to tho

16h

Ending Weed Prohibition Hasn’t Stopped Drug Crimes

James Graham L egalizing POT was supposed to reduce crime, or so advocates argued. The theory was simple: As cannabis buyers beat a path to the nearest dispensary, the black market would dry up , and with it the industry’s criminal element. Indeed, a study recently published in The Economic Journal found that after medical marijuana was legalized in California, violent crime fell 15 percent . Tal

16h

Trilobites: The Genes That Make Parrots Into the Humans of the Bird World

Long-lived and clever parrots may be as different genetically from other birds as humans are from other primates.

16h

A closer look into Harvard scientists' plan to block out the sun

Solar geoengineering aims to cool global temperatures by reflecting some of the sun's light back into space. The team plans to test how releasing particles at high altitudes affects a small part of the stratosphere. Solar geoengineering solutions such as this could be a relatively cheap way to curb global warming. None In March 1991, the second-largest volcano eruption of the 20th century occurre

16h

Nobel laureates dismiss fears about genetically modified foods

Winners of chemistry prize say excessive concerns could limit scientific progress Winners of this year’s Nobel prize for chemistry say overblown fears about genetically modified foods risk preventing society benefiting from the technology. Prof Frances Arnold, from the US, and Sir Gregory Winter, from Britain, made the comments on Friday ahead of Monday’s presentation of the prize. Continue readi

16h

Researchers explore what's behind Mediterranean diet and lower cardiovascular risk

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health offers insights from a cohort study of women in the U.S. who reported consuming a Mediterranean-type diet.

16h

ETRI exchanged quantum information on daylight in a free-space quantum key distribution

The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) has reported a successful free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) in daylight with the self-developed polarization encoding chip for the first time. QKD is one of the most promising secure communication technologies, which encodes information into a single-photon, the smallest measurable unit of light. By using the quantum mechanic

16h

Australia's Encryption-Busting Law Could Impact Global Privacy

Australia has passed a law that would require companies to weaken their encryption, a move that could reverberate globally.

16h

Trump Chooses a Loyal Foot Soldier for the UN

Nikki Haley accepted the job of U.S. ambassador to the United Nations when, as she tells it , Donald Trump assured her that she wouldn’t have to be a “talking head.” Now the president plans to replace her with a woman once described as “ the new face of the talking head ,” someone who quite literally speaks for the Trump administration. On Friday, Trump revealed that he will nominate Heather Naue

16h

Gender bias sways how we perceive competence in faces

Faces that are seen as competent are also perceived as more masculine, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

16h

Physicists Keep Trying — and Failing — to Find Dark Matter in Dark Places

A summertime sparkle seemed to hint that researchers had found dark matter, but it looks like those scientists were wrong.

16h

Dårlig klima-samvittighed? Sådan køber du din flyvetur lidt grønnere

Markedet for CO2-kompensation er lidt af en jungle. Her får du et par råd til, hvordan du kan købe udslippet fra din flyvetur tilbage.

16h

Universal income vs. the robots: Meet the presidential candidate fighting automation

7 questions for Andrew Yang, the 2020 US presidential candidate pushing for basic income.

16h

The Books Briefing: History, Reconsidered

If history is written by the victors, as the old adage goes, then revisiting and questioning stories of the past are necessary pursuits. Karina Longworth, host of the You Must Remember This podcast , dives into Old Hollywood secrets to uncover the real stories of famed actors’ lives in her latest book, Seduction . Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House series is also reanalyzed in light of the autho

16h

A Close Reading of Trump’s Friday Tweetstorm

The first presidential tweets on Friday morning landed nearly an hour before dawn on the East Coast, and they were a doozy—even for Donald Trump. In the span of five lengthy (for Twitter) posts, the president unleashed a series of charges, complaints, and conspiracy theories aimed at undercutting a forthcoming report from Special Counsel Robert Mueller and directing the nation’s attention, once a

16h

Getting the Inside Story: In Vivo Imaging

In vitro work has been generally unable to capture the intricate interplay so vital to regulating function and homeostasis. In vivo imaging represents a solution to that uncertainty. Download this eBook from AnalytikJena to find out how in vivo imaging gives scientists the ability to bridge the gap between the petri dish and the animal model!

16h

Atmospheric scientists find causes of firenado in deadly Carr Fire

Atmospheric scientists have documented a rare firenado, finding a number of factors that combined at just the right time and place to catalyze the deadly Carr Fire in Northern California. These observations may help forecasters and scientists identify — and potentially warn – for future destructive fire-generated vortices.

16h

It's possible to get too much sleep, but don't let that keep you up at night

Health But you should probably be more worried about not getting enough. At this point we should all know that we need to get eight hours of sleep per night. Any less and you’re functioning below normal. But is it possible to get too much…

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16h

"Co-op" Lets Users Barter DNA and Health Information for Shares

LunaDNA receives Securities and Exchange Commission approval to treat the data as currency.

16h

Inflammatory bowel disease linked to prostate cancer

Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is the first report to show these men have higher than average PSA values and a significantly higher risk of potentially dangerous prostate cancer. They need to be screened more carefully for prostate cancer. About 1 million men have inflammatory bowel disease in the U.S., a common

17h

Researchers evaluate pMSCs sheets for engineered repair and regeneration of heart tissue

The placenta offers an abundant source of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs), which a new study has shown can readily form cell sheets that could be implanted in children with congenital heart defects and offer benefits for heart repair and regeneration compared to commonly used synthetic material-based scaffolds.

17h

Parker's Washplant is on the Edge of Disaster | Gold Rush

Parker's beaver dam fix has catastrophically failed, leaving wash-plant Slucifer and his season in the balance. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https:

17h

A world first: Luxembourg's public transport to be free for all

To combat congestion, Luxembourg aims to become the first country to implement fare-free public transit services. Other European nations are considering similar courses, but across the pond the United States continues to fumble its public transportation to deleterious effects. Luxembourg's goal is noble, but it will have to overcome historic trends showing such fare-free systems rarely work in th

17h

Tweets Cost Kevin Hart the Oscars. His Apology Made It Worse

When the comedian's past homophobic tweets surfaced, he could've used it as an opportunity for dialogue. But he didn't.

17h

Infectivity of different HIV-1 strains may depend on which cell receptors they target

Distinct HIV-1 strains may differ in the nature of the CCR5 molecules to which they bind, affecting which cells they can infect and their ability to enter cells, according to a new study. The findings have implications for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting CCR5.

17h

Mice display altered immune system following spaceflight

Based on examinations of mice that had been on board the Bion-M1 biosatellite, new research demonstrates that the outer space environment impairs the production of B lymphocytes, the white blood cells responsible for antibody production. The study also shows that such adverse effects persist at least one week after returning to Earth.

17h

Drawing is better than writing for memory retention

Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that even if people weren't good at it, drawing, as a method to help retain new information, was better than re-writing notes, visualization exercises or passively looking at images.

17h

Wintertime arctic sea ice growth slows long-term decline

New research has found that increases in the rate at which Arctic sea ice grows in the winter may have partially slowed down the decline of the Arctic sea ice cover.

17h

Scientists enter unexplored territory in superconductivity search

Scientists mapping out the quantum characteristics of superconductors — materials that conduct electricity with no energy loss — have entered a new regime. Using newly connected tools, they've uncovered previously inaccessible details of the 'phase diagram' of one of the most commonly studied 'high-temperature' superconductors.

17h

Food system organizations must strengthen their operations to safeguard against potential threats

Food systems face growing threats as extreme weather events become more common and more extreme due to climate change. A new study highlights characteristics of organizations involved in the food system that may lead them to be more prepared to respond to such disasters, and opportunities for local, state, and federal organizations to improve resilience across the urban food system.

17h

Circulating tumor cell count could help choose treatment for metastatic breast cancer patients

Circulating tumor-cell (CTC) count could be used to choose hormone therapy or chemotherapy as frontline treatment for patients with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), HER2-negative (HER2-) metastatic breast cancer, according to data from the phase III STIC CTC clinical trial. In the case of discrepancy between CTC count-based treatment choice and physician's choice of treatment, frontline chemother

17h

'Sun in a box' would store renewable energy for the grid

Engineers have come up with a conceptual design for a system to store renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, and deliver that energy back into an electric grid on demand. The system may be designed to power a small city not just when the sun is up or the wind is high, but around the clock.

17h

Discovering neurons that rapidly catch our mistakes

Scientists identify single neurons in the human brain that catch our mistakes and correct future behavior.

17h

Neil deGrasse Tyson and the Careers That Weren’t

The summaries this week of the complicated accusations against Neil deGrasse Tyson—there are now four women , accusing the famed astrophysicist of four different kinds of sexual impropriety—have tended to distill the allegations, and Tyson’s reaction to them, down to a familiar, binary bluntness: “ Neil deGrasse Tyson Denies Misconduct Accusations .” Action and reaction, equal and opposite, the n

17h

Chronic kidney disease bucks trends in all 50 states

The burden of chronic kidney disease, as well as the probability of death related to chronic kidney disease, have increased substantially over the past 15 years in all 50 US states, report researchers. Such increases also were seen in younger adults ages 20 to 54, a group in which kidney disease had been uncommon. The findings appear in JAMA Network Open . Advances in treating cancer, heart disea

17h

Chasing Copernicus in Poland

In search of the man who kicked Earth out of its place at the center of the universe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

New traffic rules in 'Graphene City'

In the drive to find new ways to extend electronics beyond the use of silicon, physicists are experimenting with other properties of electrons, beyond charge. Physicists now describe a way to manipulate electrons based on their energy in relation to momentum — called 'valley degree of freedom.'

17h

Targeted cognitive training benefits patients with severe schizophrenia

Researchers find that patients with severe, refractory schizophrenia benefit from targeted cognitive therapy, improving auditory and verbal outcomes and the way they process information.

17h

Eliminating the latent reservoir of HIV

A new study suggests that a genetic switch that causes latent HIV inside cells to begin to replicate can be manipulated to completely eradicate the virus from the human body. Cells harboring latent HIV are 'invisible' to the natural defenses of the immune system. The findings, which suggest a cure for HIV may be possible, are reported in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

17h

Two-dimensional materials skip the energy barrier by growing one row at a time

A new study could provide engineers new design rules for creating microelectronics, membranes, and tissues, and open up better production methods for new materials. At the same time, the research helps uphold a scientific theory that has remained unproven for over a century.

17h

Hummingbirds thrive at innovative Mexico gardens

In a dimly lit corner of a bustling market in Mexico City, vendors of amulets, voodoo dolls and other mystical objects sell tiny, taxidermied hummingbirds as charms to bring luck in love.

17h

New algorithm provides a more detailed look at urban heat islands

The concept of an urban heat island (UHI), a phenomenon in which urban areas are significantly warmer than the surrounding rural areas, is not new. The methodology for estimating UHIs, however, is constantly changing, creating a wide array of differing data points.

17h

Reproduction, from Hippocrates to IVF

The first book to take in 3,000 years of baby-making shows how women functioned as "vessels" in early ideas of creation, until the ancient Greeks established theories of "dual contribution—whether two seeds or two souls—that dominated beliefs about how everything multiplied for centuries to come.

17h

Engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug

The venom of insects such as wasps and bees is full of compounds that can kill bacteria. Unfortunately, many of these compounds are also toxic for humans, making it impossible to use them as antibiotic drugs.

17h

How to Teach the Civil War in the Deep South

Editor’s Note: In the next five years, most of America’s most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just five years leading a classroom. The Atlantic’ s “On Teaching” project is crisscrossing the country to talk to vete

17h

Matter: The Planet Has Seen Sudden Warming Before. It Wiped Out Almost Everything.

In some ways, the planet's worst mass extinction — 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian Period — may parallel climate change today.

17h

Q&A: Lizard Dreams May Not Be So Different From Your Own

Some species seem to experience a type of slumber resembling R.E.M. sleep, the dream state of humans.

17h

P.M. Forni, Who Argued for ‘Choosing Civility,’ Dies at 67

In two books he wrote about rudeness and how to avoid it. He also started a program to encourage the practice of good manners.

17h

Three ways Facebook and other social media companies could clean up their acts – if they wanted to

Facebook is in crisis mode, but the company can take major steps to fix itself – and the global community it says it wants to promote. Facebook founder, CEO and majority shareholder Mark Zuckerberg need not wait for governments to impose regulations. If he and other industry leaders wanted to, they could make meaningful changes fairly quickly.

17h

Researchers Decry "Misrepresented" Findings in Fuel-Efficiency Rollback Plan

The Trump administration analysis to justify the rule change made several major errors, a new study says — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Trump Picks a Washington Insider as His Next Attorney General

In a White House unsettled by the ongoing Russia probe— and unprepared for its conclusion —the president on Friday signaled a solution to at least one of the many problems before him: who would permanently replace Jeff Sessions as attorney general. Heading to Marine One on the South Lawn, Donald Trump said he intends to nominate William Barr, a former attorney general under George H. W. Bush, to

17h

New algorithm provides a more detailed look at urban heat islands

Urban areas are warmer than the adjacent undeveloped land, a phenomenon known as the urban heat island effect. A new interactive map developed by Yale researchers gives us the most detailed look yet at these 'urban heat islands' across the world.

17h

Risk Analysis releases special issue on communicating about Zika virus

Today, Risk Analysis, an International Journal, published a special issue, 'Communicating About Zika,' which features several articles that were originally presented as works-in-progress at the Zika Communication Summit convened in March 2017 by the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

17h

MIT engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug

MIT engineers have repurposed wasp venom as an antibiotic drug that's nontoxic to human cells.

17h

Some people uncomfortable discontinuing cancer screening even when benefit is low

A new study finds 29 percent of veterans who underwent recommended screening colonoscopies were uncomfortable with the idea of stopping these screenings when the benefit was expected to be low for them personally.

17h

Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives

Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors.

17h

Ultrarestrictive opioid prescribing strategy associated with fewer pills dispensed

An ultrarestrictive opioid prescribing strategy was associated with a reduction in the number of pills dispensed in a study of patients having surgery for gynecologic cancer, without changes in postoperative pain scores, complications or increases in prescription refill requests. Under the protocol, patients having ambulatory or minimally invasive surgery weren't prescribed opioids at discharge un

17h

Gecko-inspired nanofiber ‘carpet’ could lead to superpower coatings

A new way to make arrays of nanofibers that gets its inspiration from polar bear fur, lotus leaves, and gecko feet could lead to coatings that are sticky, repellant, insulating, or light emitting. “This is so removed from anything I’ve ever seen that I would have thought it was impossible,” says Joerg Lahann, a professor of chemical engineering at the University of Michigan and senior author of t

18h

Machine-learning enables a previously-unseen look at polymers helpful in biomedical field

Polymers—molecules of repeating chemicals—are the basis of many materials: plastic water bottles, rubber tires, even the keratin in your hair. When certain kinds of polymers are sensitive to changes in external stimuli such as temperature, they become helpful, particularly in biomedical applications like drug delivery, tissue engineering, and gene delivery.

18h

Priyanka Chopra, Nick Jonas, and the Two Internets

India is commonly called the world’s largest democracy, a title that may confuse anyone raised to think of America’s claim to democracy as primary in every way. Similarly, India outranks the U.S. in terms of how many people in the country are on the internet: upward of 450 million, by various recent reports , in comparison with the U.S.’s more than 250 million documented users. (Only China has mo

18h

Study: Damning evidence of dam's impacts on rainforest birds

A study by an international team of conservation scientists found that a dam built in Thailand 31 years ago has caused the local bird population to collapse.

18h

Planning processes for Chicago's 606 Trail spawned gentrification, study finds

When nonprofit groups coordinate large green infrastructure projects such as Chicago's 606 Trail, the risks of gentrification multiply significantly due to the fragmentation that occurs among nonprofits, government agencies and housing organizations, according to a new case study of the trail.

18h

Seeing and avoiding the 'blind spot' in atomic force measurements

Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy—a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules.

18h

The work that makes all other work possible | Ai-jen Poo

Domestic workers are entrusted with the most precious aspects of people's lives — they're the nannies, the elder-care workers and the house cleaners who do the work that makes all other work possible. Too often, they're invisible, taken for granted or dismissed as "help," yet they continue to do their wholehearted best for the families and homes in their charge. In this sensational talk, activist

18h

Planning processes for Chicago's 606 Trail spawned gentrification, study finds

In a paper published in the journal Cities, Alessandro Rigolon, a professor of recreation, sport and tourism at the University of Illinois, and University of Colorado urban and regional planning professor Jeremy Nemeth examined the planning processes associated with the 606 Trail and conclude that these processes may have made gentrification the most likely outcome.

18h

Mayo-led study: Drug reduces hot flashes, improves breast cancer survivor quality of life

Research led by oncologists Roberto Leon-Ferre, M.D. and Charles Loprinzi, M.D. of Mayo Clinic has found that the drug oxybutynin helps to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flashes in women who are unable to take hormone replacement therapy, including breast cancer survivors. These findings were presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

18h

More bioplastics do not necessarily contribute to climate change mitigation

Bioplastics are often promoted as an environmentally and climate-friendly alternative to conventional petroleum-based plastics. However, a recent study from the University of Bonn suggests that shifting to plant-based plastics could have less positive effects than expected. Specifically, an increased consumption of bioplastics in the following years is likely to generate increased greenhouse gas e

18h

Study: Damning evidence of dam's impacts on rainforest birds

A study by an international team of conservation scientists found that a dam built in Thailand 31 years ago has caused the local bird population to collapse.

18h

Hunting for rare isotopes: The mysterious radioactive atomic nuclei that will be in tomorrow's technology

When you hear the term "radioactive" you likely think "bad news," maybe along the lines of fallout from an atomic bomb.

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DDT in Alaska meltwater poses cancer risk for people who eat lots of fish

Children in Alaska whose diet includes a lot of fish from rivers fed by the Eastern Alaska Mountain Range may have a long-term elevated risk for cancer because of insecticides — including DDT — in the meltwater.

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Closer look at TAILORx confirms lack of chemo benefit regardless of race or ethnicity

Before TAILORx, there was uncertainty about treatment for women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer and a score of 11-25 on a tumor gene test. The trial was designed to address this question and provides a definitive answer: no benefit from chemotherapy for women over 50 with a score of 11-25; 50 years old or younger with a score of 11-15; and any age with a

18h

Ocean acidification will increase the iodine content of edible seaweeds and their consumers

Evidence is rapidly accumulating that ocean acidification and elevated temperatures will have catastrophic consequences for marine organisms and ecosystems. In fact, it is something we are already witnessing. Coral reefs are bleaching, while snails and other calcifying marine organisms struggle to build their shells, scales and skeletons and juvenile marine animals even struggle to navigate to sui

18h

How Brexit could benefit the UK's climate change policies

With the UK leaving the European Union and eyeing new trade opportunities beyond the EU, it should also be looking for ways to take forward its policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. One of the few advantages of Brexit might lie in being able to design policies that haven't gone down the long and winding road of Brussels' consensus building.

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Data on dads shift how young women view their future

When women have the impression that more men are becoming stay-at-home parents, they are more likely to imagine themselves as the financial providers for their future families, research finds. “This shows how dependent women’s role choices can be on their expectations of their future male partners,” says lead study author Alyssa Croft, an assistant professor in the University of Arizona psycholog

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I aften sender Kina kartofler og orm til bagsiden af Månen

Klokken 19.30 dansk tid sender Kina sin Chang’e 4-mission til Månen. Her skal et landingsfartøj og en rover undersøge, hvad bagsiden består af, og så har den særlige gæster med om bord, der endnu ikke er udklækket.

18h

VIDEO: Her kommer letbanen, men regionaltoget drøner lige forbi

Kom med til Glostrup og Herlev for at se to af de travleste stationer på den kommende letbane i Købenavns forstæder. I Glostrup drøner regionaltogene forbi uden at stoppe, og i Herlev skal passagerne gå godt et par hundrede meter og ad tre trapper for at skifte fra S-toget. Der vil gå hårdt ud over letbanens passagertal.

18h

Seeing and avoiding the 'blind spot' in atomic force measurements

Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy — a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules.

19h

Bacterial 'sleeper cells' evade antibiotics and weaken defense against infection

New research, from scientists at Imperial College London, unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells, potentially opening new avenues to finding ways of clearing these bacterial cells from the body, and stopping recurrence of the bacterial infection.

19h

One out of 3 rivers in the Iberian Peninsula is affected by salinization

One out of three rivers in the Iberian Peninsula has salinization mainly due the impact of agricultural activity and territory urbanization. This environmental problem will affect hydric ecosystems due global warming, the growing use of water and the exploitation of soil natural resources.

19h

Double the stress slows down evolution

Bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics more slowly if they also have to defend themselves against predators.

19h

News about a plant hormone

The plant hormone jasmonic acid also performs a function that was previously unknown. It ensures that the leaf pores close when leaves are injured. For the plant, this could be an emergency signal.

19h

Study confirms: Multigene test is a useful decision making tool in breast cancer treatment

Multigene tests have been used in breast cancer treatment to assess the risk of metastasis for several years. A team at the Breast Cancer Center at the Technical University of Munich's (TUM) Klinikum rechts der Isar has now presented results based on data collected in its routine clinical work. These results show that the multigene test used at the university hospital is indeed helpful in making m

19h

Iron-rich lamellae in the semiconductor

There is often a pronounced symmetry when you look at the lattice of crystals: the atoms are uniformly arranged. This behavior was also to be expected by a crystal, which physicists from Germany and Poland produced: a compound from an indium arsenide semiconductor, spiked with some iron. The material, however, did not adhere to perfect symmetry. The iron formed two-dimensional, lamellar-shaped str

19h

Molecular insights into spider silk

Spider silk belongs to the toughest fibres in nature and has astounding properties. Scientists from the University of Würzburg discovered new molecular details of self-assembly of a spider silk fibre protein.

19h

Penguin foraging behaviour monitored

Accelerometers, video cameras and GPS recorders are providing a new glimpse into penguin foraging behaviour and revealing how they react to changes in their environment.

19h

The Game Awards: the highlights, premieres and winners at the video game industry's big night

"Red Dead Redemption 2" made an early impact on The Game Award's fifth annual event in Los Angeles. But "God of War" prevailed in the end.

19h

Nigeria's depleting fish stocks may pose a threat to regional security

Sometime in the next year or two, Nigeria will become the seventh country to reach a population of 200m or more. It is still growing considerably faster than all other nations towards the top of the list and, by 2050, the UN expects Nigeria to have the world's third-largest population.

19h

One out of three rivers in the Iberian Peninsula is affected by salinization

One out of three rivers in the Iberian Peninsula are highly salinized mainly due the impact of agricultural activity and urbanization. This environmental problem will affect hydric ecosystems due global warming, the growing use of water and the exploitation of soil natural resources.

19h

Like-liderlig og gnaven: 5 måder din smartphone fuckr md dn hjerne

Teknologien kan påvirke dine tanker ganske voldsomt, og din smartphone kan svække din stedsans, give dig dårlige vaner og gøre dig i dårligt humør.

19h

China’s Chang’e-4 Launches on Mission to the Moon’s Far Side

If the mission is successful, the spacecraft would be the first in human history to land on the moon’s far side.

19h

The New Old Age: Older Americans Are Flocking to Medical Marijuana

Oils, tinctures and salves — and sometimes old-fashioned buds — are increasingly common in seniors’ homes. Doctors warn that popularity has outstripped scientific evidence.

19h

EU ministers raise privacy concerns in e-evidence bill

EU ministers raised concerns Friday about whether citizens' rights are protected in a bill aimed at speeding up investigators' access to email and other digital evidence in cross-border terrorism cases.

19h

Apple watch monitors falls, track heart rhythms

For more than a decade, the latest Apple products have been the annual must-have holiday gift for the tech-savvy. That raises the question: Is the newest Apple Watch on your list—either to give or receive—this year?

19h

Another El Niño on the horizon?

The jury is still out as to whether climate change will lead to stronger El Niño events, but while representatives from around 200 countries at the COP24 conference are working to breathe life into the 2105 Paris Agreement, there is a 75–80 percent chance that a fully-fledged event could be with us in the next couple of months.

19h

Interstellar asteroid ‘Oumuamua slipped by NASA space telescope unseen

The Spitzer Space Telescope failed to spot ‘Oumuamua, the first interstellar object we’ve ever seen, but we were still able to learn something about this strange space rock

19h

Supercomputers without waste heat

Physicists from the University of Konstanz explore superconductivity for information processing.

19h

Two-dimensional materials skip the energy barrier by growing one row at a time

A new study published in the journal Science, could provide engineers new design rules for creating microelectronics, membranes, and tissues, and open up better production methods for new materials. At the same time, the research helps uphold a scientific theory that has remained unproven for over a century.

19h

Italy fines Facebook for selling users' data

Italy's competition authority has fined Facebook 10 million euros ($11.3 million) for selling users' data without informing them and "aggressively" discouraging users from trying to limit how the company shares their data.

19h

Facebook struck deals over data and burnt rivals, say British lawmakers

Internal emails at Facebook Inc., including those involving Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg, were published online by a committee of U.K. lawmakers investigating social media's role in the spread of fake news.

19h

Image: Chachani, Peru

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Chachani mountain in Peru. Standing at over 6000 m, Chachani is the tallest of the mountains near the Peruvian city of Arequipa. The outskirts of the city and part of the airport runway are just visible in the centre bottom of the image. The city is home to around 900 000 people and is renowned for its dramatic cityscape, surrounded by three volc

19h

Oldest ever traces of the plague found in Falköping

In a 5,000 year old grave outside Falköping, scientists have found the oldest traces of the plague bacterium's DNA in the world. An international research team including archaeologists from the University of Gothenburg made the discovery using advanced DNA techniques. According to the researchers, this discovery may also have identified the first pandemic in history which stretched from Europe acr

19h

I used facial recognition technology on birds

As a birder, I had heard that if you paid careful attention to the head feathers on the downy woodpeckers that visited your bird feeders, you could begin to recognize individual birds. This intrigued me. I even went so far as to try sketching birds at my own feeders and had found this to be true, up to a point.

19h

New 'Avengers: Endgame' Trailer Promises 'Fight of Our Lives'

The surprise new clip also reveals the movie's spring release date.

19h

19h

Hver fjerde hjertepatient bliver ikke udredt til tiden

Sundhedsministeren mener, at regionerne svigter hjertepatienterne, når de ikke kan overholde udredningsretten. Værst står det til i Region Sjælland.

19h

Aalborg Universitetshospital nedlægger 130 stillinger

En sparerunde på Aalborg Universitetshospital resulterer i nedlæggelse af 130 stillinger, hvoraf 27 af dem er lægestillinger. Det skaber bekymring blandt Yngre Læger.

19h

Letters: ‘There Was Honestly No Good Solution’

Silent Sam Survives On Monday, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced its recommendation that Silent Sam, a monument to a Confederate soldier, be housed in a new, $5.3 million building. What would it mean, symbolically, to get rid of the statue altogether, and what will it mean to keep it on campus? “ It’s easy enough to remove a name … or a statue,” Adam Harris wrote , “but mo

19h

Agroforestry can help the UK meet climate change commitments without cutting livestock numbers

Some 12m hectares of the UK is currently covered by agricultural grasslands which support a national lamb and beef industry worth approximately £3.7 billion. However, proposals have been made that this landscape should undergo radical changes to aid the country's climate change commitments. A controversial government advisory report recently produced by the independent Committee on Climate Change

19h

Qualcomm touts 5G in 2019, launches new processor for flagship smartphones

Qualcomm said Tuesday that another milestone has been hit in efforts to bring ultra-fast 5G wireless devices to consumers next year when a smartphone using its latest modem chip operated on a 5G network at an event in Hawaii.

19h

Molecular insights into spider silk

Spider silk is one of the toughest fibres in nature and has astounding properties. Scientists from the University of Würzburg discovered new molecular details of self-assembly of a spider silk fibre protein.

19h

How to get rid of lice

DIY Good news: These bloodsuckers can’t jump. The unholy head louse is a scourge dreaded by teachers and parents alike. Here's what you need to know about lice before they strike.

19h

Learning from lunar lights

Every few hours observing the moon, ESA's 'NELIOTA' project discovers a brilliant flash of light across its surface – the result of an object hurtling through space and striking our unprotected rocky neighbour at vast speed. Based at the Kryoneri telescope of the National Observatory of Athens, this important project is now being extended to January 2021.

19h

Quora reports data breach affecting 100 million users

Quora, a question-and-answer website, has reported a data breach affecting about 100 million users.

19h

At DFW Airport, your face could someday replace your boarding pass

On a recent weekday morning, hundreds of passengers lined up at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport to board Japan Airlines Flight 11 to Tokyo.

19h

Multichannel vectorial holographic display and encryption

Holography is a powerful tool that can reconstruct wavefronts of light and combine the fundamental wave properties of amplitude, phase, polarization, wave vector and frequency. Smart multiplexing techniques (multiple signal integration) together with metasurface designs are currently in high demand to explore the capacity to engineer information storage systems and enhance optical encryption secur

19h

Kate Orff: How Can Oysters Revive New York City's Waterways?

Oysters filter water, their shells form protective reefs and habitats, and regenerate into more oyster shells. Kate Orff uses oysters to revive depleted ecosystems — like those around New York City. (Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED)

19h

Chang'e-4: China mission launches to far side of Moon

It is the first attempt to land robotic craft on the side of the Moon which never faces Earth.

19h

New 2D sensors can cover any smooth surface

Researchers have developed a method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface. What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Now, engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that. They have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices to report on what they perceive. Electronically active 2D materials ha

20h

How to mass-produce flies the right way

As flies increasingly make the buzz, a consortium of EU researchers studied their biology and ecological features to improve artificial and mass rearing practices.

20h

Data Breaches: The Complete WIRED Guide

Everything you ever wanted to know about Equifax, Mariott, and the problem with social security numbers.

20h

What Causes Hangovers, and How Can I Avoid Them?

No one really knows how drunkenness works, and hangovers are poorly understood, no matter what your friend tells you. Still, there are a few things you can try.

20h

A gut-brain link for Parkinson’s gets a closer look

Early evidence suggests that Parkinson’s may be a gut disease that affects the brain.

20h

Faulty sensing: Cellular energy sensor linked to the progression of chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with energy depletion in kidney cells, resulting in reduced kidney function. Researchers at TMDU and Kyushu University found that failure of an important cellular energy sensor to detect energy depletion is key to the progression of CKD. However, by stimulating the activity of the sensor using alternative methods, the researchers could halt CKD progressio

20h

Milestone for bERLinPro: Photocathodes with high quantum efficiency

A team at the HZB has improved the manufacturing process of photocathodes and can now provide photocathodes with high quantum efficiency for bERLinPro.

20h

How fruit flies ended up in our fruit bowls

Fruit flies can be a scourge in our homes, but to date no-one has known how they became our uninvited lodgers. For decades, researchers have searched for their origins and now a Swedish-American research team has succeeded. They have also discovered that fruit flies in the wild are far more picky than their domesticated counterparts, a factor that long ago probably prompted the flies to move in wi

20h

How ice particles promote the formation of radicals

The production of chlorofluorocarbons, which damage the ozone layer, has been banned as far as possible. However, other substances can also tear holes in the ozone layer in combination with ice particles, such as those found in clouds. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, the University of Duisburg-Essen and Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have discovered a possible mechanism

20h

Being yelled at: Our brain on alert in a flash

What happens within the brain when it perceives a threatening signal, such as an aggressive voice? Researchers from UNIGE studied brain activity during the processing of various emotional voices. They discovered that we notice a voice much faster when it is considered threatening than when it is perceived as normal or happy. Our attention is more focused on threatening voices to enable us to clear

20h

Developing new materials for the fusion reactor

At National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) we have newly developed vanadium alloys that is strong at high temperatures and is appropriate for manufacturing and welding. From this, we have shown for the first time in the world the possibility of producing a blanket which will be installed in a future fusion reactor and will be an important equipment for generating electricity.

20h

A solution to fracture for durable solar cells

Micro cracks in solar cells are a frequent challenge for manufacturers of solar photovoltaic modules. EU-funded researchers introduced an innovative pre-stressing technique to retard the growth of cracks and make durable solar cells.

20h

Investigative report shines light on philanthropic foundation's use of offshore investments to raise money

Charles Piller, an investigative reporter for the journal Science, has published a News Feature piece in the latest issue of the journal outlining his findings surrounding the practice by philanthropic foundations of putting money in offshore investment accounts.

20h

Innovative steering system meets the needs of the disabled and autonomous driving

Current adaptable systems that enable people with physical disabilities to drive compare poorly with conventional vehicle controls like steering wheels. An EU initiative has addressed this challenge.

20h

Why biodiversity is key to our survival

Diversity, be it genetic, morphological, behavioural or ecological, is at the heart of many controversies. It fascinates us or worries us, depending on the context. But what is biological diversity? How useful is it, how is it generated and what are the foreseeable consequences of reducing it?

20h

Molecularly thin hybrid perovskite for advanced optoelectronic applications

NUS scientists have discovered that the light emission properties of molecularly thin two-dimensional (2-D) hybrid perovskite can be tuned in a highly reversible way for ultrathin optoelectronic applications. A highly efficient photodetector has been fabricated using hybrid perovskites with the thickness of a single quantum well.

20h

Er du lidt for glad for sociale medier? Her er 7 råd til en mini-afvænning

Tag magten tilbage, sæt kunstige grænser og glem de endegyldige regler, lyder nogle af eksperternes råd til at skære lidt ned på din smartphone-tid.

20h

Exercise performed during adjuvant breast cancer treatment may improve cardio function

Women who underwent a supervised program of cardiovascular exercise during adjuvant breast cancer treatment experienced better cardiovascular function than those who were not part of the exercise program, according to results of the EBBA-II trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

20h

Oxybutynin decreased frequency of hot flashes, improved QOL for breast cancer survivors

Treatment with oxybutynin helped reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flashes for women who could not take hormone replacement, including breast cancer survivors, according to results of a trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

20h

Lifestyle intervention helped breast cancer survivors lose weight

Survivors of early-stage breast cancer who participated in a lifestyle intervention on healthy habits lost weight and experienced higher rates of disease-free survival if they completed the program, according to results presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

20h

Choice of surgery may affect quality of life for young breast cancer survivors

Younger breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy reported lower breast satisfaction and poorer psychosocial and sexual well-being compared with those who underwent breast-conserving surgery, according to results of a trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

20h

Sexual subcultures are collateral damage in Tumblr's ban on adult content

The social networking and microblogging site Tumblr announced on Monday that from December 17 it will no longer host adult content on its platform. The Washington Post reported that the policy "removes one of the last major refuges for pornography on social media."

20h

Planetary defense: The Bennu experiment

On Dec. 3, after traveling billions of kilometers from Earth, NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft reached its target, Bennu, and kicked off a nearly two-year, up-close investigation of the asteroid. It will inspect nearly every square inch of this ancient clump of rubble left over from the formation of our solar system. Ultimately, the spacecraft will pick up a sample of pebbles and dust from Bennu's sur

20h

Researchers devise 3-D printer that can make energetic materials safer, more environmentally friendly

Purdue University researchers have devised a method of 3-D printing that can produce energetic materials with fine geometric features faster and with less expense than traditional methods, while also being safer and more environmentally friendly.

20h

The Human Fossil-Fuel Addiction: Greenhouse Emissions Soar to Record Levels

Despite warnings that there is little time left to get a handle on global warming, carbon emissions are on the rise.

20h

MEGAPIXELS: This is a Martian selfie from the InSight landerNASA Mars InSight Lander

Space It can’t move, so it’d might as well take something for a spin. After a seven-month journey to the Red Planet, NASA’s InSight lander is stretching out and preparing to unpack at its final destination.

21h

Determining fish age using inner ear structures

Biologists in Japan have identified four distinct zones in the otolith, a calcium carbonate structure in the inner ear, which can be used to determine age in fish.

21h

NASA's Mars InSight flexes its armNASA Mars InSight Lander

New images from NASA's Mars InSight lander show its robotic arm is ready to do some lifting.

21h

Perth's brief abalone season is a time of delicacies and danger

Starting on December 8, recreational abalone fishing will be allowed in Perth. Fishing will be limited to one hour on four Saturday mornings between December and February. The maximum catch is still 15 per person per day. A complete ban on abalone fishing between Geraldton and the Northern Territory border will remain in place.

21h

Water plumes on Europa: Tasting an extraterrestrial ocean

Computer simulations of the plumes of liquid water that stream out of Jupiter's moon Europa show that the forthcoming space mission JUICE may offer an answer to the question as to whether the Jovian moon's subsurface ocean could harbour life. Hans Huybrighs comes to this conclusion in the doctoral thesis he has recently completed at the Max-Planck Institute of Solar System Physics and the Technica

21h

Humans Made Drones by Copying Birds. Birds Are Fighting Back.

I n the National Gallery of Australia’s permanent collection is a painting by Sidney Nolan titled The Alarm . One in a series of artworks chronicling the downfall of the Kelly gang—infamous outlaws of the late 1800s—it depicts a radiant peacock encountering a policeman. Peacocks, the painting’s interpretive text explains, were in those days sometimes dragooned as sentries. The birds can sight a t

21h

'Fortnite' Season 7's Winter Wonderland Tops the Week's Game News

Ziplines, planes, and a peaceful new mode are just part of the newest update—and they top gaming news this week.

21h

Even China Roundly Condemns Editing the Genes of Babies

Chinese scientists and regulators alike are censuring the rogue biophysicist who allowed two Crispr-edited babies to be born.

21h

Bacterial 'sleeper cells' evade antibiotics and weaken defence against infection

New research from scientists at Imperial College London unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells.

21h

How ice particles promote the formation of radicals

The production of chlorofluorocarbons, which damage the ozone layer, has been banned as far as possible. However, other substances can also tear holes in the ozone layer in combination with ice particles, such as those found in clouds. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, the University of Duisburg-Essen and Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have discovered a possible mechanism

21h

Blasting molecules with extreme X-rays

Reading these words, your eyes let you see each letter and the spaces between them. But if you need reading glasses, the letters may be fuzzy or incomprehensible. Scientists face a similar challenge. Gathering the right data depends on having tools that can provide accurate, comprehensive measurements. After all, scientists want to have the clearest sight possible.

21h

Subtlety and the selective art of separating lanthanides

Lanthanide elements are essential parts of today's high-tech commodities including flat-screen TVs, cell phones, electric cars, and satellites. While the demand for these elements is high, separating lanthanides from impurities (other lanthanides) is extremely difficult. Industry uses liquid-liquid extraction. The target in water slips into an oil phase with the help of an extractant molecule. Imp

21h

Handheld gadget to provide rapid food quality testing

A microbiological detection device will help speed up the measurement of contamination in raw meat, thus minimising costs and food waste.

21h

Opening Pandora's Box: Gene editing and its consequences

Today, the scientific community is aghast at the prospect of gene editing to create "designer" humans. Gene editing may be of greater consequence than climate change, or even the consequences of unleashing the energy of the atom.

21h

Why Tumblr's ban on adult content is bad for LGBTQ youth

As of Dec. 17, Tumblr will no longer allow "adult content," defined as that which shows "real-life human genitals or female-presenting nipples, and any content —including photos, videos, GIFs and illustrations —that depicts sex acts."

21h

Image of the Day: Geckos on the Run

Surface slapping and side-to-side swinging let geckos sprint across water.

21h

Forskere skal undersøge medicinstuderendes empatiske evner

Medicinstuderendes empati daler i løbet af studietiden, viser internationale undersøgelser. Forskere fra SDU skal undersøge, om det også gælder medicinstuderende i Danmark.

21h

Online game trains players how to sort waste correctly

A simple online game can teach people to more accurately sort waste—with lasting results, a new UBC study has found.

21h

Choice of surgery may affect quality of life for young breast cancer survivors

Even as more young women with breast cancer opt to have mastectomies, many experience a persistent decline in their sexual and psychosocial well-being following the procedure, as detailed in new research by Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center.

21h

DDT in Alaska meltwater poses cancer risk for people who eat lots of fish

Children in Alaska whose diet includes a lot of fish from rivers fed by the Eastern Alaska Mountain Range may have a long-term elevated risk for cancer because of insecticides—including DDT—in the meltwater.

21h

China is about to launch a mission to explore the far side of the moon

The Chang’e 4 mission, launching on 7 December, will place both a lander and a rover on the far side of the moon, where no spacecraft has ever landed before

21h

Copycat cells command new powers of communication

From kryptonite for Superman to plant toxins for poison ivy, chemical reactions within the body's cells can be transformative. And, when it comes to transmuting cells, UC San Diego researchers are becoming superhero-like copycats.

21h

Researcher uses hacked studio data to prove racially diverse casts are more profitable

It's no secret that Hollywood has a dismal record of hiring non-white actors for prominent roles. In the past 25 years, just 11 percent of non-white actors have been nominated for Academy Awards, according to Time magazine. When movie executives are asked why they don't hire more actors of color, a common refrain is that non-white stars aren't bankable.

21h

Study forces a rethink on population history of Ibiza

Otago researchers have discovered a rare case of genetic population discontinuity on the Mediterranean Island of Ibiza. Essentially, the original genetic signature of the founding female population, handed down through centuries on Ibiza has been replaced, prompting a change in understanding of the island's genetic history.

21h

Fish at home on subsea oil and gas pipelines

A research project carried out by The University of Western Australia on a BHP subsea oil and gas pipeline off the north-west coast of Australia has found the pipeline has two to three times more the commercial value of fish than surrounding areas in deep waters.

21h

Sorry Indiana Jones, the Ark of the Covenant Is Not Inside This Ethiopian Church

Several media outlets are reporting the sacred chest holding the Ten Commandments is hiding inside the Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion.

21h

We’ve added letters to the genetic code – and the results are amazing

The first life forms with a six-letter genetic code are already pumping out drugs and other materials that nature has never seen before

21h

Why Australia’s new encryption laws may actually help criminals

Australia has just introduced new laws forcing companies to give them access to people’s encrypted messages. Cybersecurity researchers say this will likely backfire

21h

Genetic disorders should be the focus of CRISPR gene editing trials

He Jiankui used gene editing in an attempt to make HIV-resistant babies, but most geneticists think the best use of embryo editing would be to prevent genetic disorders

21h

New model for assessing the effect of ionizing radiation on microelectronic devices

The main trend in the development of hardware components for digital and analog electronic equipment is to reduce the size of the active regions of diode and transistor structures. This can be achieved by improving the performance characteristics of micro- and nanoelectronics devices (increasing their speed and memory, increasing operating frequencies and power, noise reduction, etc.) while keepin

21h

Why Tehran is sinking dangerously

Iran has a water problem. The reserves in many groundwater basins there have been severely depleted. For the last 40 years, the country has invested a lot in the agricultural sector, and has been striving to be independent in its food supply. In order to cover the increased water demand, groundwater basins have been exploited to a considerable extent in a largely unregulated way.

21h

Version2 kårer årets it-arbejdsplads: »Vi viser piger, at it er kreativt«

Vinderen i Version2’s årlige imageundersøgelse blandt it-virksomheder i Danmark er for andet år i træk Microsoft Development i Lyngby. Her arbejder man målrettet på at få flere kvinder til både at studere og vælge it som karrierevej.

22h

Elektriske løbehjul og skateboards kommer ud i trafikken trods advarsler fra alle sider

Politi, havarikommission og færdselsråd kalder de nye motoriserede køretøjer farlige.

22h

Elbilerne slipper for højere afgifter, men der er uendelig langt til millionen

Regeringen har sikret sig flertal for at fritage elbiler til under 400.000 kroner for afgifter de næste to år, men får hån fra oppositionen for at svigte Lars Løkkes løfter om grønne biler.

22h

Scientists discover possible mantle mineral

Scientists long believed that Earth's lower mantle was composed of Bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and magnesiowüstite (Mg,Fe)O, in which Fe2+ dwells. This view changed when experiments showed that Fe2+ simply can't exist at the pressure and temperature of the lower mantle. What is present is Fe3+. The two phases (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and (Mg,Fe)O both shed Fe2+ and, in turn, MgSiO3 and MgO remain. However, what mi

22h

Interactive size control of catalyst nanoparticles

How many nanometers should catalyst nanoparticles be to optimize the course of the reaction? Researchers usually look for the answer through laborious, repetitive tests. At the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, a qualitatively new technique was developed to improve the process of such optimization in microfluidic systems. The size of the catalyst nanopart

22h

Scientists find new giant dinosaur

Paleontologists from Russia have described a new dinosaur, the Volgatitan. Seven of its fossilized vertebrae, buried in the ground for about 130 million years, were found on the banks of the Volga, not far from the village of Slantsevy Rudnik, five kilometers from Ulyanovsk. The study has been published in the latest issue of Biological Communications.

22h

A new molecular player involved in T cell activation

When bacteria or viruses enter the body, proteins on their surfaces are recognized and processed to activate T cells, white blood cells with critical roles in fighting infections. During T-cell activation, a molecular complex known as the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) moves to a central location on the surface of the T-cell. Microtubules have several important functions, including determini

22h

Artificial intelligence predicts rogue waves of light

In a recent study published in Nature Communications, an international team of researchers from Tampere University of Technology (TUT), Finland, and the Institut FEMTO-ST at the Université Bourgogne-Franche Comté, France, take a significant step toward the analysis and predictability of rogue waves that appear seemingly out of nowhere.

22h

Greenland ice loss quickening

Using a 25-year record of ESA satellite data, recent research shows that the pace at which Greenland is losing ice is getting faster.

22h

Two new books explore the science and history of the 1918 flu pandemic

One-hundred years after the Spanish flu, ‘Pandemic 1918’ and ‘Influenza’ provide a new look at the global outbreak.

22h

How SpaceX Launched 64 Satellites Into Orbit on a Falcon 9

Go behind the scenes with Spaceflight Industries, the space travel agency of sorts that coordinated a jam-packed Falcon 9 flight earlier this week.

22h

Tumblr’s Porn Bloggers Eye Pillowfort and Dreamwidth

Tumblr porn alternatives Pillowfort and Dreamwidth deal with the spotlight

22h

My Befuddling Dinner With Facebook Empress Sheryl Sandberg

A breathless meal of scallops and feminist bona fides exposed her vulnerability: No one, not even Sandberg, has what it takes to tame Facebook.

22h

Electric Scooters Are Better for Cities Than Cars

The vehicles made by Bird, Lime, and the like can slash emissions, reinvigorate mass transit, and address America’s dependency on cars.

22h

The World's First Space Telescope

50 years ago, astronomers launched the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory, whose descendants include the Hubble, Spitzer and James Webb telescopes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Australien vedtager kontroversiel lov om bagdøre til krypteret data

Teknologivirksomheder kan tvinges til at give australske myndigheder adgang til krypteret data efter vedtagelse af ny kontroversiel lov.

22h

FE: Nu er Huawei også på de danske sikkerhedsmyndigheders radar

Nu advarer også den britiske efterretningstjeneste mod kinesiske Huawei. Telegiganten står i Danmark bag TDC’s 4G-net.

22h

EU spænder ben for bilproducenters fup med CO2-tal

Bilfabrikanter har pustet CO2-tal op for nemmere at kunne leve op til fremtidens krav.

22h

Google Searches Could Predict Heroin Overdoses

Internet queries about opioids are linked to drug-related hospital admissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Tailoring nonlinearity with time domain metasurface for wireless communication

Electromagnetic and optical nonlinear effects provide an important platform in a broad spectrum of technologies, including high harmonic generation, sum and difference frequency conversions, self-focusing, optical solitons, and multi-photon absorption. When illuminated by high light intensity, the material properties are modified depending on the applied electromagnetic field amplitudes, and the n

22h

Earth's magnetic poles could start to flip. What happens then?

As Earth's magnetic shield fails, so do its satellites. First, our communications satellites in the highest orbits go down. Next, astronauts in low-Earth orbit can no longer phone home. And finally, cosmic rays start to bombard every human on Earth.

22h

Eksperter: Det er mangel på respekt at kalde brug af sociale medier for tidsspild

Ordet afhængighed fylder meget i debatten om brug af smartphones og sociale medier. Men det er både overdrevet og til tider respektløst, siger eksperter.

22h

Nearly two-thirds of people at high risk of heart disease and stroke have excess belly fat

Nearly two-thirds of people at high risk of heart disease and stroke have excess belly fat, according to results of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) EUROASPIRE V survey presented today at the World Congress of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Health in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

22h

Bloodhound supersonic car project axed

The driver of the 1,000mph supersonic vehicle says the car is available for the cost of a Ferrari.

23h

We are not all doomed. Not yet

This week’s Upside digest looks at the ways to tackle climate change and rediscover our natural spaces As the world’s leaders converged on Katowice, Poland, for this year’s UN climate change conference, the mood was sombre. How could it be anything other, when in the opening keynote one of the world’s foremost naturalists said we were all pretty much doomed? While the numbers do not make for happ

23h

When Presidents Were People

Richard Ben Cramer begins What it Takes , his masterful account of the 1988 presidential race, with the story of then–Vice President George H. W. Bush botching the first pitch of Game One of the 1986 National League Championship Series. Cramer writes of Bush readying his windup as more than 40,000 fans in Houston’s Astrodome look on. But the vice president can’t quite get his arms up—the bulletpr

23h

Nikki Haley Is Already Distancing Herself From Trump

Who, exactly, is Nikki Haley? With just weeks left in her role as the ambassador to the United Nations, I wanted to ask her one of the big questions naturally prompted by her departure: Does she share Donald Trump’s iconoclastic, transactional, über-nationalist vision of America’s role in the world? “I get where he wants to go, and I just have my different style of getting us there,” Haley told m

23h

Read Nikki Haley’s Full Interview With The Atlantic

During her recent trip to Washington, D.C., for President George H. W. Bush’s funeral, Nikki Haley, the outgoing U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, sat down for an interview with The Atlantic . This interview has been edited for clarity. Uri Friedman: We’re meeting on a pretty solemn day. What’s been on your mind in recent days regarding President Bush? What do you see as, for you, the enduri

23h

Sometimes I Wish the Obamas Wouldn’t ‘Go High’

The movie Mudbound helped me train for a half marathon last year. I watched it on a treadmill and it made me so angry that I didn’t even think about the tightness in my shins and hamstrings; it distracted me from the grueling workout. Mudbound is a tender and compelling story of black pain that’s set in the Mississippi Delta during World War II. The overarching theme—which is what enraged me—was

23h

Where Mary Queen of Scots Goes Wrong

A 2018 film set centuries ago in Britain’s royal halls of power, a period piece laden with the requisite opulent costumes and set dressing, also does something new with the genre: interrogating the sexist limits on what women in this world could achieve. That movie, Yorgos Lanthimos’s The Favourite , is about Queen Anne; it’s in theaters now and is well worth seeing. Mere weeks after that film’s

23h

Engineers invent groundbreaking spin-based memory device

A team of international researchers led by engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have invented a new magnetic device to manipulate digital information 20 times more efficiently and with 10 times more stability than commercial spintronic digital memories. The novel spintronic memory device employs ferrimagnets and was developed in collaboration with researchers from Toyota Techn

23h

Atoms stand in for electrons in system for probing high-temperature superconductors

High-temperature superconductors have the potential to transform everything from electricity transmission and power generation to transportation.

23h

Two-dimensional materials skip the energy barrier by growing one row at a time

A new collaborative study led by a research team at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of California, Los Angeles and the University of Washington could provide engineers new design rules for creating microelectronics, membranes and tissues, and open up better production methods for new materials. At the same time, the research, published online Dec. 6 in

23h

Why early retirement comes with one big clause

Vicki Robin and Joe Dominguez coauthored Your Money or Your Life in 1992, a now-classic finance book about liberating yourself from debt, waking up to obsessive materialism, and learning to be financially self-sufficient. Anyone interested in becoming financially independent and retiring early needs to ask one big question first: Who are you without your job? What would you do with your life if i

23h

Nobel chemistry winners regret fear of new developments

Winners of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry say that excessive concerns about genetically modified foods and other substances can inhibit mankind from benefiting from developments in the field.

23h

Under fire Huawei agrees to UK security demands: report

Embattled Chinese telecoms giant Huawei has agreed to British intelligence demands over its equipment and software as it seeks to be part of the country's 5G network plans, the FT reported Friday.

23h

U.S.-China Friction Threatens to Undercut the Fight Against Climate Change

Distrust between the two biggest greenhouse gas emitters threatens to slow global action on climate change precisely at a time when the risks of climate catastrophe are rising.

23h

Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies

Concerns over a Chinese scientist's claim that he created the first gene-edited babies grow with more questions about whether it worked and the possible harm he may have inflicted on the twin girls. (Image credit: Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images)

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GW expert calls for strong, sustainable action to make world roadways safer

According to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) report on road safety, more than 1.3 million people die on the world's roadways each year — and millions more are injured or disabled.

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Hovedstadens letbane igen kastebold i storpolitisk spil

Københavns første letbane åbner uden de mest rentable stationsombygninger efter flere politiske slagsmål mellem henholdsvis stat og kommune og rød og blå blok. Imens tager parterne sig til hovedet.

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Nissan to recall 150,000 cars due to improper checks

Nissan Friday announced plans to recall approximately 150,000 vehicles owing to improper tests on new units, dealing a fresh blow to the Japanese car giant following the shock arrest of former chairman Carlos Ghosn.

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The 6 reasons why Huawei gives the US and its allies security nightmares

The biggest fear is that China could exploit the telecom giant’s gear to wreak havoc in a crisis.

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What Tumblr’s Porn Ban Really Means

Earlier this week, the blogging platform Tumblr announced that it would be scrubbing itself of “adult content.” The move doesn’t just affect how people look at and exchange nude photos on a downtrodden platform—it portends a broad shift in how we experience intimacy and connection online, in how user-generated content is managed, and in how tech maintains its stranglehold on the digital commons.

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Diabetesafdelinger er blevet bedre til at behandle børn og unge

Næsten alle afdelinger har forbedret sig på flere indikatorer i behandlingen af børn og unge, viser årsrapport. Det glæder formand for Dansk Selskab for Børne- og Ungdomsdiabetes, som dog ikke kan pege på en entydig årsag.

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Dansk studie frikender antidepressiv medicin som årsag til atrieflimmer

Et nyt studie fra Aarhus Universitet viser, at antidepressiv medicin ikke er forøger risikoen for atrieflimmer. Til gengæld kunne studiet tyde på, at årsagen måske kan findes i selve depressionen.

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Genom- og mikrobiomforsker hædres med Niels A. Lassen Prisen

Professor Oluf Borbye Pedersen modtager i år Niels A. Lassen Fondens hæderspris. Han bliver…

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Hør ugens podcast: Forudsætningerne skrider for letbane. Nyt internet til industrien

Hovedstadens Letbane bliver lettere end ventet, da to sløjfede stationsombygninger afsporer passagerprognosen. Én fælles protokol for IOT-kommunikation i industrien ser endelig ud til at blive en realitet.

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Nyt forskningscenter vil jagte løsninger på havets plast

Fire universiteter og Nationalmuseet vil undersøge den plast, der ender i havet – og hvilken miljøeffekt, den har.

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A sea change for shipping efficiency

BP is reducing the carbon footprint of its shipping fleet by making engines more efficient, streamlining hulls and even using LED lighting, says Gopal Hariharan

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Trump's environmental rollback rolls on

The administration plans to open protected lands for drilling and lift curbs on carbon emissions.

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Ice is a lifeline for the world's coldest region

Innokenty Tobonov sinks his harpoon into a long block of ice while his helpers expertly push it out of freezing lake waters onto the snow-dusted surface before sliding it towards an idling tractor.

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Diabetesmiddel forbundet med nedsat risiko for hjertekarsygdom

Et stort skandinavisk registerstudie viser, at diabetesmidlet Victoza, er forbundet med en reduceret risiko for alvorlige tilfælde af hjertekarsygdom. Studiet er publiceret i Lancet.

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Atter flot lønstigning til privatansatte ingeniører

IDAs privatansatte medlemmer er i gennemsnit steget lidt mere i løn end sidste år. Ingeniører er i høj kurs, lyder forklaringen fra IDA.

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'Worst drought I have seen': Afghan farmers forced to flee

Wheat and opium farmer Murad Khan Ishaqzai, 80, has never seen a drought as bad as the one ravaging western Afghanistan where more than 250,000 people have been forced to abandon their homes.

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Japan to indict Nissan as well as Ghosn: report

Tokyo prosecutors have decided to indict Nissan as well as its former chairman Carlos Ghosn and another executive as early as next week over alleged financial misconduct, a report said Friday.

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Revisions eyed for rushed Australia encryption law

Australia's top legal body on Friday warned of police and intelligence "overreach" after Canberra rushed through parliament controversial laws allowing authorities to circumvent encrypted communications.

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Fiat Chrysler to open new plant in Detroit: report

Fiat Chrysler will open a new car factory in Detroit, adding up to 400 jobs to produce a popular SUV, according to a news report.

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Egypt's fertile Nile Delta threatened by climate change

Lush green fields blanket northern Egypt's Nile Delta, but the country's agricultural heartland and its vital freshwater resources are under threat from a warming climate.

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Google moves to curb gender bias in translation

Google said Thursday it was tweaking its translation application with the goal of reducing gender bias.

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Cuba finally rolls out mobile 3G, though too costly for most

Cuba became one of the last countries in the world to get 3G mobile internet services on Thursday, though most citizens on the communist-run island won't be able to afford it.

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China prepares mission to land spacecraft on moon's far side

China was preparing to launch a ground-breaking mission early Saturday to soft-land a spacecraft on the largely unexplored far side of the moon, demonstrating its growing ambitions as a space power to rival Russia, the European Union and U.S.

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A mercenary academic produced dodgy data to sabotage my case | Anonymous academic

When I gave evidence showing that an environmental toxin had caused deaths, the authorities hired a rogue scientist Most of my job as an academic researcher is spent at my desk or in meetings, so it was with some surprise that I ended up working on a legal case. I felt like a scientist in a TV thriller. I had been contacted by someone who asked me to analyse some simple data, and the results were

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Forskere tapper på opfindsom data fra Android-telefon

En telefons strømforbrug under opladning kan bruges til at tilgå fortrolige oplysninger, har forskere påvist.

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Chinese spacecraft to attempt first landing on far side of the moon

Chang’e 4 mission aims to drop a rover into a vast and unexplored impact crater The first spacecraft to attempt a landing on the far side of the moon is due to blast off from a launch facility in China, a historic step in lunar exploration. The Chinese space agency’s Chang’e 4 mission aims to drop a robotic lander and rover into the moon’s vast and unexplored South Pole-Aitken basin. Continue rea

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The Platypus: Sensing the Body Electric

Patti was one of my favorite Beanie Babies. Her bright magenta body and yellow webbed feet exuded a certain sunny optimism, and her strange resemblance to a flattened duck endowed her with an undeniable silliness. I remember feeling a bit confused as to whether she was a real creature or more akin to Mystic the […]

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Walgreens teams up with FedEx to offer next-day drug delivery service

The service will cost $4.99 per drop-off. Same-day delivery will be available in some markets. As the population ages and rates of online shopping continue to rise, companies that can capitalize on the drug delivery market stand to earn billions. None Walgreens and FedEx plan to offer next-day prescription delivery for $4.99 per drop-off, the companies announced Thursday. The service will require

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Gene-edited babies: why are scientists so appalled? – Science Weekly podcast

Last week Dr He Jiankui announced he had created the world’s first gene-edited babies. Hundreds of Chinese scientists have signed a letter condemning the research. Hannah Devlin delves into why He’s research has caused such uproar Last week the Chinese scientist Dr He Jiankui announced he had created the first gene-edited babies . Many scientists have expressed concern about He’s work: hundreds o

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Gene-edited babies: why are scientists so appalled? – Science Weekly podcast

Last week Dr He Jiankui announced he had created the world’s first gene-edited babies. Hundreds of Chinese scientists have signed a letter condemning the research. Hannah Devlin delves into why He’s research has caused such uproar

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Canada and France plan an international panel to assess AI’s dangers

Other nations may soon join a council to discuss the impact and the potential of artificial intelligence.

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Kunstig intelligens knuser verdens førende forskere i biologi-konkurrence

Først slog computeren os i arkadespil. Så brætspil. Og nu har Googles kunstige intelligens også vundet over forskere i prestigefyldt konkurrence.

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Vitamin C may reduce harm to infants' lungs caused by smoking during pregnancy

Vitamin C may reduce the harm done to lungs in infants born to mothers who smoke during their pregnancy, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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In times of low unemployment, nursing home quality suffers

The low unemployment rate in the US — which fell to a 49-year low in September and October — is good news to many people, but perhaps not to residents of nursing homes. A Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) study found that quality of care in nursing homes improves during periods of recession and worsens when the economy is good.

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Vejle er bedst til at behandle kræft

For fjerde år i træk kan Vejle Sygehus kalde sig landets bedste til kræftbehandling. Det viser Dagens Medicins analyse af de bedste hospitaler og behandlere. Tarmkræftkirurgien er en disciplin, hvor Hans Rahr og kollegerne på Vejle Sygehus udmærker sig særligt i årets dataudtræk. Her er sket et markant løft.

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Rapport: Grønlandsisens smelterate sprænger skalaen

De seneste to årtier er smeltningen af isen i Grønland accelereret til et "hidtil" uset tempo ifølge forsker.

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Her er de bedste til 35 kræftbehandlinger

Kåringen af Danmarks bedste hospitaler til behandling af kræft er baseret på data fra kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser inden for de ni hyppigst forekommende kræfttyper samt palliativ behandling af kræftpatienter.

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Viborg vinder igen diabetes-biatlon

For fjerde år i træk er Regionshospitalet Viborg samlet set Danmarks bedste til diabetes inden for både børne- og voksenområdet.

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Småt er ­overordentligt godt i Viborg

Selv om børn- og ungeafdelingen på Regionshospitalet Viborg skifter chefer, som vi andre skifter undertøj, er hospitalet for tredje år på stribe Danmarks bedste til børnediabetes. Det viser Dagens Medicins analyse af de kliniske databasetal. Afdelingens fremtid er uvis i betragtning af etableringen af et børnediabetescenter i Aarhus.

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Sådan kårer vi de bedste til diabetes

Kåringen af Danmarks bedste hospitaler til behandling af diabetes er baseret på data fra kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser, og speciallæger i endokrinologi og pædiatri har vægtet betydningen af kvalitetsindikatorerne.

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Sophies scoop

Mens Sophie Hæstorp scorer med ansættelsen af Svend Særkjær, så står Heino Knudsen for månedens helkikser.

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Besparelse eller prioritering i sundhedsvæsenet

At argumentere for flere ressourcer til sundhedsvæsenet er naturligvis helt legitimt. Men det skal foregå på et oplyst og sagligt grundlag

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Læge mellem tro og videnskab

Læge, præst og forfatter Poul Henning Krog er aktuel med en bog om livet i almindelighed og fortæller om, hvordan han kan virke både i psykiatrien og kirken.

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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 7. december

Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2018. Hver dag med nye præmier!

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Dropper to perroner for at spare: Passagertallet for Københavns letbane svinder ind

To centrale forudsætninger for Hovedstadens Letbane er droppet. Det ryster såvel passagerprog­noser som banens i forvejen tvivl­somme økonomi.

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Canada, France Plan Global Panel to Study the Effects of AI

The International Panel on Artificial Intelligence will be modeled on a group formed in 1988 to study climate change and recommend government policies.

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Trump Rule Would Limit E.P.A.’s Control Over Water Pollution

The Trump administration’s proposal would significantly weaken a major Obama-era regulation on clean water, according to a talking points memo.

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Disability among India's elderly much higher than census estimates

New estimates of disability among India's elderly population, based on the ability to carry out three basic living activities — walking, dressing, and toileting — show that the scale of the problem is much larger than suggested by the Indian national census.

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Bagsiden: Valdemar Sejr tegnede kortet i 1200-tallet

Ugens korrektion: Til kamp mod historieløsheden!

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Radio Atlantic: The First Gene-Edited Babies

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play A Chinese researcher recently announced the birth of the first genetically edited babies. The claims remain unverified, but the news shocked and dismayed scientists around the world, touching off a scandal that has only grown . Atlantic staff writers Ed Yong and Sarah Zhang often write about the revolutionary technolog

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Rygstød til ny generation af originale forskningstalenter

Seks SCIENCE-forskere med originale idéer og lederambitioner modtager hver godt seks millioner…

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Amazon Has a History of Bear Repellent Accidents

Dozens of Amazon warehouse workers in New Jersey were sickened after a robot punctured a can of bear repellent on Wednesday.

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Computers can 'spot the difference' between healthy brains and the brains of people with DID

Machine-learning and neuroimaging techniques have been used to accurately distinguish between individuals with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) and healthy individuals, on the basis of their brain structure, in new research part funded by the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre and published in The British Journal of Psychiatry.

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Medical advances could soon spare patients surgery, say experts

Better drugs, vaccination and genomics will help to make some operations obsolete Thousands of people every year could be spared surgery for cancer and worn-out joints thanks to better drugs, vaccination and advances in genomics, a report by medical experts predicts. Developments in surgery could also make many operations less invasive and more effective, while more patients would have preventive

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Who's a Smart Dog?!

An estimate of dog intelligence requires looking at non-dogs as well to understand what's special to canines and what is just typical of the taxonomic groups they're in. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Huawei Exec’s Arrest Complicates the US-China Trade Dispute

Meng Wanzhou, Huawei's CFO and the daughter of its founder, was arrested in Canada the same day that Presidents Trump and Xi met to discuss tariffs.

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The Atlantic Daily: The Proof

What We’re Following We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Righting Votes: A credible case of election fraud centered around absentee ballots seems to be unfurling in a North Carolina county, David Graham argues, but the GOP hasn’t exactly sprung i

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More patient family-provider communication could mean fewer errors

New research from Boston Children's Hospital finds that harmful medical errors decreased by 38 percent following intervention to improve communication between healthcare providers and patients and families. The study is led by Alisa Khan, M.D., M.P.H., a pediatric hospitalist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School and is published in British Medical Journal today.

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Pot withdrawal eased for dependent users

A new drug can help people diagnosed with cannabis use disorder reduce withdrawal symptoms and marijuana use, a new Yale-led study published Dec. 6 in the journal Lancet Psychiatry shows.

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The Lancet Psychiatry: Novel approach for the treatment of cannabis use disorder shows promise in phase 2 trial

Peer-reviewed / Randomised Controlled Trial / People.Experimental drug reduced cannabis use and withdrawal symptoms compared with placebo.

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Polonium: A Rare and Highly Volatile Radioactive Element

Polonium was a critical ingredient in the first atomic bomb and it's a suspected poison in more than one high-profile death.

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Greenland is melting much faster than we thought

Environment It’s not surprising, but that doesn’t mean it's not devastating. Greenland is losing its cool. That’s not much of a surprise—its mile-thick sheet of ice was not made for this epoch of climate change.

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Global carbon dioxide emissions will hit a record high in 2018

Carbon dioxide emissions from China, the United States and India all rose this year, a new report finds.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Power Strip

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ). We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Today in 5 Lines The Michigan state Senate approved legislation stripping certain powers from the incoming Democratic secretary of state. The move comes a day afte

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Targeted cognitive training benefits patients with severe schizophrenia

Researchers find that patients with severe, refractory schizophrenia benefit from targeted cognitive therapy, improving auditory and verbal outcomes and the way they process information.

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Information on reproductive health outcomes lacking in Catholic hospitals

As Catholic health care systems expand nationwide, little is known about the reproductive outcomes of their patients compared to patients in other settings, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

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Gifts for people who love flying drones

Gadgets You don't need to be a videographer to love a UAV. Science fiction promised us that the skies would be a lot more crowded. Between jetpacks, delivery drones, flying cars, and the occasional super hero, the space above…

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Microsoft Retools Its Edge Browser, But Internet Explorer Is Forever

Major changes are coming to Edge—but remember that it's only Microsoft's second-biggest browser.

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Drug Maker Pays $360 Million to Settle Investigation Into Charity Kickbacks

Prosecutors accused Actelion Pharmaceuticals, which Johnson & Johnson acquired in 2017, of violating Medicare laws by funneling money through a patient-assistance charity.

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Dr. Lisa Schwartz, Critic of Medical Excess, Is Dead at 55

She and her husband, also a doctor, waged a campaign against “the medicalization of everyday life” and an “epidemic of diagnoses.”

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Eliminating the latent reservoir of HIV

A new study suggests that a genetic switch that causes latent HIV inside cells to begin to replicate can be manipulated to completely eradicate the virus from the human body. Cells harboring latent HIV are 'invisible' to the natural defenses of the immune system.The findings, which suggest a cure for HIV may be possible, are reported in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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The Oldest Surviving Form of Theater

The Japanese art of Noh is the oldest surviving theater tradition in practice. Dating back to the 14th century, the classical musical drama is derived from the Sino-Japanese word for "skill" or “talent.” When combined with the theater art of kyogen, Noh is known as nogaku. It was named an Intangible Cultural Heritage by UNESCO. In Noh theater, there is little plot. Many performances are allegoric

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Megapixels: This is a seal with an eel stuck up its nose

Animals Observe. Eels end up in the darnedest places.

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Lab-grown meat's steady march to your plate

Just a few years ago, the price of a lab-grown hamburger had five figures. Today, that price has gone down to just $11. Even if it's cheap, tastes the same, and preserves the environment, will people actually eat meat grown in a lab? None As 2018 wraps up, the average American is poised to have eaten 222 pounds of beef over the course of the year. Accomplishing this dubious achievement meant that

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Why doctors say gun violence is ‘their lane’

A new editorial digs into the explosive spread of the Twitter hashtag #ThisIsOurLane, which health care professionals are using to argue for their role in addressing gun violence. News of mass shootings has become devastatingly common in the United States, and at the same time the rate of suicide-by-firearm is silently increasing. The need to treat gun violence as a public health crisis has never

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Black women have worse breast cancer outcomes despite receiving similar treatment as white women

Even with equivalent treatments in women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, black women had significantly higher breast cancer recurrence and increased overall mortality compared to white women in a large phase III clinical trial, TAILORx, according to data presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

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Black breast cancer patients have worse outcomes than whites, despite similar treatments

Black women with the most common form of early breast cancer had worse outcomes than white women even after receiving equivalent care, according to a major new study led by Loyola Medicine medical oncologist Kathy Albain. Dr. Albain presented findings of the international study at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

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Research Funders Make Secretive Overseas Investments: Report

An investigation by Science reveals that charities' investments support activities opposed to their own missions, such as human health and environmental protection.

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Whales have worse than average year for entanglement in gear

Federal officials say last year was slightly worse than average for the entanglement of large whales, which is a major threat to the animals' populations.

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Internet access via mobile phones starts for all Cubans

For the first time, average Cubans became eligible to sign up for internet service for their mobile phones Thursday, a development long awaited on the communist-ruled island.

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The horror and mystery behind 'the Black Paintings'

The Black Paintings stand out in art history for their dark composition and themes. The biggest mystery, though, is that Goya painted them directly onto the walls of his home and never told anybody about them. With such little information, all we can do is speculate about the 14 horrifying Black Paintings. None By 1819, the painter Francisco Goya had been through quite a bit . He had witnessed th

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Microsoft Wants to Stop AI's 'Race to the Bottom'

Microsoft President Brad Smith calls for regulation of facial-recognition technology, to curb potential bias and invasions of privacy.

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'It Was Just Dead Brain Tissue': Seattle Woman Dies from Extremely Unusual Infection

It started with a sinus infection that wouldn't go away.

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Centuries-Old Ninja Oath Warns of Divine Wrath

A long-hidden ninja oath swearing secrecy about the elite warriors' skills recently came to light.

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Houston Methodist launches real-time flu tracker website

Pathologists at Houston Methodist developed a real-time website to track flu cases, just in time to assist physicians, the CDC and patients for the fall 2018 flu season.

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Why Tehran is sinking dangerously

Researchers have used data from radar satellites to measure the subsidence of the Earth's surface in the Tehran region in Iran. They found out that between 2003 and 2017 three areas sank there with rates of sometimes more than 25 centimeters per year, and several meters in total. For the first time, this study traces in detail the subsidence in this region over a longer period of time.

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Could algae that are 'poor-providers' help corals come back after bleaching?

How much of a reef's ability to withstand stressful conditions is influenced by the type of symbiotic algae that the corals hosts? New work investigates how the nutrients algae share with their coral hosts varies between species and what this could mean for a coral's ability to survive in a changing climate. They determined that in the wake of a bleaching event, even an algal tenant that's poor pr

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New insights in rust resistance in wheat

Approximately 88 percent of wheat production is susceptible to yellow rust. Researchers have new results regarding the fungus, which evolves quickly to produce new, virulent strains.

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The naked eye alone is not enough to ensure the accurate diagnosis of skin cancer, say experts

The visual inspection of a suspicious skin lesion using the naked eye alone is not enough to ensure the accurate diagnosis of skin cancer, a group of experts have concluded.

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DeepMind’s Go playing software can now beat you at two more games

A machine learning system called AlphaZero is the first AI that can learn to master more than one game using the same algorithm – it can play Go, chess and shogi

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Did Russia just launch a secret space weapon into orbit?

U.S. intelligence recorded a Russian rocket deploying a mysterious object during a recent mission. It's possibly an inspector satellite, a spacecraft designed to repair, monitor and, potentially, destroy other satellites. Weaponized satellites would likely be used in the early stages of a large-scale conflict, U.S. intelligence reports. None On November 30, a rocket launched from the Plesetsk Cos

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"Superhuman" AI Triumphs Playing the Toughest Board Games

Will a general algorithm that masters chess, go and shogi succeed as well for games with less-defined rules? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Dog That’s Famous for Not Wanting to Be Eaten by a Coyote

Earlier this week, an image of a tiny dog in some kind of wild neon dog armor began to ricochet around the internet. A popular dog-rating Twitter account pronounced her coyote-proof. The comedian Andy Richter named the little pup the next host of the Academy Awards. Reddit challenged its users to Photoshop the spiky chihuahua into creative scenarios, sending her into the hands of the pin-faced vi

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Australia cuts plastic bag use by 80% in 3 months after supermarket ban

The ban was led by the private sector, though several Australian states have banned single-use plastic bags. Worldwide, more than 30 countries and two U.S. states have banned single-use plastic bags. Kroger, the largest supermarket chain in the U.S., recently announced plans to phase-out plastic bags by 2025. None The decision by Australia's two largest supermarkets to ban plastic bags three mont

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Focusing on the negative is good when it comes to batteries

Fluoride-based batteries have the potential to last up to eight times longer than those in use today.

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An exoplanet inflated like a balloon

Although helium is a rare element on Earth, it is ubiquitous in the universe. It is, after hydrogen, the main component of stars and gaseous giant planets. Despite its abundance, helium was only detected recently in the atmosphere of a gaseous giant by an international team. The team has observed for the first time how this gas escapes from the overheated atmosphere of an exoplanet, literally infl

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Largest continuous oil and gas resource potential ever

USGS announces an assessment of continuous oil and gas in Texas and New Mexico's Delaware Basin, the largest USGS has ever conducted, with an estimate of 46.3 billion barrels of oil and 281 trillion cubic feet of natural gas.

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Type 2 diabetes: A therapeutic avenue is emerging

Restoring the action of insulin is one of the keys to fighting type 2 diabetes. Researchers are developing a therapeutic strategy that uses the properties of an enzyme (hormone-sensitive lipase) which, when stimulating fatty-acid synthesis in the fat cells, has a beneficial effect on insulin action.

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Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering

Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size. But now, a team has grown a self-assembling, functional network of blood vessels across centimeter scales, a size relevant for human use. With continued development and refinement, the microfluidic system could be used to grow blood vessels for human tissue and organ

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Man’s lifelong immune weakness is a new disease

Researchers have identified a new human disease—”combined immunoficiency” or CID—and the gene responsible for it, “ICOSLG.” The disease is characterized by a weakened immune system and, because of the body’s lower ability to fight off infections, patients are susceptible to recurrent life-threatening infections, such as pneumonias, and debilitating infections, such as progressive warts. The disco

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When a Killer Climate Catastrophe Struck the World's Oceans

Identifying a killer can be difficult when it seems like every murder weapon imaginable has been used in the crime, and when the victim is the entire planet. About 252 million years ago, a rich and wonderful world was annihilated in the worst mass extinction ever: the end-Permian, a catastrophe with no close competitor in Earth’s history. Volcanoes of a truly preposterous scale erupted in Siberia

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Every work of art has its own microbiome. Most could use a probiotic.

Science Italian scientists analyzed the microbial colonization on a historic easel painting. Italian scientists performed one of the first analyses of microbial colonization on a 17th century painting. The artwork’s microbiome could be responsible for…

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WSU researchers create 3D-printed glucose biosensors

A 3D-printed glucose biosensor for use in wearable monitors has been created by Washington State University researchers. The work could lead to improved glucose monitors for millions of people who suffer from diabetes.

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Biggest mass extinction caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath

By combining ocean models, animal metabolism and fossil records, researchers show that the Permian mass extinction in the oceans was caused by global warming that left animals unable to breathe. As temperatures rose and the metabolism of marine animals sped up, the warmer waters could not hold enough oxygen for their survival.

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High-temperature electronics? That's hot

A new organic polymer blend allows plastic electronics to function in high temperatures without sacrificing performance.

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Interventions in dog populations could reduce rabies in rural China

Domestic dogs play a key role in the transmission and expansion of rabies in rural areas of China, according to a new study.

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Hysterectomy linked to memory deficit in an animal model

The non-pregnant uterus is commonly assumed to be an unimportant organ. One third of American women have a hysterectomy by age 60, often before natural menopause. Researchers have found an animal model of hysterectomy resulted in decreased memory capacity and an altered hormonal profile within two months after surgery. The study suggests an important role for the uterus that could impact cognitive

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Natural compound 2HF treats leishmaniasis infections, study finds

Current treatment options for the parasitic disease leishmaniasis are largely ineffective, expensive, and tend to be plagued by resistant parasites and side effects. Now, researchers have showed that a natural flavonoid is effective at treating Leishmania amazonensis infections.

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Method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

Engineers have developed a method to transfer complete, flexible, two-dimensional circuits from their fabrication platforms to curved and other smooth surfaces. Such circuits are able to couple with near-field electromagnetic waves and offer next-generation sensing for optical fibers and other applications.

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Media coverage of disasters can have lasting effects on children's mental health

Disaster communication experts say disaster media coverage can have lasting effects on children's mental health and suggest teachers and parents be prepared to respond to questions during and after a catastrophe.

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Parrot genome analysis reveals insights into longevity, cognition

Parrots are famously talkative, and a blue-fronted Amazon parrot named Moises — or at least its genome — is telling scientists volumes about the longevity and highly developed cognitive abilities that give parrots so much in common with humans. Perhaps someday, it will also provide clues about how parrots learn to vocalize so well.

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New traffic rules in 'Graphene City'

In the drive to find new ways to extend electronics beyond the use of silicon, physicists are experimenting with other properties of electrons, beyond charge. In work published today (Dec 7) in the journal Science, a team led by Penn State professor of physics Jun Zhu describes a way to manipulate electrons based on their energy in relation to momentum—called "valley degree of freedom."

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Unknown treasure trove of planets found hiding in dust

"Super-Earths" and Neptune-sized planets could be forming around young stars in much greater numbers than scientists thought, new research by an international team of astronomers suggests.

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Golden Globes Nominations: From 'Homecoming' to 'Handmaid's,' Streaming Rules

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced the nominees this morning, and—no surprise—Amazon and Netflix cleaned up in the TV categories.

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A Computer Might One Day Beat Humans at All Their Own Games

A Computer Might One Day Beat Humans at All Their Own Games Researchers develop artificial intelligence algorithm that plays against itself to master several classic games. AIGames.jpg Image credits: DeepMind Technologies Ltd Culture Thursday, December 6, 2018 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A new computer program taught itself superhuman mastery of three classic games —

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Unknown treasure trove of planets found hiding in dust

The first unbiased survey of protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars in the Taurus star-forming region turned up a higher-than-expected number of disks with features suggesting nascent planets, according to a study by an international team of astronomers involving researchers at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory.

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New traffic rules in 'Graphene City'

In the drive to find new ways to extend electronics beyond the use of silicon, physicists are experimenting with other properties of electrons, beyond charge. In work published today (Dec 7) in the journal Science, a team led by Penn State professor of physics Jun Zhu describes a way to manipulate electrons based on their energy in relation to momentum — called 'valley degree of freedom.'

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Yin and yang: Opposites in nature, fluoride and lithium, compete for higher energy batteries

The same fluoride in your toothpaste might soon compete with lithium for longer-lasting batteries.

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Climate players: Animals can swing a landscape's capacity to store carbon

In ecosystems across the world, wild animals trigger feedback effects that can alter a landscape's capacity to absorb, release, or transport carbon, according to a new paper published in Science. Using a growing body of research, the authors explain how animal ecology, ecosystem modeling, and remote sensing can be integrated to more accurately predict and manage carbon cycling across landscapes.

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Helium exoplanet inflated like a balloon, research shows

Astronomers have discovered a distant planet with an abundance of helium in its atmosphere, which has swollen to resemble an inflated balloon.

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An exoplanet inflated like a balloon

Although helium is a rare element on Earth, it is ubiquitous in the universe. It is, after hydrogen, the main component of stars and gaseous giant planets. Despite its abundance, helium was only detected recently in the atmosphere of a gaseous giant by an international team. The team, this time led by UNIGE researchers, has observed for the first time how this gas escapes from the overheated atmos

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Focusing on the negative is good when it comes to batteries

Fluoride-based batteries have the potential to last up to eight times longer than those in use today.

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High-temperature electronics? That's hot

A new organic polymer blend allows plastic electronics to function in high temperatures without sacrificing performance.

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Key to lifelong heart health is childhood intervention

Evolving evidence shows that heart healthy habits in adults are rooted in the environments we live in in early childhood, representing a window of opportunity in young children to focus on health promotion and potentially prevent disease in adulthood, according to a review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Hysterectomy may be linked to brain function

Hysterectomy can impair some types of memory in the short term following the surgery, according to a rat study published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology.

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Rules to boost fuel economy for vehicles will do more good than harm, new study shows

Leading scholars in the field of auto fuel efficiency say Trump administration manipulated a cost-benefit analysis to justify rollback of US CAFE standards.

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A major feat: room temperature electrochemical cycling of a fluoride-ion battery

Researchers have made notable progress in the ongoing effort to develop high energy-density batteries by demonstrating the room-temperature operation of fluoride-ion based (FIB) energy cells, a new study reports.

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A mechanistic approach to neuroblastoma prognosis and risk

A new study reveals key molecular indicators that could help doctors select the best form of treatment for patients with neuroblastoma — the most common type of cancer in infants.

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Hot water and hypoxia: 'The Great Dying's' greatest killers

Increased marine temperatures and reduced oxygen availability were the specific environmental features responsible for the extinctions of vast swaths of ancient ocean life — nearly 96 percent of all marine species — during the catastrophic end-Permian mass extinction event, a new study finds.

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AlphaZero AI teaches itself to beat humans at their own complex games

The ability for computers to beat humans at their own games has long been considered a benchmark for advancement in artificial intelligence (AI).

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An exoplanet loses its atmosphere in the form of a tail

A new study, led by scientists from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), reveals that the giant exoplanet WASP-69b carries a comet-like tail made up of helium particles escaping from its gravitational field propelled by the ultraviolet radiation of its star.

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Biggest mass extinction caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath

By combining ocean models, animal metabolism and fossil records, researchers show that the Permian mass extinction in the oceans was caused by global warming that left animals unable to breathe. As temperatures rose and the metabolism of marine animals sped up, the warmer waters could not hold enough oxygen for their survival.

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Half a million tests and many mosquitoes later, new buzz about a malaria prevention drug

Researchers spent two years testing chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the malaria parasite at an earlier stage in its lifecycle than most current drugs, revealing a new set of chemical starting points for the first drugs to prevent malaria instead of just treating the symptoms.

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Interventions in dog populations could reduce rabies in rural China

Domestic dogs play a key role in the transmission and expansion of rabies in rural areas of China, according to a study published Dec. 6 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Huaiyu Tian of Beijing Normal University, Hailin Zhang of the Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory for Zoonosis Control and Prevention, Simon Dellicour of KU Leuven, and colleagues.

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Infectivity of different HIV-1 strains may depend on which cell receptors they target

Distinct HIV-1 strains may differ in the nature of the CCR5 molecules to which they bind, affecting which cells they can infect and their ability to enter cells, according to a study published Dec. 6 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bernard Lagane of the Institut Pasteur and INSERM, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, the findings have implications for the development of HIV-1 ent

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Now AI can beat you, and pretty much any other human, at a growing number of board games

Technology It teaches itself to win. Shall we play a game?

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The 'great dying': rapid warming caused largest extinction event ever, report says

Up to 96% of all marine species and more than two-thirds of terrestrial species perished 252m years ago Rapid global warming caused the largest extinction event in the Earth’s history, which wiped out the vast majority of marine and terrestrial animals on the planet, scientists have found. Related: Save millions of lives by tackling climate change, says WHO Continue reading…

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Using quantum entanglement to study proteins

For the first time, a University of Michigan chemist has used quantum entanglement to examine protein structures, a process that requires only a very small number of photons of light.

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Why Is Obamacare Enrollment Down?

Sign-ups for health plans are 11 percent lower than last year, as the December 15 deadline approaches. Here are some possible reasons.

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Elizabeth Warren Stands by DNA Test. But Around Her, Worries Abound.

Since releasing the results in October, the ancestry issue clouding her possible presidential campaign has only intensified.

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2018 in Photos: Wrapping Up the Year

As the year comes to a close, it’s time to take a look back at some of the most memorable events and images of 2018. Among the events covered in this essay (the last of a three-part photo summary of the year): midterm congressional elections in the United States, hurricanes and typhoons in Asia and North America, a contentious confirmation hearing for the U.S. Supreme Court, Brazil’s election of

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Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Hand, foot and mouth disease can spread quickly across child care centers and elementary schools. Here's what to look for and how to manage the disease.

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Barrier(less) islands

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Mastering board games

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Optimal affinity

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Animals count

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Semiconducting polymer blends that exhibit stable charge transport at high temperatures

Although high-temperature operation (i.e., beyond 150°C) is of great interest for many electronics applications, achieving stable carrier mobilities for organic semiconductors at elevated temperatures is fundamentally challenging. We report a general strategy to make thermally stable high-temperature semiconducting polymer blends, composed of interpenetrating semicrystalline conjugated polymers a

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Building two-dimensional materials one row at a time: Avoiding the nucleation barrier

Assembly of two-dimensional (2D) molecular arrays on surfaces produces a wide range of architectural motifs exhibiting unique properties, but little attention has been given to the mechanism by which they nucleate. Using peptides selected for their binding affinity to molybdenum disulfide, we investigated nucleation of 2D arrays by molecularly resolved in situ atomic force microscopy and compared

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A general reinforcement learning algorithm that masters chess, shogi, and Go through self-play

The game of chess is the longest-studied domain in the history of artificial intelligence. The strongest programs are based on a combination of sophisticated search techniques, domain-specific adaptations, and handcrafted evaluation functions that have been refined by human experts over several decades. By contrast, the AlphaGo Zero program recently achieved superhuman performance in the game of

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Room-temperature cycling of metal fluoride electrodes: Liquid electrolytes for high-energy fluoride ion cells

Fluoride ion batteries are potential "next-generation" electrochemical storage devices that offer high energy density. At present, such batteries are limited to operation at high temperatures because suitable fluoride ion–conducting electrolytes are known only in the solid state. We report a liquid fluoride ion–conducting electrolyte with high ionic conductivity, wide operating voltage, and robus

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A valley valve and electron beam splitter

Developing alternative paradigms of electronics beyond silicon technology requires the exploration of fundamentally new physical mechanisms, such as the valley-specific phenomena in hexagonal two-dimensional materials. We realize ballistic valley Hall kink states in bilayer graphene and demonstrate gate-controlled current transmission in a four-kink router device. The operations of a waveguide, a

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Photonic crystals for nano-light in moire graphene superlattices

Graphene is an atomically thin plasmonic medium that supports highly confined plasmon polaritons, or nano-light, with very low loss. Electronic properties of graphene can be drastically altered when it is laid upon another graphene layer, resulting in a moiré superlattice. The relative twist angle between the two layers is a key tuning parameter of the interlayer coupling in thus-obtained twisted

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Salmonella persisters undermine host immune defenses during antibiotic treatment

Many bacterial infections are hard to treat and tend to relapse, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant persisters. In vitro, persister cells appear to be dormant. After uptake of Salmonella species by macrophages, nongrowing persisters also occur, but their physiological state is poorly understood. In this work, we show that Salmonella persisters arising during macrophage infection

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Quantifying the contribution of recessive coding variation to developmental disorders

We estimated the genome-wide contribution of recessive coding variation in 6040 families from the Deciphering Developmental Disorders study. The proportion of cases attributable to recessive coding variants was 3.6% in patients of European ancestry, compared with 50% explained by de novo coding mutations. It was higher (31%) in patients with Pakistani ancestry, owing to elevated autozygosity. Hal

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A mechanistic classification of clinical phenotypes in neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma is a pediatric tumor of the sympathetic nervous system. Its clinical course ranges from spontaneous tumor regression to fatal progression. To investigate the molecular features of the divergent tumor subtypes, we performed genome sequencing on 416 pretreatment neuroblastomas and assessed telomere maintenance mechanisms in 208 of these tumors. We found that patients whose tumors lack

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LZTR1 is a regulator of RAS ubiquitination and signaling

In genetic screens aimed at understanding drug resistance mechanisms in chronic myeloid leukemia cells, inactivation of the cullin 3 adapter protein-encoding leucine zipper-like transcription regulator 1 ( LZTR1 ) gene led to enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activity and reduced sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Knockdown of the Drosophila LZTR1 ortholog CG3711 re

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Mutations in LZTR1 drive human disease by dysregulating RAS ubiquitination

The leucine zipper–like transcriptional regulator 1 (LZTR1) protein, an adaptor for cullin 3 (CUL3) ubiquitin ligase complex, is implicated in human disease, yet its mechanism of action remains unknown. We found that Lztr1 haploinsufficiency in mice recapitulates Noonan syndrome phenotypes, whereas LZTR1 loss in Schwann cells drives dedifferentiation and proliferation. By trapping LZTR1 complexes

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